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Encyclopedia > Book of Micah
Books of the Old Testament
(For details see Biblical canon)
Hebrew Bible or Tanakh
Common to Judaism
and Christianity
Included by Orthodox and Roman Catholics, but excluded by Jews, Protestants, and other Christian denominations:
Included by Orthodox (Synod of Jerusalem):
Included by Russian and Ethiopian Orthodox:
Included by Ethiopian Orthodox:
Included by Syriac Peshitta Bible:
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Tanakh
Torah | Nevi'im | Ketuvim
Books of Nevi'im
First Prophets
1. Joshua
2. Judges
3. Samuel
4. Kings
Later Prophets
5. Isaiah
6. Jeremiah
7. Ezekiel
8. 12 minor prophets

The Book of Micah (Hebrew: ספר מיכה) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament, traditionally attributed to Micah the Prophet. Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... A biblical canon is a list of Biblical books which establishes the set of books which are considered to be authoritative as scripture by a particular Jewish or Christian community. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish tradition) or Old Testament (Christian tradition). ... Tanakh (‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak) is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Exodus is the second book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ... The Book of Numbers is the fourth of the books of the Pentateuch, called in the Hebrew ba-midbar במדבר, i. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Book of Joshua is the sixth book in both the Hebrew Tanakh and the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Book of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is a book of the Bible originally written in Hebrew. ... Naomi entreating Ruth and Orpah to return to the land of Moab by William Blake, 1795 Julius Schnorr von Carolsfeld: Ruth in Boazs Field, 1828 The Book of Ruth (Hebrew: מגילת רות, Megilat Rut, the Scroll of Ruth) is one of the books of the Ketuvim (Writings) of the Tanakh (the... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... The Books of Kings (Hebrew: Sefer Melachim ספר מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... The Book of Ezra is a book of the Bible in the Old Testament and Hebrew Tanakh. ... 1. ... The Book of Nehemiah is a book of the Hebrew Bible, known to Jews as the Tanach and to Christians as the Old Testament. ... Megillah redirects here. ... The Book of Job (איוב) is one of the books of the Hebrew Bible. ... Psalms (from the Greek: Psalmoi) (originally meaning songs sung to a harp, from psallein play on a stringed instrument, Ψαλμοί; Hebrew: Tehilim, תהילים) is a book of the Hebrew Bible, Tanakh or Old Testament. ... The Book of Proverbs is one of the books of the Ketuvim of the Tanakh and of the Writings of the Old Testament. ... Ecclesiastes, Qohelet in Hebrew, is a book of the Hebrew Bible. ... For other uses, see Song of Solomon (disambiguation). ... The Book of Isaiah (Hebrew: Sefer Yshayah ספר ישעיה) is one of the books of Judaisms Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament, traditionally attributed to Isaiah. ... The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ YirmÉ™yāhÅ« in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianitys Old Testament. ... The Book of Lamentations (Hebrew מגילת איכה) is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh. ... Book Of Ezekiel is rapper Freekey Zekeys debut album and debut on Diplomat Records/Asylum. ... For other uses, see Book of Daniel (disambiguation). ... A minor prophet is a book in Minor Prophets section of the Hebrew Bible also known to Christians as the Old Testament. ... Tobias and the Angel, by Filippino Lippi The Book of Tobit (or Book of Tobias in older Catholic Bibles) is a book of scripture that is part of the Catholic and Orthodox and Anglican biblical canon, pronounced canonical by the Council of Carthage of 397 and confirmed for Roman Catholics... Judith with the Head of Holophernes, by Christophano Allori, 1613 (Pitti Palace, Florence) The Book of Judith is a deuterocanonical book, included in the Septuagint and in the Roman Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Christian Old Testament of the Bible, but excluded by Jews and Protestants. ... 1 Maccabees is a deuterocanonical book of the Bible which was written by a Jewish (pre-Christian) author, probably about 100 BC, after the restoration of an independent Jewish kingdom. ... 2 Maccabees is a deuterocanonical book of the Bible which focuses on the Jews revolt against Antiochus and concludes with the defeat of the Syrian general Nicanor in 161 BC by Judas Maccabeus, the hero of the work. ... Wisdom or the Wisdom of Solomon is one of the deuterocanonical books of the Bible. ... The Wisdom of Ben Sira, (or The Wisdom of Yeshua Ben Sira or merely Sirach), called Ecclesiasticus (not to be confused with Ecclesiastes) by Christians, is a book written circa 180–175 BCE. The author, Yeshua ben Sira, was a Jew who had been living in Jerusalem, who may in... It has been suggested that Epistle of Jeremy be merged into this article or section. ... Letter of Jeremiah is an Apocryphal book consisting of a letter ascribed to Jeremiah to the Jews in exile in Babylon warning them against idolatry by demonstrating its unreasonableness. ... The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ YirmÉ™yāhÅ« in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianitys Old Testament. ... The additions to Daniel comprise of three additional chapters appended to the Hebrew/Aramaic text of Daniel from the Greek Septuagint. ... Megillah redirects here. ... By far the most important of the many synods held at Jerusalem (see Wetzer and Welte, Kirchenlexikon, 2nd ed. ... 