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Encyclopedia > Borough Park
Borough Park street covered with snow.
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Borough Park (sometimes rendered as Boro Park), a neighborhood which is a section (sub-division) of the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City in the United States. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 430 KB) Summary Typical Borought Park Street Scene Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 430 KB) Summary Typical Borought Park Street Scene Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... A neighbourhood (CwE) or neighborhood (AmE) is a geographically localized community located within a larger city or suburb. ... The definitions of the political subdivisions of the state of New York differ from those in certain other countries or even various other U.S. states, leading to misunderstandings regarding the governmental nature of an area. ... // Headline text For other uses, see Brooklyn (disambiguation). ... Nickname: The Big Apple Official website: City of New York Government Counties (Boroughs) Bronx (The Bronx) New York (Manhattan) Queens (Queens) Kings (Brooklyn) Richmond (Staten Island) Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Geographical characteristics Area Total 468. ...


Borough Park contains one of the largest Orthodox Jewish communities outside of Israel. With an estimated Jewish population, that some believe may be as high as 250,000 Jews (including many Hasidic and Haredi Jews) [1], it has one of the largest concentration of Jews in the United States and is among the most Orthodox neighborhoods in the world. Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary... Jews (Hebrew: יהודים, Yehudim) are followers of Judaism or, more generally, members of the Jewish people (also known as the Jewish nation, or the Children of Israel), an ethno-religious group descended from the ancient Israelites and converts who joined their religion. ... Hasidic Judaism (from the Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות, meaning pious, from the Hebrew root word chesed חסד meaning loving kindness) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... Haredi or Charedi Judaism, often referred to as Ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism. ...


It is home to many groups of Orthodox Judaism consisting mostly of the Hasidic group of Bobov, as well as large communities of the Belz, Satmar, Stolin, Vizhnitz, Munkacz, Spinka, Burshtin, and Puppa sects of Hasidim. There remains still some small groups of Lithuanian Jews as well. Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary... Hasidic Judaism (from the Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות, meaning pious, from the Hebrew root word chesed חסד meaning loving kindness) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... Bobov, (or Bobover Hasidism) (חסידות באבוב) is a Hasidic group within Haredi Judaism originating in Bobowa, Galicia in Southern Poland and now headquartered in the neighborhood of Borough Park in Brooklyn, New York. ... The third Belzer Rebbe, Yissachar Dov Rokeach Belz (חסידות בעלז) is a Hasidic dynasty named after the town of Belz, a small town originally located in eastern Poland, presently in Ukraine. ... The Late Grand Rabbi Moshe Teitelbaum of Satmar dancing at a wedding Satmar (or Satmar Hasidism or Satmarer Hasidim) (חסידות סאטמער) is a movement of Orthodox Haredi Jews who adhere to Hasidism originating in the Hungarian town of Satu Mare (Szatmárnémeti), originally part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and presently... Karlin is a Hasidic Dynasty originating with Rebbe Aaron Perlow of Karlin in present-day Belarus. ... Vizhnitz or Vizhnitzer Hasidim are a Haredi group of Hasidic Jews. ... The Rebbe of Munkacz (or Munkatch), Rabbi Chaim Elazar Shapiro (who led the community from 1913 until his death in 1937) was the most outspoken voice of religious anti-Zionism. ... Spinka is the name of a Hasidic group within Orthodox Judaism. ... Burshtin is a Hasidic dynasty, which is presently located in Boro Park, Brooklyn, NY. The sect originated in Burshtyn, presently located in the Ukraine, but once part of Hungary. ... The Pápai Rebbe with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg Puppa is the name of a Hasidic group within Judaism. ... Hasidic Judaism (from the Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות, meaning pious, from the Hebrew root word chesed חסד meaning loving kindness) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ... Lithuanian Jews, (In Yiddish known as Litvish or Litvaks) are Ashkenazi Jews who have their origins in historic Lithuania. ...

