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Encyclopedia > Boston College Eagles
Boston College Eagles
University Boston College
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
NCAA Division I-A
Athletics director Gene DiFillippo
Location Chestnut Hill, MA
Varsity Teams 31 varsity teams
Stadium Alumni Stadium
Arena Conte Forum
Mascot Eagle
Nickname Eagles
Fight Song
Colors Maroon and Gold

              Image File history File links BC_Interlock_with_Eagle. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Boston College and the Chestnut Hill Reservoir Located 6 miles west of Boston, Chestnut Hill is a wealthy suburb notable for its stately old houses, scenic landscape and the historic campus of Boston College. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Alumni Stadium is a football stadium located on the campus of Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, approximately two miles west of Boston. ... Conte Forum is a 8,606-seat multi-purpose arena in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Genera Several, see below. ... Maroon is a color mixture composed of brown and purple. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ...

Homepage bceagles.com

The Boston College Eagles are the athletic teams representing Boston College. They compete in NCAA Division I-A as members of the Atlantic Coast Conference in all sports offered by the ACC. The men's and women's ice hockey teams compete in Hockey East. (Skiing, fencing, and sailing are also non-ACC.) Boston College is one of only 13 universities in the country offering NCAA division I-A football, division I men's and women's basketball, and division I hockey. Genera Several, see below. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ...

The Eagle on Linden Lane
The Eagle on Linden Lane

The BC mascot is Baldwin the Eagle, an American bald eagle whose name is derived from the bald head of the eagle and the word 'win.' The school colors are maroon and gold. The fight song, "For Boston," was composed by T.J. Hurley, Class of 1885. Image File history File links The Golden Eagle File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links The Golden Eagle File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Boston College mascot, Baldwin Baldwin the Eagle is the mascot of Boston College, named after the Bald Eagle. ... Maroon is a color mixture composed of brown and purple. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... For Boston is the traditional fight song of Boston College. ...


Principal athletic facilities include Alumni Stadium (capacity: 44,500), Conte Forum (8,606), Kelley Rink (7,884), Shea Field, the Newton Soccer Complex and the Flynn Recreation Complex. The Yawkey Athletics Center opened in the spring of 2005, and the Newton Campus Field Hockey Complex was completed that fall. BC students compete in 31 varsity sports, as well as a number of club and intramural teams. Boston College's Athletics program has been named to the College Sports Honor Roll as one of the nation's top 20 athletic programs by U.S. News and World Report (March 18, 2002). Alumni Stadium is a football stadium located on the campus of Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, approximately two miles west of Boston. ... Conte Forum is a 8,606-seat multi-purpose arena in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Kelley Rink is the name of the ice hockey rink within Conte Forum at Boston College. ... Shea Field is a baseball stadium in Chestnut Hill, MA. It is the home field of the Boston College Eagles college baseball team. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... March 18 is the 77th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (78th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ...


Boston College athletes are among the most academically successful in the nation, according to the NCAA's Academic Progress Rate (APR). In 2006 Boston College received Public Recognition Awards with 14 of its sports in the top 10 percent of the nation academically. The Eagles tied Notre Dame for the highest total of any Division I-A university. Other schools having 10 or more sports honored included Navy (12), Stanford (11), and Duke (11). Teams honored were football, men's fencing, men's outdoor track, men's skiing, women's rowing, women's cross country, women's fencing, women's field hockey, women's indoor track, women's outdoor track, women's skiing, women's swimming, women's soccer, women's tennis, and women's volleyball. Boston College's football program was one of only five Division I-A teams that were so honored. The other four were Auburn, Navy, Stanford, and Duke. The Academic Progress Rate (also known as APR) is a metric established by the NCAA to measure the success or failure of collegiate athletic teams in moving student-athletes towards graduation. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... The United States Naval Academy (USNA) is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy and Marine Corps and is in Annapolis, Maryland, near Washington D.C. The Academy often is referred to simply as Annapolis although naval officers normally refer to it in conversation... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke was founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, moved to Durham in 1892. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, in the United States. ...


A founding member of the Big East Conference, the Eagles joined the Atlantic Coast Conference on July 1, 2005. The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Men's basketball

Boston College basketball, ca. ...

Women's basketball

The Boston College woman's basketball team played its first game January 9, 1973, and lost to Eastern Nazarene 42-35. In its next game BC downed Jackson, 52-30, to win its first game in the program's history. The Eagles finished their first season 4-6 with wins over Mount Ida, Stonehill and Radcliffe. In her second season as head coach, Maureen Enos lead BC to a 9-4 record for the team's first-ever winning record. January 9 is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1973 (MCMLXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Eastern Nazarene College is a small liberal arts college south of Boston in Quincy, Massachusetts. ... Mount Ida College is a baccalaureate, four-year liberal arts college located in Newton, Massachusetts. ... // History Stonehill College was founded in 1948 by the Congregation of Holy Cross whose members established the University of Notre Dame (1842). ... Radcliffe College is the historical name of a womens educational institution closely associated with Harvard University. ...


Margo Plotzke took over in time for the 1980 season and she would finish her 14-season career on The Heights with only five losing seasons and a 177 wins. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ...


In 1982 the women's team joined the Big East, finishing the season with a then-BC record 17 wins, but going only 3-7 in the conference. In the Big East tourney Boston College beat UConn 69-57, but bowed out after a loss to Providence, 56-38. In 1984-85 BC went 19-9 — its best season to that date — but found itself on the short end of a loss to Vilanova in the league tournament, ending its season. It has been suggested that Torrey Life Science be merged into this article or section. ... Providence College is a Catholic college in Providence, Rhode Island, the states capital city. ...


Cathy Inglese arrives

In 1993 Cathy Inglese was named head coach of the basketball team and, after several years of rebuilding, turned the team into a perennial NCAA tournament team. Since the 1998-99 season, BC has been invited to the NCAA tournament six times, won the 2004 Big East title and advanced to the Sweet Sixteen twice — in 2003 and 2004. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Cathy Inglese is the head womens basketball coach at Boston College. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The term Sweet Sixteen refers to the final sixteen teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the semi-final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In the 1998-99 season Inglese lead the Eagles to its first ever NCAA tournament appearance, a 22-8 overall record and the Eagles went 12-6 in the Big East. In its first-ever NCAA tourney game, BC beat Ohio State and then ran into Pat Summitt and Tennessee and lost in the second round. This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... Pat Summitt (born Patricia Sue Head on June 14, 1952 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is the winningest college basketball coach of all time. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system. ...


The next season was even better for the Eagles as they won 26 total games, but again found themselves eliminated in the second round of the NCAA tournament when Virginia edged them out, 74-70. A season plagued by injuries marred the 2000-01 team which finished at 14-15 and on the outside looking into The Dance. In 2001-02, BC — who finished the season ranked 21st — received another invitation to the NCAA Tournament but were ousted in the first round this time when Mississippi State took care of the women's team 65-59. The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... NCAA Mens Basketball Division I Championship - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Drill Field on the Mississippi State University campus Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, in the town of Starkville. ...


Sweet Sixteen years

Coach Inglese lead Boston College to back-to-back appearances in the Sweet Sixteen in the 2002-03 and 2003-04 seasons. BC finished the 2003 season ranked No. 25 and entered the NCAA tourney with a 20-9 record and, as a No. 5 seed, squeaked by Old Dominion 73-72 in the first round, then won another thriller on an Amber Jacobs jumper, which blounced around the rim, and fell in with 2.5 seconds remaining — giving the Eagles an 86-85 overtime win over Vanderbilt. Boston College was then steamrolled by No. 1 UConn as Diana Taurasi and Co. bounced BC 70-49. The term Sweet Sixteen refers to the final sixteen teams in the NCAA Division I Basketball Tournament, who play in the semi-final game of each of the tournaments four regional brackets. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Tim Kaine (D-Governor Elect) Senators John Warner (R) George Allen (R) Official language(s) English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Amber Jacobs (born June 29, 1982 in Elkhart, Indiana) is a professional basketball player in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA), currently playing for the Minnesota Lynx. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Diana Lurena Taurasi (born June 11, 1982 in Chino, California) is a professional basketball player who plays for the Phoenix Mercury in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ...


