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Encyclopedia > Boston, Lincolnshire
Boston

Boston shown within Lincolnshire
Population 35,124
OS grid reference TF329437
District Boston
Shire county Lincolnshire
Region East Midlands
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town BOSTON
Postcode district PE21
Dialling code 01205
Police Lincolnshire
Fire Lincolnshire
Ambulance East Midlands
UK Parliament Boston and Skegness
European Parliament East Midlands
List of places: UKEnglandLincolnshire

Coordinates: 52°58′29″N 0°01′17″W / 52.9746, -0.0214 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 504 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 714 pixel, file size: 334 KB, MIME type: image/png) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Boston is a local government district with borough status in Lincolnshire, England. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... The East Midlands is one of the regions of England and consists of most of the eastern half of the traditional region of the Midlands. ... Constituent countries is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a number of countries make up a larger entity or grouping, concerning these countries; thus the OECD has used the phrase in reference to the parts of former Yugoslavia[1]; the Soviet Union referring to the... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This is an alphabetical list of the sovereign states of the world, including both de jure and de facto independent states. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The PE postcode area, also known as the Peterborough postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts covering a large area in eastern England, including Peterborough and Huntingdon in Cambridgeshire, Kings Lynn in Norfolk and Boston and Stamford in Lincolnshire. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ... Lincolnshire Police is the police force covering the non-metropolitan county of Lincolnshire in the East Midlands of England. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The East Midlands Ambulance Service (EMAS) is an ambulance service formed in April 1999 as a result of the merging of the Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire (including Rutland) ambulance services. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Boston and Skegness is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... East Midlands is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of places in the ceremonial county of Lincolnshire, United Kingdom. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Boston is a town and small port in Lincolnshire, UK, on the east coast of England. It is the largest town of the wider Borough of Boston local government district and has a total population of 35,124. For other uses, see Port (disambiguation). ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Boston is a local government district with borough status in Lincolnshire, England. ...


Boston's most notable landmark is The Stump, the parish church with the highest tower in England, visible in the flat lands of Lincolnshire for miles. Residents of Boston are known as "Bostonians". Emigrants sailing from Boston named several other settlements after the town, most notably Boston, Massachusetts, of the United States. Boston Stump The Boston parish church, known popularly as The Stump, in Boston, Lincolnshire, UK is dedicated to Saint Botolph, the name Boston possibly being a corruption of Botolphs Town. The church is one of the largest parish churches in England, and has the highest tower, the so-called... Bostonian may refer to: a resident of Boston, Massachusetts a resident of Massachusetts a resident of the Boston area the passenger train Bostonian This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Contents

Geography and administration

Boston received its charter in 1545. It is the main settlement in the Boston local government district of Lincolnshire which includes the town of Boston and eighteen other civil parishes. Boston is a local government district with borough status in Lincolnshire, England. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ...


Boston is in the East Midlands European Parliament constituency, which elects six members. Boston and Skegness parliament constituency of which the current member is Mark Simmonds. East Midlands is a constituency of the European Parliament. ... Boston and Skegness is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Mark Jonathon Mortlock Simmonds (born 12 April 1964, Worksop) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ...


Electoral wards

They are:

  • Central Ward elects one councillor.[1]
  • Fenside Ward elects two councillors[2][3]
  • North Ward elects two councillors 1 2.
  • Pilgrim Ward elects one councillor.
  • Skirbeck Ward elects three councillors 1 2 3.
  • South Ward elects one councillor.
  • Staniland North Ward elects one councillor.
  • Staniland South Ward elects two councillors 1 2.
  • West Ward elects one councillor.
  • Witham Ward elects two councillors 1 2

In the local elections of 2007, many local councillors from the major parties were displaced by independent candidates whose main issue as a group is the construction of a road bypass which they believe is being deliberately denied by the Lincoln-centric members of Lincolnshire County Council.


History

Etymology

The name "Boston" is said to be a contraction of "St Botolph's Town" or of "St Botolph's stone". However, fewer people now believe the story, still current, that a settlement in Boston dates from AD 654, when a Saxon monk named Botolph established a monastery on the banks of the River Witham. One reason for doubting this is that in 654, the Witham did not flow near the site of Boston. (The early medieval geography of The Fens was much more fluid than it is today.) Botolph's establishment is most likely to have been in Suffolk. However, he was a popular missionary, to whom many churches between Yorkshire and Sussex, including that of Boston, are dedicated. Nevertheless, the asteroid 741 Botolphia was named in the early twentieth century in Boston's honour based on St Botolph's story. Botolph or Botulph (died circa 680, pronounced with emphasis on the first syllable) was an English abbot and saint. ... For other uses, see Anglo-Saxon. ... The River Witham is a river in the east of England. ... The Fens may also refer to the Back Bay Fens, a park in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Botolph or Botulph (died circa 680, pronounced with emphasis on the first syllable) was an English abbot and saint. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... For the architectural structure, see Church (building). ... Look up Yorkshire in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Sussex is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex. ... For other uses, see Asteroid (disambiguation). ... 741 Botolphia 741 Botolphia is a minor planet orbiting the Sun. ...