Contents


Baby boom

Borough Park has been described as having the "baby boom of New York" because of the high number of children born to families there every year. The neighborhood recorded 4,523 births in 2004 .[2], the highest in the city. The closest area in Brooklyn in population growth was Williamsburg, which reported 3,839 births (Williamsburg is the center of the Satmar Hasidic community.) Borough Park's birth rate, 24.4 per 1,000 residents has translated into major growth in the neighborhood. Currently, it is expanding in all directions as Hasidic Jews are buying land in nearby adjacent communities. Real estate prices have also increased markedly in the region. Williamsburg is a neighborhood in northern Brooklyn, New York City. ... The Late Grand Rabbi Moshe Teitelbaum of Satmar dancing at a wedding Satmar (or Satmar Hasidism or Satmarer Hasidim) (חסידות סאטמער) is a movement of Orthodox Haredi Jews who adhere to Hasidism originating in the Hungarian town of Satu Mare (Szatmárnémeti), originally part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire and presently...


School districts

Of particular interest are the school districts of Borough Park. Despite the large population of school-children born into Borough Park's Hasidic families, virtually all attend local yeshivas for boys and Beth Jacob-type schools for girls. This has led to a public school population drain for local schools, such as Montauk Intermediate School. Most recently, the New York City Public Schools system hoped to take advantage of the empty space and construct a small school, called the Kingsborough Early College School inside Montauk. [3] The Hasidic community was not pleased by the prospect of a new public school and protested the decision. The Community Educational Council heard these complaints and decided against expanding the public school system. Yeshiva or yeshivah (Hebrew: ישיבה pl. ... Bais Yaakov (בית יעקב or Beit Yaakov or Beth Jacob -- literally House [of] Jacob in Hebrew) is a loosely organized group of Orthodox (mostly Haredi) full-time Jewish schools throughout the world for young Jewish females from religious families. ... The New York City Department of Education is a department of the city of New York which runs almost all of the citys public schools. ...


Many of the elementary schools have had mixed results from this student drain. For example, Public School 164 in Borough Park "...is at only 89 percent of capacity because many children in the community attend yeshivas. Classes are small, the hallways quiet, the principal and assistant principal know every student by name."[4] Subsequently, the percentage of children reading at or above the grade level has increased to 55% in 2004 from 40% in 1998 in an otherwise unchanged school.


Business development

Stores and businesses are currently expanding and gaining economically. The 13th Avenue shopping district, a shopping strip roughly one mile in length from 39th street to about 55th street, is packed with many storefronts to supply any Jewish household. Many Hasidic Jews shop at these stores, coming from all parts of the city, other parts of the country and from other countries. These stores credit their increase in profits and business to the use of entrepreneurial spirit among their storeowners, the increasing density of the Hasidic population in Borough Park, and the Internet [5]


The community has become renowned worldwide for its shopping and attractions among Hasidic Jews worldwide. In 1999, a 52-room kosher hotel called "The Avenue Plaza Hotel" opened on 13th Avenue, becoming the first hotel to rise in Borough Park in more than a decade. It is now a popular attraction for visitors to New York City and is among a very few that can accommodate the needs of many Hasids. The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ...


Through its expansion, it has become among the most economically active and expanding Jewish communities in the world, drawing-in many banks that service the community's needs, including Washington Mutual, Independence Community Bank, and Dime. Charles J. Hamm, the chairman, president, and CEO of Independence Community Bank commented on how incredible his banks have grown in Borough Park: "We went from zero deposits to more than $350 million in these two branches," he said, adding that the average branch has around $110 million in deposits. He attributed its large economic activity to its large population of merchants and the huge shopping attractions available. Despite its name, Washington Mutual NYSE: WM is a stock financial services company based in Seattle, Washington. ... Look up Dime in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Dime has several different meanings, here are some of them: Dime (U.S. coin) - a U.S. coin worth ten cents. ...


