FACTOID # 4: Just 1% of the houses in Nevada were built before 1939.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Boston Brahmin

Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston, are the class of New Englanders who claim hereditary and cultural descent from the English Protestants who founded the city of Boston, Massachusetts and settled New England. They are considered part of the historic core of the East Coast establishment, along with other wealthy families of New York City and Philadelphia. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Nickname: Location in Massachusetts, USA Coordinates: Country United States State Massachusetts County Suffolk County Government  - Mayor Thomas M. Menino (D) Area  - City  89. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The Establishment is a pejorative slang term to refer to the traditional and usually conservative ruling class elite and the structures of society which they control. ... New York, NY redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Philadelphia maneto - Let brotherly love continue Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States Commonwealth Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Government  - Mayor John F. Street (D) Area  - City 369. ...

Contents

Characteristics

The term Brahmin comes from the Indian caste system word meaning 'The Purest Person'. The American use of Brahmin is purely metaphorical as there is no caste or religious significance. It is used to speak of the old New England families of British Protestant (usually English) origin that were extremely influential in the development and leadership of arts, culture, science, politics, trade, and academia. The American phrase was likely coined by writer Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., as part of a January 1860 article in the Atlantic Monthly called "The Professor's Story." The Indian caste system is the traditional system of social stratification on the Indian Subcontinent, in which social classes are defined by a number of endogamous, hereditary groups often termed as jātis or castes. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. ... The Atlantic Monthly (also known as The Atlantic) is an American literary/cultural magazine that was founded in November 1857. ...


The nature of the Brahmins is summarized in the doggerel "Boston Toast" by Harvard Alumnus John Collins Bossidy. Doggerel describes verse considered of little literary value. ...

"And this is good old Boston,
The home of the bean and the cod,
Where the Lowells talk only to Cabots,
And the Cabots talk only to God."[1]

Members of these families are generally known for being fiscally conservative, socially liberal, and well educated. These families often have deeply established traditions in the Episcopalian or Unitarian faiths. According to Yankee magazine, many Brahmin families intermarried and were perceived as marked by their manners and distinctive elocution, the Boston Brahmin accent, a version of the New England accent. The Lowell family was founded in America by Percival Lowle (1571–1664); his grown sons John (1595–1647) and Richard (1602–82); and his daughter, Joanna Oliver (1609–77), when their families sailed from England to the newly established settlement of Newburyport on the north shore of the Merrimack... The Cabot family was one of the Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston. ... The arms of the Episcopal Church are based on the St Georges Cross, a symbol of England (mother of world Anglicanism), with a saltire reminiscent of the Cross of St Andrew in the canton in reference to the historical origins of the American episcopate in the Scottish Episcopal Church. ... Historic Unitarianism believed in the oneness of God as opposed to traditional Christian belief in the Trinity (Father, Son, and Holy Spirit). ... The Boston Brahmin accent is a New England accent associated with the Boston Brahmin upper social class. ...


Brahmin families

Many of the Brahmin families trace their ancestry back to the original founders of Boston while others entered New England aristocratic society during the nineteenth century with their profits from commerce and trade or by marrying into established Brahmin families like the Emersons and Winthrops. A few prominent families are listed here.


The Adamses

Adams family For the macabre group of characters created by Charles Addams and featured in cartoons, television, and movies, see The Addams Family. ...

Samuel Adams (September 27, 1722 - October 2, 1803) was an American leader, politician, writer, political philosopher and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. ... John Adams (October 30, 1735 – July 4, 1826) served as Americas first Vice President (1789–1797) and as its second President (1797–1801). ... Abigail Smith Adams she was (November 11, 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife of John Adams, the second President of the United States, and is seen as the second First Lady of the United States though that term was not coined until after her death. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ... Charles Francis Adams (August 18, 1807, Boston - November 21, 1886, Boston), the son of John Quincy Adams and Louisa Adams, was an American lawyer, politician, diplomat and writer. ... Charles Francis Adams, Jr. ... Charles Francis Adams III (2 August 1866 _ 1954) was the United States Secretary of the Navy under Herbert Hoover and well-known as a yachtsman. ... Charles Francis Adams IV (born 1910 deceased 1999) was a U.S. electronics industrialist. ... John Quincy Adams (1833 - 1894) was an American lawyer and politician, the grandson of president John Quincy Adams and the son of Charles Francis Adams. ... Henry Brooks Adams (February 16, 1838 - March 27, 1918) was a U.S. historian, journalist and novelist. ... Brooks Adams (1848 - 1927) was a U.S. historian and political scientist. ...

