FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
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Encyclopedia > Book series

A book series is a sequence of books with common characteristics, typically written by the same author, or marketed as a group by their publisher. Image File history File links Information_icon. ... [1]#redirect Book ... Cosette Dwyer is an amazing author. ... A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ...


Fictional series typically share a common setting, story arc, set of characters or timeline. They are common in genre fiction, particularly crime fiction, men's adventure and science fiction, as well as in children's literature. Setting is a term in literature and drama usually referring to the time and location in which a story takes place. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the novel by Michael Crichton, see Timeline (novel). ... Genre fiction is a term for fictional works (novels, short stories) written with the intent of fitting into a specific literary genre in order to appeal to the fans of that genre. ... Sherlock Holmes, pipe-puffing hero of crime fiction, confers with his colleague Dr. Watson; together these characters popularized the genre. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Jane Frank: illustration from Thomas Yoseloffs The Further Adventures of Till Eulenspiegel (1957). ...


Book series can be organized in different ways.


Some works in a series can stand alone -- they can be read in any order, as each book makes few, if any reference to past events, and the characters seldom, if ever, change. Many of these series books may be published in a numbered series, but it doesn't matter if you are reading the third or the thirty-third book. Examples of such series are works like the Hardy Boys, Nancy Drew, and Nick Carter. The Hardy Boys is a popular series of detective/adventure books for boys chronicling the fictional adventures of teenage brothers Frank and Joe Hardy. ... The Secret of the Old Clock, the first Nancy Drew mystery Nancy Drew is a fictional character, the heroine detective of a popular mystery series. ... Nick Carter is the name of a popular fictional detective who first appeared in dime novels published by Street & Smith in the 1890s. ...


Some series do have their characters go through changes, and make references to past events. Typically such series are published in the order of their internal chronology, so that the next book published follows the previous book. How much these changes matter will vary from series to series (and reader to reader). For some, it may be minor -- characters might get engaged, change jobs, etc, but it doesn't affect the main storyline. Examples of this type include Tony Hillerman's Jim Chee and Joe Leaphorn books. In other series, the changes are major and the books must be read in order to be fully enjoyed. Examples of this type include the Harry Potter series. Tony Hillerman (born May 27, 1925) is an award-winning American author of detective novels and non-fiction works. ... Spoiler warning: Jim Chee is one of two Navajo Tribal Police detectives in a series of mystery novels by Tony Hillerman. ... Lieutenant Joe Leaphorn is a fictional character created by American mystery writer Tony Hillerman, one of two officers of the Navajo Tribal Police that feature in a number of novels. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ...


There are some book series that aren't really proper series, but more of a single work so large that it must be published over two or more books. Examples of this type include the The Lord of the Rings volumes or the The Night's Dawn Trilogy. The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by the British academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... British author Peter F. Hamiltons The Nights Dawn Trilogy consists of three epic science fiction novels: The Reality Dysfunction (1996), The Neutronium Alchemist (1997), and The Naked God (1999). ...


Some authors make it difficult to list their books in a numerical order when they do not release each work in its 'proper' order by the story's internal chronology. They might 'jump' back in time to early adventures of the characters, writing works that must be placed before or between previously published works. Thus, the books in a series are sometimes enumerated according to the internal chronology rather than in publication order, depending on the intended purpose for the list. Examples of this series include works from the Chronicles of Narnia, where the fifth book in the series, The Horse and His Boy, is actually set during the time of the first book, and the sixth book, The Magician's Nephew is actually set long before the first book. The Chronicles of Narnia is a series of seven fantasy novels for children written by C. S. Lewis. ... Cover of a recent edition of The Horse and His Boy The Horse and His Boy is a novel by C.S. Lewis. ... The Magicians Nephew is a fantasy novel for children written by C. S. Lewis. ...


Scholarly and scientific books that are released serially (in successive parts) once a year, or less often, are also called a series. (Publications that are released more often than once a year are known as periodicals.) The connection among books belonging to such a series can be by discipline, focus, approach, type of work, or geographic location. Examples of such series include Antwerp working papers in linguistics; Early English manuscripts in facsimile; Garland reference library; Canterbury Tales Project; Early English Text Society. It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... The Early English Text Society is an organization to reprint early English texts, especially those only available in manuscript. ...

For details, see main article: Monographs in series

Contents

Monographs in series are scholarly and scientific books released in successive volumes, each of which is structured like a separate book, or scholarly monograph, with . ...