Religion and politics

During much of the early 1900s, the Jewish population in Borough Park, and Brooklyn as a whole, was part of a much more liberal-leaning voting block. However, many of these early Jewish families moved to the suburbs or other places around the city while more conservative Hasidic Jews (many of them survivors of the Holocaust and immigrant families from Eastern Europe) joined their neighborhoods. As a result, the overwhelming majority of the Hasidic population in Borough Park and Brooklyn introduced a more traditional Jewish religious lifestyle. A 2002 study by the UJA Federation-New York revealed that only 2% of Borough Park's Jews identified themselves as Reform Jews and nearly 3/4 identified themselves as Orthodox Jews. [6] Selection at the Auschwitz ramp in 1944, where the German Nazis chose whom to kill immediately and whom to use as slave labor or for medical experimentation, such as those of the infamous Dr. Josef Mengele. ... Current division of Europe into five (or more) regions: one definition of Eastern Europe is marked in orange Eastern Europe as a region has several alternative definitions, whereby it can denote: the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Central Europe and Russia. ... Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people with around 15 million followers as of 2006 [1]. It is one of the first recorded monotheistic faiths and one of the oldest religious traditions still practiced today. ... Reform Judaism can refer to (1) the largest denomination of Judaism in America and its sibling movements in other countries, (2) a branch of Judaism in the United Kingdom, and (3) the historical predecessor of the American movement that originated in 19th Century Germany. ... Orthodox Judaism is the stream of Judaism which adheres to a relatively strict interpretation and application of the laws and ethics first canonized in the Talmud (The Oral Law) and later codified in the Shulkhan Arukh (Code of Jewish Law). It is governed by these works and the Rabbinical commentary...


The neighborhood is mostly Haredi, and identifying a person as a "rabbi" is not considered unusual.


Religious observances

The Hasidic population adheres strongly to Halakha ("Jewish law") and the Shulkhan Arukh ("Code of Jewish Law") based on the Torah following many strict Judaic laws in their daily lives. There are many important Hasidic Rebbes as well as many lesser rabbinical personalities with their own synagogues and followings. The neighborhoods in which the Hasidic and Haredi communities live are connected by an Eruv which enables one to carry items outside of their homes on the Shabbat, an activity which is Halakhically forbidden, without an Eruv. Saturday is the Shabbat, a day of rest, which is strictly observed to the full extent of Halakha, by most members of the community. In some areas a siren is sounded on Friday afternoons to indicate the upcoming arrival of the Shabbat eve. // Headline text Halakha (Hebrew: הלכה; also transliterated as Halakhah, Halacha, Halakhot and Halachah) is the collective corpus of Jewish religious law, including biblical law (the 613 mitzvot) and later talmudic and rabbinic law as well as customs and traditions. ... The Shulkhan Arukh (Hebrew: Prepared Table), by Rabbi Yosef Karo is considered the most authoritative compilation of Jewish law since the Talmud. ... Torah () is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or law. It is the central and most important document of Judaism revered by Jews through the ages. ... Rebbe (Hebrew: רבי also rebbi) is a title that may be given to a Rabbi in Orthodox Judaism, particularly within Hasidic Judaism. ... Rabbi (Classical Hebrew רִבִּי ribbÄ«;; modern Ashkenazi and Israeli רַבִּי rabbÄ«) in Judaism, means teacher, or more literally great one. The word Rabbi is derived from the Hebrew root-word RaV, which in biblical Hebrew means great or distinguished, (in knowledge). In the ancient Judean schools (and among Sefaradim today) the sages... Lesko synagogue, Poland A synagogue (Hebrew: בית כנסת ; beit knesset, house of assembly; Yiddish: שול, shul) is a Jewish place of religious worship. ... Eruv (עירוב) (or Eiruv or Erub) (plural Eruvin) is a Hebrew word meaning mixture, and refers to any of three procedures which allow certain activities in Jewish law which would otherwise be forbidden. ... Shabbat (שבת shabbāt, rest Hebrew, or Shabbos in Ashkenazic pronunciation), is the weekly day of rest in Judaism. ... Shabbat (שבת shabbāt, rest Hebrew, or Shabbos in Ashkenazic pronunciation), is the weekly day of rest in Judaism. ...


Many stores in Borough Park sell or prepare kosher food made under rabbinic supervision. The circled U indicates that this can of tuna is certified kosher by the Union of Orthodox Congregations. ...