Early history

The Domesday Book of 1086, does not mention Boston by name. However, the settlement of Skirbeck is covered as part of the very wealthy manor of Drayton. Skirbeck had two churches and one is likely to have been that dedicated to St Botolph, in what was consequently Botolph's town. Skirbeck (map), is now considered part of Boston, but the name remains as a church parish and as an electoral ward. A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ... A parish is a type of administrative subdivision. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods...


The order of importance was the other way round when the Boston quarter of Skirbeck developed at the head of the Haven which lies under the present Market Place. At that stage, The Haven was the tidal part of the stream, now represented by the Stone Bridge Drain (map), which carried the water from the East and West Fens. The line of the road through Wide Bargate to the A52 and the A16 is likely to have developed on its marine silt levees. It led as it does now, to the relatively high ground at Sibsey (map), thence to Lindsey. The Haven is the tidal river of the Port of Boston, Lincolnshire in England. ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ... The A52 is a major road in England. ... The A16 road is a principal road of Lincolnshire in the east of England, connecting the port of Grimsby and Stamford, where it meets the A1 and the A43 the latter, in turn, giving a through route to Oxford and the south west of England. ... Lindsey was a unit of local government until 1974 in Lincolnshire, England, covering the northern part of the county. ...


The reason for the original development of the town, away from the centre of Skirbeck was that Boston lay on the point where navigable tidal water was alongside the land route, which used the Devensian terminal moraine ridge at Sibsey, between the upland of East Lindsey and the three routes to the south of Boston: The Devensian glaciation is a name for an ice age period which occurred between 120,000 and 10,000 years ago. ... This article is about geological phenomena. ...

  • The coastal route, on the marine silts, crossed the mouth of Bicker Haven towards Spalding.
  • The Sleaford route into Kesteven passed via Swineshead (map) thence following the old course of the River Slea, on its marine silt levee.
  • The Salters’ Way, route into Kesteven left Holland from Donington. This route was much more thoroughly developed in the later Medieval period, by Bridge End Priory (map).

The River Witham seems to have joined The Haven after the flood of September, 1014, having abandoned the port of Drayton on what subsequently became known as Bicker Haven. The predecessor of Ralph the Staller owned most of both Skirbeck and Drayton so it was a relatively simple task to transfer his business from Drayton but Domesday Book, of 1086 still records his source of income in Boston under the heading of Drayton, so Boston’s name is famously not mentioned. The Town Bridge still maintains the pre-flood route along the old Haven bank. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about Sleaford in Lincolnshire. ... Parts of Kesteven is a traditional subdivision of Lincolnshire, England. ... For other uses, see Silt (disambiguation). ... A levee, levée (from the feminine past participle of the French verb lever, to raise), floodbank or stopbank is a natural or artificial slope or wall, usually earthen and often parallels the course of a river. ... Birth place of Matthew Flinders, born 1774 More information here http://www. ... The River Witham is a river in the east of England. ... A line drawing entitled Domesday Book from Andrew Williamss Historic Byways and Highways of Old England. ...


Growth

After the Norman Conquest, Ralph the Staller’s property was taken over by Count Alana. It subsequently came to be attached to the Earldom of Richmond, Yorkshire and known as the Richmond Fee. It lay on the left bank of The Haven. Bayeux Tapestry depicting events leading to the Battle of Hastings The Norman Conquest of England was the conquest of the Kingdom of England by William the Conqueror (Duke of Normandy), in 1066 at the Battle of Hastings and the subsequent Norman control of England. ... Ralph the Staller (or Radulf stalre (meaning Ralph the Constable), otherwise Ralph the Englishman) (c. ... The town of Richmond as seen from the top of the keep of Richmond Castle Richmond is an attractive Georgian market town on the river Swale in North Yorkshire. ...


During the eleventh and twelfth centuries, Boston grew into a notable town and port. The quinzieme was a duty raised on the fifteenth part (6.667%) of the value of merchants' moveable goods at the various trading towns of England. In 1204 when the merchants of London paid £836, those of Boston paid £780b. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Port. ... “Taxes” redirects here. ...