The Cabots

Cabot family The Cabot family was one of the Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston. ...

Descendant by marriage: Godfrey Lowell Cabot (February 26, 1861 - November 2, 1962), was born in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, the son of Samuel Cabot, a physician, and Hannah Lowell Jackson. ... Thomas Dudley Cabot (May 1, 1897 - June 8, 1995) was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of Godfrey Lowell Cabot and Maria Buckminster (Moors) Cabot. ...

, Waltham, Massachusetts Francis Cabot Lowell (April 7, 1775 - April 10, 1817) was the American business man for whom the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, United States is named. ... Self-Portrait (1892) Lilla Cabot Perry, (January 13, 1848 – February 28, 1933), was one of the first American artists to embrace impressionism during the late 19th century. ... Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ...

The Chaffees/Chafees

Chaffee (Chaffee Family) Chaffee is a popular surname: Notable people named Chaffee Adna Chaffee, military leader Roger Chaffee, astronaut Objects and places named after someone named Chaffee: Chaffee County, Colorado Chaffee, Missouri The M24 Chaffee, a light tank This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might...

  • Thomas Chaffee (businessman/landowner) (1610-1683)
  • Joseph Chaffe (1639-1694)
  • Jonathon Chaffee (businessman/landowner) (1678-1766)
  • Matthew Chaffee (Boston landowner) (1657-1723)
  • Adna Romanza Chaffee(U.S. General) (1842-1914)
  • Adna R. Chaffee, Jr.(U.S. General) (1884-1941)
  • John Chafee (U.S. Senator) (1922-1999)
  • Lincoln Chafee (U.S. Senator) (b. 1953)

General Adna R. Chaffee Adna Romanza Chaffee (April 14, 1842—November 1, 1914) was a General in the United States Army. ... Adna Romanza Chaffee, Jr. ... John Lester Hubbard Chafee (October 22, 1922 – October 24, 1999) was an American politician. ... Lincoln Davenport Chafee (IPA pronunciation: , [CHAY-fee]) (born March 26, 1953) is a Republican United States Senator from Rhode Island. ...

The Choates

Choate family

Rufus Choate Rufus Choate (October 1, 1799–July 13, 1859), American lawyer and orator, was born at Ipswich, Massachusetts, the descendant of a family which settled in Massachusetts in 1667. ...

The Cushings

Cushing family

Descendant by marriage: Caleb Cushing (January 17, 1800–January 2, 1879) was an American statesman and diplomat who served as a U.S. Congressman from Massachusetts and Attorney General under President Franklin Pierce. ... Thomas Cushing (March 24, 1725 – February 28, 1788) was an American lawyer and statesman from Boston, Massachusetts. ... William Cushing (March 1, 1732–September 13, 1810) was an early associate justice of the United States Supreme Court, from its inception to his death. ...

Albert Cushing Read (29 March 1887 - 10 October 1967) was a United States aviator and Rear Admiral in the United States Navy. ...

The Crowninshields

Crowninshield family The Crowninshields are an American family prominent in seafaring and in political and military leadership as well as the literary world. ...

Descendant by marriage: Jacob Crowninshield (March 31, 1770–April 15, 1808) was a U.S. Representative from Massachusetts and appointee to the position of U.S. Secretary of the Navy but never served. ... Arent Schuyler Crowninshield (March 14, 1843 _ 1908) was an admiral of the United States Navy. ... Navy collection image of Crowninshield Benjamin Williams Crowninshield (December 27, 1772–February 3, 1851) served as the fifth United States Secretary of the Navy between 1815 and 1818, during the administrations of Presidents James Madison and James Monroe. ...

William Crowninshield Endicott (November 19, 1826 - May 6, 1900) was an American politician. ...

The Danas

Dana family

63. ... Richard Henry Dana Jr. ...

The Delanos

Delano family The Delano family in America was founded by Philippe Delano (de Lannoy), a 19-year-old Separatist of Walloon descent who arrived at Plymouth, Massachusetts on November 9, 1621 on the ship Fortune. ...