Notable book series

Fiction

These are listed in the order of their publication debut. (Some of these series started in magazines before books.)

A portrait of Sherlock Holmes by Sidney Paget from the Strand Magazine, 1891 Sherlock Holmes is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, who first appeared in publication in 1887. ... Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... The Oz books form a book series that begins with The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, and that relates the history of the Land of Oz. ... The Laughing Dragon of Oz, see Frank Joslyn Baum . ... The Bobbsey Twins are the principal characters of what was, for many years, the Stratemeyer Syndicates longest-running series of childrens novels, penned under the pseudonym, Laura Lee Hope. ... Laura Lee Hope is a pseudonym used by the Stratemeyer Syndicate for the Bobbsey Twins and several other series of childrens novels. ... The first Tom Swift book: Tom Swift and his Motor Cycle Tom Swift is the protagonist in several series of juvenile adventure novels starting in the early twentieth century and continuing to present. ... Victor Appleton was a house pseudonym used by the Stratemeyer Syndicate, most famous for being associated with the Tom Swift series of books. ... James H. Pierce and Joan Burroughs Pierce starred in the 1932-34 Tarzan radio series 1964 Edition of Tarzan of the Apes Tarzan, a fictional character created by Edgar Rice Burroughs, first appeared in the 1912 novel Tarzan of the Apes, and then in twenty-three sequels. ... Edgar Rice Burroughs Edgar Rice Burroughs (September 1, 1875 – March 19, 1950) was an American author, best known for his creation of the jungle hero Tarzan, although he also produced works in many genres. ... David Suchet as Hercule Poirot in The Dream Hercule Poirot (pronounced ) is a fictional Belgian detective who featured in the novels of Agatha Christie. ... Agatha Mary Clarissa, Lady Mallowan, DBE (15 September 1890—12 January 1976), also known as Dame Agatha Christie, was an English crime fiction writer. ... Lord Peter Death Bredon Wimsey is a fictional character in a series of detective novels and short stories by Dorothy L. Sayers, in which he solves mysteries — usually murder mysteries. ... Dorothy Leigh Sayers (Oxford, 13 June 1893 – Witham, 17 December 1957) was a renowned British author, translator, student of classical and modern languages, and Christian humanist. ... The Hardy Boys is a popular series of detective/adventure books for boys chronicling the fictional adventures of teenage brothers Frank and Joe Hardy. ... Franklin W. Dixon is the pen name used by a variety of different authors who wrote The Hardy Boys novels for the Stratemeyer Syndicate. ... The Secret of the Old Clock, the first Nancy Drew mystery Nancy Drew is a fictional character, the heroine detective of a popular mystery series. ... Carolyn Keene is the pseudonym of the authors of the Nancy Drew mystery series, and also The Dana Girls mystery series, both published by the Stratemeyer Syndicate. ... The Famous Five is a fictional group of child detectives, composed of four children (Julian, Dick, Anne and George) and their dog Timmy, created by Enid Blyton. ... It has been suggested that List of Enid Blytons books, 1960 be merged into this article or section. ... Hari Seldons holographic image, pictured on a paperback edition of Foundation, appears at various times in the First Foundations history, to guide it through the social and economic crises that befall it. ... Isaac Asimov (January 2?, 1920? – April 6, 1992, IPA: , originally Исаак Озимов but now transcribed into Russian as Айзек Азимов) was a Russian-born American author and professor of biochemistry, a highly successful and exceptionally prolific writer best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. ... The Narnia books “Narnia” redirects here. ... Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was an Irish author and scholar. ... Flemings commissioned image of James Bond to aid the Daily Express comic strip artists. ... Ian Lancaster Fleming (May 28, 1908 – August 12, 1964) was a British author, journalist and Second World War Naval Officer. ... The above illustration shows Darkover as the planet on the left with its four moons: Liriel, Kyrrdis, Irdriel and Mormallor. ... Marion Eleanor Zimmer Bradley (June 3, 1930 – September 25, 1999) was a prolific author of largely feminist fantasy novels such as The Mists of Avalon and the Darkover series, and a steadfast encourager of equality (and quality) in writing. ... Jack McGurk is a fictional boy detective in a series of novels by Edmund Wallace Hildick. ... Edmund Wallace Hildick (1925–2001) was a prolific childrens author. ... The Belgariad is a five book fantasy epic written by David Eddings. ... David Eddings (born July 7, 1931) is an American author who has written several best-selling series of epic fantasy novels. ... Cover of an early edition of The Colour of Magic; art by Josh Kirby Discworld is a comedic fantasy book series by the British author Terry Pratchett set on the Discworld, a flat world balanced on the backs of four elephants which are in turn standing on the back of... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Cover of So You Want to Be a Wizard, the first book in the series Young Wizards is a series of novels by the fantasy fiction author Diane Duane. ... Diane Duane (b. ... Magic Tree House series book cover Magic Tree House is a book series for young children by Mary Pope Osborne. ... Osborne at a book signing at the Phoenix Zoo Mary Pope Osborne (born May 20, 1949) is a childrens author who wrote the Magic Tree House book series for children. ... This article is about the Harry Potter series of novels. ... Joanne Rowling OBE (born 31 July 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... A Series of Unfortunate Events is a childrens book series, written by Daniel Handler under the pseudonym of Lemony Snicket, and illustrated by Brett Helquist. ... Lemony Snicket is a pseudonym used by author Daniel Handler in his childrens book series A Series of Unfortunate Events, as well as a character in that series. ... Dear Dumb Diary by Jim Benton is a series about a middle school girl named Jamie Kelly and her adventures. ... Jim Benton (full name: James K. Benton) is an American producer. ...