1 Esdras is a book from the Septuagint (LXX) translation of the Old Testament regarded as a deuterocanonical book in Eastern and Oriental Orthodoxy, but rejected as apocryphal by Jews, Catholics, and most Protestants. ... 1. ... The Biblical book 3 Maccabees is found in most Orthodox Bibles as a part of the deuterocanonical books. ... The book of 4 Maccabees is a homily or philosophic discourse praising the supremacy of pious reason over the passions. ... This short work of only 15 verses purports to be the penitential prayer of the Judean king Manasseh, who is recorded in the Bible as one of the most idolatrous (2 Kings 21:1-18). ... This article or section is missing references or citation of sources. ... The Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church is an Oriental Orthodox church in Ethiopia that was part of the Coptic Church until it was granted its own Patriarch by Cyril VI, the Coptic Pope, in 1959. ... In the Septuagint and for Eastern Orthodox Christians, 2 Esdras refers to the combination of Ezra and Nehemiah. ... The Book of Jubilees (ספר היובלים), sometimes called the Lesser Genesis (Leptogenesis), is an ancient Jewish religious work. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A series of three books in the Ethiopian Biblical canon. ... Syriac is an Eastern Aramaic language that was once spoken across much of the Fertile Crescent. ... The Peshitta is the standard version of the Bible in the Syriac language. ... Psalms 152 to 155 are additional Psalms found in the Syriac Peshitta, in Greek Septuagint manuscripts, and in the Qumran scrolls: 11QPs(a)154,155. ... 2 Baruch or the Syriac Apocalypse of Baruch is a Jewish pseudepigraphical text written in the late 1st century CE or early 2nd century CE, after the fall of Jerusalem to the Romans in 70 CE. It is not part of the canon of either the Jewish or most Christian... Tanakh (‎) (also Tanach, IPA: or , or Tenak) is an acronym that identifies the Hebrew Bible. ... It has been suggested that Tawrat be merged into this article or section. ... Neviim [נביאים] (Heb: Prophets) is the second of the three major sections in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), following the Torah and preceding Ketuvim (writings). ... Ketuvim is the third and final section of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible). ... Neviim [נביאים] (Heb: Prophets) is the second of the three major sections in the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible), following the Torah and preceding Ketuvim (writings). ... The Book of Joshua is the sixth book in both the Hebrew Tanakh and the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Book of Judges (Hebrew: Sefer Shoftim ספר שופטים) is a book of the Bible originally written in Hebrew. ... The Books of Samuel (Hebrew: Sefer Shmuel ספר שמואל), are part of the Tanakh (part of Judaisms Hebrew Bible) and also of the Old Testament (of Christianity). ... The Books of Kings (Hebrew: Sefer Melachim ספר מלכים) is a part of Judaisms Tanakh, the Hebrew Bible. ... The Book of Isaiah (Hebrew: Sefer Yshayah ספר ישעיה) is one of the books of Judaisms Hebrew Bible and the Christian Old Testament, traditionally attributed to Isaiah. ... The Book of Jeremiah, or Jeremiah (יִרְמְיָהוּ YirmÉ™yāhÅ« in Hebrew), is part of the Hebrew Bible, Judaisms Tanakh, and later became a part of Christianitys Old Testament. ... Book Of Ezekiel is rapper Freekey Zekeys debut album and debut on Diplomat Records/Asylum. ... 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The superscription of the Book of Zephaniah attributes its authorship to “Zephaniah son of Cushi son of Gedaliah son of Amariah son of Hezekiah, in the days of King Josiah son of Amon of Judah” (1:1, NRSV). ... The Book of Haggai is a book of the Tanakh (Hebrew Bible) and of the Old Testament, written by the prophet Haggai. ... The Book of Zechariah is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh attributed to the prophet Zechariah. ... Malachi (or Malachias, מַלְאָכִי, Malʾaḫi, Málakhî) is a book of the Bible Old Testament and Jewish Tanakh, written by the prophet Malachi. ... 11th century manuscript of the Hebrew Bible with Targum This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Hebrew Bible itself, see Tanakh (Jewish tradition) or Old Testament (Christian tradition). ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... Micah the titular prophet of the Book of Micah, also called The Morasthite He is not the same as another prophet , Micaiah son of Imlah. ...