Descendant by marriage: Columbus Delano, born June 4, 1809 Shoreham, Vermont, United States – died October 23, 1896 in Mount Vernon, Ohio, was a lawyer and a statesman, and a member of the prominent Delano family. ... Jane Arminda Delano, born March 12, 1862 in Montour Falls, New York, United States – died April 15, 1919 in Savenay, Loire-Atlantique, France, was a nurse and founder of the American Red Cross Nursing Service. ... Captain Paul Delano (15 June 1775-1842), born in Bristol, Massachusetts, was a sea captain and a member of the prominent American Delano family. ...

Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ...

The Eliots

Eliot family The Eliot family is a distinguished American family as one of the Boston Brahmins, originating in Boston, whose ancestors became wealthy held sway over the American education system. ...

Descendant by marriage: Prof. ... Charles Eliot (1959-1897), noted American landscape architect. ...

The brothers Charles Benjamin Norton, Frank Henry Norton, and Charles Eliot Norton, between 1853-1855. ...

The Emersons

Emerson family

The Rev. ... Ralph Waldo Emerson (May 25, 1803 – April 27, 1882) was an American essayist, poet, and leader of the Transcendentalist movement in the early nineteenth century. ... The second wife of American essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson. ...

The Endicotts

Endicott family

William Crowninshield Endicott (November 19, 1826 - May 6, 1900) was an American politician. ... MIT Endicott House in Dedham, Massachusetts MIT Endicott House is a suburban event facility in Dedham, Massachusetts about 30 minutes from downtown Boston. ...

The Forbeses

Forbes family This article is about the Forbes family related to US Senator John Kerry. ...

Descendant by marriage: John Murray Forbes John Murray Forbes (February 23, 1813 - October 12, 1898), one of three brothers sent by their uncle to Canton, amassed a fortune in the opium trade and China trade during the Opium Wars. ...

Al Gore (born December 11, 1943) is a Vietnam Veteran and the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...

The Holmeses

Holmes family

Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. ... Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. ...

The Jacksons

Jackson family

Jonathan Jackson (June 4, 1743– March 5, 1810) was an American merchant from Newburyport, Massachusetts. ... Charles Jackson (1775 - 1855) was an American jurist, born in Newburyport, Massachusetts. ... Patrick Tracy Jackson(14 Aug. ... , Waltham, Massachusetts For other persons named Francis Cabot Lowell, see Francis Cabot Lowell (disambiguation). ... The second wife of American essayist Ralph Waldo Emerson. ...

The Lawrences

Lawrence family

Descendant by marriage: Abbott Lawrence Lowell (1856–1943) Samuel Lawrence was an American revolutionary from rural Massachusetts. ... Merchant, born in Groton, Massachusetts, 22 April, 1786; died in Boston, Massachusetts, 31 December, 1852. ... Amos Adams Lawrence was born in Boston, Massachusetts, in 1814, the son of famed philanthropist Amos Lawrence. ... William Appleton Lawrence was elected 3rd Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Western Massachusetts (1937–57). ... Frederic C. Lawrence (1899–April 16, 1989), was suffragan bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts (1956–68). ... Abbott Lawrence (December 16, 1792–August 18, 1855) was a prominent American businessman, politician, and philanthropist. ... William Lawrence is the name of several notable people: William Lawrence (35th Congress), US Representative from the 17th district of Ohio (this is not the William Lawrence who served from the 4th and 8th districts) William Lawrence (Ohio) (1819–99), US Representative from the 4th and 8th districts of Ohio... Luther Lawrence was the son of American Revolutionary, Samuel Lawrence, patriarch of the Lawrence family from Boston. ... Abbott Lawrence Lowell (1856–1943) portrait by John Singer Sargent Abbott Lawrence Lowell (January 1, 1856–January 6, 1943) was a U.S. educator, historian, and President of Harvard University (1909–33). ...


The Lodges

  • Henry Cabot Lodge (1850–1924)
    • Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. (1902–1985)

Henry Cabot Lodge (May 12, 1850 – November 9, 1924) was an American statesman, a Republican politician, and noted historian. ... Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr. ...

The Lowells

Lowell family [2] The Lowell family was founded in America by Percival Lowle (1571–1664); his grown sons John (1595–1647) and Richard (1602–82); and his daughter, Joanna Oliver (1609–77), when their families sailed from England to the newly established settlement of Newburyport on the north shore of the Merrimack...

