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Encyclopedia > Boris Johnson
Boris Johnson MP
Boris Johnson

Incumbent
Assumed office 
4 May 2008
Deputy Richard Barnes
Preceded by Ken Livingstone

In office
6 December 2005 – 16 July 2007
Leader David Cameron
Succeeded by Adam Afriyie

Member of Parliament
for Henley
Incumbent
Assumed office 
9 June 2001
Preceded by Michael Heseltine
Majority 12,793 (27.5%)

Born 19 June 1964 (1964-06-19) (age 43)
New York City, New York, United States
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse Marina Wheeler
Relations Stanley Johnson (father)
Rachel Johnson (sister)
Children Four (2 sons, 2 daughters)
Alma mater Balliol College, Oxford
Profession Politician, journalist and historian
Religion Church of England[1]
Website www.boris-johnson.com

Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson (born 19 June 1964, better known as Boris Johnson)[2] is a British politician and the current Mayor of London; he is also a journalist and author, formerly serving as editor of The Spectator. He was elected as Member of Parliament for Henley in 2001, and was the Shadow Minister for Higher Education, until the announcement of his intention to stand in the 2008 London mayoral election. He assumed the post of Mayor of London on May 4, 2008[3] A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Boris Johnson This is a crop of : Image:Boris_Johnson_Friends_Voters_Countrymen. ... This article is about the elected mayor of Greater London. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Deputy Mayor of London is a member of the London Assembly appointed by the Mayor of London to serve as his or her second-in-command. ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born 17 June 1945) is the outgoing Mayor of London, a post he has held from its creation in 2000 until 2008. ... Her Majestys Loyal Opposition, or the Official Opposition in the United Kingdom is the largest opposition party in the House of Commons. ... The Department for Education and Skills is a department in the United Kingdom government created in 2001. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ... Adam Afriyie (born 4 August 1965, Wimbledon, London), British politician, is the Conservative Member of Parliament for Windsor. ... Henley is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Open seat redirects here. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Stanley Johnson Stanley Patrick Johnson (born 18 August 1940 in Cornwall) is a British politician including being a Conservative MEP from 1979 to 1984, noted advocate of population control, and father of Boris Johnson. ... Rachel Johnson (born 1965) is a British journalist and writer based in London. ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... and of the Balliol College College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister college St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President Helen Lochead Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Location of Balliol College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Balliol College (pronounced... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Historian (disambiguation). ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This article is about the elected mayor of Greater London. ... Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Henley is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The London mayoral election, 2008 for the office of Mayor of London was held on 1 May 2008 and was won by Conservative party candidate Boris Johnson. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

Early life

Johnson is the oldest of the four children of Stanley Johnson, a former Conservative MEP and employee of the European Commission and World Bank and his first wife, painter Charlotte Johnson Wahl, the daughter of Sir James Fawcett, a prominent barrister[4] and president of the European Commission of Human Rights.[5] Stanley Johnson also has two children by his second wife. On his father's side Johnson is great-grandson of Ali Kemal Bey, a liberal Turkish journalist and interior minister in the government of Damat Ferid Pasha, Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire who was murdered during the Turkish War of Independence.[6] During World War I Boris's grandfather and great aunt were recognised as British subjects and took their grandmother's maiden name of Johnson. In reference to his cosmopolitan ancestry, Johnson has described himself as a "one-man melting pot" - with a combination of Muslims, Jews and Christians comprising his great-grandparentage.[7] Stanley Johnson Stanley Patrick Johnson (born 18 August 1940 in Cornwall) is a British politician including being a Conservative MEP from 1979 to 1984, noted advocate of population control, and father of Boris Johnson. ... The Conservative Party, officially though less commonly known as the Conservative and Unionist Party, is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of the European Parliament (English abbreviation MEP)[1] is a member of the European Unions directly-elected legislative body, the European Parliament. ... Berlaymont, the Commissions seat The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive branch of the European Union. ... The World Bank logo The World Bank (the Bank) is a part of the World Bank Group (WBG), is a bank that makes loans to developing countries for development programs with the stated goal of reducing poverty. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Damat Ferid Pasha (wearing the fez) with the three other signatories of the Treaty of Sevres; to his right, Rıza Tevfik, and to his left, the Ottoman minister of education BaÄŸdatlı Hadi Pasha and the ambassador ReÅŸad Halis; in a photograph with several hidden messages on board... A Vizier (وزير, sometimes also spelled Wazir) is an Arabic term for a high-ranking religious and political advisor, often to a king or sultan. ... Motto دولت ابد مدت Devlet-i Ebed-müddet (The Eternal State) Anthem Ottoman imperial anthem Borders in 1683, see: list of territories Capital Söğüt (1299–1326) Bursa (1326–1365) Edirne (1365–1453) Ä°stanbul (1453–1922) Government Monarchy Sultans  - 1281–1326 (first) Osman I  - 1918–22 (last) Mehmed VI Grand Viziers  - 1320... Combatants   Turkish Revolutionaries United Kingdom Greece France Italy Armenia Ottoman Empire Georgia Commanders Mustafa Kemal Ä°smet Ä°nönü Kazım Karabekir Ali Fuat Cebesoy Fevzi Çakmak George Milne Henri Gouraud Papoulas Georgios Hatzianestis Drastamat Kanayan Movses Silikyan Süleyman Åžefik Pasha The Turkish War of Independence (Turkish: KurtuluÅŸ Savaşı or... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... Languages Historical Jewish languages Hebrew, Yiddish, Ladino, others Liturgical languages: Hebrew and Aramaic Predominant spoken languages: The vernacular language of the home nation in the Diaspora, significantly including English, Hebrew, Yiddish, and Russian Religions Judaism Related ethnic groups Arabs and other Semitic groups For the Jewish religion, see Judaism. ... This article is about the religous people known as Christians. ...