Contents

Content

The book may be divided into three sections:

  1. Chapters 1–3 mainly consist of oracles of judgment.
  2. Chapters 4–5 of oracles of hope.
  3. Chapters 6–7 begins with judgment and moves to hope.

Chapters 1–3 mainly consist of oracles of judgment. The judgment motif is so strong in this book that Micah only preached about judgment. Judgment in Micah is seen in the destruction of Samaria, in the coming of an invader against Jerusalem, in the greedy land-grabbers' loss of their land and in their being abandoned by Yahweh, in shame for the false prophets, in the siege of Jerusalem and the cleaning of the land from idolatry and militarism. It has been suggested that Sebastia, Middle East be merged into this article or section. ... For other uses, see Jerusalem (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Yahweh be merged into this article or section. ...


Chapters 4–5 consist of oracles of hope. The prophet said that those conditions would not prevail forever. Judgment would come but a saved, chastened, and faithful remnant would survive. A new king from the line of David would be replace the present weak king on the throne. He would reign in the majesty of the name of Yahweh. His people would dwell securely and he would be great to the ends of earths. In religion, a prophet (or prophetess) is a person who has directly encountered the numinous or the divine and serves as an intermediary with humanity. ... Davidic line, (also House of David or Davidic Dynasty, sometimes referred to as Royal House of Israel), known in Hebrew as Malkhut Beit David (Monarchy of the House of David) refers to the tracing of royal lineage by kings and major leaders in Jewish history to the Biblical King David...


Chapters 6–7 begin with judgment and move to hope. Micah puts a protest on the people's lips, offering any religious response God cared to ask for. God's indictment becomes specific in 6:9–16. Violence, deception, and crooked business practices were rampant. They would bring desolation and destruction to the land. The reference to Omri and Ahab indicates that the same kinds of corruption that destroyed the northern kingdom had now spread to Judah. This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ... Omri (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ; short for Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian  ; The is my life) was king of Israel and father of Ahab. ... Ahab or Achav (אַחְאָב Brother of the father, Standard Hebrew Aḥʼav, Tiberian Hebrew ʼAḥăʼāḇ, ʼAḫʼāḇ) was King of the province of Samaria in the greater Kingdom of Israel, and the son and successor of Omri (1 Kings 16:29-34). ... Kingdom of Judah (Hebrew מַלְכוּת יְהוּדָה, Standard Hebrew Malḫut YÉ™huda, Tiberian Hebrew Malḵûṯ YÉ™hûḏāh) in the times of the Hebrew Bible, was the nation formed from the territories of the tribes of Judah, Simeon, and Benjamin after the Kingdom of Israel was divided, and was named after Judah...


In conclusion, Micah's later hearers take his messages to heart. His words of hope gave them new heart to live as God's people in a darkened world.