In 2004 the women's team exacted some postseason revenge when BC upset the University of Connecticut in the Big East Tournament, 73-70, in the semi-finals. Boston College, who defeated Syracuse and Miami en route to its March 8 win over the Huskies, downed Rutgers in the finals to capture the Big East Tournament title — becoming the first Big East team to win four games to take the tournament crown. For its tournament title, BC finished the year ranked No. 18 and headed into the NCAA's as a No. 3 seed. The Eagles downed Eastern Michigan 58-56 in the first round; BC had an easier time in the second round, routing Ohio State 63-48 to move onto its second Sweet Sixteen in as many years. The No. 7-seeded University of Minnesota scored a mild upset over the Eagles with a 76-63 win and eliminated BC from the tournament. It has been suggested that Torrey Life Science be merged into this article or section. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... The University of Miami (also known as UM or just The U) is a private university founded in 1925 with its main campus in the city of Coral Gables in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in leap years). ... Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ... Eastern Michigan University (Ypsilanti, MI, USA 48197) is a comprehensive, co-educational public university located in Ypsilanti, Michigan. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... Washington Avenue Bridge at night The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, almost always abbreviated U of M, and sometimes referred to as The U by locals, is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system. ...


2004-05 season

In its final year in the Big East the Boston College women's team finished the year at 20-10 with another trip to the NCAA's. In the regular season, BC finished a respectable 10-6 in conference play, but got bounced in its only game in the league tourney, losing 41-37 to Villanova. Then BC beat the University of Houston 65-43 in the first round of the NCAA Tournament, but with a tough draw, were edged out by Duke 70-65. Villanova (Latin, new villa) is a generic placename that can refer to several places: Arnaldus de Villanova, a 14 century alchemist, astrologer and physician. ... The University of Houston, formerly University of Houston–University Park, is a comprehensive doctoral degree-granting university[1] located in Houston, Texas. ...


2005-06 season

Boston College entered the 2005-06 season as a participant of the Preseason NIT. Following a 51-44 win over Drexel and a 62-51 victory over Richmond, BC ran into and were stuffed by former Big East rival UConn 60-46 in the semifinal round. The women rebounded with 41-point win over Vermont, topping the Catamounts 79-38. Boston College entered league play with a 12-2 record and ranked no. 19 in the country, including a stunning win against then top-10 ranked Stanford University. In BC's first-ever ACC game, the women lost a heart-breaking overtime game to Maryland 67-64. After a rough 0-4 start to ACC play, the Eagles bounced back to win seven straight games, including wins in six consecutive conference games. BC won its first-ever ACC game as a league member on January 26 when it downed Virginia 57-43. The Eagles then won at NC State on January 30, 75-66. The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


The winning streak came to an end when BC was confronted with two straight games against top-5 opponents. On February 16, No. 4 Maryland downed the Eagles 86-59; then the BC women fell again, losing to the No. 2 team in the country when UNC dropped Boston College on Tobacco Road, 69-62. The regular season ended on a sour note for Boston College as NC State and Florida State handed BC two more losses on February 24 and February 26 respectively, closing the regular season with four straight losses for the Eagles. The Boston College women stand at 19-11 overall (6-8 ACC) and are No. 25 in the coaches' poll as of March 7. BC senior forward Brooke Queenan was named All-ACC Second Team. Queenan led the Eagles with 14.8 points- and 8.0 rebounds-per-game for BC in the regular season. February 16 is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The University of North Carolina is a sixteen-university system which comprises all public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States. ... Tobacco Road is a term that refers to the tobacco producing area of North Carolina, and is often used when referring to sports (particularly basketball) played between rival North Carolina universities. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... Florida State University Seal Florida State University is a public university located in Tallahassee, Florida, known for its programs in fine arts, education, public administration & policy, information studies, international affairs, music, criminology, and nursing. ... February 24 is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... March 7 is the 66th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (67th in leap years). ...


Boston College lost its first-round game in its first-ever ACC tournament as the No. 8 seed, falling to Virginia 57-54 on March 2. BC earned an at-large bid in the NCAA field. The Eagles received a No. 8 seed beat Notre Dame 78-61 following 17 days off between games. BC advanced to the field of 32 to face No. 1 seeded Ohio State University, a team which had won twenty straight games coming in. The underdog Eagles stunned the Buckeyes 79-69 largely behind the performance of BC guard Kindyll Dorsey, who scored a school NCAA tournament record six 3-pointers and 24 points overall. BC then lost a heartbreaker to the No. 5 seeded Utah Utes in the Sweet Sixteen 57-54, missing three potential game-tying shots in the last twenty seconds. March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ...


After the season, forward Brooke Queenan was drafted by the New York Liberty of the WNBA in the second round, making her the third WNBA draft pick in BC history after Amber Jacobs and Cal Bouchard. Despite losing Queenan, All-ACC defensive teamer Aja Parham, and steady forward Lisa Macchia, BC headed into the offseason with a strong core of returning players including returning captain and point guard Sarah Marshall, senior guard Kindyll Dorsey, and senior center Kathrin Ress, as well as star incoming freshman, American Idol finalist and McDonald's All-American Ayla Brown. Amber Jacobs (born June 29, 1982 in Elkhart, Indiana) is a professional basketball player in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA), currently playing for the Minnesota Lynx. ... Ayla Marie Brown (born July 28, 1988) is an NCAA basketball player and recording artist from Wrentham, Massachusetts // Ayla Brown finished her high school career as one of the top female basketball players in Massachusetts history, scoring 2358 career points. ...


Football

Eastern Champions, 1928
Eastern Champions, 1928
Boston College's first football team, 1893
Boston College's first football team, 1893
Alumni Field, precursor to Alumni Stadium, ca. 1920
Alumni Field, precursor to Alumni Stadium, ca. 1920

Football at Boston College can be traced to the 1884 founding of the "Boston College Athletic Club" and the first series of interclass games held on the James Street Fields in Boston's South End. In 1892, President Edward Devit, SJ, grudgingly agreed to the requests of two undergraduates, Joseph F. O'Connell of the class of 1893 and Joseph Drum of the class of 1894, to start a varsity football team. Drum would become the first head coach, albeit an unpaid position and O'Connell was captain. On October 26, 1893, BC played its first official game against the St. John's Literary Institute of Cambridge followed by its first intercollegiate game against MIT. BC won the first game 4-0, but lost 6-0 to MIT. Two of the original team's alumni had particularly significant careers: Lineman John Douglass became the first BC graduate to be elected to the U.S. House of Representatives and running back James Carlin became president of Holy Cross, a nearby Jesuit college in Worcester, Massachusetts. Image File history File links BCfootballbanquet1929. ... Image File history File links BCfootballbanquet1929. ... Boston Colleges 1893 football team File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Boston Colleges 1893 football team File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links BCalumnifield. ... Image File history File links BCalumnifield. ... 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The South End is a neighborhood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... In sports, a coach or manager is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... Captain is a nautical term, an organizational title, and a rank in various uniformed organizations. ... October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar). ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ...   Nickname: The Heart of the Commonwealth, The City of the Seven Hills, Wormtown Settled: 1673 â€“ Incorporated: 1684 Zip Code(s): 01608 â€“ Area Code(s): 508 / 774 Official website: http://www. ...


In addition to success on the gridiron, Boston College football has achieved success in the classroom. In 2006, Eagle football had an NCAA APR score of 982, placing them in the 90th-100th percentile nationally. The football team's APR was the highest of any school that finished the 2005 season ranked in the ESPN/USA Today Coaches' Poll. The Academic Progress Rate (also known as APR) is a metric established by the NCAA to measure the success or failure of collegiate athletic teams in moving student-athletes towards graduation. ...