Johnson was born in New York City, New York, USA[8], but his family returned to England soon afterwards as his mother had yet to take her Oxford finals. Johnson's sister Rachel was born a year later. As a child, Boris Johnson suffered from severe deafness and had to undergo several operations to have grommets inserted in his ears, and was reportedly rather quiet as a child.[1] He was educated at the European School in Brussels [9], Ashdown House and then at Eton College, where he was a King's Scholar. He read Classics at Balliol College, Oxford as a Brackenbury scholar, and was elected President of the Oxford Union, at his second attempt. Frank Luntz[10] and Radek Sikorski[1] have claimed Johnson touted himself as a supporter of the Social Democratic Party, then a dominant current at the university, as a strategy to win the Union presidency, though Johnson denies he was more than the SDPs preferred candidate. While at Oxford he was also a member of the Bullingdon Club, a student dining society known for raucous feasts, and was involved in the British-Arab University Association. New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Rachel Johnson (born 1965) is a British journalist and writer based in London. ... Some rubber grommets. ... The Schola Europaea logo. ... This article is about the settlement itself. ... Ashdown House is an all-boarding mixed preparatory school in Forest Row, East Sussex. ... The Kings College of Our Lady of Eton beside Windsor, commonly known as Eton College or just Eton, is a public school (privately funded and independent) for boys, founded in 1440 by King Henry VI. It is located in Eton, near Windsor in England, north of Windsor Castle, and... A Kings Scholar is a scholar of Eton College, who has passed the Kings Scholarship Examinations and is therefore admitted into a house, College, which is the oldest Eton house and comprised solely of Kings Scholars. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... and of the Balliol College College name Balliol College Named after John de Balliol Established 1263 Sister college St Johns College, Cambridge Master Andrew Graham JCR President Helen Lochead Undergraduates 403 MCR President Chelsea Payne Graduates 228 Location of Balliol College within central Oxford , Homepage Boatclub Balliol College (pronounced... The Oxford Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Oxford Union, is a private debating society in the city of Oxford, England, whose membership is drawn primarily but not exclusively from the University of Oxford. ... Frank I. Luntz (born February 23, 1962) is a corporate and political consultant and pollster who has worked most notably with the Republican Party in the United States. ... RadosÅ‚aw Sikorski, Warsaw, 2006 RadosÅ‚aw Radek Sikorski (born February 23, 1963 in Bydgoszcz) is a conservative Polish politician and journalist. ... The Social Democratic Party (SDP) was a political party of the United Kingdom that existed nationwide between 1981 and 1988. ... Bullingdon Club members pose for the camera in 1986. ...


In 1987 he married Allegra Mostyn-Owen but the marriage lasted less than a year, finally being dissolved in 1993[11]. Later that same year he married Marina Wheeler, a barrister, the daughter of journalist and broadcaster Sir Charles Wheeler and his Sikh Indian wife, Dip Singh[12]. The Wheeler and Johnson families have known each other for decades, and Marina Wheeler was at the European School in Brussels at the same time as her future husband. They have two sons (Theo and Milo) and two daughters (Lara and Cassia). This article is about the year 1987. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Charles Wheeler (born Selwyn Charles Cornelius-Wheeler on March 26, 1923) is a veteran British journalist and broadcaster. ... Religions Sikhism Scriptures Guru Granth Sahib Languages English, Punjabi] A Sikh (English: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ) is an adherent to Sikhism. ...


Journalism and historiography

Upon graduating from Oxford with a 2:1 he lasted a week as a management consultant ("Try as I might, I could not look at an overhead projection of a growth profit matrix, and stay conscious"), before becoming a trainee reporter for The Times. Within a year he was sacked for falsifying a quotation from his godfather, Colin Lucas, later vice-chancellor of Oxford University.[13] After a short time as a writer for the Wolverhampton Express & Star, he joined The Daily Telegraph in 1987 as leader and feature writer, and from 1989 to 1994 was the paper's European Community correspondent. He served as assistant editor from 1994 to 1999. His association with The Spectator began as political columnist from 1994 to 1995. In 1999 he became editor of The Spectator, where he stayed until December 2005 upon being appointed Shadow Minister for Higher Education. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Sir Colin Renshaw Lucas (1940- ) was the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University. ... The Express & Star is a right wing leaning evening newspaper based in Wolverhampton, England, publishing 11 different editions covering the Black Country, Birmingham and areas of the wider West Midlands from Tamworth to Kidderminster. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... The European Community (EC) was originally founded on March 25, 1957 by the signing of the Treaty of Rome under the name of European Economic Community. ... Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ...


He wrote an autobiographical account of his experience of the 2001 election campaign Friends, Voters, Countrymen: Jottings on the Stump. He is also author of three collections of journalism, Johnson's Column, Lend Me Your Ears and Have I Got Views For You. His first novel was Seventy-Two Virgins, published in 2004, and his next book will be The New British Revolution, though he has put publication on hold until after the London Mayoral election [14]. He was nominated in 2004 for a British Academy Television Award, and has attracted several unofficial fan clubs and sites. His official website and blog started in September 2004. Have I Got Views For You (2006) is a book on Boris Johnsons political and humorous history especially his time on BBC2s Have I Got News For You http://www. ... The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ...


Johnson is a popular historian and his first documentary series, The Dream of Rome, comparing the Roman Empire and the modern-day European Union, was broadcast in 2006. The Dream Of Rome (2006) is a book by Boris Johnson MP, in which he discusses how the Roman Empire achieved political and cultural unity in Europe, and compares it to the failure of the European Union to do the same. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ...


Political career

In 2001, Johnson was elected MP for Henley-on-Thames, succeeding Michael Heseltine, having previously been defeated in Clwyd South in the 1997 general election. In 2004 he was appointed to the front bench as Shadow Minister for the Arts in a small reshuffle resulting from the resignation of the Shadow Home Affairs Spokesman, Nick Hawkins. He was also from November 2003 vice-chairman of the Conservative Party, with an emphasis on campaigning.[15] , Henley-on-Thames is a town on the north side of the River Thames in south Oxfordshire, England, about 10 miles downstream and north-east from Reading, 10 miles upstream and west from Maidenhead. ... Michael Ray Dibdin Heseltine, Baron Heseltine, CH, PC (born 21 March 1933) is a British businessman and Conservative Party politician. ... Clwyd South (De Clwyd in Welsh) is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... Nicholas John Hawkins (born 27 March 1957) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ...