Thus by the opening of the thirteenth century, it was already significant in trade with the continent of Europe and ranked as a port of the Hanseatic League. It was one of the official "staple towns" of England, authorized to carry on the import and export trade. Much of Boston's trade at this time was in wool, and Boston is said by the locals to have been built on it. Apart from wool, Boston also exported salt, produced locally on the Holland coast, grain, produced up-river and lead, produced in Derbyshire and brought via Lincoln, up-river. The wool export trade began to decline in the fifteenth century as the industry shifted to the value-adding business of weaving, which was conducted in other parts of the country, the Hansa merchants quit the town, and Boston's wealth declined. Animated, colour-coded map showing the various continents. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ... A staple port is a port designated by a government or monarch as a place where specific goods may be exported or imported. ... For other uses, see Wool (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Parts of Holland is an area in south-east Lincolnshire, England. ... This article is about cereals in general. ... This article is about the metal. ... Derbyshire is a county in the East Midlands of England. ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... Value added refers to the additional value created at a particular stage of production or through image and marketing. ... Tweed loom, Harris, 2004 Woven sheet Weaving is an ancient textile art and craft that involves placing two sets of threads or yarn called the warp and weft of the loom and turning them into cloth. ...

Blackfriars Arts Centre
Blackfriars Arts Centre

In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries four orders of friars arrived in Boston: Dominicans, Franciscans, Carmelites, and Augustinians. As the English Reformation progressed, their friaries were closed by King Henry VIII. The refectory of the Dominican friary was eventually converted into a theatre in 1965, and now houses the Blackfriars Arts Centre. Blackfriars Arts Centre in October 2004. ... Blackfriars Arts Centre in October 2004. ... A friar is a member of a religious order of men. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... The Order of Our Lady of Mt. ... Detail of St. ... The Protestant Reformation was a movement which began in the 16th century as a series of attempts to reform the Roman Catholic Church, but ended in division and the establishment of new institutions, most importantly Lutheranism, Reformed churches, and Anabaptists. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... A refectory is a dining room, especially in monasteries, boarding schools and academic institutions. ... Serge Sudeikins poster for the Bat Theatre (1922). ... Blackfriars Arts Centre Blackfriars Arts Centre is a theatre and community centre located in Boston, England built on the site of a mediaeval friary. ...


The town received its charter from Henry VIII in 1545, and Boston had two Members of Parliament from 1552 but with The Haven silted, the town was then, rather living on memories. A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ...


Seventeenth and eighteenth centuries

In 1607 a group of pilgrims from Nottinghamshire led by William Brewster and William Bradford attempted to escape pressure to conform with the teaching of the English church by going to The Netherlands from Boston. At that time unsanctioned emigration was illegal, and they were brought before the court in the Guildhall. Most of the pilgrims were released fairly soon and the following year, set sail for The Netherlands, settling in Leiden. In 1620, several of these were among the group who moved to New England in the Mayflower. Pilgrim Fathers Memorial located in Boston, United Kingdom. ... Pilgrim Fathers Memorial located in Boston, United Kingdom. ... Categories: Stub | Memorials ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... Signing of the Mayflower Compact Elder William Brewster (born c. ... William Bradford (March 19, 1590 – May 9, 1657) was a leader of the separatist settlers of the Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts, and was elected thirty times to be the Governor after John Carver died. ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... Motto: Je Maintiendrai (Dutch: Ik zal handhaven, English: I Shall Uphold) Anthem: Wilhelmus van Nassouwe Capital Amsterdam1 Largest city Amsterdam Official language(s) Dutch2 Government Parliamentary democracy Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Beatrix  - Prime minister Jan Peter Balkenende Independence Eighty Years War   - Declared July 26, 1581   - Recognised January 30, 1648 (by Spain... The ancient guildhall of St Marys Guild in Boston was built around 1450. ... Coordinates: , Country Province Area (2006)  - Municipality 23. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... For other uses, see Mayflower (disambiguation). ...


Boston remained a hotbed of religious dissent. In 1612 John Cotton became the Vicar of St Botolph's and, although viewed askance by the Church of England for his non-conformist preaching, became responsible for a large increase in Church attendance. He encouraged those who disliked the lack of religious freedom in England to join the Massachusetts Bay Company, and later helped to found the city of Boston, Massachusetts (1630) which he was instrumental in naming. Unable to tolerate the religious situation any longer he eventually emigrated himself in 1633. John Cotton (1585–1652) The Reverend John Cotton (December 4, 1585 – December 23, 1652) was a highly regarded principal among the New England Puritan ministers, who also included John Winthrop, Thomas Hooker, Increase Mather (who became his son-in-law), John Davenport, and Thomas Shepard. ... The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called by the name Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was the direct predecessor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay and then the state of Massachusetts. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


At the same time, work on draining the fens to the west of Boston was begun, a scheme which displeased many whose livelihoods were at risk. This and the religious friction put Boston into the parliamentarian camp in the Civil War which in England, began in 1642. (One of the sources of livelihood obtained from the fen was fowling. The feathery aspect of this is still reflected in the bedding manufacturers, now in Skirbeck.) The chief backer of the drainage locally, Lord Lindsey, was shot in the first battle and the fens returned to their accustomed dampness until after 1750. The Roundheads was the nickname given to the supporters of Parliament during the English Civil War. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The Battle of Edgehill (or Edge Hill) was the first major engagement of the First English Civil War. ...