Holy Cross rivalry

In 1896, Boston College and Holy Cross began what was to become one of the most storied rivalries in college football.[citation needed] For much of the early to mid 20th century, BC and The Cross drew some of New England's largest sports crowds. In 1913, BC began playing home games at Alumni Field. To accommodate larger crowds, the Holy Cross game was routinely held at larger venues off campus, with the 1916 matchup taking place at the newly constructed Fenway Park. A record 54,000 attended the 1922 game at Braves Field, home of the Boston Braves baseball team. On November 28, 1942, BC lost in a huge upset to Holy Cross by a score of 55-12. This led to the BC players not attending their scheduled victory celebration at the Cocanut Grove nightclub, which ironically burned down that night. In 1986 Holy Cross changed the direction of its football program, joining the Division 1-AA Patriot League, and terminated the series. BC had won 17 of the last 20 games. Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Alumni Stadium is a football stadium located on the campus of Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, approximately two miles west of Boston. ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... “Fenway” redirects here. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... Braves Field was a baseball stadium that formerly stood in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Major league affiliations National League (1876–present) East Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3,21,35,41,42,44 Name Atlanta Braves (1966–present) Milwaukee Braves (1953-1965) Boston Braves (1941-1952) Boston Bees (1936-1940) Boston Braves (1912-1935) Boston Rustlers (1911) Boston Doves (1907-1910) Boston... November 28 is the 332nd day (333rd on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Patriot League is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ...


Disputed national championship

1940 National Championship banner
1940 National Championship banner

The 1940 season could arguably be called the greatest year in the history of Boston College football. BC's undefeated (11-0) team captured the 1941 Sugar Bowl championship and the school claims on its Web site to have won a share of the national title, even though the NCAA does not consider BC one of its national champions for this year. Five members of that storied team have been inducted into the National Football Foundation’s College Football Hall of Fame: end Eugene Goodreault (50); guard George Kerr (47); center Chet Gladchuk, Sr. (45); fullback Michael Holovak (12); and halfback Charles O’Rourke (13). It included a 19-18 victory over Georgetown before 41,700 fans at sold-out Fenway Park, that was called one of the greatest games ever by famed sportswriter Grantland Rice. Going into the game, the Hoyas had twenty-two consecutive victories spanning three seasons. BC trailed until the third quarter, when a 43 yard touchdown pass from Charlie O'Rourke to Monk Maznicki put the Eagles ahead. With just seconds remaining, BC had the ball on their own nine, fourth down and 18 to go. Georgetown set up to return the Eagles’ punt. Instead of punting, O’Rourke scrambled in his own end zone for 45 seconds then took a safety. BC used the free kick to boot the ball far downfield and dashed the Hoyas' three-season unbeaten record. Legendary Coach Frank Leahy took his undefeated Eagles on to the Sugar Bowl in New Orleans where they beat Tennessee. BC claims it won the national title in a three-way tie with Stanford and Minnesota. The NCAA does not recognize Boston College as a national champion in that year, however. It would turn out to be Coach Leahy’s final year with the Eagles, before he accepted an offer to coach at his alma mater, Notre Dame. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (820x501, 145 KB) Boston College National Championship banner, 1940 Photo by author I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (820x501, 145 KB) Boston College National Championship banner, 1940 Photo by author I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... This article is about the American football game. ... Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. With roots extending back to March 25, 1634 and founded in its current form on January 23, 1789... Grantland Rice (November 1, 1880–July 13, 1954) was an early 20th century American sportswriter. ... Frank Leahy Francis William Leahy (1907–1973) was an American collegiate football coach, who earned the nickname The Master. He was born in ONeill, Nebraska. ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system. ... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County. ... Washington Avenue Bridge at night The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, almost always abbreviated U of M, and sometimes referred to as The U by locals, is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ...


The Flutie years

The early 1980s are sometimes referred to as "The Flutie Era", and are often credited with putting BC football firmly into the big time. Quarterback Doug Flutie played for Boston College from 1981 to 1984, and won the Heisman Trophy in his senior year. He gained national attention on November 23, 1984, when he led the Eagles to victory in a high-scoring, back-and-forth game against incumbent national champion Miami Hurricanes (led by star QB Bernie Kosar). The game was nationally televised on CBS the day after Thanksgiving, and had a huge audience. Miami staged a dramatic drive to take the lead, 45-41, in the closing minute of the game. Boston College then took possession at their own 22-yard line with 28 seconds to go. After two passes moved the ball another 30 yards, only six seconds remained on the clock. On the last play of the game, Flutie scrambled away from the defense and threw a Hail Mary pass that was caught in the end zone by his roommate, Gerard Phelan, giving BC a 47-45 win. A persistent urban legend holds that this play essentially clinched the Heisman Trophy for Flutie; in fact, the Heisman voting was already complete by the day of the game. It has been called "the greatest moment in college football."[1] Douglas Richard Doug Flutie (b. ... John Cappellettis 1973 Heisman Trophy is part of an exhibit at the Penn State All-Sports Museum located at Beaver Stadium, on the campus of the Pennsylvania State University. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Miami (also known as UM or just The U) is a private university founded in 1925 with its main campus in the city of Coral Gables in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States. ... Bernie Joseph Kosar, Jr. ... CBS is one of the largest radio and television networks in the United States. ... Thanksgiving, or Thanksgiving Day, is an annual one-day holiday to give thanks, traditionally to God, for the things one has at the end of the harvest season. ... A Hail Mary pass or Hail Mary play in American football is a forward pass made in desperation, with only a very small chance of success. ... Gerard Phelan played wide receiver for the Boston College Eagles. ... An urban legend or urban myth is a kind of modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ...


"The Holy War"

In recent years, Notre Dame has become one of BC's primary football rivals. Today, ND is the only other Catholic university playing NCAA Division I-A football. The match up was dubbed the "Holy War" in 1975, and has acquired a number of other nicknames over the years. The two teams battle for the Ireland Trophy. The series produced one of the top moments in college football history[1] when in 1993, David Gordon kicked a wobbly 41-yard field goal as time expired to beat top-ranked and undefeated Notre Dame 41-39, ending Irish hopes for a national championship. During the 2002 matchup in South Bend, Indiana, Notre Dame came into the game undefeated at 8-0, wearing their celebrated green jerseys (which since 1981 had only been worn against archrival USC or in bowl games). BC won the game 14-7, putting an end -- again -- to Notre Dame's dreams of an undefeated season. The series was played annually from 1992 to 2004 and is scheduled to resume in 2007, though its future after 2010 is uncertain.[2] On November 2, 2005, Notre Dame announced that because it had agreed to a request from the Big East to play teams from that conference each season, it would suspend the Boston College series following the 2010 season. Big East Commissioner Mike Tranghese said the conference made the request after Boston College, Miami, and Virginia Tech withdrew from the Big East to join the Atlantic Coast Conference. However, on February 6, 2007, BC Director of Athletics Gene DeFilippo stated “The Notre Dame contract calls for two games in South Bend, in 2007 and 2009, and two games in Boston, in 2008 and 2010. We have been in discussions with Notre Dame concerning additional games, and I am very hopeful that we will be able to announce something in the near future.” The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Holy War is a title used to describe the college football game between Boston College and Notre Dame. ... The Ireland Trophy, created by the University of Notre Dames Student Government in 1995, is presented anually as a token of goodwill, camaraderie and the friendly rivalry to the winnner of the Notre Dame-Boston College football game. ... Location in the state of Indiana Coordinates: County St. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of thirteen universities, mostly in the northeastern United States: Boston College (scheduled to leave in 2005) University of Connecticut (UConn) Georgetown University (Plays Division I-AA football in the Patriot League) University of Notre Dame (Plays Division I-A football... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... February 6 is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini (common) era. ...


Memorable moments in the BC-ND rivalry

With their first meeting in 1975, the Irish and the Eagles have generated some memories in only 31 years. The teams had met consecutively from 1992 until 2004. Over the course of 17 games, here are some of the more memorable ones:


Freedom fight (1983-12-29): Meeting at the 1983 Liberty Bowl in Memphis Notre Dame and the Eagles engaged in a tight and taut contest — a harbinger of things to come. Despite Doug Flutie throwing for 287 yards and three touchdowns, BC found itself on the short-end of a 19-18 loss. The Eagles were down 19-12 at halftime and, after a Flutie TD pass to Scott Gieselman in the third quarter and a missed extra-point, BC had an opportunity to win late in the game. On fourth down with 1:08 remaining, a Flutie pass fell incomplete for an Irish win. 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 29 is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 2 days remaining. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the stadium, see Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ...


