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Encyclopedia > Bordeaux wine regions
Bordeaux and sub regions

The wine regions of Bordeaux are the area around the city of Bordeaux within the Gironde department of Aquitaine. The region is naturally divided by the Gironde River into a Left Bank area which includes the Médoc and the sub regions of St-Estèphe, Pauillac, St.-Julien, and Margaux and a Right Bank area which includes the subregions of Saint-Émilion, Pomerol, Bourg and Blaye. Additional wine regions include the area of Graves which is south east of the Médoc and includes the sub regions of Pessac-Léognan, Sauternes and Barsac, Gironde. Across from the Graves, on the Right Bank, is the Entre-Deux-Mers area between the Gironde and Dordogne rivers. This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Gironde is a département in the southwest of France named after the Gironde Estuary. ... Departments (French: départements) are administrative units of France and many former French colonies, roughly analogous to English counties. ... Location Administration Capital Bordeaux Regional President Alain Rousset (PS) (since 1998) Départements Dordogne Gironde Landes Lot-et-Garonne Pyrénées-Atlantiques Arrondissements 18 Cantons 235 Communes 2,296 Statistics Land area1 41,309 km² Population (Ranked 6th)  - January 1, 2005 est. ... The Gironde is a navigable estuary, but often referred to as a river, in southwest France. ... The Médoc is one of the most famous of the French wine-growing regions, consisting of the region in the département of Gironde, on the left bank of the Gironde estuary, north of Bordeaux. ... Pauillac is a small village and port on the Gironde estuary, famed for producing some of the finest and longest-lasting red wine in the world. ... St-Julien is a village on the left bank of the Garonne estuary in the Gironde département of south-west France, famed for its production of red wine. ... Margaux is a village and commune in the Gironde département of south-west France, that produces red wine. ... Saint Emilion Saint-Émilion is a small town near Bordeaux, France that is famous for the eponymous wine region that surrounds it. ... Pomerol is a village and wine growing region (AOC) in France. ... Blaye is a commune of the Gironde département, in France. ... Graves (pronounced , meaning gravel land in French) is an important wine region of Bordeaux, producing over 20 million bottles each year. ... Pessac-Léognan is one of the most important of the French wine appellations, and consists of many of the finest of the vineyards of the Bordeaux region. ... Sauternes is a commune of the Gironde département in France. ... Barsac is a town and commune on the left bank of the Garonne river in the Gironde département in south-west France. ... Dordogne (Occitan: Dordonha) is a department in central France named after the Dordogne River. ...


All of these regions have their own appellation and Appellation d'origine contrôlée laws which dictate the composition of their vineyards, time of harvest and appropriate yields as well as various winemaking techniques. Bordeaux wine labels will include the region on the front if all the grapes have been harvested in a specific regions. Generic Bordeaux wine labellings are often produced by co-operatives and négociants who work with grapes from different appellations or less prestigious ones like Entre-Deux-Mers. An appellation in its broadest sense is a name or designation. ... Appellation dOrigine Contrôlée (AOC), which roughly translates as term of origin is the French certification granted to certain French geographical indications for wines, cheeses, butters, and other agricultural products, by the government bureau Institut National des Appellations dOrigine (INAO). ... Winemakers often use carboys like these to ferment smaller quantities of wine Winemaking, or vinification, is the process of wine production, from the selection of grapes to the bottling of finished wine. ... This article needs a complete rewrite for the reasons listed on the talk page. ... Bordeaux with sub-wine regions A Bordeaux wine is any wine produced in the Bordeaux region of France. ... A négociant is a wine merchant who assembles the produce of smaller growers and winemakers and sells the result under its own name. ...