Johnson was dismissed from these high-profile posts in November 2004 over accusations that he lied to Michael Howard about a four-year extra-marital affair with Petronella Wyatt, The Spectator's New York correspondent and former deputy editor. Johnson derided these allegations as "an inverted pyramid of piffle", but Howard sacked Johnson because he believed press reports showed Johnson had lied, rather than for the affair itself.[16] The Rt Hon. ... Petronella Wyatt (born 1969, London) is a British journalist and author. ...


He was appointed Shadow Minister for Higher Education on 9 December 2005 by new Conservative Leader David Cameron, and resigned as editor of The Spectator soon afterwards. On 2 April 2006 it was alleged in the News of the World that Johnson had had another extramarital affair, this time with Times Higher Education Supplement journalist Anna Fazackerley. The video[17] shows him emerging from her flat and waving to her in a taxi. Subsequently, in a speech at the University of Exeter concerning student finance, he allegedly made comical remarks about his gratitude to the audience for not "raising other issues" during the talk, which may have been a reference to the allegations. A report in The Times[18] stated that Cameron regarded the possible affair as a private matter, and that Johnson would not lose his job over it. is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The University of Exeter (usually abbreviated as Exon. ...


Higher education

As Shadow Minister for Higher Education, Johnson became responsible for the Conservative's stance on university top-up fees. Top-up fees (not their official name) are a new way of charging tuition to undergraduate and PGCE students who study at universities in the United Kingdom from the 2006-2007 academic year onwards. ...


Johnson stood for the February 2006 election of Rector at the University of Edinburgh, after receiving seven times more nominations than needed to stand.[19] His presence as candidate caused an unprecedented turn-out and sparked an "Anyone but Boris" campaign.[20] Protests included having drinks thrown over him at his first of two visits to the student body.[19][21] Johnson eventually polled third of four, with 2,123 votes, behind 3,052 votes for journalist Magnus Linklater and 3,597 for Green Party MSP Mark Ballard.[20] Johnson was quoted as having been pleased to mobilise the student body, but disappointed at the personal campaign against him as an "English top-up fee merchant."[20] The Lord Rector of Edinburgh University is elected every three years by the students and staff at the University of Edinburgh. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Magnus Linklater is a Scottish journalist and former newspaper editor. ... Mark Ballard Mark Ballard, born June 27, 1971 is a Member of the Scottish Parliament for Lothians region, representing the Scottish Green Party and rector of the University of Edinburgh. ...


In September 2006 his image was used in 'Boris needs you' and 'I Love Boris' material to promote the Conservative Party's image during Freshers Week in universities.[22]


Conservative candidate for London Mayor

On 16 July 2007, after several days of speculation and media interest, Johnson announced he was a potential Conservative candidate for the London mayoral election in 2008.[23] At the same time he resigned as shadow Higher Education spokesman, but remained an MP, and according to The Independent enjoyed the "tacit support" of David Cameron.[24] George Jones, Political Editor for The Daily Telegraph reported that the Evening Standard quoted Johnson as saying, "The opportunity is too great and the prize too wonderful to miss... the chance to represent London and speak for Londoners."[23] is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The London mayoral election, 2008 for the office of Mayor of London was held on 1 May 2008 and was won by Conservative party candidate Boris Johnson. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ...


Johnson's candidacy for London Mayor was confirmed by the Conservative Party on 27 September 2007.[25] His election campaign was launched in Edmonton on 31 March 2008, when David Cameron, introducing Johnson, commented "I don't always agree with him but I respect the fact that he's absolutely his own man."[26] is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Edmonton is a place in the eastern part of the London Borough of Enfield. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Canadian ice hockey player, see Dave Cameron. ...


Johnson's outspokenness both as a politician and as a journalist and editor of The Spectator has led to his association with a number of controversies (see below). Some were brief flashes in the pan, while others were seized upon by opponents during his campaign for Mayor of London.


On 1 May 2008 in the Daily Telegraph, the Conservative journalist Simon Heffer found Johnson an unsuitable proposition as Mayor. "Mr Johnson is not a politician. He is an act", Heffer wrote. He criticised Johnson's scattergun attitude to everything he does and "the charm of doing nothing properly".[27] Another conservative journalist, Peregrine Worsthorne on The First Post website, was similarly dismissive. He also thought Johnson could not be serious about anything and Worsthorne was gloomy about Johnson's potential impact on the Cameron project; "should he actually win, the Tory party could be in serious trouble", because of the implication that a Cameron government might be incompetent too.[28] is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Simon James Heffer (born July 18, 1960) is an English journalist and writer. ... Sir Peregrine Gerard Worsthorne (born December 22, 1923) is a British Conservative journalist, writer and broadcaster. ...


The British National Party advocated Johnson as their second preferential choice in the Mayoral election in 2008.[29] On the BBC's Question Time pre-election live Mayoral election debate between the three leading candidates, when questioned on the BNP's call for support as a second choice vote, Johnson categorically stated he did not want a single vote from any BNP supporter. As it turned out, the number of BNP votes cast in the Mayoral election would not have swung the second preference count to such an extent that Johnson could have lost anyway. The British National Party (BNP) is a white nationalist political party in the United Kingdom. ... Question Time is a topical debate television programme in the United Kingdom, based on Any Questions?. It is currently shown on BBC One at 22:35 on Thursdays, and typically features politicians from the three major political parties and other public figures who answer questions put to them by the...


Johnson's candidacy was the subject of international interest. Germany's Der Spiegel and America's National Public Radio reported the race, both quoting Johnson as saying "if you vote for the Conservatives, your wife will get bigger breasts, and your chances of driving a BMW M3 will increase."[30][31], without however giving a source for this; the BBC has quoted the same statement by him from his 2004 campaign trail.[32] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... NPR redirects here. ...