Tough-luck losers (1993-11-20): The Eagles knocked off the No. 1 Irish in 1993 in South Bend on a last second, 41-yard David Gordon field goal kick — crushing any hopes of a Notre Dame national championship. Boston College held a 38-17 lead with 11:13 left in the game, but the Irish fought back. The Stadium rocked as the Irish completed a 21-point comeback. But in the end, Gordon kicked a knuckle ball field goal for the winning score. For BC, it was retribution for a 54-7 thrashing the previous year and its first-ever win over the Irish. For its effort, the Eagles made the November 29, 1993, Sports Illustrated cover. 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... South Bend is the name of the following places in the United States of America: South Bend, Indiana South Bend Township, Kansas South Bend Township, Minnesota South Bend, Nebraska South Bend Township, Pennsylvania South Bend, Washington This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that... November 29 is the 333rd (in leap years the 334th) day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


Pouring it on (1994-10-08): Following its upset over the top-ranked team from South Bend, Boston College knocked off another top 10 Irish team — who stood at 4-1 coming in — with a 30-11 win at Alumni Stadium over then-No. 8 Notre Dame. Eagles running back Justice Smith rushed for 144 yards and two touchdowns. 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... Alumni Stadium is a football stadium located on the campus of Boston College in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, approximately two miles west of Boston. ...


Off of my Cloud (1998-11-07): Although the Eagles stood at a paltry 3-5 coming in, BC fans dared hope their team could still knock off then-No. 13 ranked Irish. Down 31-20 with 9:23 left in the game, Eagles senior quarterback Scott Mutryn threw a 6-yard touchdown pass to Anthony DiCosmo. After a failed two-point conversion, the BC defense prevented a Notre Dame score. The Eagle offense then marched all the way to the Irish 4-yard line with only seconds remaining on the clock. Running back Mike Cloud was stuffed at the line of scrimmage on the first three downs (though replays indicated he crossed the plain into the end zone), and finally ND safety Deke Cooper tackled Cloud in the back field on fourth down with six seconds left for a 31-26 final. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... November 7 is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 54 days remaining. ... In American football and Canadian football, a team may try to score a two-point conversion (score two points) instead of an extra point (one point) immediately after they score a touchdown. ... Michael Alexander Mike Cloud (born July 1, 1975) is an American football player who is currently a running back for the New England Patriots. ... Deke Cooper (born October 18, 1977 in Swainsboro, Georgia) is an American football player who currently plays cornerback for the Miami Dolphins. ...


Bowl season is cancelled (1999-11-20): The Irish came into the game in a must-win situation in order to avoid its first bowl-ineligible season since 1986, while the Eagles entered on a three-game winning streak and had its best mark after 9 games since the 1993 campaign. The Eagles came out firing and withstood an early pair of touchdowns by Tony Fisher and Julius Jones, countering with touchdown passes by Tim Hasselbeck as the game was tied at 17 at the break. Hasselbeck would put the Eagles ahead for good with a 1 yard sneak in the third quarter and another touchdown toss early in the fourth. But the Irish showed no quit with their season on the line, as Jarious Jackson hit Fisher for a nine-yard score, but a missed extra-point by Jim Sanson changed the scenario, forcing the Irish to go for the two-point conversion (which they failed) following Jones' 67-yard punt return score with 3:27 left after a three-and-out from BC. The Irish would get the ball back once more with 2:18 left on the clock, but on the second play of the drive, Jackson's pass was intercepted by Pedro Cirino, sealing the 31-29 victory and assuring the Irish of staying home for the holidays. 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tony Fisher (born in 1979) is currently a running back for the Green Bay Packers. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Tim Hasselbeck (born April 6, 1978, in Norfolk, Massachusetts) is an NFL quarterback. ... Jarious Jackson (born May 3, 1977 in Tupelo, Mississippi) is an American football quarterback and safety, currently a backup with the B.C. Lions of the CFL. // High School Jackson attended Tupelo High School in Mississippi and was an All-America selection in 1995. ...


Back for more (2002-11-02): BC went to Notre Dame Stadium to face No. 4-ranked Notre Dame, who were clad in their green jerseys for the first time in three years and for the first time at home in 17 seasons, and the team from Chestnut Hill brought back some ghosts of 1993 to South Bend. The Irish got a bad break when replays indicated a sure TD was called out-of-bounds, but BC had been victimized by a bad call in 1998. Notre Dame fumbled eight times and back-up quarterback Pat Dillingham threw two interceptions. BC walked out with a 14-7 win, its first over a top-5 team since beating the No. 1 Irish in 1993 on the very same field. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... Notre Dame Stadium is the home football stadium for the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... Chestnut Hill is a place in the State of Massachusetts in the United States of America: see Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. ...


Another kicker (2003-10-25): Notre Dame and BC staged another dramatic battle in 2003. As usual, the game came down to the final seconds. Holding a 24-6 lead, the Irish fought back in desperate need of a win to maintain some chance of a bowl bid. Notre Dame's Nate Schiccatano blocked a BC punt late in the game and Carlos Campbell ran it 25 yards for a touchdown with 3:34 left and a 25-24 Irish lead. On the ensuing Boston College possession, the Eagles marched down to the Irish 8-yard line where kicker Sandro Sciortino booted in a chip shot with 38 seconds remaining and a 27-25 BC win. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Break your heart (2004-10-23): Boston College and ND played on the afternoon of Game 1 of the 2004 World Series in which the Red Sox met the Cardinals. As the Red Sox would go on to shed their curse that year, Notre Dame's hex with regard to BC delivered more heartache for Irish fans. Trailing 20-7 at halftime, Boston College mounted a comeback against the Irish lead by quarterback Paul Peterson who threw for 383 yards on the day. With 54 seconds left, Peterson hit Tony Gonzalez for a touchdown and a 24-23 win. A missed extra-point by ND kicker DJ Fitzpatrick in the first half would account for the difference in the game. It was Notre Dame's fourth straight loss to BC and its fifth in the previous six meetings. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 23 is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 2004 World Series represented the 100th time two modern Major League Baseball teams met to decide the championship. ... The Boston Red Sox are a Major League Baseball team located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1,2,6,9,14,17,20,42,45,85 Name St. ...


Notre Dame drops BC (2005-?) : Notre Dame, in an attempt to clear up scheduling in the future, decided to terminate the contract with Boston College after the 2010 season. Thus, only four more meetings from 2006 onwards are currently scheduled.


Gambling scandal

Boston College earned some negative press in 1996 when news broke that some football players had bet against BC in a bad loss October 26 to Syracuse. After the 45-17 beating by the Orange, word leaked out to Head Coach Dan Henning that several players may have bet against the team in the game, and the coach subsequently told the university administration. Following an investigation by the university and law enforcement officials, 13 players would be suspended from the team for the season for placing illegal bets — six permanently from the football program. As a result of the scandal and a mediocre 16-19-1 record as coach, Henning resigned at then end of the 1996 season. October 26 is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 66 days remaining. ... Syracuse University (SU) is a private research university located in Syracuse, New York. ... Dan Henning (born June 21, 1942 in The Bronx, New York) is the former Head Coach of the Atlanta Falcons (1983-1986) and the San Diego Chargers (1989-1991) of the NFL. He was also the head coach of the Boston College Eagles (1994-96). ...


Tom O'Brien era

In December 1996 BC hired a 1971 Navy graduate and the former Virginia offensive coordinator Tom O'Brien. O'Brien arrived at The Heights with plans to revive the program after the team had been tarnished in the wake of the scandal. With good recruiting skills and a strong coaching staff around him, notably offensive coordinator Dana Bible and defensive coordinator Frank Spaziani, O'Brien has turned the program into a consistent top-25 team. The team has also been helped by increased exposure on the national stage due to the move to the ACC and, more recently, improved facilities in the form of the Yawkey Center. 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... For similarly-named academic institutions, see Boston (disambiguation). ... The 2004 Eagles were ranked in the top 10 nationally in scoring defense, top 20 in rushing defense and top 25 in pass efficiency defense. ...