Estates in Bordeaux are often classified according to the reputed quality of the producer. On the Left Bank, the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855 is the starting point for classification and includes most of the Left Bank estates as well as Sauternes and Château Haut-Brion of Graves. Estates who were not classified in that listing may be classified under the Cru Bourgeois label. In 1953, the rest of the Graves was classified. In 1954, a separate classification of Saint-Emilion wine was set up for this Right Bank region. For the 1855 Exposition Universelle de Paris, Emperor Napoleon III requested a classification system for Frances best Bordeaux wines which were to be on display for visitors from around the world. ... Château Haut-Brion is a First Growth in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. ... First Growth (French Premier Cru) status refers to the greatest wines of the Bordeaux region. ... In 1954 the wines of Saint-Emilion in the wine-growing region of Bordeaux were classified. ...


While wine making styles do vary, a general rule of thumb is that the Left Bank is predominately more Cabernet Sauvignon based with the Right Bank more Merlot based. The Graves area produced both red wine and white wine from the Sauvignon blanc and Sémillon grapes. The area of Sauternes and Barsac are more known for the botrytized dessert wines. Old vine Cabernet Sauvignon at Chateau Montelena in Napa Valley. ... Merlot grapes on the vine. ... Sauvignon blanc is a white wine grape probably originating in the Bordeaux region of France that is now planted in much of the worlds winelands producing a crisp dry refreshing white varietal wine. ... Sémillon is a golden-skinned grape used to make dry and sweet white wines, most notably in France and Australia. ... Sauternes is a commune of the Gironde département in France. ... Barsac is a town on the left bank of the Garonne river in the Gironde département in south west France. ... Binomial name Botryotinia fuckeliana (de Bary) Whetzel 1945 Botrytis cinerea is a fungus that affects many plant species, although its most economically important hosts are wine grapes[]. In viticulture, it is commonly known as botrytis bunch rot; in horticulture, it is usually called grey mould or gray mold. ... Dessert wines are those wines which are typically served with dessert, although they are also drunk on their own, i. ...

Contents

Left bank

The wine regions of the Left bank of the Gironde river is bordered by large coniferous forest land that have a tempering affect on the maritime climate of the area. The region spans from the mouth of the river down south and includes the four famous communes of St-Estephe, Pauillac, St. Julien and Margaux. It also includes the area formerly known as the Bas-Médoc (lower Médoc), but now simply labeled as Médoc, this region of Bordeaux is located at the mouth of the Gironde River. Although the region does not have any classified growths, there are a number of Crus Bourgeois located in the soft clay soil of the Médoc. As Merlot favors the clay more then Cabernet Sauvignon, the wines from this region tend to have favor the right bank style of St.-Emilion more then other Left bank wines. [1] Orders & Families Cordaitales † Pinales   Pinaceae - Pine family   Araucariaceae - Araucaria family   Podocarpaceae - Yellow-wood family   Sciadopityaceae - Umbrella-pine family   Cupressaceae - Cypress family   Cephalotaxaceae - Plum-yew family   Taxaceae - Yew family Vojnovskyales † Voltziales † The conifers, division Pinophyta, are one of 13 or 14 division level taxa within the Kingdom Plantae. ... From the latin maritimus, maritime refers to things relating to the sea. ... The Médoc is one of the most famous of the French wine-growing regions, consisting of the region in the département of Gironde, on the left bank of the Gironde estuary, north of Bordeaux. ...


The Central Médoc includes the area between St. Julien and Margaux. This area is home to many Crus Bourgeois including the Cru Bourgeois Exceptionnels rated Château Chasse-Spleen and Château Poujeaux. Within the Central Medoc there are the appellations Listrac-Médoc and Moulis-en-Médoc. Within Moulis, some wines estates near the village of Grand Poujeaux have added that name to their labels. The Listrac appellation is located on a lime stone based plateau and produced highly tannic wines that require a bit of aging before they soften. [2] Limey shale overlaid by limestone. ... Monte Roraima In geology and earth science, a plateau, also called a high plateau or tableland or chodechugger, is an area of highland, usually consisting of relatively flat open country. ...