Mayor of London

Mayoral victory

A few minutes before midnight on the evening of 2 May 2008, Boris Johnson was confirmed as having won the London Mayor election, beating the incumbent Ken Livingstone. He won on second preference votes, as he did not receive enough first preference votes to win outright; 1,168,738 votes as against Livingstone's 1,028,966.[3] Following his victory, he praised Livingstone as a "very considerable public servant" and added that he hoped to "discover a way in which the mayoralty can continue to benefit from your transparent love of London."[3] Johnson also announced that as a result of his victory he will resign as an MP.[33] Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Wikinews is a free-content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born 17 June 1945) is the outgoing Mayor of London, a post he has held from its creation in 2000 until 2008. ... Members of Parliament sitting in the House of Commons in the United Kingdom are technically forbidden to resign. ...


Staff appointments

Johnson appointed Richard Barnes as his Deputy Mayor on 6 May 2008, as well as appointing the following to newly devolved offices; Ian Clement as Deputy Mayor for Government Relations, Kit Malthouse as Deputy Mayor for Policing and Ray Lewis as Deputy Mayor for Young People.[34] The Deputy Mayor of London is a member of the London Assembly appointed by the Mayor of London to serve as his or her second-in-command. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Deputy Mayor of London is a member of the London Assembly appointed by the Mayor of London to serve as his or her second-in-command. ... Kit Malthouse (born 1966) is a British politician and former city councillor and Deputy Leader for Westminster City Council in London. ...


Alcohol ban

On 7 May 2008, Johnson unveiled plans to ban the consumption of alcohol on the London transport network, effective from 1 June.[35] is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Forensic Audit Panel

The formation of the Forensic Audit Panel was announced on 8 May 2008, which would monitor and investigate financial management at the London Development Agency and the Greater London Authority.[36] The Panel would be headed by Patience Wheatcroft, former editor of The Sunday Telegraph. is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... The London Development Agency is an agency of the Greater London Authority that is responsible for development in Greater London. ... The Greater London Authority (GLA) is the city-wide governing body for London, England. ... Patience Wheatcroft a British journalist who is currently editor of the Sunday Telegraph newspaper. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ...


Television appearances

Have I Got News for You

Johnson has appeared on the British television programme Have I Got News for You four times as a guest presenter and three times as a panellist.[37] The tabloid press, before he became an MP, tagged him as the show's star, even though he had then appeared only twice on a programme that had run for ten years. He has also taken part in the similar Radio 4 programme, The News Quiz. Have I Got News for You is a British television panel show; produced by Hat Trick Productions for the BBC. It is based loosely on the BBC Radio 4 show The News Quiz, and has been running since 1990. ... A television presenter is a British term for a person who is known for introducing or hosting television programmes. ... The News Quiz is a topical comedy quiz broadcast on British radio BBC Radio 4. ...


On his first HIGNFY appearance,[38] in 1998, Ian Hislop chided Johnson over his previous association with fraudster Darius Guppy (see below). Johnson later claimed the show was "fixed", though he retracted the comment when invited back. When asked why he had come back, Johnson replied to the delight of the audience that it was "basically for the money." Ian Hislop (born 13 July 1960) is the editor of British satirical magazine Private Eye, a team captain on the popular satirical current affairs quiz Have I Got News for You and a comedy scriptwriter. ... Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson (born 19 June 1964, better known as Boris Johnson)[2] is a British politician and the current Mayor of London; he is also a journalist and author, formerly serving as editor of The Spectator. ...


By his third appearance Johnson had been elected to Parliament. He was subjected to a surprise Mastermind parody round on which he was forced to answer questions about his party's leader, Iain Duncan Smith. He started by getting his own name "wrong", saying, "my name is Boris Johnson" and then being corrected by the host, Angus Deayton, who proceeded to quote his full birth name, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel Johnson. Next, despite claiming to be an admirer and supporter of his leader, Johnson got no questions correct. He also admitted he had forgotten the title of his own book as he was writing it. Mastermind is one of the most highly regarded British quiz shows, well-known for its challenging questions, intimidating setting, and air of seriousness. ... Rt. ... Gordon Angus Deayton (born January 6, 1956) is an English comic actor and television presenter. ...


Johnson later became a guest host for the show, his first opening remarks being: "When I first appeared on this show I complained that the whole thing was scripted and fully rehearsed. I'd now like to complain in the strongest possible terms, that it isn't." He initially promised Paul Merton a coconut instead of a point. Johnson then retracted the offer but Merton insisted on a coconut. At the end, a stage hand brought in a bag of them, giving Johnson a chance to say, "Coconuts, from the party that keeps its promises!" He also said his becoming leader of the Conservative Party was as likely as his "being locked in a disused fridge". Merton told him, "These things do happen." For other uses, see Coconut (disambiguation). ...


In 2004 Johnson was nominated for a BAFTA Television Award in the entertainment category for his performance on the show in 2003.[39] Johnson returned to front Have I Got News for You in November 2005. He admitted on the show that he once tried to snort cocaine, but sneezed and failed. He also hosted HIGNFY's Christmas special on 15 December 2006, his fourth appearance as host. Full, unedited versions of the shows can be found on the HIGNFY: Best of the Guest Presenters DVDs, on the "Full Boris" bonus disc, which features the entire uncut studio recordings. The British Academy Television Awards, also known as the BAFTAs or, to differentiate them from the BAFTA Film Awards, the BAFTA Television Awards, are the most prestigious awards given in the British television industry, analogous to the Emmy Awards in the United States. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On the DVD commentary of The Very Best of Have I Got News for You, Merton and Hislop affectionately refer to Johnson as Wodehousian, and stated that "every time he's on it gets better". Sir Pelham Grenville Wodehouse, KBE (15 October 1881 – 14 February 1975) (IPA: ) was a comic writer who has enjoyed enormous popular success for more than seventy years. ...


Top Gear

Johnson has appeared on television motoring show Top Gear as a "star in a reasonably priced car" (one of the show's features). He set a time of 1m 56s in the Suzuki Liana, finishing nine places from the bottom before they changed car. While nearing the end of his timed lap, he failed to realise that he had accidentally pressed the horn with his arm. After hearing the noise he looked around puzzled and said, "Who hooted at me?" This article is about the current format of the BBC television programme. ... Star in a Reasonably-Priced Car is a recurring segment on the BBC Two motoring programme Top Gear. ... 2002 Suzuki Aerio sedan Suzuki Aerio wagon The Suzuki Aerio (called the Liana in Europe) is a car built by Suzuki Motor Corporation for the lower midsize segment in the Japanese and European markets and for the subcompact segment in the North American market. ...