Following two mediocre seasons in 1997 (4-7) and 1998 (4-7), O'Brien's vision of a re-built football program began to take shape. In 1999, the Eagles finished the regular season 8-3 including a 31-29 win at Notre Dame Stadium on November 20. BC had earned itself its first bowl berth since being ensnarled in the 1996 gambling scandal. Despite the excitement of its first postseason game in five years, Boston College laid an egg at the Insight.com Bowl in Tucson, Arizona, getting squashed by the University of Colorado, 62-28. In 2000 BC finished the regular season at 6-5 with just enough wins to be bowl-eligible and found themselves in Honolulu for the Aloha Bowl where they downed Arizona State 31-17, giving O'Brien his first bowl victory as head coach. 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean [1]. // Coated in ice, power and telephone lines sag and often break, resulting in power outages. ... Notre Dame Stadium is the home football stadium for the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... November 20 is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Insight Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season college American football bowl game played in Arizona since 1989. ... Nickname: The Old Pueblo Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Pima Government  - Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area  - City  195. ... The University of Colorado (CU) System consists of five campuses: University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Colorado Springs University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Fitzsimons campus of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, scheduled to open in 2007 in Aurora, Colorado... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Honolulu as seen from the International Space Station Honolulu is the largest city and the capital of the U.S. state of Hawai‘i. ... The Aloha Classic is a now_defunct National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I_A college football bowl game played in Honolulu, Hawaii at Aloha Stadium. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is (as of 2004) the third-largest university in the United States with a student body of 57,543. ...


The year 2001 saw Boston College end a 21-game losing streak to ranked opponents when, in the Music City Bowl, the Eagles beat No. 16 Georgia 20-16 to finish at 8-5. But the most memorable moment of the year came in another thrilling game against then-No. 1 Miami at Alumni Stadium. Trailing 12-7 BC stood at the Hurricanes 9-yard-line, poised to win with just over 20 seconds left in the contest, but a freak interception thrown by Eagles quarterback Brian St. Pierre cost BC the game. St. Pierre threw too low for BC receiver Ryan Read, and the pass ricocheted off a Miami defender's leg and fell into the hands of Ed Reed, who returned it 80 yards for a touchdown — preserving a win for the Hurricanes and keeping its hopes alive for a national championship, which they would eventually win. Despite the heartbreaking loss, the season had several highs including running back William Green rushing for 1,559 yards and being the top RB taken in the 2002 NFL Draft; eight wins for the first time since 1993; and the team finished the season ranked (No. 21) for the first time since 1994. 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gaylord Hotels Music City Bowl presented by Bridgestone is a post-season American college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played in Nashville, Tennessee, since 1998. ... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Brian St. ... Edward Earl Reed, Jr. ... High school running back A running back, halfback, tailback or wingback is the position of a player on an American and Canadian football team who lines up in the offensive backfield. ... William Green may refer to the following: William Ellis Green, an Australian cartoonist. ... The NFL Draft (officially the NFL Annual Player Selection Meeting) is an annual sports draft in which National Football League (NFL) teams take turns selecting amateur college American football players and other first-time eligible players. ...


Over the next few years the team posted respectable win-loss records and continued to win bowl games. In 2002, BC went 9-4 and won the Motor City Bowl, in 2003 they were 8-5 with a victory in the San Francisco Bowl and finished 9-3 in 2004 with a win in the Continental Tire Bowl. The year 2004 would be the Eagles final campaign in the Big East, and it finished the season in a four-way tie atop the league — a year in which they closed the season ranked No. 21 in both major polls. For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Motor City Bowl is a major post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually since 1997. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Emerald Bowl is a major post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually at 40,800-seat SBC Park (home of the San Francisco Giants) in San Francisco, California, since 2002. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Continental Tire Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season college football bowl game that has been played annually at 73,367-seat Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 2002. ...


BC holds the active national record for consecutive bowl victories, having won a postseason bowl game in each of the past seven years. BC footballers routinely rank at or near the top in Division 1-A for best graduation rate and were ranked sixth nationally in Student-Athlete GPA for 2004-05. As of June 2005, 20 Boston College football players were on NFL rosters. Among the more notable: Marc Colombo '02 (Cowboys), Doug Flutie '85 (Patriots), William Green '02 (Browns), Matt Hasselbeck '98 (Seahawks), Chris Hovan '00 (Bucs), Dan Koppen '03 (Patriots), Tom Nalen '94 (Broncos) and Damien Woody '99 (Lions). Marc Colombo (born October 8, 1978) in Bridgewater, Massachusetts) is an American football offensive tackle for the Dallas Cowboys of the NFL. He was selected with the 29th overall pick of the 2002 NFL Draft by the Chicago Bears out of Boston College. ... City Irving, Texas Other nicknames Americas Team, The Boys, Team colors Royal Blue, Navy Blue, Metallic Silver, Silver, and White Head Coach Wade Phillips Owner Jerry Jones General manager Jerry Jones League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1960–present) Western Conference (1960) Eastern Conference (1961-1969) Capitol Division (1967... Douglas Richard Doug Flutie (b. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present) American Football... William Green may refer to the following: William Ellis Green, an Australian cartoonist. ... ... Matthew Michael Hasselbeck (born September 25, 1975 in Westwood, Massachusetts) is an American football quarterback, who plays for the Seattle Seahawks. ... City Seattle, Washington Team colors Pacific Blue, Navy Blue, Neon Green, White Head Coach Mike Holmgren Owner Paul Allen General manager Tim Ruskell Mascot Blitz, and Taima the augur hawk League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1976–present) American Football Conference (1977-2001) AFC West (1977-2001) National Football Conference... Chris Hovan (born May 12, 1978 - Rocky River, Ohio) is an American football player who currently plays defensive tackle for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the NFL. He started off his rookie and sophomore years with the Minnesota Vikings with very promising statistics. ... City Tampa, Florida Other nicknames {{{nicknames}}} Team colors Buccaneer Red, Pewter, Black, and Orange Head Coach Jon Gruden Owner Malcolm Glazer Fight song {{{song}}} Mascot Captain Fear Local radio Flagship stations: WFUS (103. ... Dan Koppen (born September 12, 1979 in Dubuque, Iowa) is an American football player who is the starting center for the New England Patriots of the NFL. After attending Boston College, the hometown Patriots selected him in the fifth round of the 2003 NFL Draft with the 164th overall choice. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present) American Football... Thomas (Tom) Andrew Nalen (born May 13, 1971 in Foxboro) is a football player. ... City Denver, Colorado Other nicknames Orange Crush Team colors Orange, Broncos Navy Blue, and White [1] Head Coach Mike Shanahan Owner Pat Bowlen General manager Ted Sundquist Mascot Miles League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970... Damien Woody is an all-pro NFL center who before playing with the Detroit Lions played with the New England Patriots. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ...


Mathias Kiwanuka, BC defensive end who earned Big East Defensive Player of the Year honors in 2004, was drafted by the New York Giants in the April 2006 NFL Draft. The Giants are coached by former BC Head Football Coach Tom Coughlin. Mathias Kagimu Kiwanuka (born March 8, 1983 in Indianapolis, Indiana) currently is a player in the NFL, and a Boston College alum. ... Defensive end is the name of a defensive position in the sport of American football. ... City East Rutherford, New Jersey Other nicknames Big Blue Wrecking Crew, Big Blue, G-Men, The Jints, The New York Football Giants Team colors Royal Blue, Red, Gray, and White Head Coach Tom Coughlin Owner John Mara (50%) and Steve Tisch (50%) General manager Jerry Reese League/Conference affiliations National... The 2006 NFL Draft, the 71st in league history, took place in New York City at Radio City Music Hall on April 29 and April 30, 2006. ... For information on the former Wal-Mart executive, see Tom Coughlin (Wal-Mart). ...


On December 6, 2006, O'Brien decided to leave the Eagles and replace Chuck Amato as head coach at NC State. December 6 is the 340th day (341st on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Chuck Amato (born June 26, 1946 in Easton, Pennsylvania) was the head football coach of North Carolina State University. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ...


