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Encyclopedia > Borg (Star Trek)
The Borg

A Borg drone, in the Hollywood Entertainment Museum, Los Angeles
Founded Before the 15th century
Base of Operations Delta Quadrant
Star Trek
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Original Series · 80 episodes
Animated Series · 22 episodes
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III: Search for Spock
IV: Voyage Home · V: Final Frontier
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Trekkies · Motto · Sexuality
Star Trek Portal


The Borg are a fictional pseudo-race of cyborgs depicted in Star Trek. The Borg appear in many elements of the Trek franchise, playing major roles in The Next Generation and Voyager TV series, notably as an invasion threat to the Federation, and the means of return of the stranded Federation starship Voyager. The Borg have become a symbol in popular culture for any juggernaut against whom "resistance is futile." Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... In the fictional Star Trek series, the Milky Way Galaxy is divided into four quadrants, which are further subdivided into sectors. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... Star Trek: The Animated Series is an animated science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... List of Star Trek: The Animated Series episodes This is a list of episodes from the fictional animated television, Star Trek: The Animated Series, set in the Star Trek universe. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... This list of Star Trek: Enterprise episodes is accompanied by each episodes original airdate on UPN in the United States, along with its Nielsen rating, and number of viewers. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan (Paramount Pictures, 1982; see also 1982 in film) is the second feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (Paramount Pictures, 1984; see also 1984 in film) is the third feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (Paramount Pictures, 1989; see also 1989 in film) is the fifth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country (Paramount Pictures, 1991; see also 1991 in film) is the sixth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek Generations (Paramount Pictures, 1994) is the seventh feature film based on the Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: Insurrection (Paramount Pictures, 1998) is the ninth Star Trek feature film. ... Star Trek Nemesis (2002) is the tenth Star Trek feature film, and the fourth and last film to star the cast from The Next Generation. ... This article is about the 2008 film. ... This is a list of sapient species and races from the fictional universe of Star Trek. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the Star Trek science fiction universe, Humans/Terrans (Homo sapiens sapiens) are one of the races undertaking interstellar travel. ... For the Vulcan homeworld, see Vulcan (Star Trek planet). ... Romulans are a fictional alien species in the Star Trek universe related to Vulcans, at war or uneasy truce with the humans of Earth and the United Federation of Planets throughout most of the Star Trek series and films. ... Q In the Star Trek fictional universe, the Q are a race of near-omnipotent, near-omniscient god-like beings from a parallel existence called the Q Continuum. ... This article is about the fictional race. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ... Bajorans, a race of humanoids in the fictional Star Trek universe, were introduced in the Next Generation series and played an integral part in the Deep Space Nine series. ... The Ferengi are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the Star Trek universe. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Dominion is a ruthless and militaristic Gamma Quadrant state, consisting of many different races, with ultimate power held by the xenophobic Changelings. ... The Mirror Universe (MU) is a fictional parallel universe in which the plots of several Star Trek television episodes take place, named for Mirror, Mirror, the original series episode in which it first appeared. ... The Star Trek franchise has produced a large number of novels, comic books, video games, and other materials, which are generally considered non-canon. ... Star Trek: Phase II was a planned television series set to air in Spring 1978 on a proposed Paramount Television Service (which eventually became United Paramount Network) based on the characters of Gene Roddenberrys Star Trek. ... This is a list of the various Star Trek novels, novelisations, short story collections that have been published since 1968. ... Almost continuously since 1967, a number of companies have published comic book series based on Star Trek and its spin off series, including Gold Key Comics, Marvel Comics, DC Comics, Malibu, Wildstorm, and currently IDW Publishing, with varying degrees of success. ... The Star Fleet Universe is the variant of the Star Trek fictional universe as detailed in the series of tactical and strategic interstellar wargames from Amarillo Design Bureau Inc. ... The Star Trek Customizable Card Game is a collectible card game based on the Star Trek universe. ... // Video games Throughout the years, the influence of Star Trek has expanded sufficiently to warrant the creation of a long series of PC games. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The view from the outside of the Las Vegas Hilton Star Trek: The Experience is a theme park at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, based on the fictional Star Trek universe. ... The Star Trek canon consists of the television series Star Trek (the original series), Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, and the ten motion pictures based upon the series. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article is an attempt to list every Star Trek episode from every form of media in order by stardate. ... The below is an abridged timeline of events established in the group of television shows and feature films set in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... It has been suggested that List of Starfleet ship classes be merged into this article or section. ... This article is becoming very long. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Planet Classification System is a system developed by the Federation to categorize planets by many factors, such as atmospheric composition, age, surface temperature, size, and presence of life. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for an encyclopedia. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Memory Alpha (often abbreviated to MA) is a collaborative project to create the most definitive, accurate and accessible encyclopedic reference for topics related to the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Star Trek is one of the most culturally influential television shows – and perhaps the most influential science fiction TV series – in history. ... Trekker redirects here. ... Where no man has gone before is a saying used in the introductory sequence of all but one of the episodes of the original Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Sexuality in Star Trek refers to the wide range of sexual practices seen in the Star Trek franchise. ... Many fantasy stories and worlds call their main sapient humanoid species races rather than species. ... For other uses, see Cyborg (disambiguation). ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... The fictional Intrepid-class starship USS Voyager is the primary setting of the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager. ... Popular culture (or pop culture) is the widespread cultural elements in any given society that are perpetuated through that societys vernacular language or lingua franca. ... The Car of Juggernaut, as depicted in the 1851 Illustrated London Reading Book The term juggernaut ( ) is used to describe any literal or metaphorical force regarded as unstoppable that will crush all in its path. ... “Resistance is futile” (IPA: ) is a famous catch phrase used by the Borg from the Star Trek fictional universe. ...