  • John Lowell II (Jun 17, 1743–May 6, 1802), aka The Old Judge, is considered to be the patriarch of the Boston Lowells; married three times, losing his first two wives during childbirth.
  • Descendants of John Lowell II and Sarah Higginson (Jan 3, 1745–May 5, 1772); m. Jan 8, 1767
    • Anna Cabot Lowell (Mar 30, 1768–Dec 18, 1810)
    • John Lowell, Jr. (lawyer) (Oct 6, 1769–Mar 12, 1840) aka The Rebel; m. Jun 8, 1793 to Rebecca Amory (Jan 8, 1771–Mar 12, 1842)
      • John Amory Lowell (Nov 11, 1798–Oct 31, 1881); married twice, losing his first wife during childbirth.
      • Descendants of John Armory Lowell and Susan Cabot Lowell; m. Feb 14, 1822
        • Susan Cabot (Apr 15, 1823–Jun 9, 1868)
        • Judge John Lowell (Oct 18, 1824–May 14, 1897); m. to Lucy Buckminster Emerson
          • John Lowell (b. May 6, 1856); m. Oct 24, 1888 to Mary Emlen Hale of Philadelphia
            • Ralph Lowell (July 23, 1890–1978); m. Sept 1, 1917 to Charlotte Loring (1897–1981)
          • Judge James Arnold Lowell (Feb 5, 1869–Nov 30, 1933); m. Dec. 2, 1897 to Mary Wharton Churchman of Philadelphia
      • Descendants of John Amory Lowell and Elizabeth Cabot Putnam (Nov 11, 1807–Feb 12, 1881); m. Apr 9, 1829
        • Augustus Lowell (Jan 15, 1830–1900); m. Jun 1, 1854 to Katherine Bigelow Lawrence (b. 1832)
          • Percival Lowell (Mar 13, 1855–Nov 12, 1916); m. 1908 to Constance Savage Keith (Oct 31, 1863–Sept 24, 1954)
          • Abbott Lawrence Lowell (Dec 13, 1856–Jan 6, 1943); m. Jun 19, 1879 to Anna Parker Lowell
          • Katherine Lowell (b. Nov 27, 1858); m. Dec 5, 1882 to Alfred Roosevelt of New York (a first cousin of Teddy Roosevelt)
          • Elizabeth Lowell (Feb 2, 1862–1935); m. Jun 9, 1888 to William Lowell Putnam
          • Roger Lowell (Feb 2, 1862–Aug 31, 1863)
          • May Lowell (b. May 1, 1870–d. at birth)
          • Amy Lowell (Feb 9, 1874–May 12, 1925)
      • Anna Cabot Lowell (1808–1894)
  • Descendants of John Lowell II and Susanna Cabot (Jan 13, 1754–Mar 30, 1777); m. May 31, 1774
    • Francis Cabot Lowell (businessman) (Apr 7, 1775–Aug 10, 1817); m. Oct 31, 1798 to Hannah Gardner Jackson (Feb 3, 1776–May 10, 1815)
      • John Lowell, Jr. (philanthropist) (May 11, 1799–Mar 4, 1836)
      • Susan Cabot Lowell (Feb 14, 1801–Aug 15, 1827); m. bef. 1824 to John Amory Lowell
      • Francis Cabot Lowell Jr. (Jan 5, 1803–Sept 8, 1874); m. Jan 11, 1826 to Mary Lowell Gardner
        • George Gardner Lowell (Mar 29, 1830–Feb 6, 1885); m. Apr 4, 1854 to Mary Ellen Parker (b. Aug 21, 1832)
          • Francis Cabot Lowell (judge) (Jan 7, 1855–Mar 6, 1911)
          • Anna Parker Lowell (Aug 21, 1856–Mar 23, 1930); m. Jun 19, 1879 to Abbott Lawrence Lowell
        • Mary Lowell (July 26, 1833–Feb 11, 1915); m. July 15, 1856 to Algernon Sidney Coolidge (Aug 22, 1830–Jan 4, 1912)
        • Georgina Lowell (Jan 10, 1836–1922)
        • Edward Jackson Lowell (Oct 18, 1845–May 11, 1894); m. Jan 14, 1868 to Mary Walcott Goodrich (Jane 1, 1846–Apr 5, 1874)
          • Guy Lowell (Aug 6, 1870–Feb 4, 1927); m. May 17, 1898 to Henrietta Sargent
      • Edward Jackson Lowell (1805–Sept 8, 1880)
  • Descendants of John Lowell II and Rebecca Russell (Feb 27, 1747–Sept 15, 1816); m. Dec 25, 1778
    • Rebecca Russell Lowell (May 17, 1779–May 11,1853); m. to Samuel Pickering Gardner (May 14, 1767–Dec 18, 1843)
      • Mary Lowell Gardner (Jan 12, 1802–Aug 3, 1854); m. Jan 11, 1826 to Francis Cabot Lowell Jr.
    • Rev. Charles Russell Lowell, Sr. (Aug 15, 1782–Jan 20, 1861); m. Oct 2, 1806 to Harriet Brackett Traill Spence (abt. 1783–Mar 30, 1850)
      • Charles Russell Lowell Jr. (Oct 30, 1807–23 Jun 23, 1870); m. Apr 18, 1832 to Anna Cabot Jackson (Sept 29, 1811–Jan 7,1874)
        • Gen. Charles Russell Lowell III (Jan 2, 1835–October 20, 1864); m. Oct 31, 1863 to Josephine Shaw (Dec 16, 1843–Oct 12, 1905)
          • Carlotta Shaw Lowell (Nov 30, 1864)
        • Lt. James Jackson Lowell (Oct 15, 1837–Jul 4, 1862)
        • Harriet Lowell (Sept 11, 1836–Jan 20, 1920); m. Jun 9, 1860 to George Putnam Jr. (Oct 8, 1834–1912)
      • Rev. Robert Traill Spence Lowell (Oct 8, 1816–Feb 12, 1891); m. Oct 28, 1822 to Marianna Duane (Nov 11, 1822–Nov 2, 1890)
        • Commander Robert Traill Spence Lowell Jr. (Mar 23, 1860–Mar 17, 1887); m. Sept 2, 1886 to Kate Bailey Mears
          • Robert Traill Spence Lowell III (July 15, 1887–1950); m. Apr 26, 1916 to Charlotte Winslow (Feb 7, 1888–1954)
      • James Russell Lowell (Feb 22, 1819–Aug 12, 1891); m. Dec 26, 1844 to Maria White (Jul 8, 1821–Oct 27, 1853) and later m. Sept 20, 1857 to Frances H. Dunlap (d. Feb 19, 1885) with no issue
        • Blanche Lowell (Dec 31, 1845–Mar 19, 1847)
        • Mabel Lowell (Sept 9, 1847–1898); m. Apr 2, 1872 to Edward Burnett (b. Mar 16, 1848)
        • Rose Lowell (Jul 16, 1849–Feb 2, 1850)
        • Walter Lowell (Dec 22, 1850–Jun 9, 1852)

