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Encyclopedia > Boris III of Bulgaria
Boris III
Tsar of Bulgaria
Reign 3 October 191828 August 1943
Born January 30, 1894
Sofia, Bulgaria
Died August 28, 1943
Sofia, Bulgaria
Predecessor Ferdinand I of Bulgaria
Successor Simeon II of Bulgaria
Consort Giovanna of Italy
Issue Marie Louise of Bulgaria
Simeon II of Bulgaria
Royal House Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Father Ferdinand I of Bulgaria
Mother Marie Louise of Bourbon-Parma

Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria (January 30, 1894August 28, 1943), originally Boris Klemens Robert Maria Pius Ludwig Stanislaus Xaver, son of Ferdinand I, came to the throne in 1918 upon the abdication of his father, following Bulgaria's defeat in World War I. This was the country's second major defeat in only five years, after the disastrous Second Balkan War (1913). Under the Treaty of Neuilly, Bulgaria was forced to cede new territories and pay crippling reparations to its neighbors, thereby threatening political and economic stability. Two political forces, the Agrarian Union and the Communist Party, were calling for the overthrowing of the monarchy and the change of the government. It was in these circumstances that Boris succeeded to the throne. Image File history File links Boris3bulgaria1894. ... October 3 is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Ferdinand I of Bulgaria Ferdinand I, Tsar of Bulgaria (February 26, 1861 - September 10, 1948), born Prince Ferdinand Maximilan Karl Leopold Maria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, was the Prince Regnant and later King of Bulgaria as well as an author, botanist and philatelist. ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... Giovanna of Savoy Tsaritsa Ioanna of Bulgaria, (13 November 1907 - 26 February 2000) was born Princess Giovanna of Savoy and was the last Tsaritsa of Bulgaria. ... Princess Maria Louise (Bulgarian: ; b. ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria... Ferdinand I of Bulgaria Ferdinand I, Tsar of Bulgaria (February 26, 1861 - September 10, 1948), born Prince Ferdinand Maximilan Karl Leopold Maria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, was the Prince Regnant and later King of Bulgaria as well as an author, botanist and philatelist. ... Marie Louise of Bourbon-Parma was the princess-consort of Bulgaria as the first wife of Ferdinand of Bulgaria, the then prince-regnant, and Tsar after her death, and became mother of Tsar Boris III of Bulgaria. ... Monomakhs Cap symbol of Russian autocracy, the crown of Russian grand princes and tsars Czar and tzar redirect here. ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Ferdinand I of Bulgaria Ferdinand I, Tsar of Bulgaria (February 26, 1861 - September 10, 1948), born Prince Ferdinand Maximilan Karl Leopold Maria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, was the Prince Regnant and later King of Bulgaria as well as an author, botanist and philatelist. ... Look up abdication in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... The Second Balkan War was fought in 1913 between Bulgaria on one side and Greece and Serbia on the other side. ... The Treaty of Neuilly, dealing with Bulgaria for its role as one of the Central Powers in World War I, was signed on the November 27, 1919 at Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. ...


One year after Boris's accession, Aleksandar Stamboliyski (or Stambolijski) of the Bulgarian People's Agrarian Union was elected prime minister. Though popular with the large peasant class, Stambolijski earned the animosity of the middle class and military, which lead to his toppling in a military coup in September 1923. In 1925, there was a short border war with Greece which was resolved with the help of the League of Nations. Also in 1925, there were two attempts on Boris's life perpetrated by leftist extremists. After the second attempt, the military in power exterminated in reprisals several thousand communists and agrarians including representatives of the intelligentsia. Aleksandar Stamboliyski (Александър Стамболийски, March 1, 1879-June 14, 1923) was the prime minister of Bulgaria from 1918 until 1923. ... The League of Nations was an international organization founded after the Paris Peace Conference, 1919. ...


In the military coup on May 19, 1934, Boris helped[source?] the military establish a dictatorship and abolish the political parties in Bulgaria. In the following year, he assumed control of the country and established a personal regime in which, under a democratic façade, he ruled as an absolute monarch.[source?]