Authorship

Micah prophesied throughout the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, roughly 735–700 BC. Micah was brought up in Moresheth-Gath in the Philistine plain, thus he is known as Micayahu of Moresheth. The prophet’s name, in its elongated form "Micayahu," is commonly translated "Who is like God?" or possibly, "He who is like Him (God)." Jotham (Yotam in Hebrew God is perfect or complete) was the king of Judah, and son of Uzziah with Jerusha, daughter of Zadok. ... This entry incorporates text from Eastons Bible Dictionary, 1897, with some modernisation. ... Hezekiah (or Ezekias) (Hebrew: חזקיה or חזקיהו, God has strengthened) was the 13th king of indepedent Judah and the son of King Ahaz and Abijah (2 Chronicles 29:1), who was a daughter of a man (who was not the prophet) named Zechariah. ...


Micah grew up in the poorer, working class of his small farming community. The quality of his prophecy, however, has caused many scholars to believe that he received a good education and/or may have been one of the wealthier members of the community; i.e. a land owner. Still others consider him as an elder of the community, indicating his respect among his people. Regardless of his background, he was well aware of the avarice and injustices of the rich.


Few Old Testament scholars today would defend Micah's authorship of the entire book.[citation needed] However, some scholars attribute much more of the material to Micah than others.[citation needed] The authorship of the book of Micah is somewhat controversial.[citation needed] It is generally agreed that Micah composed chapters 1 through 3; some scholars hold that chapter 6 and sections of chapter 7 were also written by the historical Micah. The primary reasons given are because chapters 3-5 foretell of events in the 6th century BCE and chapters 6-7 have elements of a universal religious outlook which was not widely present in Judaism until much later.


Date of composition

The superscription suggests the time of the ministry of Micah as being during the reigns of Jotham (742–735 BC), Ahaz (735–715 BC), and Hezekiah (715–687 BC). These figures allow a maximum period of fifty-five years for Micah's ministry, but it is not likely that he was active as a prophet during all of that time. He was active during the late eighth century BC; he was among the earliest of the Minor Prophets. The message in Micah 1:2–9 was given before the destruction of Samaria in 721. The appeal of Jeremiah's supporters to the prophecy of Micah confirms his connection with Hezekiah: "And some of the land arose and said to all the assembled people, Micah of Moresheth prophesied during the days of Hezekiah king of Judah" (Jeremiah 26:17). A minor prophet is a book in Minor Prophets section of the Hebrew Bible also known to Christians as the Old Testament. ... The figure of Jeremiah on the Sistine Chapel ceiling, by Michelangelo. ... This article or section seems to describe future events as if they have already occurred. ...


Micah purportedly prophesied in the reigns of Kings Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah of Judah, dating him between 750 and 685 BC; the dates surrounding his forth telling can be honed more precisely. Knowing that Jotham took “full control” in 739 and that Micah began prophesying before Samaria’s fall in 722, it is likely the text coverage begins sometime after 735. Since Micah’s prophecies extend to the 701 Assyrian invasion of Judah (5:5), it is also likely that the text stops around 700. Historically within this time frame, Jotham was able to ride out on his father’s success in the Second Golden Age; he maintained a considerably prosperous reign. While Jotham prospered on the throne in Judah, Tiglath-Pileser III was on a parallel plane in control of Assyria. Pileser increased considerably in power, thriving long into the reign of Ahaz. Ahaz did not carry faith in the Lord of Judah nor His promise for provision and safety; anticipating an Assyrian invasion, he gave the land of Judah over to the Assyrians in the form of a Suzerainty Treaty. In the throes of this “alliance,” Ahaz converted part of the Temple into a shrine to Asshur and led the southern kingdom into the darkness. Hezekiah came into power around 716, “And the Lord was always with him; he was successful wherever he turned. He rebelled against the king of Assyria” (II Kings 18:7, TANAKH). Jeremiah returns to this even in his discourse: “Did Hezekiah of Judah, and all of Judah, put [Micah] to death? Did he not rather fear the Lord and implore [Him]?” (26:19). Hezekiah’s adherence to David’s example of mindful obedience to Yahweh made him a key to the preservation of, at very least, Jerusalem for the next century.