Descendant by marriage: John Lowell ( June 17, 1743– May 6, 1802) was an American lawyer and jurist from Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Lowell, Jr. ... John Amory Lowell (1798–1881) was an American philanthropist and businessman from Boston. ... Judge John Lowell 1824–1897 For other persons named John Lowell, see John Lowell (disambiguation). ... Categories: Stub | 1890 births | 1978 deaths ... Augustus Lowell was President of Boott Cotton Mills in Lowell, Massachusetts in 1897 and the father of Abbott Lawrence Lowell. ... Percival Lowell (March 13, 1855 – November 12, 1916) was an author, mathematician, and esteemed astronomer who fueled speculation that there were canals on Mars, founded the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona, and formed the beginning of the work and theories that led to the discovery of Pluto 14 years after... Abbott Lawrence Lowell (1856–1943) portrait by John Singer Sargent Abbott Lawrence Lowell (January 1, 1856–January 6, 1943) was a U.S. educator, historian, and President of Harvard University (1909–33). ... Born Elizabeth Lowell Putnam in Brookline, MA in the late 19th century to parents Augustus Lowell of the privileged Lowell family of Boston. ... Amy Lowell Amy Lawrence Lowell (February 9, 1874 – May 12, 1925) was an American poet of the imagist school who posthumously won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1926. ... , Waltham, Massachusetts Francis Cabot Lowell (April 7, 1775 - April 10, 1817) was the American business man for whom the city of Lowell, Massachusetts, United States is named. ... John Lowell, Jr. ... Francis Cabot Lowell (January 7, 1855 - March 6, 1911) was a longtime federal judge in the United States. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Guy Lowell (August 6, 1870-February 4, 1927) was an American architect and landscape architect. ... Charles Russell Lowell, Sr. ... Charles Russell Lowell (2 January 1835-20 October 1864), American soldier, was born in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Josephine Shaw Lowell (December 16, 1843 - October 12, 1905) was a Progressive Reform leader in the United States in the Nineteenth century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Robert Lowell (March 1, 1917–September 12, 1977), born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, IV, was a highly regarded mid-twentieth-century American poet. ... Jean Stafford (July 1, 1915 - March 26, 1979) was an American short story writer and novelist, who won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction for her Collected Short Stories in 1970. ... Elizabeth Hardwick (July 27, 1916) is an American literary critic, novelist, and short-story writer. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... James Russell Lowell circa 1855. ... Maria White Lowell in 1845 Maria White Lowell (8 July 1821 - 27 October 1853) was a United States poet and abolitionist. ...