Boris married Giovanna of Italy, daughter of Victor Emmanuel III of Italy, first in Assisi in October 1930 (attended by Benito Mussolini), and then at an Orthodox ceremony in Sofia. The marriage produced a daughter, Maria Louisa, in January 1933, and a son and heir to the throne, Simeon, in 1937. Giovanna of Savoy Tsaritsa Ioanna of Bulgaria, (13 November 1907 - 26 February 2000) was born Princess Giovanna of Savoy and was the last Tsaritsa of Bulgaria. ... Victor Emmanuel III (Italian: Vittorio Emanuele III; 11 November 1869 – 28 December 1947) was King of Italy (29 July 1900 – 9 May 1946), as well as putative Emperor of Ethiopia (1936 - 1943) and King of Albania (1939 - 1943). ... This article is about the Italian town. ... Marie Louise (Bulgarian: Мария Луиза; b. ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ...


In the early days of World War II, Bulgaria was neutral, but powerful groups in the country swayed its politics toward Germany (whom they had also allied with in World War I), which had gained initial sympathies by forcing Romania to cede southern Dobruja back to Bulgaria. In 1941, Boris reluctantly allied himself with the Axis Powers in an attempt to recover Macedonia from Greece and Yugoslavia that was lost by Bulgaria under the Treaty of Neuilly. However, in spite of this loose alliance, Boris was not willing to render full and unconditional cooperation with Germany, and the only German presence in Bulgaria was along the railway line which passed through it to Greece. Combatants Allied Powers: United Kingdom France Soviet Union United States Republic of China and others Axis Powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Winston Churchill Charles de Gaulle Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Chiang Kai-Shek Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tojo Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nicholas II Aleksei Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Herbert Henry Asquith Douglas Haig John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna Armando Diaz Woodrow Wilson John Pershing Franz... Map of Romania with Northern Dobruja highlighted in orange and Bulgaria with Southern Dobruja highlighted in yellow. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Kingdom of Yugoslavia was a Balkan state which existed from December 1, 1918 to mid-April 1941. ... The Treaty of Neuilly, dealing with Bulgaria for its role as one of the Central Powers in World War I, was signed on the November 27, 1919 at Neuilly-sur-Seine, France. ...


In early 1943, Nazi officials requested that Bulgaria send its Jewish population to Poland. The request caused a public outcry, and a campaign whose most prominent leaders were Parliament Chairman Dimitar Peshev and the head of the Bulgarian Orthodox Church, Archbishop Stefan, was organized.[source?] Following this campaign Boris refused to permit the extradition of Bulgaria's 50,000 Jews. Nonetheless, he did sanction the German demand for the extradition of 13,000 Jews from those territories re-occupied by Bulgaria. These two decisions have led to a position today where large numbers of people regard Boris as a hero for 'saving' Bulgaria's Jews, and large numbers revile him for condemning those of the occupied territories. The extent to which the King was able to influence events in either case remains a matter of debate. The word Jew (Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination... Dimitar Peshev (Bulgarian: ) (25 June 1894 - 25 February 1973) was the Bulgarian Parliament Deputy Speaker and Minister of Justice during World War II. He rebelled against the pro-Nazi cabinet and prevented the deportation of Bulgarias 48,000 Jews. ... The Bulgarian Orthodox Church (Bulgarian: , Bylgarska pravoslavna cyrkva) is an autocephalous Eastern Orthodox Church with some 6. ...


Most irritating for Hitler, however, was the Tsar's refusal to declare war on the Soviet Union or send Bulgarian troops to the Eastern front.

Styles of
King Boris III of The Bulgarians
Image:S-c-g-arms.JPG
Reference style His Majesty
Spoken style Your Majesty
Alternative style Sir