The Borg are depicted as an amalgam of cybernetically enhanced humanoid drones of multiple species, organized as an inter-connected collective with a hive mind, inhabiting a vast region of space with many planets and ships, and sophisticated technology. They operate towards one single-minded purpose: to add the biological and technological distinctiveness of other species to their own, in pursuit of perfection. This is achieved through forced assimilation, a process which transforms individuals and technology into Borg, enhancing individuals by adding synthetic components. For other uses, see Cybernetics (disambiguation). ... The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... Collective can also refer to the collective pitch flight control in helicopters A collective is a group of people who share or are motivated by at least one common issue or interest, or work together on a specific project(s) to achieve a common objective. ... A group mind or group ego in science fiction is a single consciousness occupying many bodies. ... Perfection is a state of flawlessness. ... Captain Jean-Luc Picard, as Locutus, undergoing assimilation after his abduction in Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... In chemistry, chemical synthesis is purposeful execution of chemical reactions in order to get a product, or several products. ...


Originally encountered by Captain Picard at the instigation of Q, little intelligence is forthcoming about the Borg or their origins and intents. In alien encounters, they exhibit no desire for negotiation or reason, only to assimilate. Exhibiting a rapid adaptability to any situation or threat, with encounters characterized by matter of fact 'resistance is futile' type imperatives, the Borg develop into one of the greatest threats to Starfleet and the Federation. Originally perceived on screen as a homogeneous and anonymous entity, the concept of a Queen and central control is later introduced, while spokespersons for the Borg are sometimes employed to act as a go-between in more complicated plot lines. Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional Star Trek character portrayed by Patrick Stewart. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... For other uses, see Adaptation (disambiguation). ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Look up Homogeneous in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about the fictional race of aliens. ... Unimatrix One is the central territory of The Borg, located in the Delta Quadrant. ...


In Star Trek, attempts to resist the Borg becomes one of the central themes, with many examples of successful resistance to the collective, both from existing or former drones, and assimilation targets, with at least one species being shown as having superior capabilities to the Borg. It is also demonstrated that it is possible to survive assimilation (most notably Picard), and that drones can escape the collective (most notably Seven of Nine), and become individuals, or exist collectively without forced assimilation of others. Species 8472 is a fictional advanced race in the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager that inhabits the realm of fluidic space. ... Seven of Nine (born Annika Hansen) is a fictional character in the television series Star Trek: Voyager, portrayed by actress Jeri Ryan. ...

Contents

Depiction

Star Trek: The Next Generation

The Borg (or Borg Collective and Borg Collective Consciousness as they would later be addressed) first appear in the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode "Q Who?", when the omnipotent lifeform Q transports the Enterprise-D to the outskirts of the Delta Quadrant to challenge Jean-Luc Picard's assertion that his crew is ready to face the unexplored galaxy's unknown dangers and mysteries. The Enterprise first encounters them while scanning a planet that has been stripped of all technological components. The Borg (as Guinan officially designates them) appear in a strangely de-generalized "cube shaped" ship, with no apparent life signs aboard, although it is later revealed that the Borg have the ability to mentally link with their ship in order to perform routine tasks and while doing so no longer register as individuals. (How locomotive Borg go undetected by the sensors is never explained) When first mentioning the Borg, Q states, ominously: "The Borg is the ultimate user...they're unlike any threat your Federation has ever faced." Guinan later refers to them as being "made up of biological and technological life, which has been developing for, thousands of centuries" (This conflicts with the later stated temporal origins of the Borg as presented in the Star Trek: Voyager episode, "Dragon's Teeth") It's interesting to note here that Q first describes them using the singular designation of "is" rather than the pluralities which would be routinely used in reference to them in later appearances. After a hopeless battle with a single Borg vessel in which the Enterprise-D finds itself completely outclassed, Picard asks for and receives Q's help in returning the ship back to its previous coordinates in the Alpha Quadrant. At the episode's conclusion, Picard suggests to Guinan that Q did "the right thing for the wrong reason" (a T. S. Eliot quotation) basically stating that Starfleet can now fully understand just how dangerous the Final Frontier can truly be. The episode suggests that the Borg may have been responsible for the destruction of Federation and Romulan colonies in the first-season finale, "The Neutral Zone".[1] The episode further hints that Q had planned the entire encounter with the Borg in a kind of Machiavellan scheme in order to accelerate Humanity's encounter with a technologically superior mortal enemy which would have inevitably assimilated it otherwise. The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Q Who? is an episode from the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... The USS Enterprise (NCC-1701-D) (or Enterprise-D, to distinguish it from prior starships with the same name) is a 24th century starship in the Star Trek fictional universe and the principal setting of the Star Trek: The Next Generation television series. ... In the fictional Star Trek series, the Milky Way Galaxy is divided into four quadrants, which are further subdivided into sectors. ... Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional Star Trek character portrayed by Patrick Stewart. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ...