Setting

Micah had a populist message in a small town southwest of Jerusalem, Moresheth-gath. Most of the messages of hope can be credited to Micah, but often their general content hinders reconstruction of a specific historical setting. Although we read the canonical book through the eyes of the postexilic community of faith, who come to the fore in 7:8–20, the importance of these sections lies in the spiritual message of these prophetic texts. For this reason, scholars look very carefully at messages of hope. They ask whether they came from the prophet who gave his name to the book or from later prophets. Certainly the final edition of the book gives the impression of coming from early postexilic times.


Purpose

Judean politics, society and manner of worship (primarily in the reign of King Ahaz) combine to form the standard of living Micah fervently opposes. “Stemming from the poorer, working class, Micah was acutely aware of the injustices and avarice of the rich,” according to Zondervan’s Pictorial Encyclopedia. This awareness is easily discernible beginning in chapter two, directly following Micah’s initial expression of God’s case against the people—Micah speaks boldly against social injustice. In verses 2:1-2 he abhors those in power who “plot evil on their beds,” and he continues, in verses 3:1-3, to indict the leaders of Israel crying, “you ought to know what is right, but you hate good and love evil.” Micah recognizes power as a God-given responsibility and sees, instead of thanksgiving and acts of love and gratitude, the powerful (not just politically, but priests as well) conniving to maintain their wealth and further subjugate those of “lesser status.” At the time, even a man claiming to be a prophet would speak only in the way that would benefit him—paying no heed even to his own call to righteousness. At the height of the corruption, false prophets were primarily denouncing the coming of God’s judgment, and "[they] had men’s wishes on their side." And so, these are the issues. . . this is the audience to which Micah evangelizes: a people who could collectively be described as having substituted sacrifices and gestures for righteousness in practice. As he winds down, Micah refocuses his arraignment in Chapter 6, wherein he describes God’s call to justice and loving mercy—nothing more than a humble walk with Himself. In a clear understanding of this platform, Micah delivers the whole of his teaching so richly throughout this text.


The purpose of writing the book was to express disdain for the corruptions and pretensions of Jerusalem and its leaders. In an era of urbanization, he championed the traditions of early Israel. Micah condemned religious practice untethered from ethical performance (3:9–10, 6:3–5, 6–8). Micah was probably not a professional prophet. He criticizes the prophets who give oracles for money (3:11) or tailor their messages according to their clients' generosity (3:5). His credentials are divine inspiration and his unflinching stand for moral truth (3:8). His strong sense of call is exhibited in virtually every line. Fervently yet concisely he speaks to the issues of his day in terms of Israel's covenant obligations. Behind the covenant, in spite of Israel's failure to maintain that bond, is the God of the covenant who yet will lead his people to future glory… A covenant, in its most general sense, is a solemn promise to do or not do something specified. ...


Message

Underlying the manuscript is a courtroom setting, which Micah uses to show the wholeness of the Lord in spite of his audience’s incompleteness. The Lord God subjects Himself to each of the different roles in court, beginning with the image of accuser moving through judge, jury, and executioner, ending most significantly with Himself as the defendant, pleading His case before the people. Micah begins by paying homage to the Almighty and calls for his audience to do the same as “the Lord is coming forth from His dwelling-place” (1:3). The prophet’s next move: a brief overview of what is to come and why. Because of Israel and Judah’s sin (which he marks at Samaria and Jerusalem) the Lord is coming down and “the mountains shall melt…and the valleys burst open” (1:4). As the accuser, God has already—in but a few words—stated his case; in an opening power-play, He notes the hottest spots for both Israeli and Judean worship as the sources of their sin ... how can it be? Their separation from God is a result of their half-hearted attempts to obey Him. All throughout, Micah reassures the aspiring faithful, as in verses 2:7, “my words are friendly to those who walk in rectitude,” 4:1, “The peoples shall gaze on [The Mount of the Lord’s House] with joy,” and 7:19, “He will take us back in love.” This is where His court differs from the courts of the world; the court God herein presents is a forewarning of what is yet to come in light of current action, instead of a current action in response to an exploit past. In 4:9-13, God says you will be exiled from your land—your poor leaders will be humbled—but the conquerors “do not know the design of the Lord…you will crush the many peoples.” Even in the midst of the sentence, He provides hope.