The area just south of Margaux is called Southern Médoc with wines produced in this area using the Haut-Médoc designations or, in some cases, Margaux. This area includes the classified growths of Château La Lagune in Ludon and Château Cantemerle in Macau. [3] Château Cantemerle is a French winery in the Haut-Médoc region of Bordeaux. ...


St-Estèphe

Among the four famous Left Bank communes, St-Estèphe is the northernmost region with the jalle du Breuil dividing it from Pauillac to the south. The soil of St-Estèphe is a heavy composite of clay washed a shore from the Gironde. This soil type drains slowly and gives St-Estèphe estates an advantage during dry summers. The wines produce here tend to have more acidity then other red Bordeaux and with less perfume.[4] While Cabernet Sauvignon is still the dominate grape, this sub-region has more planting of Merlot then any other area on the Left bank.[5] Butchers Creek, Omeo, Victoria A stream, brook, beck, burn or creek, is a body of water with a detectable current, confined within a bed and banks. ... The Gay Head cliffs in Marthas Vineyard are made almost entirely of clay. ...


St-Estèphe has five classified estates. The Second Growths Château Cos d'Estournel and Château Montrose. The Third Growth Château Calon-Ségur. The Fourth Growth Château Lafon-Rochet. The Fifth Growth Château Lafon-Rochet. The region also has numerous Cru Bourgeois including the Cru Bourgeois Exceptionnels rated Château Haut-Marbuzet, Château Les Ormes-de-Pez, Château de Pez, and Château Phélan-Ségur. The area is also home to several independent vignerons who produce wine as various co-operatives such as the Marquis de St-Estèphe and Canterayne. [4] Château Cos dEstournel (commonly referred to as Cos) is a winery in the Saint-Estèphe appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... Château Montrose is a Second Growth in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855 and is one of the most prestigious wine producers in France. ... A cooperative (also co-operative or co-op) is an association of persons who join together to carry on an economic activity of mutual benefit, in an egalitarian fashion. ...


Pauillac

The Château Latour tower in Pauillac is featured on every bottle of this First Growth wine

Located south of St-Estèphe, the area around Pauillac has the highest elevation of the Médoc with the estates of Château Mouton Rothschild and Château Pontet-Canet sitting on a summit of 100ft. Up until the early 19th century, Malbec was considered the great grape of the Pauillac region. Eventually the Cabernet Sauvignon vine took hold in the gravel soil of the area. Vineyards in Pauillac are not as parceled as other regions of Bordeaux with entire slopes and plateaus belonging to a single estate.[6] Image File history File links Latour_Tower. ... Image File history File links Latour_Tower. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... Château Mouton Rothschild, located 50 km (30 mi) north-west of the city of Bordeaux, France in an area known as the Médoc, specifically the village of Pauillac. ... Château Pontet-Canet is one of the dozen Pauillac properties ranked as Fifth Growths in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855, making it one of the most prestigious in France. ... A topographical summit is a point on a surface which is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. ... Malbec is a black, mellow grape variety originally grown in France, in the Loire Valley and Cahors. ... In GIS or Tax talk a parcel is: a contiguous area of land described in a single description by a deed or other instrument or as one of a number of lots on a plat or plan, separately owned and capable of being separately conveyed. ... Monte Roraima In geology and earth science, a plateau, also called a high plateau or tableland or chodechugger, is an area of highland, usually consisting of relatively flat open country. ...