Godfrey Lowell Cabot (February 26, 1861 - November 2, 1962), was born in Boston, Massachusetts, USA, the son of Samuel Cabot, a physician, and Hannah Lowell Jackson. ... Julian Lowell Coolidge (September 28, 1873 - March 5, 1954) was an American mathematician and a professor and chairman of the Mathematics Department at Harvard University. ... Ferris Lowell Greenslet (1875, Glens Falls, New York -- 1959, Boston) was an American editor and writer. ...

The Peabodys

Peabody family

Nathaniel Peabody (1774-1855) was a U.S. physician from Boston, Massachusetts. ... George Peabody (February 18, 1795 – November 4, 1869) was an entrepreneur and philanthropist who founded the Peabody Institute. ... Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, (May 16, 1804-January 3, 1894) educator who opened the first English-language kindergarten in the United States. ... The Rev. ... Endicott Peabody (February 15, 1920–December 1, 1997) was a Governor of Massachusetts Peabody was born in Lawrence, Massachusetts, served in the United States Navy during World War II, and received a BA and a law degree from Harvard University. ...

The Perkinses

Perkins family

Commodore George Hamilton Perkins (20 October 1836 - 28 October 1899) was an officer in the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... Elisha Perkins (1741-1799) was a US physician who created his own magnetic therapy, Perkins Tractors. ... // Events April 10 - Austrian army attack troops of Frederick the Great at Mollwitz August 10 - Raja of Travancore defeats Dutch East India Company naval expedition at Battle of Colachel December 19 - Vitus Bering dies in his expedition east of Siberia December 25 - Anders Celsius develops his own thermometer scale Celsius... 1799 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Frances Coralie Fannie Perkins (April 10, 1882 – May 14, 1965) was the U.S. Secretary of Labor from 1933 to 1945, and the first female cabinet member. ... The Weld Family is an extended family of Boston Brahmin most remembered for the philanthropy of its members. ... Jacob Perkins (9th July 1766 - 30th July 1849) was an American inventor and physicist born in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and was apprenticed to a goldsmith. ... Thomas Handasyd Perkins. ...

The Phillipses

Phillips family

The founder of Phillips Andover Academy, his uncle was Dr. John Phillips who founded Phillips Exeter Academy. ... The top prep schools in the US both bear his name: Phillips Exeter Academy and Phillips Andover Academy, the former founded by him in 1781 and the latter founded by his nephew Samuel Phillips Jr. ... Wendell Phillips Wendell Phillips (29 November 1811 – 2 February 1884) was an American abolitionist, advocate for Native Americans, and orator. ...

The Putnams

Putnam family

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Born Elizabeth Lowell Putnam in Brookline, MA in the late 19th century to parents Augustus Lowell of the privileged Lowell family of Boston. ...

The Quincys

Quincy family

  • Edmund Quincy (settled in Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1633)
  • Josiah Quincy I (1709–1784)
  • Colonel John Quincy

Descendant by marriage: Josiah Quincy III (February 4, 1772 – July 1, 1864) was a U.S. educator and political figure. ...

Abigail Smith Adams she was (November 11, 1744 – October 28, 1818) was the wife of John Adams, the second President of the United States, and is seen as the second First Lady of the United States though that term was not coined until after her death. ... John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 – February 23, 1848) was a diplomat, politician, and President of the United States (March 4, 1825 – March 4, 1829). ...

The Saltonstalls

Saltonstall family The Saltonstall family is a Boston Brahmin family from the U.S. state of Massachusetts, notable for having had a family member attend Harvard University from every generation since Nathaniel Saltonstall—later one of the more principled judges at the Salem Witch Trials—graduated in 1659. ...