But to whom does this hope extend? Anticipating this question, the Lord explains, “I will bring together a remnant of Israel” (2:12). This remnant language lends itself perfectly to the extended metaphor Micah carries regarding this select group as His flock of sheep. In 4:6-7 Yahweh describes His plan to assemble the lame sheep and turn them into a remnant ... a populous nation for Him to rule. In chapter 5, Micah even uses the imagery of a “lion among beasts of the wild” to describe the scattered remnant and their strength, with the Lord God as their source. As Micaiah (whose elongated name is above described) adulates at the close of the manuscript, “Who is a God like You…who has not maintained His wrath forever against the remnant” (7:18). As of yet unanswered, who is part of the remnant? The overtone throughout this whole metaphor falls into the idea that God is out for the good of those who love him.


References

  • Easton's Bible Dictionary, 1897.
  • LaSor, William Sanford et al. Old Testament Survey: the Message, Form, and Background of the Old Testament. Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans, 1996.
  • BELIEVE Religious Information Source. Book of Micah. (n.d.). 13 Paragraphs. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from http://mb-soft.com/believe/txs/micah.htm
  • Hailey, Homer. (1973). A Commentary on the Minor Prophets. Grand Rapids: Baker Book House.
  • Maxey, Al. THE MINOR PROPHETS: Micah. (n.d.). 20 Paragraphs. Retrieved October 4, 2005, from http://www.zianet.com/maxey/Proph11.htm
  • McKeating, Henry. (1971). The Books of AMOS, HOSEA, AND MICAH. New York: the Syndics of the Cambridge University Press.
  • Pusey, E. B. (1963). The Minor Prophets: A Commentary (Vol. II). Grand Rapids: Baker Book House.
  • Smith, John Merlin Powis. (1914). A Commentary on the Cooks of AMOS, HOSEA, AND MICAH. New York: The MacMillan Company.
  • Wood, Joyce Rilett. (2000). Speech and action in Micah’s prophecy. Catholic Biblical Quarterly, no. 4(62), 49 paragraphs. Retrieved September 30, 2005, from OCLC (FirstSearch) database http://newfirstsearch.oclc.org

October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 4 is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Micah
  • Jewish translations:
    • Michah - Micah (Judaica Press) translation with Rashi's commentary at Chabad.org
  • Christian translations:

This entry incorporates text from the public domain Easton's Bible Dictionary, originally published in 1897. Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... The original Wikisource logo. ... Rashi (1040-1105) (Artists imagination) Rashi רשי is a Hebrew acronym for רבי שלמה יצחקי (Rabbi Shlomo Yitzhaqi), (February 22, 1040 – July 13, 1105), a rabbi in France, famed as the author of the first comprehensive commentaries on the Talmud and Tanakh. ... Eastons Bible Dictionary generally refers to the Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Third Edition, by Matthew George Easton M.A., D.D. (1823-1894), published three years after Eastons death in 1897 by Thomas Nelson. ...



  Results from FactBites:
 
Book of Micah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (801 words)
Micah wrote the book in the reigns of Jotham, Ahaz, and Hezekiah, roughly 735-700 BC Few Old Testament scholars today would defend Micah's authorship of the entire book.
The authorship of the book of Micah is somehow controversial.
Judgment in Micah is seen in destruction of Samaria, in the coming of a invader against Jerusalem, in the greedy land-grabbers loss of their land and in their being abandoned by Yahweh, in shame for the false prophets, in the siege of Jerusalem and the cleaning of the land from idolatry and militarism.
Micah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (295 words)
The author of the Book of Micah, also called "The Morasthite" to distinguish him from Micaiah, the son of Imlah (1 Kings 22:8).
He was a prophet of Judah, a contemporary of Isaiah (Micah 1:1), a native of Moresheth of Gath (1:14, 15).
Micah is commonly short for the Book of Micah in the Bible.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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