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Encyclopedia > Bonar Law
The Right Hon. Andrew Bonar Law

Image:bonar_law.jpg

Period in Office: October, 1922 - May, 1923
PM Predecessor: David Lloyd George
PM Successor: Stanley Baldwin
Date of Birth: September 16, 1858
Place of Birth: Kingston, New Brunswick, Canada
Political Party: Conservative

Andrew Bonar Law (September 16, 1858 _ October 30, 1923) was a Conservative British statesman and Prime Minister.


Although born in Kingston, New Brunswick, Canada, son of a Presbyterian minister, Law was raised by wealthy Scottish cousins. Law eventually became a partner in a Glasgow iron-working firm, and was elected to parliament as a Conservative in 1900. He associated himself with the Protectionist wing of the party led by Joseph Chamberlain, and after Chamberlain withdrew from politics in 1906, Law came to lead that wing of the party along with Chamberlain's son, Austen. In 1911, Arthur Balfour resigned as leader of the Tories, and after a deadlock between Chamberlain and Walter Long, Law was elected Leader as a compromise candidate. Law's closest associate was his fellow Canadian, newspaper mogul William Maxwell Aitken (later Lord Beaverbrook). In the years prior to the outbreak of the First World War, Law focused most of his attention on the tariff issue and on the issue of Irish Home Rule, which he furiously opposed.


He entered the Coalition government as Colonial Secretary in 1915, and actually had a chance to be prime minister in 1916 but deferred to Lloyd George. He served in Lloyd George's War Cabinet first as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons. At war's end he gave up the exchequer for the less demanding sinecure office of Lord Privy Seal, but remained Leader of the Commons. In 1921, ill health forced his resignation as Tory leader and Leader of the Commons in favor of Austen Chamberlain, but he returned in October 1922 to become Prime Minister when Tory backbenchers led by Stanley Baldwin forced the Conservatives to leave Lloyd George's coalition as a result of the complete failure of the Lloyd George government's policies in Turkey. He was replaced in May of 1923 by Baldwin, with whom he did not get along, because he was suffering from terminal throat cancer, of which he died later in the year in London.


Bonar Law's Government, October 1922 _ May 1923

Changes

April 1923 - Griffith-Boscawen resigns as Minister of Health and is succeeded by Neville Chamberlain.



Preceded by:
Arthur Balfour
Leader of the British Conservative Party
1911–1921
Succeeded by:
Austen Chamberlain
Preceded by:
Lewis Harcourt
Secretary of State for the Colonies
1915–1916
Succeeded by:
Walter Hume Long
Preceded by:
Reginald McKenna
Chancellor of the Exchequer
1916–1919
Succeeded by:
Austen Chamberlain
Preceded by:
Herbert Henry Asquith
Leader of the House of Commons
1916–1921
Succeeded by:
Austen Chamberlain
Preceded by:
The Earl of Crawford and Balcarres
Lord Privy Seal
1919–1921
Preceded by:
Austen Chamberlain
Leader of the British Conservative Party
1922–1923
Succeeded by:
Stanley Baldwin
Preceded by:
Austen Chamberlain
Leader of the House of Commons
1922–1923
Preceded by:
David Lloyd George
Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
1922–1923













  Results from FactBites:
 
First World War.com - Who's Who - Andrew Bonar Law (463 words)
Andrew Bonar Law was the Canadian-born son of a Scottish clergyman.
Law made a decisive rousing speech at the Conservative Carlton Club which changed their minds and saved the Conservative party.
Law's 'Tranquillity Manifesto' was an attempt to allow Britain to recover from war damage.
Andrew Bonar Law - LoveToKnow 1911 (4210 words)
Law announced that he and Lord Lansdowne were willing to agree that food duties should not be imposed without the approval of the electorate at a subsequent general election; and to remain leaders in deference to their followers' appeal, in spite of the party's disregard of their advice.
Law with his colonial birth and his belief in Colonial Preference, did not bring him much into the limelight; and, influential as he was in the councils of the Ministry, in public he was content to play a comparatively subordinate part.
Bonar Law was whole-heartedly in favour of the Coalition, and frequently adjured his Conservative friends to remain true to it.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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