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Encyclopedia > Body piercing
Female pierced through the following: Lobe (Ear), Septum (Nose), Labret (Lips)

Body piercing usually refers to the piercing of a part of the human body for the purpose of wearing jewelry in the opening created. Body piercing is a form of body modification. The word "piercing" can refer to the act or practice of body piercing, or to a specific pierced opening in the body. Some people practice piercing for religious or other cultural reasons, while many individuals, particularly in the modern West, choose to be pierced for spiritual, ornamental, or sexual reasons. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Physical Features of the Human Body The human body is the entire physical structure of a human organism. ... Body piercing jewelry is jewelry manufactured specifically for use in body piercing. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual...

Contents

In ancient times

Evidence suggests that body piercing (including ear piercing) has been practiced by peoples all over the world from ancient times. Mummified bodies with piercings have been discovered, including the oldest mummified body discovered to date, that of Ötzi the Iceman, which was found in a Valentina Trujillon glacier. This mummy had an ear piercing 7–11 mm (1 to 000 gauge in AWG) diameter. A mummy is a corpse whose skin and dried flesh have been preserved by either intentional or accidental exposure to chemicals, extreme cold, very low humidity, or airlessness. ... “Ötzi” redirects here. ... Glacial and Glaciation redirect here. ... American wire gauge (AWG), also known as the Brown and Sharpe wire gauge, is used in the United States and other countries as a standard method of denoting wire diameter, especially for nonferrous, electrically conducting wire. ...


In Genesis of the Bible 24:22, Abraham's servant gave an earring and bracelets to Rebekah, wife of his son Isaac. In Exodus 32, Aaron makes the golden calf from melted earrings. Deuteronomy 15:12-17 dictates ear piercing as a mark of slavery. Leviticus 19:28 says to not pierce your body. Nose piercing has been common in India since the 16th century. Genesis (‎, Greek: Γένεσις, meaning birth, creation, cause, beginning, source or origin) is the first book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament of the Bible. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... An angel prevents the sacrifice of Isaac. ... Exodus is the second book of the Torah, the Tanakh, and the Old Testament. ... The Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin Aaron (Hebrew: , Standard  Tiberian ), or Aaron the Levite (flourished about 1200 B.C.), was, according to biblical accounts, one of two brothers who play a unique part in the history of the Hebrew people. ... Adoration of the Golden Calf by Nicolas Poussin: imagery influenced by the Greco-Roman bacchanal In the Hebrew Bible the golden calf was an idol made by Aaron for the Israelites during Mosess unexpectedly long absence. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Leviticus is the third book of the Hebrew Bible, also the third book in the Torah (five books of Moses). ...


Body piercing folklore

Many contemporary authors and body piercing enthusiasts have made attempts to explain the history or development of body piercing in Western Culture, prior to its contemporary practice. In Dreamtime by Hans Peter Duerr, the author claims that nipple piercing became popular in 14th century Europe. There is evidence, both anecdotal and photographic, that nipple piercing was practiced in Europe during the late 19th century and in the early 20th century, but it was not considered to be a common practice. It is sometimes claimed that Roman centurions practiced nipple piercing and that soldiers attached their capes to the piercings. This is not true. Their capes were attached to the breastplate of their armor. This particular myth owes its popularity to Doug Malloy, an American piercing pioneer who published pamphlets in the late 1970's promoting his highly fanciful histories of body piercing. A nipple with a barbell piercing Male nipple piercings A nipple piercing is a piercing, centered usually at the base of the nipple. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... This can also refer to a piece of riding equipment, see Breastplate (tack). ... The story of Jim Ward and Gauntlet is the direct result of the financial success of Doug Malloy (real name Richard Simonton), who made his fortune from selling distribution rights of recordings that he made of great European orchestras. ...


Body piercing today

Modern history and social attitudes

Nipple piercings, lip piercing and a stretched ear.
Nipple piercings, lip piercing and a stretched ear.

Ear piercing has existed continuously since ancient times, including throughout the 20th century in the Western world. However, in the mainstream Western culture of North America, Europe, Australasia, etc., it became a relative rarity from the 1920s until the 1960s. At that time, it regained popularity among westernized women, and was eventually adopted by men in the hippie community, and later the punk subculture before it broke into the mainstream. Ear piercing, of either or both ears, has always been practiced by men in many non-Western cultures. By the 1980s, male ear piercing had become somewhat common in westernized cultures, although men usually only pierced one of their ears. Today, single and multiple piercing of either or both ears is extremely common among Western women and somewhat common among men. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 397 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1544 pixel, file size: 849 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Body piercing Nipple piercing Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 397 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1544 pixel, file size: 849 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Body piercing Nipple piercing Metadata This... A nipple with a barbell piercing Male nipple piercings A nipple piercing is a piercing, centered usually at the base of the nipple. ... Lip piercings are a type of body piercings which penetrate the lips or, more commonly, the area surrounding the lips. ... A little girls pierced ear with a small earring. ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ... Singer at a modern Hippie movement in Russia Hippie (sometimes spelled hippy) refers to a member of a subgroup of the counterculture that began in the United States during the early 1960s, becoming an established social group by 1965, and expanding to other countries before declining in the mid-1970s. ... Punks at a music festival The punk subculture is a subculture/counterculture based on punk rock. ...