Scholarly and scientific

The Very Short Introductions series (or VSI series) is a book series published by the Oxford University Press publishing house. ... Oxford University Press (OUP) is a highly-respected publishing house and a department of the University of Oxford in England. ... The Carus Mathematical Monographs is a book series published by the Mathematical Association of America. ... The Mathematical Association of America (MAA) is a professional society that focuses on undergraduate mathematics education. ... Cover of book #9 in the Great Ideas Series. ... Penguin Books is a British publisher founded in 1935 by Allen Lane. ...

Publisher Series

For a more complete list, see main article: Monographs in series The Blue Guides (French, Guides Bleus) are a series of highly detailed and authoritative travel guidebooks focusing almost exclusively on art and architecture along with the history and context necessary to understand them. ... Worlds Best Reading was a series distributed by Readers Digest from 1996 to 2006. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... RR Donnelley NYSE: RRD is a Fortune 500 company based in Chicago, Illinois that provides print and related services. ... MeadWestvaco Corp. ... The 2006 Early-Summer Easton Press Catalog. ... // The Rivers of America Series started in 1937 with the publication of Kennebec: Cradle of Americans by Robert P. Tristram Coffin, and ended in 1974 with the publication of The American: River of El Dorado by Margaret Sanborn. ... Farrar and Rinehart was a publishing company founded by John Chipman Farrar, Stanley M. Rinehart and Frederick R Rinehart in New York in 1929. ... The Franklin Library was the publishing division of the Franklin Mint, which produced collectors books similar to those of the Easton Press for three decades. ... The Loeb Classical Library is a series of books, today published by the Harvard University Press, which present important works of ancient Greek and Latin Literature in a way designed to make the text accessible to the broadest possible audience, by presenting the original Greek or Latin text on each... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Volumes in the Library of America series The Library of America (LoA) is a nonprofit publisher of classic American literature. ... Monographs in series are scholarly and scientific books released in successive volumes, each of which is structured like a separate book, or scholarly monograph, with . ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Book series - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (680 words)
A book series is a sequence of books with common characteristics, typically written by the same author, or marketed as a group by their publisher.
Thus, the books in a series are sometimes enumerated according to the internal chronology rather than in publication order, depending on the intended purpose for the list.
Examples of this series include works from the Chronicles of Narnia, where the fifth book in the series, The Horse and His Boy, is actually set during the time of the first book, and the sixth book, The Magician's Nephew is actually set long before the first book.
UW Press: UW Press Book series in print, and distributed book series (3785 words)
The books in the series are by some of the most prominent historians in the world and are based upon a series of lectures in social and intellectual history that was inaugurated in 1976 in honor of the distinguished historian Merle Curti.
The purpose of the series is to publish single-authored and edited books that focus on historical and contemporary issues within and among Southeast Asian countries, as well as on the region's relations with the rest of the world.
Established in 1985, this book series is devoted to the critical analysis and understanding of the intellectual, linguistic, and cultural methods of a variety of disciplines.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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