The Borg next appear in The Next Generation's third-season finale and fourth-season premiere, "The Best of Both Worlds". In the third-season cliffhanger, Picard is abducted and subsequently assimilated by the Borg and transformed into Locutus. Being the Latin term for speaker, "Locutus" is the Borg method of describing the former Picard as the representative of the Borg in all future contacts related to Humanity. In the fourth-season premiere it is revealed by the Borg (through Locutus) that they are now enhanced by the tactical knowledge and life experience assimilated from Picard, and later use this information to easily defeat a Starfleet armada at Wolf 359 consisting of 39 starships, some of the ships being sent from the Klingon Empire. Picard is later "deassimilated" and gives critical information about an overlooked weakness of the Borg to the android Data, who uses it to plant a command into the Borg vessel's computer network in order to misdirect them into regenerating or, "going to sleep." Almost immediately the Borg ship self destructs as a fail-safe due to network corruption by Data. The episode ends with Humanity saved from assimilation and Picard (as Captain again) deep in thought as he looks out upon the image of the Earth. It's interesting to note that the psychological aftermath of Picard's abduction, violent assimilation and his personally held guilt over "betraying" Starfleet are fully addressed in the following episode, "Family". The Battle of Wolf 359 itself is depicted in brevity in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine pilot, "Emissary", in addition to the death of protagonist Benjamin Sisko's wife, Jennifer Sisko. This episode sets the stage for a source of conflict between Commander Sisko and Captain Picard due to Sisko holding Picard personally rsponsible for his Wife's death.[2] Spoiler warning: Locutus of Borg Locutus of Borg is, in the Star Trek fictional universe, the designation for a drone within the Borg Collective made using the body of Captain Jean-Luc Picard of the USS Enterprise-D, who was assimilated circa stardate 43989. ... Wolf 359 is a star located approximately 2. ... For other uses, see Android (disambiguation). ... Data[1] is a character, portrayed by Brent Spiner, in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Combatants Borg Collective United Federation of Planets Strength 1 Borg cube 40 Starfleet vessels Casualties Unknown casualties, no starships 11,000+ casualties, 39 starships The Battle of Wolf 359 is a fictional battle between the United Federation of Planets Starfleet and the Borg Collective depicted in the Star Trek: The... Space station Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (ST:DS9 or STDS9 or DS9 for short) is a science fiction television series produced by Paramount and set in the Star Trek universe. ... Benjamin Lafayette Sisko, played by Avery Brooks, is the main character of the television series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. ... Commander is a military rank which is also sometimes used as a military title depending on the individual customs of a given military service. ...


In the fifth-season episode "I, Borg", the Enterprise crew rescues a solitary Borg who is given the name "Hugh" by Chief Engineer Geordi La Forge. The crew faces the moral decision of whether or not to use Hugh (who begins to develop a sense of independence as a result of a severed link to the collective consciousness of the Borg) as an apocalyptic means of delivering a devastating computer virus that would theoretically destroy the Borg, or to humanely allow him to return to the Borg with his individuality intact.[3] The episode ends with hugh being returned to the Collective with his individuality left intact and suggests that allowing Hugh to remain "free" may ultimately prove to be more beneficial to humanity (and possibly the Borg) rather than allowing him to return as simply a weapon of mass destruction. I, Borg was the twenty third episode of the fifth season of the television show Star Trek: The Next Generation // Overview: A member of the dangerous cybernetic race known as the Borg is captured by the Enterprise crew and examined. ... Jonathan del Arco as Hugh, the Borg drone In the fictional Star Trek universe, Hugh, otherwise known as Three of Five, is a Borg that appeared in The Next Generation episodes I, Borg and Descent. ... Geordi La Forge is a regular character in the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation, played by LeVar Burton. ...


The sixth-season cliffhanger "Descent" (Star Trek: The Next Generation)|Descent]]" follows up on the events which took place after "I, Borg" depicting a group of rogue Borg who had become deassimilated after assimilating Hugh's corrupted "individuality" programming. These rogue Borg were under the control of the psychopathic android Lore, the "older" brother of Data. In cult leader-like fashion, Lore had manipulated the Borg of a derelict Borg vessel into following him by appealing to their restored emotions and exploiting their new found sense of individuality. Their fear at being separated from the Borg Collective and of being unable to run even the basic functions of their vessel allowed Lore to exploit them and manipulate them into becoming his followers, for the later purpose of attacking the Federation. After slowly "convincing" Data to join him after an earlier away team battle with the rogue Borg in which Data exhibited the emotion of anger, Data and Lore forge an alliance and mutually pledge their desire to destroy the Federation in front of an audience of cheering Borg and the captive party of Captain Picard, Beverly Crusher, and Geordi La Forge. In the seventh-season opener it is revealed that Lore had triggered Data's earlier angry reaction and eventual cooperation thru the use of the stolen emotion chip (now in Lore's possession) which Noonian Soong (Data and Lore's creator) had intended for Data and Data alone. In the end Data's ethical subroutines are restored (having been suppressed by Lore through use of the emotion chip) and he manages to deactivate Lore after a battle in which a renegade Borg faction led by Hugh attacks the main complex of Lore and his followers and helps to free Captain Picard, Geordi La Forge, and Doctor Beverly Crusher. Data reclaims the emotion chip, Lore is mentioned as needing to be dismantled (for safety) and the surviving Borg fall under the leadership of Hugh. The fate of these deassimilated Borg (or Bio-Borg) is not revealed in the series. It is important to note that "Descent" is the first appearance of the insignia of the deassimilated Borg, in the form of a Red Borg Claw facing upright. This is not the insignia of the Borg Collective (as is commonly misconstrued) since the Borg have no need for aesthetics of any sort. Lore, played by Brent Spiner is a prototype android and the evil twin brother of Data in Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... Data[1] is a character, portrayed by Brent Spiner, in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Doctor Beverly Crusher, played by actress Gates McFadden, was a character on the Star Trek: The Next Generation TV show and subsequent films. ...


Star Trek: First Contact

The Borg return as the antagonists in the film Star Trek: First Contact. After again failing to assimilate Earth by means of a direct assault in the year 2373 by a single Borg cube, the Borg (in a Borg sphere launched after the destruction of the cube by the Enterprise-E) travel back in time to the year 2063 in an attempt to stop Zefram Cochrane's first contact with Vulcans and in effect erase the Federation from the 24th century. The incident where the Enterprise shoots down a Borg sphere that crashes into the Arctic is a setup for the Star Trek: Enterprise episode "Regeneration". The movie also introduces the character of the Borg Queen, a recurring character in Star Trek: Voyager. Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The 24th century (Gregorian Calendar) comprises the years 2301-2400. ... (Redirected from 2063) Millennia: 2nd millennium - 3rd millennium - 4th millennium Centuries: 20th century - 21st century - 22nd century Decades: 2010s 2020s 2030s 2040s 2050s - 2060s - 2070s 2080s 2090s Years: 2060 2061 2062 2063 2064 2065 2066 2067 2068 2069 The Decade as a Whole This decade is expected to be called... Zefram Cochrane is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe created by Gene Roddenberry. ... For the Vulcan homeworld, see Vulcan (Star Trek planet). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The 24th century (Gregorian Calendar) comprises the years 2301-2400. ... For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... The starship Enterprise (NX-01) Star Trek: Enterprise is a science fiction television series set in the Star Trek universe. ... Regeneration is the 48th episode of Star Trek: Enterprise. ... This article is about the fictional race of aliens. ... The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ...