2005 season

Boston College moved to the Atlantic Coast Conference in time for the 2005 season and the football team faced a new schedule of opponents. BC football earned its first ACC win at Clemson on September 24 and finished the year at 8-3 including a 5-3 conference record, tied for the Atlantic Division title with Florida State, and the Eagles were invited to the MPC Computers Bowl where they defeated Boise State on the Broncos' home turf. BC ended the 2005-06 campaign at No. 17 in the coaches' poll and at No. 18 in the AP poll. Boston College won nine games for the second straight year and the third time in four years, while the senior class tied the school record for most wins in a four-year period with 35 (1939-42). The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... This article discusses Clemson University. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[4] is a public research university located in Tallahassee, the capital city of Florida. ... The MPC Computers Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at 30,000-seat Bronco Stadium on the campus of Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, since 1997. ... Boise State University is a state university located near downtown Boise, the capital city of Idaho. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...

September 3 is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Brigham Young University Brigham Young University, often referred to as BYU, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... Alternate meanings: West Point (disambiguation). ... September 17 is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years). ... Florida State University Seal Florida State University is a public university located in Tallahassee, Florida, known for its programs in fine arts, education, public administration & policy, information studies, international affairs, music, criminology, and nursing. ... September 24 is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article discusses Clemson University. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ball State University is a state-run research university located in Muncie, Indiana. ... October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (282nd in leap years). ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... October 27 is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 65 days remaining. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech (also known as VPI), is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, veterinary medicine, and business programs are considered to be among... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... UNC can refer to: UNified Coarse thread [1], see Unified Thread Standard The United National Congress, a major political party in Trinidad and Tobago In France, the Union Nationale de Combattants the Universidad Nacional de Córdoba (Argentina) in computing, Universal Naming Convention or Uniform Naming Convention (see path (computing... November 12 is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 49 days remaining. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... December 28 is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 3 days remaining. ... Boise State University is a state university located near downtown Boise, the capital city of Idaho. ... The MPC Computers Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at 30,000-seat Bronco Stadium on the campus of Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, since 1997. ...

2006 schedule

August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... Central Michigan University (also known as CMU) is a coeducational state university located in Mount Pleasant in the U.S. state of Michigan. ... September 9 is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years). ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. ... September 16 is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years). ... Brigham Young University Brigham Young University, often referred to as BYU, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... September 23 is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years). ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Maine, established in 1865, is the flagship university of the University of Maine System. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech (also known as VPI), is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, veterinary medicine, and business programs are considered to be among... October 21 is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 71 days remaining. ... The Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[4] is a public research university located in Tallahassee, the capital city of Florida. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... University at Buffalo The University at Buffalo, formerly known as the State University of New York at Buffalo, is located in Buffalo, New York, USA, and is one of the four university centers operated by the State University of New York. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Duke was founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, moved to Durham in 1892. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... November 23 is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 38 days remaining. ... The University of Miami (also known as UM or just The U) is a private university founded in 1925 with its main campus in the city of Coral Gables in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States. ... December 30 is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 1 day remaining. ... The Meineke Car Care Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season college football bowl game that has been played annually at 73,367-seat Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 2002. ... Teamwork: Fourth Class Midshipmen lock arms and use ropes made from uniform items as they brace themselves climbing the Herndon Monument The United States Naval Academy, or USNA, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers of the United States Navy. ...

2007 schedule

September 1 is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... September 8 is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years). ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... September 15 is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years). ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia and Metz, France. ... September 22 is the 265th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (266th in leap years). ... USMA redirects here. ... September 29 is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This page is about the university system across Massachusetts. ... October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Notre Dame IPA: is a Roman Catholic institution located in Notre Dame, Indiana, immediately northeast of South Bend, Indiana, United States. ... October 25 is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech (also known as VPI), is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, USA. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, veterinary medicine, and business programs are considered to be among... November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... The Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[4] is a public research university located in Tallahassee, the capital city of Florida. ... November 10 is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 51 days remaining. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The University of Miami (also known as UM or just The U) is a private university founded in 1925 with its main campus in the city of Coral Gables in metropolitan Miami, Florida, in the United States. ...

Football coaches

Years Head Coach Record
1893 Joseph Waters 3-3-0
1894 William Nagle 1-6-0
1895 Joseph Lawless 2-4-2
1896 Frank Carney 5-3-0
1897-1899, 1901 John Dunlop 15-17-2
1902 Arthur White 0-7-1
1908 Joe Reilly, Joe Kenney 2-4-2
1909 Charles McCarthy 3-4-1
1910 Jim Hart 0-4-2
1911 Joseph Courtney 0-7-0
1912-1913 William Joy 6-7-2
1914-1915 Stephen Mahoney 8-8-0
1916-1917 Charles Brickley 12-4-0
1918 Frank Morrissey 5-2-0
1919-1926 Frank Cavanaugh (College Hall of Fame Bio) 48-14-5
1927 D. Leo Daley 4-4-0
1928-1934 Joe McKenney 44-18-3
1935 Dinney McNamara / Harry Downes 3-1-0 / 3-2-0
1936-1938 Gil Dobie (College Hall of Fame Bio) 16-6-5
1939-1940 Frank Leahy (College Hall of Fame Bio) 20-2-0
1941-1942 Denny Myers 35-27-4
1943-1945 Moody Sarno 11-7-1
1946-1950 Denny Myers 35-27-4
1951-1959 Mike Holovak 49-29-3
1960-1961 Ernie Hefferle 7-12-1
1962-1967 Jim Miller 34-24-0
1968-1977 Joe Yukica 68-37-0
1978-1980 Ed Chlebek 12-21-0
1981-1990 Jack Bicknell 59-55-1
1991-1993 Tom Coughlin 21-13-1
1994-1996 Dan Henning 16-19-1
1997-2006 Tom O'Brien 75-45-0
2006-2007 Frank Spaziani 1-0-0 interim coach for Tom O'Brien.
2007- Jeff Jagodzinski 0-0-0

Charles McCarthy (1873 - March 26, 1921) was a coach of the University of Georgia Bulldogs football team for the 1897 and 1898 seasons. ... Frank The Iron Major Cavanaugh (April 28, 1876–August 29, 1933) was an American football head coach. ... Gilmour Gloomy Gil Dobie (1879–1948) was an American college football coach. ... Frank Leahy Francis William Leahy (1907–1973) was an American collegiate football coach, who earned the nickname The Master. He was born in ONeill, Nebraska. ... Mike Holovak (born September 19, 1919) is a former football player, coach and executive who served as a head coach at the collegiate level with Boston College, then handled similar duties with the American Football Leagues Boston Patriots from 1961-1968. ... Joe Yukica was the head football coach at Boston College from 1968 to 1977. ... Ed Chlebek was a college football coach at Boston College, Eastern Michigan University, and Kent State University. ... Jack Bicknell (born February 20, 1938) is a football coach. ... For information on the former Wal-Mart executive, see Tom Coughlin (Wal-Mart). ... Dan Henning (born June 21, 1942 in The Bronx, New York) is the former Head Coach of the Atlanta Falcons (1983-1986) and the San Diego Chargers (1989-1991) of the NFL. He was also the head coach of the Boston College Eagles (1994-96). ... Thomas P. OBrien (born October 5, 1948), is an American college football coach. ... The 2004 Eagles were ranked in the top 10 nationally in scoring defense, top 20 in rushing defense and top 25 in pass efficiency defense. ... Jeff Jagodzinski is an American football coach. ...

Postseason bowl history

BC is a combined 13-6 in bowl game appearances and has the longest active winning bowl record in the nation with seven straight victories.