Originally, there was a large controversy surrounding the erection of an Eruv in Borough Park, because of differing interpretations of the application of Jewish law. In the 1950s, recent Jewish immigrants, mostly Hasidim, from Poland and Hungary began to expand their influence. These Hasidim, who populate most of the neighborhood today, brought their own traditions and religious customs to Borough Park. The Eruv, which was used to network Orthodox families in many places of eastern Europe for a long time, was originally challenged by the older Jewish community. Lithuanian Jews, who settled in Borough Park beginning around 1910, saw it as a move of religious liberalism. However, over time, the Hasidim grew reaching roughly 85% in 2000.[7] After some debate, the eruv was constructed to link the community, circumventing the Shabbat prohibition of carrying necessary items. It was built in 1999-2000 and has remained an enormous network, numbering about 225 blocks in Borough Park. Eruv (עירוב) (or Eiruv or Erub) (plural Eruvin) is a Hebrew word meaning mixture, and refers to any of three procedures which allow certain activities in Jewish law which would otherwise be forbidden. ... Minhag (Hebrew: מנהג Custom, pl. ...


Bobov dynastic schism

Main article: Bobov (Hasidic dynasty)

Borough Park is the center of the large Bobov community, part of Hasidic Judaism. Numbering roughly 1,800 to 2,000 families [8], it is one of Brooklyn's largest Hasidic communities and has followings in Canada, England, and Israel. Bobov, (or Bobover Hasidism) (חסידות באבוב) is a Hasidic group within Haredi Judaism originating in Bobowa, Galicia in Southern Poland and now headquartered in the neighborhood of Borough Park in Brooklyn, New York. ... Bobov, (or Bobover Hasidism) (חסידות באבוב) is a Hasidic group within Haredi Judaism originating in Bobowa, Galicia in Southern Poland and now headquartered in the neighborhood of Borough Park in Brooklyn, New York. ... Hasidic Judaism (from the Hebrew: Chasidut חסידות, meaning pious, from the Hebrew root word chesed חסד meaning loving kindness) is a Haredi Jewish religious movement. ...


In 2005, the Bobover Rebbe, Rabbi Naftali Halberstam died, and his followers were left with a difficult line of succession. Rabbi Halberstam, who had no sons, had a half-brother Rabbi Ben Zion Halberstam and a son-in-law, Rabbi Mordecai David Unger, who both claimed the right to be the Grand Rabbi ("Rebbe") of the community. Tension broke out upon his death, leading to a split in the Bobov community. Rabbi Ben Zion Halberstam now in leads the main Bobov synagogue on 48th street. Many of Rabbi Unger's supporters remain firm in their decision to follow him and congregate in the temporary synagogue in the Bais Yakov building (a Jewish girls' school) on 45th Street. They also installed another of Halberstam's sons-in-law, Rabbi Yehoshua Rubin as chief rabbi of the 45th Street community. Today, the division is awaiting a ruling from a Beth din Jewish religious court with the involvement of New York's court system. Rebbe (Hebrew: רבי also rebbi) is a title that may be given to a Rabbi in Orthodox Judaism, particularly within Hasidic Judaism. ... Grand Rabbi Naftali Halberstam of Bobov Naftali Tzvi Halberstam כק אדמור מבאבוב, זצל (1930-2005) was the Grand Rebbe (akin to chief rabbi)of Bobov from August of 2000 until March of 2005. ... There were two Rabbi Benzien Halbershtams Rabbe Benzien Halbershtam-was the Rabbe of the Bobev Hasidich dynasty until [[World Wor 2] Rabbi Benzien Halbershtam-is a grandson of the original and presently a half-brother of the late Rabbe of the Bobev in the Boroughpark section of Brklyn, N... Grand Rebbe Mordche Duvid Unger (right) and Grand Rabbi Yehoshua Rubin Grand Rabbi Mordechai David Unger of Bobov כק אדמור מבאבוב, שליטא (b. ... A beth din (בית דין, Hebrew: house of judgment, plural battei din) is a rabbinical court of Judaism. ...


Police and security

The Hasidic community has developed a network of residents to handle emergencies in the neighborhood. The Hatzolah are a group of volunteers who serve as middlemen between local law enforcement, fire departments, healthcare agencies and the community. They act as a first-response in many instances and use their understanding of Jewish laws, languages, and cultural nuances to react to problems with greater sensitivity. The Hasidic community has been able to form close ties with the local authorities, leading to a close, but often fragile relationship. Hatzolah ( which means rescue or relief in Hebrew), is a volunteer Emergency medical service (EMS) organization functioning in Israel and in many Orthodox Jewish neighborhoods in major cities of the United States, as well as in Australia, South Africa, Mexico, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada, Russia, and the United Kingdom. ...