Star Trek: Voyager

The Borg make frequent appearances in Star Trek: Voyager, which takes place in the Delta Quadrant. The Borg are first discovered by Voyager in episode "Blood Fever". Later Chakotay discovers a population of ex-Borg of various species in "Unity". The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ... Blood Fever is an episode of Star Trek: Voyager, the 16th episode of the third season. ... Chakotay, played by Robert Beltran, is a character in Star Trek: Voyager. ... Unity is an episode of Star Trek: Voyager, the 17th episode of the third season. ...


In "Scorpion", as the ship nears Borg space, the Voyager crew devise a defense against Species 8472, a species who has inflicted heavy losses on the Borg and which the Borg are unable to assimilate. The crew offers the Borg their technique in exchange for safe passage through Borg space. Seven of Nine, Tertiary Adjunct of Unimatrix 01, is dispatched to Voyager to facilitate this arrangement. After Voyager crosses Borg space, Seven of Nine attempts to assimilate Voyager and is severed from the hive mind and becomes a member of Voyager's crew. Seven of Nine's rediscovery of her humanity becomes a recurring plot point of the series. Scorpion was a two-part episode of Star Trek: Voyager. ... Species 8472 is a fictional advanced race in the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager that inhabits the realm of fluidic space. ... Seven of Nine (born Annika Hansen) is a fictional character in the television series Star Trek: Voyager, portrayed by actress Jeri Ryan. ...


Flashbacks and allusions in several episodes, such as "The Raven", establish that prior to her assimilation, Seven of Nine was Annika Hansen, the child of scientists who studied the Borg in the Delta Quadrant independent of the Federation. == The Raven == An episode of star trek: voyager where we are told the story of seven of nines passed. ...


In "Drone", an advanced Borg drone is created when Seven of Nine's nanoprobes are fused with the Doctor's mobile emitter in a transporter accident. The drone, who adopts the moniker "One", involuntarily sends a signal to the collective, bringing a sphere to Voyager. One destroys the Borg ship and lets himself die to protect Voyager from further Borg pursuits. Drone is an episode from the fifth season of Star Trek: Voyager. ... The Doctor is a character on the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager. ...


In "Dark Frontier", after recovering Borg data nodes from a destroyed Borg probe ship, Captain Kathryn Janeway uses the information to plot an attack against a nearby damaged Borg scout ship to retrieve a transwarp coil to aid in Voyager's journey home. The Borg Queen learns of the plot and communicates to Seven of Nine an offer to spare Voyager if Seven rejoins the collective. Voyager recovers the transwarp coil and uses it, with the Delta Flyer, to save Seven from the Queen. Voyager uses the transwarp coil to travel 20,000 light-years. This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... Kathryn Janeway (Born: May 20, 2332 in Bloomington, Indiana), played by Kate Mulgrew, is a Starfleet officer in the fictional Star Trek universe. ... A light-year, symbol ly, is the distance light travels in one year: exactly 9. ...


In the Voyager finale, "Endgame", a version of Janeway from a future alternate timeline travels back in time to aid in Voyager's return to the Alpha Quadrant. This Janeway allows herself to be assimilated, delivering a neurolytic pathogen that disrupts the Borg to the point of killing the Borg Queen and destroying the Borg Unicomplex. Voyager uses a transwarp hub to travel back to the Alpha Quadrant. Neurolysis is the destruction of nerves or nerve tissue or freeing a nerve from inflammatory adhesions by radio frequency, heat, cutting or by chemical injection. ...


Star Trek: Enterprise

A group of Borg, although not described as such in dialog, discovered in the Arctic in "Regeneration" send a transmission toward the Delta Quadrant. According to dialogue, their transmission would reach its destination in 200 years, essentially establishing a closed time loop with the events of "Q Who", explaining why the cube in the latter episode was already en route to Earth. These Borg are "survivors" of the Borg sphere shot down in Star Trek: First Contact, but never identify themselves as such throughout this episode. The episode's events prompt characters to allude to Zefram Cochrane's claims that "strange cybernetic creatures from the future" tried to interfere with first contact. For the ships, see USS Arctic, SS Arctic, MV Arctic The red line indicates the 10°C isotherm in July, sometimes used to define the Arctic region border Artificially coloured topographical map of the Arctic region The Arctic is the region around the Earths North Pole, opposite the Antarctic... Regeneration is the 48th episode of Star Trek: Enterprise. ... A time loop is a common plot device in science fiction (especially in universes where time travel is commonplace) in which time runs normally for a set period (usually a day or a few hours) but then skips back like a broken record. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


Another Enterprise episode, planned for the fifth season of the show (which never materialized), would have featured Alice Krige as a Starfleet medical technician who encounters the Borg and is assimilated - thereby becoming the Borg Queen we would later meet. Alice Maud Krige (born June 28, 1954) is a South African actress known for introducing the role of the Borg Queen in the Star Trek motion picture, She reprised her role for the final episode of // Krige was born in Upington, South Africa, the daughter of Pat, a psychologist, and... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


Other media

In the non-canonical Star Trek: The Manga, the crew of the Enterprise under James T. Kirk discovers an alien station operating near a black hole. The commander of the station appears to be abducting races in a desperate attempt to cure a strange plague among his people. Using his own daughter as a guinea pig, he is able to create a cure for the plague, though the end result is always assimilation into his daughter's, the future Borg Queen, consciousness for those cured. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into fictional universe. ... James Kirk redirects here. ... For other uses, see Black hole (disambiguation). ... This article is about the fictional race of aliens. ...