Leverett Saltonstall, (great-grandfather of Leverett Saltonstall, 1892-1979), was a Representative from Massachusetts. ... Leverett A. Saltonstall (September 1, 1892 – June 17, 1979) was an American politician who served as Governor of Massachusetts (1939 - 1945) and as a United States Senator (1945 - 1967). ...

The Winthrops

Winthrop family The Dudley-Winthrop Family is a U.S. political family. ...

John Winthrop John Winthrop (12 January 1587/8–26 March 1649) led a group of Puritans to the New World and joined the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1629. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. ... Gov. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... Robert Charles Winthrop Robert Charles Winthrop (May 12, 1809–November 16, 1894) was an American statesman who served in the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate. ...

The Welds

Weld family The Weld Family is an extended family of Boston Brahmin most remembered for the philanthropy of its members. ...

This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... William Gordon Weld (1775-1825), scion of the Weld Family of Boston, was a shipmaster and ship owner. ... William Fletcher Weld (1800-1881), scion of the Weld Family of Boston, was a shipping magnate during the Golden Age of Sail. He later invested in railroads and real estate. ... Stephen Minot Weld (1806-1867), scion of the Weld Family of Boston, was a schoolmaster, real estate investor and politician. ... George Walker Weld (1840-1905), youngest son of William Fletcher Weld and member of the Weld Family of Boston, was a founding member of the Boston Athletic Association (organizers of todays Boston Marathon) and the financier of the Weld Boathouse, a landmark on the Charles River. ... The Weld Family is an extended family of Boston Brahmin most remembered for the philanthropy of its members. ... Charles Goddard Weld (1857-1911), was a Boston-area physician, sailor, philanthropist, and art lover. ... Gen. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Tuesday Weld, born August 27, 1943, is an American film actress. ... Theodore Dwight Weld (1803–1895), the author of American Slavery As It Is: Testimony of a Thousand Witnesses, was an American abolitionist. ... Weld daguerreotype taken at the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law Convention, Cazenovia, New York. ...

See also

Elitism is the belief or attitude that the people who are considered to be the elite — a selected group of persons with outstanding personal abilities, wealth, specialised training or experience, or other distinctive attributes — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken the most seriously, or... During its history the United States has seen many families who have repeatedly produced notable politicians from their ranks, and these historic U.S. political families have had a significant impact on politics in the United States. ... Caroline Webster Schermerhorn Astor (September 22, 1830–October 30, 1908) preferred to be known simply as Mrs. ... Samuel Ward McAllister (1827-1895) was the self-appointed arbiter of New York society in the 1880s. ... Specific to the United States, the Social Register is a directory of names and addresses of the powerful and wealthy individuals who form the social elite, though until recently not necessarily the political or corporate elite; inclusion in the Social Register was formerly a guide to the members of polite... The Independent School League (ISL) is composed of sixteen prestigious New England preparatory schools that compete athletically and academically. ... WASP is a term which originated in the United States. ... The term Yankee currently refers to people from or in New England; by extension it is applied to any resident of the Northeast (New England, Mid-Atlantic, and upper Great Lakes states), to any Northerner during and after the American Civil War, or to other citizens of the United States. ...

References

  1. ^ Andrews, Robert (ed.) (1996). Famous Lines: A Columbia Dictionary of Familiar Quotations. Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-10218-6. 
  2. ^ Lowell, Delmar R., The Historic Genealogy of the Lowells of America from 1639 to 1899; Rutland VT, The Tuttle Company, 1899; ISBN 9780788415678.

Delmar R. Lowell 1844–1912 Rev. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Boston Brahmin - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (348 words)
Boston Brahmins, also called the First Families of Boston are a blue-blooded class of New Englanders who claim hereditary or cultural descent from the Anglo-Saxon Protestants who founded the city of Boston, Massachusetts and originally settled New England.
The assertion that they are "Brahmin" is not just a claim of high social class, but also of cultural, intellectual, and possibly spiritual leadership; these roles were performed by the namesake caste that existed in India.
The nature of the Brahmins is summarized in the doggerel poem, "Boston Toast," by John Collins Bossidy.
Boston slang - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1466 words)
Boston slang consists of words and phrases of slang originating from Boston.
Though most often used in Boston, the slang can also be heard in other cities of Massachusetts or even other New England states, though not always as frequently.
The Hub - Boston; shortened from Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m