Johnson is known for his love of cycling and regularly cycles to work. He has been the victim of several bike thefts and has expressed his desire to plant "decoy bicycles throughout Islington and send Navy Seals in through the windows of thieves". SEALs in from the water. ...


The Dream of Rome

Johnson presented a BBC TV series titled The Dream of Rome, which questioned how ancient Rome managed to unite Europe in a way the modern European Union has failed to. A book published by HarperCollins followed the series. For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Dream Of Rome (2006) is a book by Boris Johnson MP, in which he discusses how the Roman Empire achieved political and cultural unity in Europe, and compares it to the failure of the European Union to do the same. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ...


Persona

Johnson on a demonstration against hospital closures with Liberal Democrat M.P. John Hemming (left) on March 28, 2006
Johnson on a demonstration against hospital closures with Liberal Democrat M.P. John Hemming (left) on March 28, 2006

Johnson is one of the most recognisable figures in British politics — partly attributable to his trademark unruly hairstyle. He is one of few British politicians identifiable by his first name alone. Reportedly, fearing that this familiarity made him more likeable and was helping his chances during the London Mayoral Campaign, Labour MP Tessa Jowell set up a 'swearbox' where any campaign member referring to him as 'Boris' would pay a fine.[40] Jowell herself denied these claims. Well-known people named John Hemming include: John Hemming (explorer) John Hemming (politician) John Hemming - publisher of *Shakespeares works after his death, along with Henry Condell This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tessa Jowell (born 17 September 1947 in London) is a British politician. ...


Johnson has been a frequent target for satirists. The magazine Private Eye pictured him on the front cover of issues 1120 (26 November 2004) and 1156 (14 April 2006). He has featured regularly in its cartoon strip (currently called Dave Snooty and his Pals) as "Boris the Menace" (cf. Dennis the Menace). Online, the news satire website DeadBrain has published over 25 articles mentioning Johnson,[41] and the website Backing Boris spearheads a lighthearted campaign to advance his cause. 1867 edition of Punch, a ground-breaking British magazine of popular humour, including a good deal of satire of the contemporary social and political scene. ... Private eye may mean: Look up Private eye on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Private Eye a fortnightly British satirical magazine-newspaper, edited by Ian Hislop (as of 2005) A private investigator, a private detective for hire (see also crime fiction and detective fiction) Private Eye, a song by Alkaline Trio... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dennis the Menace denotes either of two cartoon characters. ... News satire, also called fake news, is a type of parody presented in a format typical of mainstream journalism, and called a satire because of its content. ...


He has shown himself to be outspoken on issues which are treated by some as belonging to the realms of political correctness. Political correctness is the alteration of language to redress real or alleged injustices and discrimination or to avoid offense. ...


Johnson made the following comments about Islam in his Spectator column shortly after the July 7 bombings in 2005: For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ... The 7 July 2005 London bombings (also called the 7/7 bombings) were a series of coordinated terrorist bomb blasts that hit Londons public transport system during the morning rush hour. ...

"It is time to reassert British values…That means disposing of the first taboo, and accepting that the problem is Islam. Islam is the problem. To any non-Muslim reader of the Koran, Islamophobia — fear of Islam — seems a natural reaction, and, indeed, exactly what that text is intended to provoke. Judged purely on its scripture — to say nothing of what is preached in the mosques — it is the most viciously sectarian of all religions. The trouble with this disgusting arrogance and condescension is that it is widely supported in Koranic texts, and we look in vain for the enlightened Islamic teachers and preachers who will begin the process of reform. What is going on in these mosques and madrasas? "When is someone going to get 18th century on Islam’s mediaeval ass?"[42] The Quran (Arabic al-qurʾān أَلْقُرآن; also transliterated as Quran, Koran, and less commonly Alcoran) is the holy book of Islam. ... Islamophobia is a controversial[1][2] though increasingly accepted[3][4] term that refers to prejudice or discrimination against Islam or Muslims. ... Sectarianism is an adherence to a particular sect or party or denomination, it also usually involves a rejection of those not a member of ones sect. ... The Masjid al-Haram in Mecca as it exists today A mosque is a place of worship for followers of the Islamic faith. ... Madrassa in the Gambia The word madrassa in the Arabic language (and other languages of the Islamic nations such as Persian, Turkish, Indonesian etc. ... The word Enlightment redirects here. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...

In Friends, Voters, Countrymen (2001), Johnson wrote that "if gay marriage was OK - and I was uncertain on the issue - then I saw no reason in principle why a union should not be consecrated between three men, as well as two men, or indeed three men and a dog."[43] Friends, Voters, Countrymen (2002) is a book by Boris Johnson and how he fights politics and how he won Henley-on-Thames. ...


Controversies

Stuart Collier

Johnson was criticised in 1995[44] when a recording of a telephone conversation made in 1990 was made public in which he is heard agreeing to supply to a former schoolmate, Darius Guppy, the address of the News of the World journalist Stuart Collier. Guppy wished to have Collier beaten up for his knowledge of Guppy's failed insurance fraud.[45] Collier was not attacked, but Johnson did not alert the police and the incident only became public knowledge when the conversation was summarised in the Daily Mail. [46] Johnson retained his job at the Telegraph but was reprimanded by its editor Max Hastings.[1] Darius Guppy was convicted of defrauding Lloyds of London insurance market of £1. ... The News of the World is a British tabloid newspaper published every Sunday. ... Sir Max Hastings (born December 28, 1945) is a British journalist, editor, historian and author. ...