In the Star Trek novel Probe, which takes place following the events of Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home, the Borg are mentioned obliquely in communication with the whale-probe as spacefaring "mites" (the whale-probe's term for humanoid races) who traveled in cubical and spherical spacefaring vessels; the Borg apparently attacked the whale-probe and damaged its memory in some fashion prior to the events of the film. Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home (Paramount Pictures, 1986; see also 1986 in film) is the fourth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


The novel Vendetta reveals that the planet killer weapon from the Original Series episode "The Doomsday Machine" is a prototype for a weapon against the Borg. The starship Enterprise as it appeared on Star Trek Star Trek is a culturally significant science fiction television series created by Gene Roddenberry in the 1960s. ... The Doomsday Machine is a second season episode of Star Trek: The Original Series. ...


Borg Queen

Borg Queen in First Contact

The movie Star Trek: First Contact introduced the Borg Queen (played by Alice Krige). The Borg Queen is the focal point within the Borg collective consciousness and a unique drone within the collective, who originates from Species 125, that brings "order to chaos", referring to herself as "we" and "I" interchangeably. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... Alice Maud Krige (born June 28, 1954) is a South African actress known for introducing the role of the Borg Queen in the Star Trek motion picture, She reprised her role for the final episode of // Krige was born in Upington, South Africa, the daughter of Pat, a psychologist, and...


In First Contact, the Borg Queen is seen as apparently present during Picard's former assimilation at the start as flashbacks in Picard's mind, and was believed destroyed on the Borg cube those years earlier, before she directed her attentions to Data in the film. After his capture by her drones, she tried to tempt him with live flesh to comply with her. The Queen was also seemingly destroyed in at least three other instances: during Star Trek: First Contact by Data, most likely for good; "Dark Frontier"; and "Endgame". In the Star Trek: The Experience attraction The Borg Invasion 4-D, the Borg Queen re-appears after Voyager returns to the Alpha Quadrant, but as Admiral Janeway attempts to kill her, she activates a transporter allowing her to survive. Data[1] is a character, portrayed by Brent Spiner, in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Dark Frontier is a feature-length episode of Star Trek: Voyager from the fifth season. ... The view from the outside of the Las Vegas Hilton Star Trek: The Experience is a theme park at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, based on the fictional Star Trek universe. ... The view from the outside of the Las Vegas Hilton Star Trek: The Experience is a theme park at the Las Vegas Hilton in Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, based on the fictional Star Trek universe. ...


In the Star Trek: Voyager relaunch novels, the Borg Queen isn't a single, irreplaceable entity, but the product of a program called "The Royal Protocol" that shares its name with a Starfleet document outlining requirements when dealing with foreign royalty. This program is used to create a Borg Queen from any female Borg, commanding the technology within her to alter and adapt to the Protocol's specifications. In the relaunch novels, one of the leaders of Starfleet Intelligence gets her hands on "The Royal Protocol" and, with the use of an Emergency Medical Hologram, turns herself into a new kind of Borg Queen who cares about and loves her drones.


In the Mirror Universe story, "The Worst of Both Worlds", by Greg Cox the Queen is portrayed as a male. This version apparently can inhabit both male and female bodies, depending on the situation, but prefers females. In the Star Trek television series, the Mirror Universe is an alternate reality. ... Greg Cox is the New York Times bestselling author of numerous Star Trek novels, including The Eugenics Wars, (Volume One and Two), The Q Continuum, Assignment: Eternity, and The Black Shore. ...


Assimilation

In the Star Trek fictional universe, assimilation is the process by which the Borg integrate beings and cultures into their collective. "You will be assimilated" is one of the few on-screen phrases employed by the Borg when communicating with other species. The Borg are portrayed as having encountered and assimilated thousands of species and (reportedly) trillions of lifeforms throughout the galaxy. The Borg identify species uniquely with a number assigned to them upon first contact. This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... For other uses, see Galaxy (disambiguation). ... First contact may refer to: In science: First contact (anthropology), a first meeting of two previously unknown cultures First contact (astronomy), the moment in astronomy during a transit or eclipse when the apparent positions of the two bodies first touch In Star Trek: First Contact (TNG episode), a fourth season...


Initially, the Borg were a mysterious group of marauders that snatched entire starships or took over entire planets and societies in order to collect and assimilate just their technology, being less interested in individual lifeforms. It is postulated that assimilation of individuals emerged as an efficient additional method for the Borg of gaining new knowledge and therefore enhancing the collective, as seen through the assimilation of Picard. One of the fictional ships called the Starship Enterprise from Star Trek, one of the most famous fictional starships. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ...


A Borg infant was found in the Borg cube, suggesting they reproduced rather than assimilated lifeforms. (TNG: "Q Who?"). This however is theorized to be their method of assimilating children and/or pregnant female sentients only. In their second appearance, "The Best of Both Worlds", they were shown to assimilate individuals—namely, Picard—into the collective by surgically altering them. This method is generally agreed to be the preferred method of assimilation in regards to fully matured biological lifeforms. The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... Q Who? is an episode from the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ... The Best of Both Worlds is a two-part episode from the third/fourth seasons of the television series Star Trek: The Next Generation. ...

Jean-Luc Picard as Locutus

The method of assimilating individual lifeforms into the collective has been represented differently over time. Throughout, infant and fetal humanoids have been grown in an accelerated state and surgically receive implants tied directly into the brain, as well as ocular devices, tool-enhanced limbs, armor, and other prosthetics. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Jean-Luc Picard is a fictional Star Trek character portrayed by Patrick Stewart. ... For other uses, see Fetus (disambiguation). ... A United States Army soldier plays table football with two prosthetic arms Jon Comer, professional skateboarder with a prosthetic leg. ...