The later eighteenth century saw a revival when the Fens began to be effectively drained. The Act of Parliament permitting the embanking and straightening of the fenland Witham was dated 1762. Its sluice was designed to help scour out The Haven. The land proved to be fertile, and Boston began exporting cereals to London. In 1774 the first financial bank was opened, and in 1776 an Act of Parliament allowed watchmen to begin patrolling the streets at night. An Act of Parliament or Act is law enacted by the parliament (see legislation). ... Cereal crops are mostly grasses cultivated for their edible seeds (actually a fruit called a grain, technically a caryopsis). ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Bank (disambiguation). ...


Modern history

In the nineteenth century, the names, first of Howden, near the Grand Sluice and later, of Tuxford, near the Maud Foster Sluice, were respected among engineers for their steam road locomotives, thrashing engines and the like. Howden developed his business from making steam engines for river boats while Tuxford began as a miller and millwright. His mill was once prominent near Skirbeck Church, just to the east of the Maud Foster Drain. Howden can refer to: Howden, East Yorkshire, England, a town near Beverley. ... Image:Tuxford - Nottinghamshire dot. ...


The railway reached the town in 1848 and briefly, it was on the main line from London to the North. The area between the Black Sluice and the railway station was mainly railway yard and the railway company's main depôt. The latter facility moved to Doncaster when the modern main line was opened. Boston remained something of a local railway hub well into the twentieth century, moving the produce of the district and the trade of the dock, plus the excursion trade to Skegness and similar places. But it was much quieter by the time of the Beeching cuts of the 1960s. For other places with the same name, see Doncaster (disambiguation). ... , Skegness is a seaside town and civil parish within the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. ... Richard Beeching Richard Beeching, Baron Beeching (21 April 1913 - 23 March 1985), commonly known as Doctor Beeching, was chairman of British Railways and a physicist and engineer. ...


Boston once again became a significant port in trade and fishing when, in 1884, the new dock with its associated wharves on The Haven were constructed. It continued as a working port, exporting grain, fertilizer, and importing timber although much of the fishing trade was moved out in the inter-war period. The first cinema opened in 1910, and the town was used by film makers during the Second World War to represent The Netherlands when the real thing was not able to cooperate. In 1913 a new Town Bridge was constructed. Central Park was purchased in 1919, and is now one of the focal points of the town. Electricity came to Boston during the early part of the century, and electrical street lighting was available from 1924. A dock is an area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, forming a chamber used for building or repairing one ship. ... Metung Wharf on Bancroft Bay, Gippsland Lakes, Victoria, Australia A wharf is a fixed platform, commonly on pilings, roughly parallel to and alongside navigable water, where ships are loaded and unloaded. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Electricity (from New Latin ēlectricus, amberlike) is a general term for a variety of phenomena resulting from the presence and flow of electric charge. ...


The Haven Bridge, which now carries the two trunk roads over the river was opened in 1953 and the new road built in the early 1970s rather separated Skirbeck from Boston but the town largely avoided the development boom of the 1960s. More recently, the new shopping centre named the Pescod Centre opened in 2004, bringing many new shops into the town. Further development is planned. For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ...


The town is experiencing something of a boom at present. By the standards of recent decades, it has seen a large increase in immigration recently, most notably from Eastern Europe and Portugal. This has led to some social tension, which came to a head during the 2004 European Football Championship, when something akin to rioting[1] occurred briefly. After the loss to Portugal in the 2006 World Cup, trouble once again flared, with clashes between riot police and English supporters. In economics, the term boom and bust refers to the movement of an economy through economic cycles due to changes in aggregate demand. ... Euro 2004 Logo The 2004 UEFA European Football Championship, commonly called Euro 2004, was held in Portugal between 12 June and 4 July 2004. ...


However, as a sea port and holder of trade fairs, the town was long accustomed to seamen from the Baltic, Hansa merchants and so on. After the surrounding land was drained, there were influxes of seasonal labourers from other parts of England, from Ireland or other parts of Europe. People occasionally became excited then too - the Hansa merchants finally left after one had been in a fight. But the fights are noticed because of their rarity. This article is about maritime crew. ... Population density in the wider Baltic region. ... Carta marina of the Baltic Sea region (1539). ... Migrant farm worker, New York A migrant worker is someone who regularly works away from home, if they even have a home. ...