2006 Boro Park riot

On April 4th, 2006, the arrest of a 75-year old Haredi man sparked a minor riot in Borough Park. The man was arrested for allegedly talking on his cell phone at a red light and continuing to remain idle and talk when the light turned green, he was blocking a police car behind him, with its lights and sirens turned on. In the process of being ticketed the man got out of his car and was arrested for refusing to get back in it. NYPD Chief Of Department Joseph Esposito allegedly used foul language in response to the rioters, who then set several garbage fires as well as setting a police car on fire.[1] Mayor Bloomberg stated that residents of Borough Park acted inappropriately by rioting after the arrest. [2]. The rioters were mostly young boys and men on leave from their schools in preparation for Passover. The wild behavior of the crowd was condemned by all Jewish community leaders and in the local Jewish newspapers. Haredi or Charedi Judaism, often referred to as Ultra-Orthodox Judaism, is the most theologically conservative form of Orthodox Judaism. ... The New York City Police Department (NYPD) , the largest police department in the United States, has primary responsibility for law enforcement and investigation within the five boroughs of New York City. ...


References

  1. ^ Barnes, Julian. "A Debate Over Strictures For Sabbath Observance." The New York Times. New York, N.Y. Jun 2, 2000. pg. B.1
  2. ^ "Fertile Grounds--Baby Boom in Borough Park." New York Post. Jan 23, 2006. pg. 7.
  3. ^ Gootman, Elissa. "Plans for a Public School Upset Brooklyn Hasidim." The New York Times. Feb 3, 2006. pg. B3(Local)
  4. ^ Joyce Purnick."Schools Find New Test, For Themselves." New York Times. Apr 5, 2004. pg. B.1
  5. ^ Roane, Kit R. "For Jews Around World, Borough Park Is the Place to Shop." The New York Times. Aug 22, 1999. pg. 1.1 (Local)
  6. ^ Newman, Andy. "In Orthodox Borough Park, Last Holdouts Get Strange Looks; Reform Jews, Adrift in a Sea of Black Hats." The New York Times. May 13, 2005. pg. B1(Local)
  7. ^ Barnes, Julian. "Symbolic Line Divides Jews in Borough Park." The New York Times. New York, N.Y. Jun 2, 2000. pg. B.1
  8. ^ Newman, Andy. "A Battle for Succession Takes No Holiday." The New York Times, March 26, 2005 pB4 col 01 (19 col in)
Borough of Brooklyn in New York City
Neighborhoods Barren Island | Bath Beach | Bay Ridge | Bedford-Stuyvesant | Bensonhurst | Boerum Hill | Borough Park | Brighton Beach | Brooklyn Heights | Brooklyn Navy Yard | Brownsville | Bushwick | Canarsie | Carroll Gardens | Clinton Hill | Cobble Hill | Coney Island | Crown Heights | Downtown Brooklyn | DUMBO | Dyker Heights | East Flatbush | Flatbush | Fort Greene | Fort Hamilton | Gerritsen Beach | Gowanus | Greenpoint | Manhattan Beach | Marine Park | Midwood | Mill Basin | New Utrecht | Ocean Hill | Park Slope | Prospect Heights | Red Hook | Sheepshead Bay | Starret City | Sunset Park | Williamsburg | Windsor Terrace

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NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Borough Park, Brooklyn (6324 words)
Borough Park (usually spelled by its residents Boro Park), is a neighborhood in the southwestern part of the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City in the United States.
Borough Park is home to many Hasidic groups with the largest being the Hasidic communities of Bobov; as well as large numbers in the Belz, Ger, Satmar, Stolin, Vizhnitz, Munkacz, Spinka, Klausenburg, and Puppa communities, among others.
Borough Park (sometimes rendered as Boro Park), is a neighborhood in the borough of Brooklyn, in New York City in the United States.
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