Later, in Star Trek: First Contact, the method of (adult) assimilation was depicted with the more efficient injection of nanoprobes into individuals. Borg nanoprobes are injected into the bloodstream of a victim by a number of tubules (usually two) that spring forth from the top of the hand (or some other extremity) of a Borg drone. The nanoprobes, each about the size of a human red blood cell (RBC), travel through the victim's bloodstream to various tissues and locations throughout the body and latch onto individual cells. The nanoprobes rewrite the cellular DNA, altering the victim's biochemistry, and eventually form larger, higher structures and networks within the body such as electrical pathways, processing and data storage nodes, and ultimately prosthetic devices that spring forth from the skin. Assimilation by nano-probe is depicted on-screen as being a fast acting process, with the victim's skin pigmentation turning grey with visible dark tracks forming where presumably blood vessels once existed. Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are present in the blood and help carry oxygen to the rest of the cells in the body Blood is a circulating tissue composed of fluid plasma and cells (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets). ... “Red cell” redirects here. ... Biological tissue is a collection of interconnected cells that perform a similar function within an organism. ... Drawing of the structure of cork as it appeared under the microscope to Robert Hooke from Micrographia which is the origin of the word cell being used to describe the smallest unit of a living organism Cells in culture, stained for keratin (red) and DNA (green) The cell is the... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ...


In "Mortal Coil", Seven of Nine states that the Borg assimilated the nanoprobe technology from "Species 149", suggesting that other improvements in assimilation technology could have been assimilated, as well as indicating that the Borg's interest in assimilating technologies has not lapsed. Mortal Coil is an episode from the fourth season of Star Trek: Voyager. ...


Assimilation is depicted as the preferred way for the Borg to gain information,[4] especially about species of which no individuals have been previously assimilated. However, in several episodes drones are depicted as first interrogating alien technologies for tactical knowledge, rather than immediately assimilating the few individuals who may be present, as seen in "Q Who?". Q Who? is an episode from the second season of Star Trek: The Next Generation. ...


Because assimilation depends on nanoprobes, species with an extremely advanced immune system such as Species 8472 are able to withstand assimilation. Species 8472 is a fictional advanced race in the science fiction television series Star Trek: Voyager that inhabits the realm of fluidic space. ...


The capability of nanoprobes to absorb improved technologies they encounter into the Borg collective is demonstrated in the Voyager episode "Drone", where Seven of Nine's nanoprobes are fused with the Doctor's futuristic mobile emitter, creating a drone with enhanced capabilities to current drones, that then attempts to contact the collective. Fortunately for Voyager, this drone’s enhanced capabilities are not disseminated throughout the collective; the drone, in fact, sacrificed itself to save Voyager’s crew. Drone is an episode from the fifth season of Star Trek: Voyager. ...


In William Shatner's novel The Return, Spock is nearly assimilated by the Borg, but is saved by the fact that he mind-melded with V'ger. This is because, according to Shatner's novel, the alien race that found V'ger was an earlier form of the Borg. Spock was saved from assimilation because he had part of the Borg Collective in his mind after he mind-melded with V'ger. William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ... The Return is a novel by William Shatner that was co-authored by Garfield Reeves-Stevens and Judith Reeves-Stevens. ... This article is about the Star Trek character. ... Vger (Vejur in the novelization by Gene Roddenberry) is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. ...


Origin

Model of a Borg cube

Over thousands of centuries, the Borg have encountered and assimilated thousands of species (as attested by Guinan and the Borg Queen). However, little information regarding the true origin of the Borg millennia ago has been divulged in Star Trek canon. In Star Trek: First Contact, the Borg Queen merely states that the Borg were once much like humanity, "flawed and weak," but gradually developed into a partially synthetic species in an ongoing attempt to evolve and perfect themselves. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... These pages contain the trends of millennia and centuries. ... The Star Trek canon consists of the television series Star Trek (the original series), Star Trek: The Next Generation, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek: Voyager, Star Trek: Enterprise, and the ten motion pictures based upon the series. ... Star Trek: First Contact (Paramount Pictures, 1996; see also 1996 in film), is the eighth feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series. ...


In the episode of Star Trek: Voyager called "Dragon's Teeth", it is learned from Gedrin that before he and his people were put into suspended animation over 900 years ago, that the Borg were just a few assimilated colonies inside the Delta quadrant and viewed somewhat like a minor pain. Now awake in the in 24th century, he's amazed to see that the Borg control a vast area of the Delta quadrant. This gives the impression that the Borg came into existence somewhere in 15th or 16th century. This, however, conflicts with the information provided by Guinan in TNG's "Q Who." When asked about the Borg by Picard, she mentions that they are "made up of organic and artificial life... which has been developing for... thousands of centuries." The starship Voyager (NCC-74656), an Intrepid-class starship. ...


It is speculated in the Star Trek Encyclopedia that there could be a connection between the Borg and V'ger, the vessel encountered in Star Trek: The Motion Picture (TMP); this is advanced in William Shatner's novel, The Return. Coincidently, in the novelization of Star Trek: The Motion Picture (written by Gene Roddenberry), the V'ger entity notes that the Ilia probe is resisting the programming given to it because of the residual memories and feelings for Decker. When V'ger becomes aware of this, it is aware that "the resistance was futile, of course", which is almost identical to the Borg phrase, "Resistance is futile". The Star Trek Encyclopedia: A Reference Guide to the Future is an encyclopedia of all things related to Star Trek. ... Vger (Vejur in the novelization by Gene Roddenberry) is a fictional character in the Star Trek universe. ... Star Trek: The Motion Picture (Paramount Pictures, 1979; see also 1979 in film) is the first feature film based on the popular Star Trek science fiction television series and is released on Friday, December 7. ... William Alan Shatner (born on March 22, 1931) is a Canadian actor who gained fame for playing James Tiberius Kirk of the USS Enterprise in the television show Star Trek from 1966 to 1969 and in seven of the subsequent movies. ...