The area of Pauillac has more classified first growth estates then any other area of Bordeaux. These include the First Growths Château Lafite-Rothschild, Château Latour and Château Mouton Rothschild. The Second Growths Château Pichon Longueville Baron and Château Pichon Longueville Comtesse de Lalande. The Fourth Growth Château Duhart-Milon-Rothschild. The Fifth Growth Château Pontet-Canet, Château Batailley, Château Haut-Batailley, Château Haut-Bages-Liberal, Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste, Château Grand-Puy-Ducasse, Château Lynch-Bages, Château Lynch-Moussas, Château d'Armailhac, Château Pedesclaux, Château Clerc-Milon, and Château Croizet Bages.[6] Château Lafite-Rothschild Lafite-Rothschild label from the 1999 vintage Château Lafite Rothschild is a winery in France currently owned by members of the Rothschild banking family of France. ... Château Latour label Tower at Château Latour In most appraisals of the wine-growing world, the five First Growth Châteaux of the famous 1855 Bordeaux Classification are placed among the very best in the world. ... Chateau Pichon Longueville Baron is a Second Growth estate, often described as a “Super Second. ... Chateau Haut-Bages-Liberal is a Fifth Growth estate in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855, making it one of the most prestigious in France. ... Château Grand-Puy-Lacoste is a winery in the Pauillac appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... Château Lynch-Bages is a winery in the Pauillac appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... Label from a bottle of Pedesclaux wine. ...


St-Julien

Situated on two plateaus between Pauillac and Margaux, the wine region of St-Julien has the smallest wine production of the four major regions in the Médoc. The region is divided into essentially two areas-the riverside estates around the village of St.Julien and the southern estates around the village of Beychevelle where the areas Cru Bourgeois are also grouped.[7] The waters of the Gironde estuary have a warming influence on the climate which, coupled with the south easterly exposure of most vineyards, helps to fully ripen the Cabernet Sauvignon vines in this area.[8] Monte Roraima In geology and earth science, a plateau, also called a high plateau or tableland or chodechugger, is an area of highland, usually consisting of relatively flat open country. ... The Gironde is a navigable estuary, but often referred to as a river, in southwest France. ...


St-Julien has the highest proportion of classified estates then any other region in Bordeaux. These include the Second Growth Château Léoville-Las Cases, Château Léoville-Poyferré, Château Léoville Barton, Château Gruaud-Larose, and Château Ducru-Beaucaillou. The Third Growths Château Lagrange, Château Langoa Barton, Château Saint-Pierre, Château Talbot, Château Branaire-Ducru, and Château Beychevelle.[7] These eleven classed growths account for nearly 80 percent of the entire region wine production.[8] Château Léoville-Las Cases is a Second Growth in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. ... Château Gruaud-Larose is a French winery in the Saint-Julien appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... Château Ducru-Beaucaillou is a Second Growth in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. ... Château Lagrange Château Lagrange is a winery in the Saint-Julien appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Château Branaire-Ducru is a winery in the appellation of Saint-Julien in the Bordeaux region of France. ...


Margaux

The Margaux appellation encompasses the village of Margaux and the neighboring villages of Arsac, Labarde, Soussans and Cantenac. It is the most southerly of Médoc's appellations. The commune makes almost entirely red wine, harvesting Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot grapes, with only a small amount of white wine made. This region has the thinnest soil in the region with the highest proportion of gravel that allows the soil to drain very well. The wines from this area is very susceptible to the overall quality of the vintage year and the weather effects during the growing season and harvest. [9] Cabernet Franc is a red wine grape variety similar to and a parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. ... Petit verdot is a variety of black grape used in the production of red wine, principally in blends with Cabernet Sauvignon. ... Gravel being unloaded from a barge Gravel is rock that is of a certain grain size range. ...