'Theft' of cigar case

Boris Johnson has been investigated by the police for the 'theft', in 2003, of a cigar case belonging to Tariq Aziz, an associate of Saddam Hussein, which Johnson had found in the rubble of Aziz's house in Baghdad. At the time, Johnson wrote an article in the Daily Telegraph, stating he had taken the cigar case and would return it to its owner upon request.[47] Despite this admission in 2003, Johnson received no indication from the police that he was being investigated for theft until 2008, leading supporters of Johnson to express suspicion that the investigation coincided with his candidacy for the position of London Mayor. "This is a monumental waste of time," said Johnson.[48] Mikhail Yuhanna, later and more popularly known as Tariq Aziz or Tareq Aziz, (Arabic: طارق عزيز, Syriac: ܜܪܩ ܥܙܝܙ) (born 1936 in Tel Keppe) was the Foreign Minister (1983 – 1991) and Deputy Prime Minister (1979 – 2003) of Iraq, and a close advisor of former President Saddam Hussein for decades. ...


People of Liverpool

On 16 October 2004, The Spectator carried an unsigned editorial[49] comment criticising a perceived trend to mawkish sentimentality by the public. Using British hostage Kenneth Bigley as an example, the editorial claimed the inhabitants of Bigley's home city of Liverpool were wallowing in a "vicarious victimhood"; that many Liverpudlians had a "deeply unattractive psyche"; and that they refused to accept responsibility for "drunken fans at the back of the crowd who mindlessly tried to fight their way into the ground" during the Hillsborough disaster, a contention at odds with the findings of the Taylor Report. The editorial closed with: "In our maturity as a civilisation, we should accept that we can cut out the cancer of ignorant sentimentality without diminishing, as in this case, our utter disgust at a foul and barbaric act of murder." is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ... Kenneth Bigley and his wife Sombat at their wedding in 1998. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... The Memorial at Hillsborough. ... The Taylor Report is a document, whose development was overseen by Lord Justice Taylor, concerning the aftermath and causes of the Hillsborough disaster in 1989. ...


Although Johnson had not written the piece (journalist Simon Heffer later said he "had a hand" in it), he accepted responsibility for its publication.[50] The Conservative leader at the time, Michael Howard, condemned the editorial, saying "I think what was said in The Spectator was nonsense from beginning to end", and sent Johnson on a tour of contrition to the city.[51] There, in numerous interviews and public appearances, Johnson defended the editorial's thesis (that the deaths of figures such as Bigley and Diana, Princess of Wales, were over-sentimentalised); but he apologised for the article's wording and for using Liverpool and Bigley's death as examples, saying "I think the article was too trenchantly expressed but we were trying to make a point about sentimentality". Michael Howard resisted calls to dismiss Johnson over the Bigley affair, but dismissed him the next month over the Wyatt revelations. Simon James Heffer (born July 18, 1960) is an English journalist and writer. ... The Rt Hon. ... Diana Spencer redirects here. ...


Papua New Guinea

Johnson's journalism and public speaking is much given to overblown metaphor, and a 2006 column likening Tory leadership disputes to "Papua New Guinea-style orgies of cannibalism and chief-killing" was criticised in Papua New Guinea. The nation's High Commissioner invited him to visit the country and see for himself, while remarking that his comments might mean he was refused a visa.[52] Johnson suggested he would add Papua New Guinea to his global apology itinerary, and said he was sure the people there "lived lives of blameless bourgeois domesticity like the rest of us". His defence was conclusive: "My remarks were inspired by a Time Life book I have which does indeed show relatively recent photos of Papua New Guinean tribes engaged in warfare, and I'm fairly certain that cannibalism was involved." Cannibal redirects here. ...


Portsmouth

In April 2007 Johnson was called upon to resign by the MPs for the city of Portsmouth after claiming in a column for GQ that the city was "one of the most depressed towns in Southern England, a place that is arguably too full of drugs, obesity, underachievement and Labour MPs".[53] For other places with the same name, see Portsmouth (disambiguation). ... GQ can refer to several things: Gentlemens Quarterly, a mens magazine The ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 country code for Equatorial Guinea GQ, a replacement Quake 1 game engine This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Allegations of racism

Two days after Boris Johnson's candidacy for Mayor of London took a six point poll lead over Ken Livingstone in a YouGov survey published by the Daily Telegraph[54], Doreen Lawrence, mother of murdered teenager Stephen Lawrence, said that he would 'destroy London's unity', adding that 'once people read his views, there is no way he is going to get the support of any people in the black community'. She was referring especially to the occasion on which Johnson, as a journalist in 1999, accused the Macpherson Inquiry, which reported on police racism following the Lawrence murder, of 'hysteria', adding that the "recommendation that the law might be changed so as to allow prosecution for racist language or behaviour 'other than in a public place'" was akin to "Ceausescu's Romania".[55] YouGov is a British internet-based market research firm. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the Australian footballer, see Steven Lawrence. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Nicolae CeauÅŸescu (IPA , in English, sometimes (and erroneously) ) (January 26, 1918–December 25, 1989) was the leader of Romania from 1965 until December 1989, when a revolution and coup removed him from power. ...


The Conservative London Assembly candidate for Bexley and Bromley and former Conservative candidate for mayor of Lewisham, James Cleverly, another black Londoner, rejected Lawrence's criticisms. The London Assembly is an elected body that supervises the Greater London Authority and the Mayor of London. ... Greater London is divided into a number of constituencies for London Assembly elections. ... Lewisham is a district in south-east London, England and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Lewisham. ... James Cleverly is a member of the Conservative Party and was the Conservative candidate for Mayor of Lewisham in the 2006 local government elections. ...


In a piece in the Evening Standard on 6 August 2007, the journalist Andrew Gilligan responded to the allegations saying how 'outrageous – indeed Orwellian – it is to attack a man as a destroyer of racial harmony, one of the most serious charges you can lay, simply on the basis that he refuses to sign up for every dot and comma of a report of which she approves. While condemning the "grotesque failures" in the Lawrence case which "may well have originated in racism," Boris was far from the only person to oppose that particular Macpherson recommendation. Labour MPs opposed it, too. So did the Government, clearly, because they didn’t implement it.' Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Andrew Paul Gilligan (born 22 November 1968, Teddington, London, England) is a journalist best known for his 2003 report about a British government briefing paper on Iraq and weapons of mass destruction (the September Dossier) while working for BBC Radio 4s The Today Programme as its defence and diplomatic... The adjective Orwellian describes the situation, idea, or societal condition that George Orwell identified as being inimical to the welfare of a free-society. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ...