Demographics

Population

According to the 2001 census, there were 35,124 people residing in Boston town, of whom 48.2% were male and 51.8% were female. Children under five accounted for approximately 5% of the population. 23% of the resident population in Boston were of retirement age.


According to a Department of Health report published in October 2006, the population of Boston has the highest rate of obesity in England, with almost one in three residents clinically obese. However another survey into binge drinking released in 2007 showed that Boston had one of the lowest consumption rates of alcohol in the United Kingdom. Drinking too much alcohol may qualify as binge drinking if it leads to at least two days of inebriation and the drinker neglects usual responsibilities The British Medical Association states that there is no consensus on the definition of drinking. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Religion

80% of the population are Christians (some of them practising) , the next highest religious minority were Muslims making up 0.4%. There are also small Buddhist, Hindu, Jewish and Sikh communities. 11% of the population claim no religion. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... A replica of an ancient statue found among the ruins of a temple at Sarnath Buddhism is a philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhārtha Gautama, a prince of the Shakyas, whose lifetime is traditionally given as 566 to 486 BCE. It had subsequently been accepted by... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ...


Landmarks

Some of the most interesting things to be seen in Boston lie not in the usual list of tourist features but in the area of civil engineering. However, there are remarkable sights of the more usual sort. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday speech. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ...

Boston Stump viewed from the Market Place. From 1552, the Bostonians used to have their jail between the church and where the red car is. This is likely to be where the Scrooby Pilgrims were imprisoned in 1607.
Boston Stump viewed from the Market Place. From 1552, the Bostonians used to have their jail between the church and where the red car is. This is likely to be where the Scrooby Pilgrims were imprisoned in 1607.

The medieval parish church, (dedicated to St Botolph) with its high tower, is known locally as "The (Boston) Stump". It can be seen for many miles around the town. Building on the current church began early in the fourteenth century, The building of the tower began around 1450 by excavation of a deep, wide hole. Archaeological records indicate that a wooden Norman church had existed on the site of the south aisle. The internal space of the building is impressive but the added interest of the ceiling, windows reredos, choir stalls with their misericords, the optional climb up the tower steps and numerous other details make the place worth a trip. The pulpit, made in 1612 indicates the importance accorded to preaching in the time of the pilgrims. The furnishings of most English parish churches were destroyed or neglected in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries so it is not surprising to find that was so here, in the town of John Cotton but the end of the nineteenth and the early twentieth century were a high point in craftsmanship and it shows here. There is interest outside as well, look at the buttress on the south-west corner of the tower for a record of flooding. St Botolphs Parish Church, viewed from the market place in October 2004. ... St Botolphs Parish Church, viewed from the market place in October 2004. ... Boston Stump The Boston parish church, known popularly as The Stump, in Boston, Lincolnshire, UK is dedicated to Saint Botolph, the name Boston possibly being a corruption of Botolphs Town. The church is one of the largest parish churches in England, and has the highest tower, the so-called... A small village in north Nottinghamshire which was the home of William Brewster one of the Pilgrim Fathers who set sail for America in 1620. ... This article is about a particular group of seventeenth-century European colonists of North America. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... Boston Stump The Boston parish church, known popularly as The Stump, in Boston, Lincolnshire, UK is dedicated to Saint Botolph, the name Boston possibly being a corruption of Botolphs Town. The church is one of the largest parish churches in England, and has the highest tower, the so-called... The nave of Durham Cathedral demonstrates the characteristic round arched style, though use of shallow pointed arches above the nave is a forerunner of the Gothic style. ... An altar and reredos from University Church, Dublin A reredos is a screen or decoration behind the altar in a church, usually depicting religious iconography or images. ... Misericords are small wooden shelves underneath folding seats in order to provide some level of comfort for those standing during long periods of prayer. ...


While you are there, look up-river to the Grand Sluice. It is disguised by a railway bridge and a road bridge but it is there, twice a day keeping the tide out of the Fens and twice a day allowing the water from the upland to scour the Haven. Not far away in the opposite direction, was the boyhood home of John Foxe, the author of Foxe's Book of Martyrs. John Foxe, line engraving by George Glover, first published in the 1641 edition of Actes and Monuments John Foxe (1516–April 8, 1587) is remembered as the author of the famous Foxes Book of Martyrs. ... William Tyndale, just before being burnt at the stake, cries out Lord, ope the King of Englands eies in this woodcut from an early edition of Foxes Book of Martyrs. ...


The Town Bridge maintains the line of the road to Lindsey and from its western end, looking at the river side of the Exchange Building to the right, it is possible to see how the two ends of the building, founded on the natural levees of The Haven have stood firm while the middle has sunk into the infill of the former river.