The area is home to more classified second and third growths then any other appellation including the first growth Château Margaux. The region is also home to the second growths Château Rauzan-Ségla, Château Rauzan-Gassies, Château Durfort-Vivens, Château Lascombes, and Château Brane-Cantenac. The region's third growths include Château Kirwan, Château d'Issan, Château Giscours, Château Malescot St. Exupery, Château Cantenac-Brown, Château Boyd-Cantenac, Château Palmer, Château Desmirail, Château Ferriere and Château Marquis d'Alesme Becker. The three fourth growths are Château Pouget, Château Prieure-Lichine, Château Marquis de Terme. The two fifth growths are Château Dauzac and Château du Tertre. The areas Cru Bourgeois Exceptionnels include Château Labégorce Zédé and Château Siran. [9] The vineyard of Château Margaux stands as the producer of one of the worlds greatest and most sought-after red wines. ... Chateau Rauzan-Gassies is a Second Growth estate in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. ... Château Durfort-Vivens is a French winery in the Margaux appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... Chateau Lascombes is a Second Growth estate in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. ... Chateau Brane-Cantenac is one of five Margaux chateaux classified as Second Growths in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855. ... Chateau Giscours is a Third Growth in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855, making it one of the most prestigious in France. ... Château Palmer is a winery in the Margaux appellation of the Bordeaux region of France. ... Chateau Prieure-Lichine is a Fourth Growth in the Bordeaux Wine Official Classification of 1855, making it one of the most prestigious in France. ...


Graves

This region is bordered on the north by the Garonne river and contain the sub regions of Pessac-Léognan, Sauternes and Barsac. It is known for it intensely gravelly soil.[10] The soil is the result glaciers from the Ice Age which also left white quartz deposits that can still be found in the soil of the some of the top wine making eststaes.[11] While Château Haut-Brion was included in the 1885 classification of the Médoc, the Graves appellation itself was classified in 1953 for its red wine producers. White wine were included in an updated 1959 classification. [12] Austrias longest glacier, the Pasterze, winds its 8 km (5 mile) route at the foot of Austrias highest mountain, the Grossglockner A glacier is a large, long-lasting river of ice that is formed on land and moves in response to gravity. ... Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400 000 years For the animated movie, see Ice Age (movie). ... Quartz is one of the most common minerals in the Earths continental crust. ...


The Graves is considered the birthplace of claret. In the Middle Ages, the wines that were first exported to England were produced in this area. Château Pape Clément, founded at the turn of the fourteenth century by the future Pope Clement V, was the first named chateaux in all of Bordeaux. In 1663, Samuel Pepys' mention of Château Haut-Brion was the first recorded mention of French Claret in London.[13] Claret is a name used in English for red wine from the Bordeaux region of France, along the valleys of the rivers Gironde, Garonne and Dordogne, including Medoc, Graves and St Emilion. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Clement V, born Bertrand de Goth (also occasionally spelled Gouth and Got) (1264 – April 20, 1314), was Pope from 1305 to his death. ... Samuel Pepys, FRS (23 February 1633 – 26 May 1703) was an English naval administrator and Member of Parliament, famous chiefly for his comprehensive diary. ...


Pessac-Léognan

This area of the Graves, located just south of the city of Graves, is home to the first growth estate Château Haut-Brion. In addition to wine production, the area is known for its crops of pine trees and vineyards are often separated by by rows of forest trees.[14] The soil of Pessac-Léognan is composed of gravel terraces with sediments from different geological eras. [13] This article deals with the tree; for the e-mail client see Pine email client Species About 115. ... Terraced vineyards near Lausanne The Incan terraces at Písac are still used today. ... The geologic time scale is used by geologists and other scientists to describe the timing and relationships between events that have occurred during the history of the Earth. ...


The area received appellation status in 1987 and produces both red and white wines.[14] All of the estates named in the 1959 Graves classification are located in this appellation.[13]Cabernet Sauvignon is the dominant grape variety, followed by Merlot and the white wine grapes Sauvignon blanc and Sémillon. The white wines of this area are barrel fermented and aged on their lees.[12] Sauvignon blanc is a white wine grape probably originating in the Bordeaux region of France that is now planted in much of the worlds winelands producing a crisp dry refreshing white varietal wine. ... Sémillon is a golden-skinned grape used to make dry and sweet white wines, most notably in France and Australia. ... Beer fermenting at a brewery. ... Lees refers to deposits of dead yeast or residual yeast and other particles that precipitate, or are carried by the action of fining, to the bottom of a vat of wine after fermentation and aging. ...