BC's Sugar Bowl winning team on the steps of Bapst Library, 1940
BC's Sugar Bowl winning team on the steps of Bapst Library, 1940
Year Bowl Game Score Poll
1939 Cotton Bowl Boston College 3 Clemson 6 Finished year No. 11 in AP Poll
1940 Sugar Bowl Boston College 19 Tennessee 13 Finished year No. 5 in AP Poll[3][4]
1942 Orange Bowl Boston College 21 Alabama 37 Finished year No. 8 in AP Poll
1982 Tangerine Bowl Boston College 26 Auburn 33 unranked
1983 Liberty Bowl Boston College 18 Notre Dame 19 Finished year No. 19 in AP Poll
1984 Cotton Bowl Boston College 45 Houston 28 Finished year No. 5 in AP Poll
1986 Hall of Fame Bowl Boston College 27 Georgia 24 Finished year No. 19 in AP Poll
1992 Hall of Fame Bowl Boston College 23 Tennessee 38 Finished year No. 21 in AP Poll
1993 Carquest Bowl Boston College 31 Virginia 13 Finished year No. 13 in AP Poll
1994 Aloha Bowl Boston College 12 Kansas State 7 Finished year No. 23 in AP Poll
1999 Insight.com Bowl Boston College 28 Colorado 62 unranked
2000 Aloha Bowl Boston College 31 Arizona State 17 unranked
2001 Music City Bowl Boston College 20 Georgia 16 Finished year No. 21 in AP Poll
2002 Motor City Bowl Boston College 51 Toledo 25 unranked
2003 San Francisco Bowl Boston College 35 Colorado State 21 unranked
2004 Continental Tire Bowl Boston College 37 North Carolina 24 Finished year No. 21 in AP Poll
2005 MPC Computers Bowl Boston College 27 Boise State 21 Finished year No. 18 in AP Poll
2006 Meineke Car Care Bowl Boston College 25 Navy 24 Finished year No. 20 in AP Poll

Note: The year indicates the season, as some bowl games are played in early January of the following calendar year. Image File history File links BCfootball1940nationalchamps. ... Image File history File links BCfootball1940nationalchamps. ... 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full year calendar). ... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ... Clemson University is a public, coeducational, land-grant research university located in Clemson, South Carolina. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ... 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1940 calendar). ... This article is about the American football game. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Capital One Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played in Orlando, Florida at the Citrus Bowl, and previously known as the Tangerine Bowl (1947-1982) and the Florida Citrus Bowl (1983-2001). ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, in the United States. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the stadium, see Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. ... Not to be confused with the University of Notre Dame Australia University of Notre Dame du Lac The University of Notre Dame (standard name; full legal name University of Notre Dame du Lac) is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning located in Notre Dame, Indiana, USA adjacent to the... 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Cotton Bowl stadium, see Cotton Bowl (stadium). ... The University of Houston, formerly University of Houston–University Park, is a comprehensive doctoral degree-granting university[1] located in Houston, Texas. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. ... 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... Outback Bowl is an annual college football bowl game played at Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, Florida. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... The Champs Sports Bowl is an annual college football game that is played in Orlando, Florida. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... The Aloha Classic is a now_defunct National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I_A college football bowl game played in Honolulu, Hawaii at Aloha Stadium. ... Kansas State University, commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... The Insight Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season American college football bowl game played in Arizona since 1989. ... The University of Colorado (CU) System consists of five campuses: University of Colorado at Boulder University of Colorado at Colorado Springs University of Colorado at Denver University of Colorado Health Sciences Center Fitzsimons campus of the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, scheduled to open in 2007 in Aurora, Colorado... 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Aloha Classic is a now_defunct National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I_A college football bowl game played in Honolulu, Hawaii at Aloha Stadium. ... Arizona State University (ASU) is a public institution of higher education and research with several campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gaylord Hotels Music City Bowl presented by Bridgestone is a post-season American college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played in Nashville, Tennessee, since 1998. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... The Motor City Bowl is a major post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually since 1997. ... The University of Toledo is a public university situated in Toledo, Ohio. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Emerald Bowl is a post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually at 40,800-seat AT&T Park (home of the San Francisco Giants) in San Francisco, California, since 2002. ... Colorado State University is a public land grant institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Continental Tire Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season college football bowl game that has been played annually at 73,367-seat Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 2002. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The MPC Computers Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at 30,000-seat Bronco Stadium on the campus of Boise State University in Boise, Idaho, since 1997. ... Boise State University is a state university located near downtown Boise, the capital city of Idaho. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Meineke Car Care Bowl is an NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A post-season college football bowl game that has been played annually at 73,367-seat Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, North Carolina, since 2002. ... The multinational Combined Task Force One Five Zero (CTF-150) The British Grand Fleet, the supreme naval force of World War I A rare occurrence of a 5-country multinational fleet, during Operation Enduring Freedom in the Oman Sea. ...


Ice Hockey

Men's Hockey

BC's men's ice hockey team has long been considered one of the best programs in the nation. Three BC head coaches rank among the winningest coaches in NCAA history, including Len Ceglarski and the legendary John "Snooks" Kelley, after whom BC's rink is named. With over 700 wins, Jerry York, BC '67, is the winningest active coach in the NCAA. Under his leadership, BC won a national championship in 2001. In 2004 BC won the coveted Beanpot, an annual tournament between Boston College, Boston University, Harvard University, and Northeastern University. Jerry York (born July 25, 1945 in Watertown, Mass) is the Mens Hockey Coach at Boston College. ... The Beanpot refers primarily to a college mens ice hockey tournament between four major college hockey schools of the Boston, Massachusetts area, held annually since the 1952-53 season. ... For the unrelated Jesuit university in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) , is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. Founded in 1636,[1] Harvard is the oldest institution of higher learning still operating in the United States. ... Northeastern University (NU) is a top-tier private research university in Boston, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ...


BC's main rival in hockey is Boston University The rivalry is known as the Green Line Rivalry or the Battle of Commonwealth Ave, since the two schools share both the street and its trolley line, separated by about 3 miles. The games are always sellouts at both schools' arenas with tickets being nearly impossible to get. Students and fans from both schools make the trip to the opposition's arena for away games, often creating an intense atmosphere when the fans of both schools interact. The Green Line Rivalry, also known as the Battle of Commonwealth Avenue, is the name for the hockey rivalry between Boston College and Boston University. ...


Recent BC alumni who have gone on to play in the NHL include Brian Gionta, Chuck Kobasew, Patrick Eaves, Marty Reasoner, Brooks Orpik, Bill Guerin, and Brian Leetch. NHL redirects here. ... Brian Gionta (born January 18, 1979 in Rochester, New York, United States) is an American ice hockey rightwinger. ... Chuck Kobasew (born April 17, 1982 in Osoyoos, British Columbia) is a professional ice hockey player. ... Patrick Eaves (born on May 1, 1984 in Calgary, Alberta, Canada) is an American NHL player for the Ottawa Senators. ... Marty Reasoner (b. ... Brooks Orpik (b. ... William Robert Guerin (born November 9, 1970, in Worcester, Massachusetts) is a professional ice hockey right wing in the NHL, playing for the San Jose Sharks. ... Brian Leetch with the New York Rangers Brian Leetch (born March 3, 1968 in Corpus Christi, Texas, USA) is a professional ice hockey player with the National Hockey Leagues Boston Bruins. ...


Boston College has won two national championships in hockey, in 1949 and 2001. The 2001 championship run was capped by a thrilling overtime goal by Kris Kolanos over the University of North Dakota, 3-2 OT.


BC won the postseason tournament in Hockey East in 2005, 2001, 1999, 1998, 1990, 1987, and the ECAC postseason tournament in 1978 and 1965. Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ...


The hockey team won the Hockey East regular season crown in 2005, 2003, 2001, 1991, 1990, 1989, 1987, 1986, 1985, and the ECAC title in 1980. Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... The Eastern College Athletic Conference is a College Athletic Conference comprising schools that compete in 35 mens and womens sports. ...


BC has won the Beanpot 13 times: 2004, 2001, 1994, 1983, 1976, 1965, 1964, 1963, 1961, 1959, 1957, 1956, and 1954. The Beanpot refers primarily to a college mens ice hockey tournament between four major college hockey schools of the Boston, Massachusetts area, held annually since the 1952-53 season. ...


Boston College players have twice won the Hobey Baker Award, which honors college hockey's top player. David Emma won the award in 1991, and Mike Mottau won it in 2000. The Hobey Baker Award is an annual award given to the top college mens ice hockey player. ...


Boston College played the Wisconsin Badgers for the National Champtionship in 2006, losing 2-1.


Women's Hockey

Women's Hockey has not been historically successful at Boston College, but in four years under head coach Tom Mutch, the Eagles have made tremendous progress. In 2006, they won their first Women's Beanpot, defeating powerhouse Harvard 2-0, and repeated the feat in 2007, topping BU 6-1. Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Bu. ...