The prison used to stand in the Market Place, by the church (see the photograph caption). The lawyers' quarter is still in use, just to the north of the church. On the site of the prison is a statue of the founder of the Illustrated London News, Herbert Ingram. The statue was designed by Alexander Munro and was unveiled in October 1862. The allegorical figure at the base of the monument is a reference to Ingram's efforts to bring the first piped water to the town. He was also instrumental in bringing the railways to Boston. Born in nearby Swineshead, he was also MP for Boston from 1856 until his death in a shipping accident on Lake Michigan in 1860. The Illustrated London News was a magazine founded by Herbert Ingram and his friend Mark Lemon, the editor of Punch magazine. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Illustrated London News Herbert Ingram (1811-1860) was the father of pictorial journalism in the United Kingdom through his founding of the Illustrated London News. ... Swineshead is a village in Lincolnshire, England, around 7 miles west of Boston. ... --67. ...


The market, held on Saturdays and Wednesdays in the Market Place and also on Wide Bargate on Wednesday, is a worthwhile experience. Market Place and Strait Bargate are the retail hub of the town centre. Coincidentally, No.1 Market Place and No.1 Strait Bargate are the same building, F. Hinds jewellers. Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...

Maude Foster Mill
Maude Foster Mill

The seven-storeyed Maud Foster Tower Windmill, completed in 1819 by millwrights Norman & Smithson of Hull for Issac and Thomas Reckitt, is momentarily the tallest operating windmill in England (80ft/24.4 metres to the top of the cap) following extensive restoration during the 1980s and early 1990s and is now a working museum. The tall mill without the usual tar coating in Lincs stands on the dyke above the drain it is named after and is unusual in having an odd number (five) of sails. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 2048 pixels, file size: 1. ... The Maud Foster Windmill, one of the largest operating windmills in England is located on the Maud Foster Drain in Boston, England. ... Hull or Kingston upon Hull is a British city situated on the north bank of the Humber estuary. ... A Dutch tower windmill, sporting sails, surrounded by tulips A windmill is an engine powered by the wind to produce energy, often contained in a large building as in traditional post mills, smock mills and tower mills. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...


The Boston Guildhall in which the Pilgrim Fathers were tried, on the first floor, by the magistrates, was converted into a museum in 1929. The American Room was opened by the U.S. Ambassador, Joseph Kennedy, in 1938. The cells in which the pilgrims are said to have been held at the time of their trial are on the ground floor. In 2005 it is closed for repair and refurbishment. - The Pilgrim Fathers Memorial is located on the north bank of The Haven a few miles outside the town. It was here at Scotia Creek, that the pilgrims made their first attempt to leave for Holland in 1607. Elevator plate with floor numbering. ... A magistrate is a judicial officer. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... An ambassador, rarely embassador, is a diplomatic official accredited to a foreign sovereign or government, or to an international organization, to serve as the official representative of his or her own country. ... Joseph Joe Patrick Kennedy, Sr. ... In legal parlance, a trial is an event in which parties to a dispute present information (in the form of evidence) in a formal setting, usually a court, before a judge, jury, or other designated finder of fact, in order to achieve a resolution to their dispute. ... Floor numbering in a building can cause misunderstandings between speakers of different varieties of the English language. ... Categories: Stub | Memorials ... This article is about a region in the Netherlands. ...


In Skirbeck Quarter, on the right bank of The Haven, is the Black Sluice, the outfall of the South Forty-Foot Drain.


The Prime Meridian passes through Boston, marked by the fairly modern, suburban Meridian Road (PE21 0NB) which straddles the line the road was named after. Location of the Prime Meridian Image:Prime Meridian. ...


The oldest landmark is the Boston May Fair which has been held in the town every year since at least 1125. This fair is held during the first week of May, and is one of the largest outdoor fairs in the country. By tradition, the fair is officially opened by the incumbent mayor at 11 am,(not any more) on the May Day bank holiday. A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... May Day is May 1, and refers to any of several holidays celebrated on this day. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Freiston Shore is a nature reserve, and lies on The Wash coast north of the mouth of The Haven. The Wash, as seen looking west from Heacham, Norfolk The Wash is also the name of a 2001 film. ...