Sauternes and Barsac

Sauternes is a subregion of Graves known for its intensely sweet, white, dessert wines such as Château d'Yquem. Wines produced in the region of Barsac are allowed to be labeled either with the commune name or with Sauternes. The intense sweetness is the result of the grapes being affected by Botrytis cinerea, a fungus that is commonly known as noble rot. In the autumn, the Ciron river produces mist that descend upon the area and persist till after dawn. These conditions are conducive to the growth of the fungus which dessiccates the grape and concentrates the sugars inside. The three main grapes are of this are Sémillon, Sauvignon blanc and Muscadelle. [15] Sauternes is a commune of the Gironde département in France. ... Dessert wines are those wines which are typically served with dessert, although they are also drunk on their own, i. ... A half bottle of Yquem Château dYquem is a Premier Cru Supérieur (French, Great First Growth or Great First Vintage) wine from the Sauternes region in the southern part of Bordeaux. ... Binomial name Botryotinia fuckeliana (de Bary) Whetzel 1945 Botrytis cinerea is a fungus that affects many plant species, although its most economically important hosts are wine grapes[]. In viticulture, it is commonly known as botrytis bunch rot; in horticulture, it is usually called grey mould or gray mold. ... Noble rot (French: La Pourriture Noble) is the benevolent form of a grey fungus, Botrytis cinerea, affecting wine grapes. ... Desiccation is the state of extreme dryness, or the process of extreme drying. ... Muscadelle is a white wine grape. ...


Production cost in this area is high. The evaporation and fungus affections produces low yields, five to six times less then in other Bordeaux regions. The berries are normally harvested individually from the bunch with pickers going through the vineyards several times between September and November to ensure that the berries are picked at their optimal points. The wine is then fermented in small oak barrels, further adding to the cost. Even with half bottles of the First Growths priced at several hundred dollars, these wines still have difficulties turning a profit and in the mid 20th century a string of bad vintages drove many growers in the region out of business. [15]


Right Bank

The area of Libournais encompassed much of what is referred to as the Right Bank. Named for for it historical capital, Libourne, this area sits on the right bank of the Dordogne river and expands past west past the convergence of the Isle river. Further west, after the Garonne and Dordogne rivers meet, the region of Bourg and Blaye is found the right bank of the Garonne. The "expression" Right bank typically refers to wines from the Pomerol & St-Emilion areas of Libournais. [16] Libourne, the wine-making capital of northern Gironde, is a French commune in the Aquitaine region. ... Isle is a 235 km long river in south-western France. ...


Pomerol

The area of Pomerol was first cultivated by the Romans during their occupation of the area. Up until the early 20th century the area was known mostly for its white wine production. This area within Libournais doesn't have a distinct city center with several villages spread across an area about the same size as St.-Julien. The area overall has gravel based soil that is typical of Bordeaux with western and southern section having more sandy soil while the northern and easter sections towards St.-Emilion having more clay composition. [17] Roman or Romans may refer to: A thing or person of or from the city of Rome. ...


The wines of Pomerol have a high composition of Merlot in their blends are considered the most gentle and least tannic and acidic of Bordeaux wines. Cabernet Franc, known in this area as Bouchet is the second leading grape and helps to contribute to the dark, deep coloring that is typical of Pomerol wines. Due to the reduced tannins found in these wines they can typically be drunk much younger than other red Bordeaux. The chateaus in the area are not classified with the winemakers seeming disinclined to devise one, although Château Pétrus is often grouped with the First Growths of Bordeaux. [17] Cabernet Franc is a red wine grape variety similar to and a parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. ... Pétrus is a wine of the Pomerol wine region in Bordeaux. ...