2006-07 was a season of remarkable change for the team. In March of 2007 the Eagles were selected for the NCAA women's ice hockey tournament for the first time in program history. As the #6 seed, they pulled off a stunning upset over #3 Dartmouth College, 3-2 in double overtime, qualifying for the 2007 Women's Frozen Four in Lake Placid. Dartmouth College is a private academic institution in Hanover, New Hampshire, in the United States. ... Lake Placid is the name of some places in the United States of America: Lake Placid, Florida Lake Placid, New York Lake Placid is also a lake in the state of New York (see Lake Placid (lake)). Lake Placid is also the name of a film. ...


Move to the ACC

On July 1, 2005, Boston College moved from the Big East to the Atlantic Coast Conference. July 1 is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 183 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 2003 the ACC announced plans to expand from nine teams to twelve. Miami, Syracuse, and Boston College were rumored to be the three schools under consideration, and all three met with officials from the ACC regarding membership. It was later revealed that Miami had been dissatisfied with the Big East and its leadership since a formal letter of complaint was issued by them to Big East Commissioner Mike Tranghese several years prior in 1999. Their issues went unresolved, leading to Miami's interest in the ACC - a league who had been pursuing the college football superpower since the mid-1990s, at the request of neighboring football schools Florida State, Clemson and Georgia Tech. The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ...


Connecticut Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, representing UConn (whose membership in Big East Football was then pending) led the "remaining" football schools (Virginia Tech, Rutgers, Pittsburgh, and West Virginia) in the filing of two lawsuits. One suit named the ACC, and the other named Miami and Boston College, accusing them of conspiring to weaken the Big East. Syracuse was not named as a defendant in part because they never made public comments about the ongoing situation.


In an unexpected turn, due in large measure to political pressure applied by Governor Mark Warner of Virginia, the ACC replaced Syracuse with Virginia Tech in its expansion vote. Things became even more surprising when, reached by phone at a conference in Switzerland, then-N.C. State Chancellor Marye Anne Fox cast a shocking last-minute "no" vote against Boston College. As a result, the ACC extended invitations only to Miami and Virginia Tech. Virginia Tech immediately accepted the invitation and filed court papers to get themselves out of the awkward position of suing their new conference. The remaining four plaintiffs removed Boston College from the list of defendants and asked both BC and Syracuse to join their suit. Boston College and Syracuse declined. Mark Robert Warner (born December 15, 1954) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Virginia and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Marye Anne Fox Marye Anne Fox (born 9 December 1947) is a physical organic chemist and university administrator. ...


The Big East presidents and athletic directors met in summer 2003 to discuss replacing the departed members and establishing a process by which members would exit the conference in the future. The remaining members of the conference moved towards establishing a US$5 million exit fee and 27 month waiting period for any other schools who wished to leave in the future. At a Big East meeting in Newark on October 1, conference presidents asked BC president Rev. William P. Leahy, S.J., about rumors surrounding the Eagles' intentions. Fr. Leahy conceded that the Eagles might indeed be leaving the conference.[5] It has been suggested that BC might have remained if the Big East had spun out its non-football schools and reconfigured as an eight- or nine-team league. The Big East considered extending invitations to Penn State and Notre Dame, however neither school showed interest in joining the conference.[6] Several models for a new conference were discussed; however it was eventually decided that the football schools would explore separating from the basketball-only schools and establish an 8-team all-sports conference. It was very quickly realized that this scenario would not be feasible due to the fact that the new conference would lose its automatic NCAA basketball tournament berth and possibly its BCS bid because the football schools had not been together long enough to satisfy certain NCAA rules. It was then decided that for the time being, the conference would add additional football and basketball schools and continue in its bifurcated structure until such time as the football schools could establish their own conference. Unhappy with this decision, the administration of Boston College once again entertained overtures from the Atlantic Coast Conference. ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... October 1 is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... William P. Leahy, SJ (born 1948) is the 25th President of Boston College, a post he has held since 1996. ...


Speculation that Chancellor Foxe, a Notre Dame trustee, cast her vote against BC so that the ACC might consider extending membership to Notre Dame was fueled by press accounts reporting that a bid to the Fighting Irish was imminent. But in October 2003, the ACC voted unanimously to invite Boston College to become their twelfth member. When BC accepted, they were returned to the lawsuit still pending against Miami by several Big East schools. In response, Boston College petitioned the Supreme Judicial Court of Massachusetts for a declaratory judgment to avoid paying the increased Big East "exit fee" that had been voted for but not yet amended to the Big East's constitution. Boston College won both decisions, but the Big East appealed. A secret settlement reported to be worth US$5 million was reached in May 2005, and as part of the settlement the ACC agreed to play a number of football games each year against Big East teams.[7] However, this large settlement was offset by the cumulative legal fees incurred by the Big East in pursuing the litigation.[8] Boston College joined the ACC in 2005, and was exempted from having to play football against their former conference colleagues who had been party to the lawsuit. Boston College officials have stated that the university will not schedule games against any of their former Big East Football colleagues with the exception of Syracuse. An eight-year deal to play Syracuse in football starting in 2010 has been signed, and a four-year deal to play Providence College in basketball begins in the 2006-7 school year.[9]


Footnotes

  1. ^ a b "College football's best of the last 20 years." USA Today. November 19, 2002. http://www.usatoday.com/sports/college/football/2002-11-19-memorable-moments_x.htm
  2. ^ The rivalry is scheduled to resume in 2007 under a contract that ran through 2013. However, the series may be a victim of acrimony stemming from BC's move to the Atlantic Coast Conference. On November 2, 2005, Notre Dame announced that because the Irish have agreed to play three Big East Conference teams each season, they will stop playing Boston College following the 2010 season. Big East Commissioner Mike Tranghese said the conference made the request after Boston College, Miami, and Virginia Tech withdrew from the Big East to join the ACC. Notre Dame senior associate athletic director John Heisler said the Irish simply don't have room for Boston College — the only other Catholic university playing Division I football — on their schedule after adding the three Big East opponents. Heisler said that had the Eagles stayed in the Big East, they would have been one of those three. “They made a business decision to go to the ACC,” Heisler said. Notre Dame has a unique and unusual relationship with the Big East Conference, in which it is a member institution but its celebrated football program remains independent and has a separate television contract with NBC.
  3. ^ http://www.shrpsports.com/cf/appolls.htm
  4. ^ http://www.ncaa.org/champadmin/ia_football_past_champs.html
  5. ^ "BC's bumpy landing - Imminent ACC entry ends turbulent flight" by Mark Blaudschun, Boston Globe, June 3, 2005.
  6. ^ "Big East considered adding Penn State, Notre Dame" by Rob Biertempfel, Pittsburgh Tribune Review, February 25, 2005.
  7. ^ "Big East lawsuit settlement benefits Pitt, WVU - Attractive games, money fallout from ACC suit" by Ray Fittipaldo, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, May 5, 2005.
  8. ^ "Legal fees in Big East lawsuit top $2 million" by Mickey Furfari, Charleston Daily Post, June 16, 2006.
  9. ^ PC and BC still find each other attractive, by Kevin McNamara, Providence Journal

USA Today is a national American newspaper published by the Gannett Corporation. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... November 2 is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 59 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... June 3 is the 154th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (155th in leap years), with 211 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pittsburgh Tribune-Review is a newspaper in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA. It was founded in 1992 as an offshoot of the Greensburg Tribune-Review following a press strike at the two previously dominant Pittsburgh dailies. ... February 25 is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, also known simply as the PG, is the largest daily newspaper serving metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 16 is the 167th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (168th in leap years), with 198 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Providence Journal is a daily newspaper serving the metropolitan area of Providence, Rhode Island. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Boston College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5280 words)
Boston College is a private research university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States.
Boston College is one of the oldest and largest Jesuit universities in the United States and is home to one of the world's most prominent Catholic theological and philosophical faculties.
The history of Boston College is traced to the founding of the Society of Jesus in 1534 and the early activity of Jesuits in New England in the 17th and 18th centuries.
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