Present day

Local economy

There is a Tesco on New Hammond Beck Road, near Swineshead Road (A52) to the west of the town. There is an Asda on Sleaford Road (A52) close to the railway station. There are Co-ops on Argyle Street (A1137), on West Street and on Eastwood Road, heading east out of the town. Wetherspoons have a pub, the Moon Under Water, close to the bridge over the river on the High Street. Bingo is played at The Gliderdrome Bingo Hall, Boston's original bingo. The Gliderdrome was famous in the 1960s for attracting top Motown acts as well as various other artists including in the 1970s Marc Bolan & T-Rex. Elton John lyricist Bernie Taupin wrote the words for "Saturday Nights Alright For Fighting" based on his nights out at the Gliderdrome and Elton John himself has also appeared here. It is one of the very few English venues that soul legend Otis Redding performed at. It still holds dances a few time each year. A new shopping park has recently opened on Horncastle Road. This new development has brought several large companies to the town for the first time. TK Maxx, The Bath Store, Netto, SportsDirect.com and Gala Bingo which opened in January 2007. Dynamic Cassette International (Jet Tec) is one of the biggest manufacturing employers in the town. For other uses, see Tesco (disambiguation). ... Swineshead is a village in Lincolnshire, England, around 7 miles west of Boston. ... This article is about the supermarket chain. ... This article is about Sleaford in Lincolnshire. ... the station entrance Boston railway station serves the town of Boston in Lincolnshire. ... The Co-operative Group, the trading name of Co-operative Group (CWS) Ltd, is a United Kingdom consumers co-operative, one of the largest consumer-owned businesses in the world. ... The Moon Under Water in Hounslow J. D. Wetherspoon plc (LSE: JDW) (commonly referred to as Wetherspoons) is a British pub chain founded by Tim Martin. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Netto logo A Netto store in Copenhagen Netto is a Danish based chain of discount supermarkets. ... Gala Coral Group Ltd is a British betting shop, bingo and casino operator owned by private equity houses Candover Investments, Cinven and Permira. ... Dynamic Cassette International (DCI) is an internationally-recognised[1] Boston, Lincolnshire, UK based ink cartridge manufacturing company, producing products under the Jet Tec brand name. ...


Sport

  • The town has two non-league football clubs. The more senior Boston United, nickname The Pilgrims, who play in the Conference North. The stadium is currently located on York Street in the centre of the town and has an approximate capacity of 6,200. The town's second club are Boston Town, nickname The Poachers, who play in the United Counties League. Home games are played at their stadium on Tattershall Road, on the outskirts of Boston. The two traditionally play each other at the beginning of each season. The most recent game ended in a shock 1-0 win for Boston Town.
  • The Princess Royal Arena is located on The Boardsides, just outside Boston. This stadium is unique owing to its attention given to the disabled.
  • Boston Rugby Club is also located at the Princess Royal Arena. The team play in blue shirts with narrow white stripes.It first started in 1927 by Ernst Clark, a gentleman with an interest in giving his boys and their friends something to do, or rather something to keep them out of trouble.
  • Boston Rowing Club, near Carlton Road, hosts the annual Boston Rowing Marathon each year in mid-September. Crews from all over the UK compete, starting at Brayford Pool in Lincoln, finishing in times from three to six hours.

Speedway racing was staged at a stadium in New Hammond Beck Road in the 1970s and 1980s. The Boston Barracudas raced in the lower division. After attempts to secure a new venue failed in the 1990s a team, known as Boston, raced in the Conference League out of King's Lynn Boston United Football Club are a football club based in Boston , England. ... The Football Conferences logo Conference North (often referred to as Nationwide North for sponsorship reasons) is a division of the Football Conference in England, taking its place immediately below the Conference National. ... Boston Town F.C. are a football team in Boston, Lincolnshire, England. ... The United Counties Football League (also known after its sponsor as the Eagle Bitter United Counties League) is an English football league covering Northamptonshire, Bedfordshire and the surrounding area. ... Official Website www. ... The Boston Rowing Marathon is an event taking place on the third Sunday of September annually in Lincolnshire, England. ... The Brayford Pool. ...


Boston has been shown to have the highest obesity rate of any town in the United Kingdom, with one-third of adults (31%) in the town considered clinically obese. Six out of seven people fail to hit the target of three half-hour sessions a week of moderate intensity sport or active recreation. This obesity has been linked to social deprivation .[4]


Education

Boston Grammar School, an all male selective school, is on South End, near the John Adams Way (A52/A16), Geoff Moulder Leisure Centre and River Witham. Its female analogue, Boston High School is on Spilsby Road (A16), in the north of the town next to the Pilgrim Hospital. These two are the only schools in the town to have sixth-forms, and they are both joining together in the near future. Haven High Technology College is on Marian Road to the north of the town. Boston College is on Skirbeck Road. Boston Grammar School is a selective school for boys aged 11 to 18, recently admitting girls aged 16 to 18, in Boston, Lincolnshire. ... Haven High Technology College is a secondary school located in Boston, Lincolnshire. ... Boston College is a predominantly further education college in Boston in Lincolnshire. ...