Saint-Émilion

Vineyards in Saint-Émilion

The wine region of Saint-Émilion centers around the eponymous commune of the same name. There are several villages around the region that share the Saint-Émilion name, such as Montagne-Saint-Émilion and St-Georges-Saint-Émilion, and are permitted to label their wines under the same name. The area is bordered to the west by Pomerol. Merlot is the dominate grape in this area, followed by Cabernet Franc. The climate and damper, cool soils of the area makes it difficult for Cabernet Sauvignon grapes to fully ripen and as such is less often used. The wines take a little longer to mature then the ones in Pomerol but are still able to drunk relatively young for a Bordeaux (4-8 years). In favorable vintages the wines have a good aging potential. [18] The Vintagers, after a miniature of the Dialogues de Saint Gregoire (thirteenth century)—manuscript of the Royal Library of Brussels. ...


Saint-Émilion wines were first classified in 1878 and have been continuously revised with the most recent revision occurring in 1996. Chateaux are divided into two First Growth classification-Premiers Grands Crus Classés A, which currently includes Château Ausone and Château Cheval Blanc, and Premiers Grands Crus Classés B which currently includes 13 chateaux such as Château Angélus and Château Figeac. Below the Premiers crus are the Grands Crus Classés which currently includes 55 chateaux. Estates can apply for classification by passing two tasting panels.[18] Château Ausone is a winery in Saint-Émilion in the Bordeaux region of France. ... Château Cheval Blanc Château Cheval Blanc, an excellent Bordeaux property in Saint-Émilion. ... Chateau Figeac is the largest estate in Saint-Emillion, with 50 hectares of vineyards. ...


Bourg and Blaye

The Garonne and Dordogne rivers meet near Bourg

North of Libournais, this area sits on the Right bank of the Garonne and Dordogne rivers and is one of the oldest wine producing regions in Bordeaux, exporting wine long before the Médoc was even planted. Merlot if the main grape of the area followed by Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc and Malbec. The area around Bourg also has sizable Sauvignon blanc planting for sparkling wines and Ugni blanc for cognac. [19] Malbec is a black, mellow grape variety originally grown in France, in the Loire Valley and Cahors. ... A glass of sparkling wine A Sparkling wine cork It has been suggested that Spumante, Frizzante, Sekt and Cremant be merged into this article or section. ... Trebbiano is a white grape used to make white wine, and the most common white grape variety in Italy, accounting for around a third of all Italys white wine. ... Cognac is a commune in the French département of Charente, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ...


Entre-Deux-Mers

Entre-deux-mers is a dry white wine made in Bordeaux. The appellation is one of the largest in the Bordeaux region and is situated between the Garonne and the Dordogne (which are actually considered inland seas). The area is responsible for three quarters of the wine sold under the generic AC Bordeaux or Bordeaux Superieur labels.[20]


See Also

French gastronomy France is one of the oldest wine producing regions of Europe. ...

External links

  • Bordeaux wine map
  • Bordeaux wine guide
  • Académie du vin de Bordeaux

References

  1. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 86 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  2. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 94 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  3. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 97 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  4. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 88 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  5. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 133 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  6. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 90 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  7. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 92 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  8. ^ a b C. Fallis, editor The Encyclopedic Atlas of Wine pg 188 Global Book Publishing 2006 ISBN 1740480503
  9. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 96 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  10. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 98 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  11. ^ K. MacNeil The Wine Bible pg 134 Workman Publishing 2001 ISBN 1563054345
  12. ^ a b C. Fallis, editor The Encyclopedic Atlas of Wine pg 194 Global Book Publishing 2006 ISBN 1740480503
  13. ^ a b c J. Robinson Jancis Robinson Oxford Companion to Wine pg 325 Third Edition Oxford University Press 2006 ISBN 0198609906
  14. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 100 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  15. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 102 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  16. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 104 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  17. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 106 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  18. ^ a b H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 108 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  19. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 111 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324
  20. ^ H. Johnson & J. Robinson The World Atlas of Wine pg 82 Mitchell Beazley Publishing 2005 ISBN 1840003324

 
 

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