The extra section of the game Star Trek: Legacy contains the "Origin of the Borg" which tells the story of V'ger being sucked into a black hole where space and even time are bent. Through whatever providence, this machine survived. Living machines found the probe and altered it. Its programming was a mystery to them. They interpreted it as best they could. Returning to the creator, but it could find nothing. No others like it and none that could have created it. In that moment, the probe decided all carbon-based life was an infestation of the creator's universe leading to assimilation. That was their only useful purpose...as tools for it to learn and grow. It catalogued all carbon-based life and their technology. It created drones in their image and merged them into a collective consciousness. This is where the Borg began, sent out as heralds to find its creator and to learn all that is learnable and return that information to V'ger for assimilation. As the collective grew the necessity for a single voice became the only logical recourse. The Collective found the females of certain species displayed a mental prowess, enabling them to shift through thousands of thoughts and bring order to chaos. Installing these females as the Collective's processors of information, they became much more efficient. With thoughts and desires of her own, she was no longer bound to serve V'ger. But the destruction of the Queen put a limit on the life of the Collective. With its size and power unregulated, it would become chaotic. This explanation however is not canon. This however does not discount the major possibility though that there is in fact some sort of connection between V'ger and the Borg. For other uses, see Black hole (disambiguation). ... This article is about the idea of space. ... This article is about the concept of time. ... Look up mystery in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Carbon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Consciousness is a quality of the mind generally regarded to comprise qualities such as subjectivity, self-awareness, sentience, sapience, and the ability to perceive the relationship between oneself and ones environment. ... For other uses, see Species (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chaos (disambiguation). ... Canon, in the context of a fictional universe, comprises those novels, stories, films, etc. ...


In the graphic novel Star Trek: The Manga, the origin of the Borg is explained by a result of medical nano-machines and a diseased species. A species of alien was under threat of extinction by a disease that was wiping out its population. In order to find a cure, it built a repository satellite containing test subjects infused with body parts, organs, and DNA of multiple species along with cybernetic enhancements put in place by advanced medical technology. The satellite is maintained by nano-machines and in essence is self repairing and also monitors and cares for the patients in hopes of finding a cure. The species itself is capable of transwarp corridor travel and also are able to time travel as the Borg are able to with their systems of transwarp corridors. The medical facility eventually deteriorates, its test subjects still under care by the nano-machines. The nano-machines, falling in a state of disrepair and corrupted programing, begin infusing themselves to the patients, interpreting them as part of the satellite in needing repair. Among the patients is the daughter of head medical researcher of the satellite. The satellite eventually falls apart in an encounter with an away team from the Enterprise under the command of James T. Kirk. In the final moments of the satellites destruction and the escape of the crew members of the Enterprise with the patients, the subjects display qualities inherently resembling the Borg; injection of nano-machine probes, rapid adaptation to weaponry, and a hive mind consciousness, as all the subjects begin following the whim of the daughter. As the succumbing of the disease was inevitable, and the corrupt nano-machine programing infused in to the bodies, the final image of the page of the manga Borg origin is left with the daughter turned borg queen, stating "Resistance is futile." Nanotechnology refers broadly to a field of applied science and technology whose unifying theme is the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale, generally 100 nanometers or smaller, and the fabrication of devices with critical dimensions that lie within that size range. ... Extraterrestrial, as an adjective, refers to something that originates, occurs, or is located outside Earth or its atmosphere. ... For other uses, see Extinction (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medical term. ... Look up cure in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article is about artificial satellites. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Time travel is a concept that has long fascinated humanity—whether it is Merlin experiencing time backwards, or religious traditions like Mohammeds trip to Jerusalem and ascent to heaven, returning before a glass knocked over had spilt its contents. ... A patient having his blood pressure taken by a doctor. ... A comparison of the Enterprise with other ships and buildings (see image description for more detail) The USS Enterprise, (NCC-1701) is a fictional starship in the television series Star Trek, which chronicles the vessels mission to explore strange new worlds; to seek out new life and new civilizations... James Kirk redirects here. ... A weapon is a tool used to kill or incapacitate a person or animal, or destroy a military target. ... This article is about the comics created in Japan. ...


The Borg in computer games

The Borg appear as antagonists to the player in the following Star Trek game titles:

Activision at one point planned to release Star Trek: Borg Assimilator, in which the player would play a Borg, but later canceled the game. Star Trek: Birth of the Federation is a 4X turn-based computer strategy game, based in the Star Trek fictional universe, that was released in 1999. ... Star Trek: Armada is a computer game published by Activision, based upon the Star Trek universe. ... Star Trek: Armada II is a computer game published by Activision, based upon the Star Trek universe. ... Star Trek: Away Team is an isometric computer strategy game set in the fictional universe of Star Trek and focusing on commando-style combat. ... Star Trek: Voyager Elite Force is a first-person shooter computer game made by Raven Software and published by Activision in 2000. ... Star Trek Elite Force 2 is a first-person shooter video game developed by Ritual Entertainment and published by Activision. ... Star Trek: Starfleet Command III is a Star Trek computer game published in 2002. ... Star Trek: Legacy is the title of a game released by Mad Doc Software for PC and Xbox 360. ...


The Borg as a cultural allusion

In the text commentary to the Collector's Edition of Star Trek: First Contact, Mike Okuda revealed that Star Trek: The Next Generation writers began to develop the idea of the Borg as early as the first season episode, "Conspiracy," which introduced a coercive, symbiotic life form that took over key Federation personnel but who were thwarted by the Enterprise crew and presumably never heard of again. Plans to feature the Borg as an increasingly menacing threat were subsequently scrapped in favor of a more subtle introduction, culminating in the encounter between Borg and the Enterprise crew in "Q Who?". Image File history File links Emblem-important. ...