Kitwood Boys' School and Kitwood Girls' School were both examples of the post war secondary modern system. The boys' school located in Mill Road was closed in 1993 and now forms part of Boston College. The former girls' school has now become Haven High Technology College. This article should be transwikied to wiktionary The term post-war is generally used for the period after the end of World War II, i. ... Secondary modern schools are a type of school in British educational systems, part of the Tripartite System. ... Haven High Technology College is a secondary school located in Boston, Lincolnshire. ...


Town twinning

Boston's twin towns include: Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Boston's link with Laval is one of the oldest twinnings in the world. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Laval is a commune in the Mayenne département of France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Hakusan (白山市; -shi) is a city located in Ishikawa, Japan. ...


See also

Boston United Football Club are a football club based in Boston , England. ... Dynamic Cassette International (DCI) is an internationally-recognised[1] Boston, Lincolnshire, UK based ink cartridge manufacturing company, producing products under the Jet Tec brand name. ...

References

  1. ^ "Central Ward councillor 1", Boston.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  2. ^ "1 Fenside Ward councillor 1", Boston.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  3. ^ "2 Fenside Ward councillor 2", Boston.gov.uk. Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  4. ^ Carter, Helen. "Lincolnshire: home of the porker?", The Guardian, October 12, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-07-30. 
  • Morris, J. ed. Domesday Book Vol. 31, Lincolnshire Parts 1 & 2. Chichester. (1986) ISBN 0-85033-598-1.
  • Thompson, P. The History and Antiquities of Boston etc. Boston, London & Boston Mass. (1856). facsimile edn. (1997) ISBN 0-948639-20-2.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Boston, Lincolnshire

Additional articles Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

  • Boston, Lincolnshire - article detailing much more of the history; at Citizendium

Archival material Citizendium (sit-ih-ZEN-dee-um, a citizens compendium of everything) is an English-language online wiki-based free encyclopedia project spearheaded by Larry Sanger, co-founder of Wikipedia. ...

Geography

Organisations

Special interest

Footnotes

  • Note a: Morris, J. (Domesday Book for Lincolnshire: Landowner 12 entry 67).
  • Note b: Thompson,P. Division VIII.


Lincolnshire

For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Lincolnshire_flag. ...


County town: Lincoln Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ...


Other settlements: Boston | Bourne | The Deepings | Gainsborough | Grantham | Louth | Skegness | Sleaford | Spalding | Stamford , Bourne is a market town on the western edge of The Fens, in southern Lincolnshire, England. ... Map sources for The Deepings at grid reference TF150094 The Deepings is a collective term used to describe adjoining villages near the River Welland, 8 miles to the North of Peterborough and 10 miles or so to the East of Stamford. ... Gainsborough is a town within the West Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. ... Grantham is a medium sized market town in Lincolnshire, England with about 35,000 inhabitants (40,000 including Great Gonerby), situated on the River Witham. ... , Louth is a market town within the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. ... , Skegness is a seaside town and civil parish within the East Lindsey district of Lincolnshire, England. ... This article is about Sleaford in Lincolnshire. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Parliamentary Constituencies: Boston and Skegness | Gainsborough | Grantham and Stamford | Lincoln | Louth and Horncastle | Sleaford and North Hykeham | South Holland and The Deepings Boston and Skegness is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Gainsborough is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Grantham and Stamford is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Lincoln is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Louth and Horncastle is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Sleaford and North Hykeham is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... South Holland and The Deepings is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Districts: Boston | East Lindsey | Lincoln | North Kesteven | South Holland | South Kesteven | West Lindsey Boston is a local government district with borough status in Lincolnshire, England. ... East Lindsey is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England. ... Lincoln (pronounced //) is a cathedral city and county town of Lincolnshire, England. ... North Kesteven is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England. ... South Holland is a local government district of Lincolnshire. ... South Kesteven is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England, forming part of the traditional Kesteven division of the county . ... West Lindsey is a local government district in Lincolnshire, England. ...


Further details: Geography | History | Education | Transport | Places of interest | Diocese Lincolnshire, England derived from the merging of the territory of the ancient Kingdom of Lindsey with that controlled by the Danelaw borough Stamford. ... For other places with the same name, see Lincolnshire (disambiguation). ... The Diocese of Lincoln forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ...


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  Results from FactBites:
 
BBC - Lincolnshire Places - Tour of Boston (354 words)
Historically Boston was an important port for trade around northern Europe and in the 13th century became the leading port in England.
Boston later developed from being a trading centre to a production centre for crops.
The fenlands surrounding Boston were drained and sea banks were built to enable crops to be cultivated.
Boston, Lincolnshire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3102 words)
Boston is a town and small port in Lincolnshire, on the east coast of England.
Boston remained something of a local railway hub well into the 20th century, moving the produce of the district and the trade of the dock, plus the excursion trade to Skegness and similar places.
Boston once again became a significant port in trade and fishing when, in 1884, the new dock with its associated wharves on the Haven were constructed.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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