On the 9 August 1943, Hitler summoned Boris to a stormy meeting at Rastenburg, East Prussia, where Tsar Boris arrived by plane from Vrajdebna on Saturday 14 August. While Bulgaria had declared a 'symbolic' war on the distant United Kingdom and the United States, at that meeting Boris once again refused to get involved in the war against the Soviet Union, giving as one reason for his unwillingness to send troops to Russia that many ordinary Bulgarians had strong Russophile sentiments. The 'symbolic' war against the Western Allies, however, turned into a disaster for the citizens of Sofia as the city was heavily bombarded by the US, and the British Royal Air Force, in 1943 and 1944. A style of office, or honorific, is a form of address which by tradition or law precedes a reference to a person who holds a title or post, or to the political office itself. ... Look up majesty in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Majesty is an English word rooting in the Latin Maiestas, meaning literally, Greatness. ... Kętrzyn is a town in north-eastern Poland with 30,300 inhabitants (1995). ... East Prussia (German: Ostpreu en; Polish: Prusy Wschodnie; Russian: Восточная Пруссия — Vostochnaya Prussiya) was a province of Kingdom of Prussia, situated on the territory of former Ducal Prussia. ... Position of Sofia in Bulgaria Coordinates: Country Bulgaria Province Sofia-City Mayor Boyko Borisov Area    - City 1,310 km²  - Land (?) km²  - Water (?) km² Elevation 550 m Population (15 September 2006)  - City 1,246,791  - Density 907/km²  - Metro 1,377,761 Time zone EET (UTC+2)  - Summer (DST) EEST (UTC...



Shortly after returning to Sofia, Boris died of apparent heart failure. He had complained of chest pains for some months and had put it down to angina.[source?] Conspiracy theories instantly sprang up, many choosing to believe that he was poisoned by Hitler in an attempt to put a more obedient government in place. The evening before the illness occurred, Boris had an official dinner in the Italian embassy. Others suggest that his death was a Communist plot to destabilize the monarchy. The question has never been settled and many people remain of the belief that Boris was murdered, in spite of no evidence being available. Boris was succeeded by his six-year-old son Simeon II under a Regency Council headed by his brother, Prince Kyril of Bulgaria. angina tonsillaris see tonsillitis. ... This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... His Royal Highness Kyril Prince of Preslav (November 17, 1895 - February 1, 1945) was the second son of Ferdinand I of Bulgaria and his first wife Marie Louise of Bourbon-Parma. ...


Following a large impressive State Funeral at the Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, Sofia, where the streets were lined with weeping crowds, the coffin of Tsar Boris III was taken by train to the mountains and buried in Bulgaria's largest and most important monastery, the Rila Monastery. After taking power in September 1944, the Communist-dominated government had his body exhumed and secretly buried in the courtyard of the Vrana Palace near Sofia. At a later time the Communist authorities removed the zinc coffin from Vrana and moved it to a secret location, which remains unknown to this day. After the fall of communism, an excavation attempt was made at the Vrana Palace, in which only Boris's heart was found, as it had been put in a glass cylinder outside the coffin. The heart was taken by his widow in 1993 to Rila Monastery where it was reinterred. The St. ... Rila Monastery with the medieval tower The Rila Monastery (Bulgarian: Рилски манастир, Rilski manastir) is the largest and most famous Eastern Orthodox monastery in Bulgaria. ... Vrana Palace is a royal palace, located in Sofia, Bulgaria. ...


See also

  • History of Bulgaria

The history of Bulgaria as a separate country began in the 7th century with the arrival of the Bulgars and the foundation of the First Bulgarian Empire together with the local seven Slavic tribes, a union recognized by Byzantium in 681. ...

References

  • Bulgaria in the Second World War by Marshall Lee Miller, Stanford University Press, 1975.
  • Boris III of Bulgaria 1894-1943, by Pashanko Dimitroff, London, 1986, ISBN 0-86332-140-2
  • Crown of Thorns by Stephane Groueff, Lanham MD., and London, 1987, ISBN 0-8191-5778-3
  • The Betrayal of Bulgaria by Gregory Lauder-Frost, Monarchist League Policy Paper, London, 1989.
  • The Daily Telegraph, Obituary for "HM Queen Ioanna of the Bulgarians", London, 28 February 2000.