These remarks were followed by criticism from two black Labour London MPs, Diane Abbott and Dawn Butler, who criticised a column written by Johnson in 2002, saying he had used "most offensive language of the colonial past", showing "that the Tory party is riddled with racial prejudice".[56] In the article in question, written to satirise the Prime Minister's visit to Congo, [57] Johnson mocked "Supertone" (Tony Blair) for his brief visits to world trouble spots, bringing peace to the world while the UK deteriorated; Blair would arrive as "the tribal warriors will all break out in watermelon smiles to see the big white chief", just as "it is said the Queen has come to love the Commonwealth, partly because it supplies her with regular cheering crowds of flag-waving piccaninnies". Diane Julie Abbott (born September 27, 1953 in Paddington, London) is a British Labour Party Member of Parliament, representing the Hackney North and Stoke Newington constituency. ... Dawn Petula Butler (born 3 November 1969) is the Labour Party Member of Parliament for Brent South. ... For the impact structure in Western Australia, see Piccaninny crater. ...


Johnson's campaign team rejected suggestions that their candidate might be prejudiced, insisting that he "loathes racism in all its forms". However, journalist Rod Liddle said that Johnson has used the word "piccaninnies" on another occasion to refer to black Africans.[58] Greater London analyst and director of the Greater London Group at the London School of Economics, Dr. Tony Travers, has written that "There is no way to dress up expressions such as "piccaninnies'" and "watermelon smiles" to take them within a million miles of acceptable." [59] Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ...


At an Evening Standard debate on January 21, 2008, Johnson apologised for these remarks, while insisting that they were taken out of context: is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ...

I do feel very sad that people have been so offended by these words and I'm sorry that I've caused this offence. But if you look at the article as written they really do not bear the construction that you're putting on them. I feel very strongly that this is something which is simply not in my heart. I'm absolutely 100 per cent anti-racist, I despise and loathe racism".[60]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Gimson, Andrew (2006 [2007]), Boris: The Rise of Boris Johnson, Pocket Books [Simon & Schuster], pp. 254, 11-12, 71, 118, 119, ISBN 0-7432-7584-5 
  2. ^ "About Boris", official website biography.
  3. ^ a b c Elections 2008 - London Mayor BBC News retrieved May 3, 2008
  4. ^ Sholto Byrnes (2008-03-27). "Who is Boris Johnson?". New Statesman. Retrieved on 2008-04-28.
  5. ^ "Human Rights in the Private Sphere", Andrew Clapham, OUP, 1993, pg. 186
  6. ^ My dream for Turkey, by Boris’s great-grandfather - The Spectator
  7. ^ Guardian: Phooey! One-man melting pot ready to take on King Newt
  8. ^ About Boris. Boris Johnson. Retrieved on 2008-05-08.
  9. ^ Westminster Hall debates
  10. ^ Henry Deedes "Pandora column: A youthful flirtation comes back to haunt Boris", The Independent, 9 August 2006. Retrieved on 29 April 2008.
  11. ^ No dumb blond
  12. ^ "Boris celebrates Vaisakhi in Southall". BackBoris.com (2008-04-06). Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  13. ^ BBC Article: Boris Johnson's media scrapes from 17 July 2007
  14. ^ theBookseller.com
  15. ^ "The Conservative Party has decided to sell the lease on its London HQ.", BBC News, 11 November 2003. Retrieved on 15 April 2008.
  16. ^ Independent article from 14 November 2004 on Johnson's sacking.
  17. ^ News of the World video clip of Boris Johnson. News of the World.
  18. ^ Johnson 'will keep his job'. The Times (2006-04-03). Retrieved on 2006-09-17.
  19. ^ a b guardian.co.uk Damp greeting from students for Boris Johnson, 27 January 2006
  20. ^ a b c Times Higher Education supplement Blond has more fun but fails to thwart anti top-up fee vote, 24 February 2006
  21. ^ Pint Poured Over Boris Johnson MP. YouTube.
  22. ^ Boris Johnson goes Warhol to become poster boy for Tories. Media Guardian (2006-09-06). Retrieved on 2006-09-17.
  23. ^ a b George Jones "Boris Johnson to run for mayor", Daily Telegraph, 18 July 2007. Retrieved on 24 July 2007.
  24. ^ Andrew Grice "'I'll put the smile back on London's face': Boris confirms challenge to succeed Ken", The Independent, 17 July 2007. Retrieved on 14 July 2007.
  25. ^ Johnson is Tory mayor candidate. BBC News (2007-09-27).
  26. ^ Cameron backs 'brilliant' Johnson. BBC News. Retrieved on 2008-03-31.
  27. ^ Simon Heffer "Why treat the London election as a joke?", Daily Telegraph, 1 May 2008. Retrieved on 1 May 2008.
  28. ^ Peregrine Worsrthorne "A serious Boris? You must be joking", The First Post, 1 May 2008. Retrieved on 1 May 2008.
  29. ^ Give second vote to Johnson, BNP tells supporters. Guardian (2008-04-02).
  30. ^ The Bizarre Fight to Be Mayor of London, Der Spiegel, April 17, 2008
  31. ^ London Mayor's Race Not Your Average Election, April 21, 2008
  32. ^ The Boris Johnson story. BBC News (2008-05-04).
  33. ^ The Guardian: Johnson snatches Tories' biggest prize (2008-05-03).
  34. ^ Boris Johnson announces further senior appointments to his administration. Greater London Authority (2008-05-06). Retrieved on 2008-05-08.
  35. ^ Mayor unveils plan to ban alcohol on the transport network. Greater London Authority (2008-05-06). Retrieved on 2008-05-07.
  36. ^ Mayor of London announces new Forensic Audit Panel to investigate GLA and LDA. Greater London Authority (2008-05-08). Retrieved on 2008-05-07.
  37. ^ Off The Telly tells the story of Have I Got News for You, courtesy of the show's former webmaster, Matthew Rudd.
  38. ^ HIGNFY Boris Johnson's debut..... YouTube. Retrieved on 2006-09-17.
  39. ^ BAFTA: Television nominations 2003
  40. ^ Philip Hensher "Banning Boris-ing is a waste of time", The Independent, 7 April 2008. Retrieved on 15 April 2008.
  41. ^ List of satirical articles about Boris Johnson. DeadBrain. Retrieved on 2006-09-19.
  42. ^ "Just don’t call it war". The Spectator (2005-07-16). Retrieved on 2008-05-02.
  43. ^ "Boris Johnson hits back at his critics", Pink News, 2007-08-27. 
  44. ^ Daily Mail, 16 July 1995.
  45. ^ Harry Phibbs "Good solid meat for Boris watchers: Boris: The Rise of Boris Johnson - Andrew Gimson", review by the Social Affairs Unit, 11 October 2006. Retrieved on 12 April 2008.
  46. ^ The revenge of deadly Darius | the Daily Mail
  47. ^ Nice try, Tariq Aziz ... but no cigar - Daily Telegraph May 2003,
  48. ^ Police probe Boris Johnson over cigar 'theft' - Daily Telegraph February 27, 2007
  49. ^ Spectator — leader of 16 October 2004.
  50. ^ Boris Johnson "What I should say sorry for" by Boris Johnson, The Spectator, 23 October 2004. Retrieved on 13 July 2007..
  51. ^ BBC article about the 2004 Liverpool controversy.
  52. ^ Boris apology to Papua New Guinea. BBC News (2006-09-08). Retrieved on 2006-09-17.
  53. ^ "MP slammed over 'fat city' slur", BBC, 2007-04-03. 
  54. ^ Lembit Opik out of London mayoral race. Daily Telegraph (2007-08-02).
  55. ^ Johnson 'would destroy London's unity' as mayor | Politics | The Guardian
  56. ^ "Labour MPs spurn Boris mayoral bid", BBC, 2007-07-04. 
  57. ^ "If Blair's so good at running the Congo, let him stay there", Daily Telegraph, 10 January 2002
  58. ^ "Crikey, win or lose, Boris Johnson is a gamble for David Cameron", The Times, 2008-01-13. 
  59. ^ The BoJo, Ken and Bri show, New Statesman, 6 September 2007
  60. ^ "I didn't mean to be racist, claims Boris", Evening Standard, 2008-01-22. 