The Borg were a concept born out of necessity for Star Trek to feature a new antagonist and the regular enemy that was lacking during the first season of The Next Generation, now that the Klingons were allies, and the Romulans mostly absent. Originally intended as the new enemy for the United Federation of Planets, the Ferengi failed to assert themselves as a convincing threat because of their comical, unintimidating appearance and devotion to capitalist accumulation or "free enterprise". They were subsequently reassigned the role of annoying but cute comic relief characters. A new military threat was thus needed to replace the Klingons and Romulans. The Borg, with their frightening appearance, immense power, and most importantly a no-nonsense, totally sinister motive became the signature villains for the TNG era of Star Trek. Its strongest definition is most probably the fearful Luddite prophecy – the vision that technology will eventually transform humanity into monsters. This theme has been, of course, reflected in the story of Dr. Frankenstein, among countless other manifestations, most notably the Cybermen of the British sci-fi series Doctor Who, who bear a striking resemblance to the Borg. This article is about the fictional race. ... Romulans are a fictional alien species in the Star Trek universe related to Vulcans, at war or uneasy truce with the humans of Earth and the United Federation of Planets throughout most of the Star Trek series and films. ... The Ferengi are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the Star Trek universe. ... For other uses, see Capitalism (disambiguation). ... Free Enterprise is am economic system characterized by private or corporate ownership of capital goods; investments that are determined by private decision rather than by state control; and determined in a free market. ... The Luddites were a social movement of English textile artisans in the early nineteenth century who protested — often by destroying textile machines — against the changes produced by the Industrial Revolution, which they felt threatened their livelihood. ... For other uses, see Prophecy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the 1818 novel. ... The Cybermen - 1966 vintage (from The Moonbase). ... This article is about the television series. ...


The behaviour of the Borg are strongly reminiscent of traditional villains Vampires and Zombies, modernised for the science fiction genre. The Borg assimilate their victims using two small injection tubules which inject the hostile nanomachines into the victim's neck, mimicking the vampire behaviour of biting the neck, and leaving the same telltale double puncture marks. Depending on the depiction of the vampire, a single bite may not necessarily turn the victim into a vampire, a Borg's "bite" has the sole purpose of assimilating the victim into another Borg Drone. Additionally, the Borg usually move with the same slow monotonous pace of modern depictions of zombies, and work with the same unified will. Further reading Christopher Frayling - Vampyres: Lord Byron to Count Dracula 1992. ... For other uses see Zombie (disambiguation) A zombie is a kind of undead, or figuratively, a very apathetic person. ...


The Borg are one of the more recognizable and popular Star Trek villains, and the term "Borg" has been used to describe conformist individuals or organizations in the vernacular of science-fiction literates.[citation needed]


References

  1. ^ Okuda, Mike and Denise Okuda, with Debbie Mirek (1999). The Star Trek Encyclopedia. Pocket Books. ISBN 0-671-53609-5. 
  2. ^ Erdmann, Terry J.; Paula M. Block (2000-08-01). Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion. Pocket Books. ISBN 0671501062. 
  3. ^ Nemeck, Larry (2003). Star Trek: The Next Generation Companion. Pocket Books. ISBN 0-7434-5798-6. 
  4. ^ Star Trek Voyager: "Scorpion" Parts 1 and 2

Michael Okuda is an graphic designer who is best known for his work on Star Trek. ... The Star Trek Encyclopedia: A Reference Guide to the Future is an encyclopedia of all things related to Star Trek. ... Pocket Books is the name of a subdivision of Simon & Schuster publishers. ...

Further reading

  • Patrick Thaddeus Jackson and Daniel H. Nexon, "Representation is Futile?: American Anti-Collectivism and the Borg" in Jutta Weldes, ed., To Seek Out New Worlds: Science Fiction and World Politics. 2003. New York: Palgrave Macmillan. ISBN 0-312-29557-X. Pp. 143-167.
  • Thomas A. Georges. Digital Soul: Intelligent Machines and Human Values. Boulder: Westview. ISBN 0-8133-4057-8. p. 172. (The Borg as Big Business)

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Borg

In science fiction, a common theme is that of the assimilating race: a fictional species or race which maintains its numbers not by conventional sexual reproduction but through the assimilation of the members of other groups. ... “Resistance is futile” (IPA: ) is a famous catch phrase used by the Borg from the Star Trek fictional universe. ...

External links

Main Star Trek nations
Bajorans  · Borg  · Breen
Cardassians  · Dominion  · Ferengi
Gorn  · Hirogen  · Humans  · Kazon  · Klingons
Q  · Romulans  · Tholians  · Trill
United Federation of Planets  · Vulcans  · Xindi
Memory Alpha (often abbreviated to MA) is a collaborative project to create the most definitive, accurate and accessible encyclopedic reference for topics related to the Star Trek fictional universe. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Wiki wiki redirects here. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Bajorans, a race of humanoids in the fictional Star Trek universe, were introduced in the Next Generation series and played an integral part in the Deep Space Nine series. ... Breen soldier appearing on Star Trek: Deep Space 9 The Breen are a species in the science fiction franchise Star Trek. ... This article is about the Star Trek universe. ... In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Dominion is a ruthless and militaristic Gamma Quadrant state, consisting of many different races, with ultimate power held by the xenophobic Changelings. ... The Ferengi are a fictional extraterrestrial race from the Star Trek universe. ... The Gorn which Captain Kirk fought in Arena A Gorn from the Enterprise episode In a Mirror, Darkly Part II In the fictional Star Trek universe, the Gorn are intelligent reptilian humanoids from the Gorn Hegemony. ... The Hirogen are a fictional race in the Star Trek universe. ... In the Star Trek science fiction universe, Humans/Terrans (Homo sapiens sapiens) are one of the races undertaking interstellar travel. ... In the Star Trek fictional universe, the Kazon are a Delta Quadrant race. ... This article is about the fictional race. ... Q In the Star Trek fictional universe, the Q are a race of near-omnipotent, near-omniscient god-like beings from a parallel existence called the Q Continuum. ... Romulans are a fictional alien species in the Star Trek universe related to Vulcans, at war or uneasy truce with the humans of Earth and the United Federation of Planets throughout most of the Star Trek series and films. ... Tholians are a starfaring and extremely territorial race in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... Jadzia Dax is a Trill who carries the Dax symbiont. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the Vulcan homeworld, see Vulcan (Star Trek planet). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

 
 

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