External links

  • Find-A-Grave biography
Bulgarian Royalty
House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
Image:S-c-g-arms.JPG

Ferdinand I
Children
   Prince Boris
   Prince Kyril
   Princess Eudoxia
   Princess Nadejda
Boris III
Children
   Princess Marie Louise
   Prince Simeon
Simeon II
Children
   Prince Kardam
   Prince Kyrill
   Prince Kubrat
   Prince Konstantin-Assen
   Princess Kalina
Grandchildren
   Prince Boris
   Prince Beltran
   Princess Mafalda
   Princess Olimpia
   Prince Tassilo
   Prince Mirko
   Prince Lukás
   Prince Tirso
   Prince Umberto
   Princess Sofia
Edit
House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
Born: [[30 January]] 1894
Died: [[28 August]] 1943
Preceded by
Ferdinand I
Tsar of Bulgaria
19181943
Succeeded by
Simeon II
Bulgarian monarchs
Great Bulgaria (632–681)

Kubrat | Batbayan Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Ferdinand I of Bulgaria Ferdinand I, Tsar of Bulgaria (February 26, 1861 - September 10, 1948), born Prince Ferdinand Maximilan Karl Leopold Maria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, was the Prince Regnant and later King of Bulgaria as well as an author, botanist and philatelist. ... His Royal Highness Kyril Prince of Preslav (November 17, 1895 - February 1, 1945) was the second son of Ferdinand I of Bulgaria and his first wife Marie Louise of Bourbon-Parma. ... Princess Maria Louise (Bulgarian: ; b. ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... Prince Kardam (born December 2, 1962), is eldest son of the deposed tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria and his wife Doña Margarita Gomez-Acebo y Cejuela, however born after his loss of the throne. ... Prince Kyrill (born July 11, 1964), also known as Kyrill of Saxe-Coburg, is the second son of the deposed tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (later Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 to 2005) and his wife Doña Margarita Gomez-Acebo y Cejuela. ... Kubrat of Saxe-Coburg (born November 5, 1965), is third son of Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria and his wife Doña Margarita Gomez-Acebo y Cejuela. ... Konstantin-Assen of Saxe-Coburg (born December 5, 1967), is fourth son of tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria and his wife Doña Margarita Gomez-Acebo y Cejuela. ... Kalina of Bulgaria Kalina of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (born January 19, 1972 in Madrid, Spain), is fifth child and only daughter of former Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria and his wife Doña Margarita Gomez-Acebo y Cejuela. ... Boris of Saxe-Coburg, born October 12, 1997 in Madrid, is the first son of Kardam of Saxe-Coburg and grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Prince Beltran of Bulgaria (born March 23, 1999 in Madrid) is the second son of Kardam, Prince of Turnovo and a grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Mafalda of Saxe-Coburg, born July 27, 1994 in London, is the first daughter of Kyrill of Preslav and granddaughter of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Olimpia of Saxe-Coburg, born December 14, 1995 in London, is the second daughter of Kyrill of Preslav and granddaughter of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Tassilo of Saxe-Coburg, born January 20, 2002, is a son of Kyrill of Preslav and grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Mirko of Saxe-Coburg, born April 26, 1995, is first son of Kubrat of Panagiurishte and grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Lukás of Saxe-Coburg, born July 15, 1997), is second son of Kubrat of Panagiurishte and grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Tirso of Saxe-Coburg, born June 3, 2002, is third son of Kubrat of Panagiurishte and grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Umberto of Saxe-Coburg (styled HRH Prince Umberto of Bulgaria), born November 20, 1999, is son of Konstantin-Assen of Vidin and grandson of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... Princess Sofia of Bulgaria (born November 20, 1999) is the daughter of Konstantin-Assen, Prince of Vidin and a granddaughter of Simeon II of Bulgaria, the former Tsar of Bulgaria. ... House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (Bulgarian branch) was the ruling dinasty of Bulgaria (1887 - 1946). ... January 30 is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... August 28 is the 240th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (241st in leap years), with 125 days remaining. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Ferdinand Maximilan Charles Leopold Marie, Ferdinand of Bulgaria (February 26, 1861 - September 10, 1948) was monarch of Bulgaria as well as an author, botanist and philatelist. ... // Rulers of Bulgaria Note on titles According to a controversial 17th century Volga Bulgar source, early Bulgar leaders bore the title of baltavar, which might mean ruler of Avars, although this is likely a folk etymology. ... Year 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1943 calendar). ... Simeon Saxe-Coburg-Gotha as Prime Minister of Bulgaria Tsar Simeon II of Bulgaria (born June 16, 1937) was the last Tsar of Bulgaria from 1943 to 1946, and was Prime Minister of Bulgaria from 2001 until August 2005. ... // Rulers of Bulgaria Note on titles According to a controversial 17th century Volga Bulgar source, early Bulgar leaders bore the title of baltavar, which might mean ruler of Avars, although this is likely a folk etymology. ... In 632, Khan Kubrat united the Bulgars and formed a confederation of tribes, known as Great Bulgaria, or Bulgaria Magna, with a capital at the ancient city of Fanagoria. ... Kubrat (Bulgarian: Кубрат, Greek: χουβρτου) became the first bulgar BaltAvar in 632 by uniting under single rule all the Bulgar tribes and defeating the Avars. ... Batbayan (d. ...