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The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Cover of the Nov 12, 2005 issue of The Spectator magazine. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Social Affairs Unit is a registered charity in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New Statesman is a left-of-centre political weekly published in London. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Johnson's Column (Continuum International — Academi) ISBN 0-8264-6855-1
  • Friends, Voters, Countrymen (HarperCollins, 2001) ISBN 0-00-711913-5
  • Lend Me Your Ears (HarperCollins, 2003) ISBN 0-00-717224-9
  • Seventy-Two Virgins (HarperCollins, 2004) ISBN 0-00-719590-7
  • The Dream of Rome (HarperCollins, 2006) ISBN 0-00-722441-9
  • Have I Got Views For You (HarperPerennial, 2006) ISBN 0-00-724220-4
  • Life in the Fast Lane: The Johnson Guide to Cars (HarperPerennial, 2007) ISBN 0-00-726020-2
  • The British (HarperCollins, 2008) ISBN 0-00-717225-7
  • The Perils of the Pushy Parents: A Cautionary Tale (HarperPress 2007) ISBN 0-00-726339-2

Friends, Voters, Countrymen (2002) is a book by Boris Johnson and how he fights politics and how he won Henley-on-Thames. ... Lend Me Your Ears is a book by Boris Johnson MP. Amazon. ... Seventy-Two Virgins is a book by Boris Johnson MP and Boriss first novel. ... The Dream Of Rome (2006) is a book by Boris Johnson MP, in which he discusses how the Roman Empire achieved political and cultural unity in Europe, and compares it to the failure of the European Union to do the same. ... Have I Got Views For You (2006) is a book on Boris Johnsons political and humorous history especially his time on BBC2s Have I Got News For You http://www. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Further reading

  • Andrew Gimson Boris: The Rise of Boris Johnson (Simon & Schuster, 2006) ISBN 0-7432-7584-5.

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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Boris Johnson
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Boris Johnson
  • Mayor of London, the London Assembly and the Greater London Authority - official London government website
  • Boris Johnson.com official web site and blog
  • CityMayors.com profile
  • MayorWatch pages
  • Conservative Party — Boris Johnson MP official biography
  • BBC News — Boris Johnson profile 10 February 2005
  • Open Directory Project — Boris Johnson directory category
Media offices
Preceded by
Frank Johnson
Editor of The Spectator
1999–2005
Succeeded by
Matthew d'Ancona
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Michael Heseltine
Member of Parliament for Henley
2001–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Ken Livingstone
Mayor of London
2008–present
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Johnson, Boris
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Johnson, Alexander Boris de Pfeffel (Birth)
SHORT DESCRIPTION British Politician and Mayor of London
DATE OF BIRTH June 19, 1964
PLACE OF BIRTH New York City, New York, United States
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... This article is about the elected mayor of Greater London. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Blog of Funk: Boris Johnson: Honest Conservative (867 words)
Boris has all the classic Tory credentials with one important exception - he simply isn't oily.
Boris got himself into deep water by attributing the mawkish malaise he accurately described to the City of Liverpool, and then sunk the Johnson ship by mentioning Hillsborough, a football stadium tragedy in which policing errors caused 90+ people to be crushed to death.
Boris was right to go and expose himself to their withering scorn.
Boris Johnson slams videogames // GamesIndustry.biz (441 words)
In a recent opinion piece for The Telegraph, Johnson wrote, "Millions of seven to 15 year olds are hooked, especially boys, and it is time someone had the guts to stand up, cross the room and just say no to Nintendo.
Johnson went on to quote figures stating that the number of computer games per household is higher for Britain than for any other EU country, and that 89 per cent of UK households with children own a console.
Although Johnson is not a regular commentator on videogames, he is well known in Britain for his controversial opinions on a wide range of topics.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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