First Bulgarian Empire (681–1018) The First Bulgarian Empire was founded in 681 AD in the lands near the Danube delta and disintegrated in 1018 AD by annexion to the Byzantine Empire. ...


Asparukh | Tervel | Kormesiy | Sevar | Kormisosh | Vinekh | Telets | Sabin | Umor | Toktu | Pagan | Telerig | Kardam | Krum | Omurtag | Malamir | Presian | Boris I | Vladimir | Simeon I | Peter I | Boris II | Roman | Samuil | Gavril Radomir | Ivan Vladislav | Presian II Asparukh or Isperikh (Bulgarian: Аспарух, Asparuh or Исперих, Isperih) was ruler of the Bulgars in the second half of the 7th century and is credited with the establishment of the First Bulgarian Kingdom in 680/681. ... Tervel (Bulgarian: Тервел) also called Tarvel, or Terval, or Terbelis in some Byzantine sources, was the ruler of the Bulgars at the beginning of the 8th century. ... Kormesiy or better Kormesij was a ruler of Danubian Bulgaria in the first half of the 8th century. ... Sevar (Bulgarian: ) was a ruler of Bulgaria in the 8th century. ... Kormisosh was Khan of Bulgaria between 753 and 756. ... Vinekh or better Vineh was ruler of Bulgaria in the mid-8th century. ... Telets or better Telec, was the ruler of Bulgaria 762–765. ... Sabin was the ruler of Bulgaria 765–766. ... Umor was the ruler of Bulgaria in 766. ... Toktu (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria 766–767. ... Pagan was the ruler of Bulgaria 767–768. ... Telerig was the ruler of Bulgaria 768–777. ... Kardam (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria 777–after 796/before 803. ... Krum (Bulgarian: ) (died April 13, 814) was ruler of Bulgaria, from after 796/ before 803 to 814. ... Omurtag or Omortag (Bulgarian: ) was ruler of Bulgaria from 814 to 831. ... Malamir (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria 831–836. ... Presian I was the ruler of Bulgaria 836–852. ... Boris I Michail or Boris I Michael (Bulgarian Борис I Михаил, known also as Bogoris)(died May 2, 907) was the khan from 852 to 889 and first Christian ruler of Bulgaria. ... Vladimir-Rasatte (Bulgarian: ) was the ruler of Bulgaria from 889 to 893. ... Simeon the Great (modern painting) Tsar Simeon the Great (Bulgarian: Цар Симеон Велики, Tsar Simeon Veliki) (lived c. ... Czar Peter I of Bulgaria (927-969), the son of Czar Simeon the Great of Bulgaria, was married to Maria Irena, the granddaughter of Byzantine Emperor Romanus I Lecapenus. ... Czar Boris II of Bulgaria, the son of Czar Peter I of Bulgaria ruled for three years (969-972). ... Roman (Bulgarian: Роман) was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 977 and 997 (in Byzantine captivity from 991). ... It has been suggested that Samuils Inscription be merged into this article or section. ... Gavril Radomir was the ruler of Bulgaria from October 1014 to August or September 1015. ... Ivan Vladislav was the ruler of Bulgaria from August or September 1015 to August or September 1018. ... Presian II (or also Prusian), was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for a short time in 1018. ...


Second Bulgarian Empire (1186–1396) The Byzantines ruled Bulgaria from 1018 to 1185, although initially it was not fully integrated into the Byzantine Empire, for example preserving the existing tax levels and the power of the low-ranking nobility. ...


Ivan Asen I | Peter IV | Ivanko | Kaloyan | Boril | Ivan Asen II | Kaliman I Asen | Michael Asen I | Kaliman II Asen | Mitso Asen | Constantine I Tikh | Ivailo | Ivan Asen III | George Terter I | Smilets | Chaka | Theodore Svetoslav | George Terter II | Michael Shishman | Ivan Stephen | Ivan Alexander | Ivan Shishman | Ivan Sratsimir Ivan Asen I (also Ioan Asen I, in English John Asen I), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria 1189-1196. ... Peter IV (in Bulgarian Petăr IV, or commonly but less accurately Petăr II) (Bulgarian: ) ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria 1185-1197. ... Ivanko (Bulgarian: ) killed Ivan Asen I, ruler of the renascent Second Bulgarian Empire, in 1196. ... Kaloyan Asen, Kalojan, Johannizza, John, The Romankiller (c. ... Boril was the son of a sister of Tsar Kaloyan. ... Portrait of Ivan Asen II from the Zograf Monastery on Mount Athos, 1817 Ivan Asen II (Bulgarian: Иван Асен II, and also Йоан Асен II, Ioan Asen II, in English sometimes John Asen II), emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1218 to 1241. ... Kaliman I of Bulgaria was the son of Tsar Ivan Asen II and Anna Maria of Hungary. ... Michael Asen I of Bulgaria (Bulgarian: Михаил Асен I, Mihail Asen I; often inconsistently styled Michael II Asen), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1246 to 1256. ... Kaliman II of Bulgaria was the son of Alexander. ... Mitso Asen (Bulgarian: ) emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1256 until 1257. ... Tsar Constantine Tikh of Bulgaria (ruled 1257-1277) took the throne of Bulgaria after the assasination of Michael II Asen of Bulgaria in 1256. ... Ivailo (Bulgarian: Ивайло ), nicknamed Bărdokva (radish or lettuce) or Lakhanas (cabbage) was a rebel leader in Bulgaria in 1277 and reigned as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1278 to 1279. ... Tsar Ivan Asen III of Bulgaria was the son of Tsar Mico Asen and his wife Princess Maria of Bulgaria. ... Tsar George I of Bulgaria was married twice. ... Tsar Smilets of Bulgaria was married to Princess Maria of Byzantine. ... Tsar Chaka was tsar of Bulgaria from 1298-1300. ... Theodore Svetoslav (Bulgarian: Тодор Светослав, Todor Svetoslav and also Теодор Светослав, Teodor Svetoslav), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1300 to 1322. ... Tsar George II of Bulgaria was monarch of Bulgaria from 1322 to 1323. ... Michael Asen III (Bulgarian: Михаил Асен III, Mihail Asen III, commonly called Michael Shishman (Михаил Шишман, Mihail Å iÅ¡man) or Michael III Shishman), ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1323 to 1330. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Tsar Ivan Alexander of Bulgaria was married twice. ... Tsar Ivan Shishman of Bulgarian was the son of Tsar Ivan Alexander and his second wife Theodora. ... Ivan Sratsimir or Ivan Stratsimir (Bulgarian: ) was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria in Vidin from 1356 to 1397. ...


Kingdom of Bulgaria (1878–1946) The Treaty of San Stefano of March 3, 1878 provided for an independent Bulgarian state, which spanned over the geographical regions of Moesia, Thrace and Macedonia. ...


Alexander I | Ferdinand I | Boris III | Simeon II Alexander Joseph of Battenberg (April 5, 1857 - November 17, 1893), the first prince of modern Bulgaria, reigned from April 29, 1879 to September 7, 1886). ... Ferdinand I of Bulgaria Ferdinand I, Tsar of Bulgaria (February 26, 1861 - September 10, 1948), born Prince Ferdinand Maximilan Karl Leopold Maria of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, was the Prince Regnant and later King of Bulgaria as well as an author, botanist and philatelist. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


 
 

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