Less conventional forms of body piercing have also existed continuously for as long as ear piercing, but generally not in Western cultures. For example, women in India routinely practice nostril piercing, and have done so for centuries. Nose piercing is the piercing of the skin or cartilage which forms any part of the nose, normally for the purpose of wearing jewelry; among the different varieties of nose piercings, the nostril piercing is the most common. ...


In the 1970s, body piercing gained popularity in the gay BDSM subculture for various reasons. In 1975, Jim Ward opened The Gauntlet, America's first storefront body piercing operation, in Los Angeles. A collar is a common symbol in BDSM. Female bottom in bondage with leather monoglove BDSM is any of a number of related patterns of human sexual behavior. ... Jim Ward is one of the co-creators of the modern body piercing movement. ... The Gauntlet, also known as Gauntlet Enterprises, was a business founded in November, 1975 by Jim Ward that pioneered the field of body piercing in North America. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Most Body Piercings

Canadian Brent Moffat set the world record for most body piercings (700 piercings with 18g surgical needles in 1 session of 7 hours, using “play piercing” where the skin is pierced for permanently healing to wear jewelry). In the UK, a record was made by piercer Charlie Wilson on subject Kam Ma, with 600 permanent piercings in just over 8 1/2 hours. Officially titled “most pierced woman” Elaine Davidson of Scotland set the record for most permanent piercings (1,903 permanent piercings) and she first broke or created this record in 2000 upon verification by Guinness judges (462 body piercings, with 192 at the time being around her head and face).[1] Unofficially Dwaine Scum attempted to break the Guinness World Record for the most consecutive body piercings (1000 needles over his stomach and chest in 5 hours).[2] Benjamin Drucker (USA) allowed 745 18-gauge (1.2 cm (0.5 in) long) surgical needles inserted into his body by Nate Adams (USA) in 2 hours 21 minutes at Ix Body Piercing of Taos, New Mexico, USA on July 12, 2003.[3] A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ... Body piercing is a form of body modification. ... Surgery Surgery is the medical specialty that treats diseases or injuries by operative manual and instrumental treatment. ... The word needle has several meanings: Sewing Needles used for sewing In sewing, a needle is a long, slender, object with a pointed tip, usually made of metal. ... Beyond overall skin structure, refer below to: See-also. ... For the Todd Rundgren album, see Healing (Todd Rundgren). ... Jewelry (the American spelling; spelled jewellery in Commonwealth English) consists of ornamental devices worn by persons, typically made with gems and precious metals. ... Several notable people are called Charles Wilson: Charles Wilson (politician) is a US Congressman Charles Wilson (physicist) was a 19th Century physicist Charles Wilson (historian) Charles Wilson (Montreal mayor) was the first elected mayor of Montreal in the 19th century Charles A. Charlie Wilson Jr. ... Elaine Davidson Since having her first body piercing in January 1997, Brazilian born Elaine Davidson has had 2,500 piercings over and inside her body, as of 13 October 2004. ... This article is about the country. ... Guinness logo Guinness is Good for You - Irish language advertisement. ... Judges may refer to the Book of Judges in the Bible more than one judge. ... Guinness logo Guinness is Good for You - Irish language advertisement. ... A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ... In anatomy, the stomach is a bean-shaped hollow muscular organ of the gastrointestinal tract involved in the second phase of digestion, following mastication. ... Male Chest The chest is a part of the anatomy of humans and various other animals. ... Surgery Surgery is the medical specialty that treats diseases or injuries by operative manual and instrumental treatment. ... The word needle has several meanings: Sewing Needles used for sewing In sewing, a needle is a long, slender, object with a pointed tip, usually made of metal. ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... Nate Adams (born March 29, 1984) is an American motocross rider and extreme sports athlete. ... Taos can mean Taos Pueblo, a Native American Pueblo Taos, a city in northern New Mexico Taos Ski Valley, New Mexico, a ski resort village in New Mexico Taos County, New Mexico Taos, Missouri TAOS, or True Access Operating System, used in Lucent networking products Taos, an operating system for... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...


Personal attitudes

Attitudes towards piercing vary. Some regard the practice of piercing or of being pierced as spiritual, sometimes embracing the term "modern primitive", while others deride this view as insulting, as cultural appropriation, or as trendy. Some see the practice as a form of artistic or self-expression. Others choose to be pierced as a form of sexual expression, or to increase sexual sensitivity. For some people, piercing is part of an S-M lifestyle or relationship, or is incorporated into S-M play. [citation needed] Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ...


Some people choose to be pierced for symbolic reasons. For example, some survivors of sexual abuse have said that they experience piercing as allowing them to retake control over their own bodies. Some people choose to be pierced to symbolize certain relationships.


While some people consider body modification to be a sign of non-conformity, others deride body piercing as trendy, but this isn't always the case. This leads to prejudice or cognitive bias against those with piercings or visible signs of past piercings. For with(out) prejudice in law, see Prejudice (law). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Contemporary piercing procedure

Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard practice.
Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard practice.

Permanent body piercings (as opposed to play piercings) are performed by creating an opening in the body using a sharp object through the area to be pierced. This can either be done by cutting an opening using a needle (usually a hollow medical needle) or scalpel or by removing tissue, either with a scalpel or a dermal punch. Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard procedure. ... Immediate disposal of used needles into a sharps container is standard procedure. ... Play piercing, needle play, or recreational acupuncture is body piercing done for the purpose of enjoying the experience rather than producing a permanent body decoration. ... A scalpel is a very sharp knife used for surgery, anatomical dissection, and various arts and crafts. ... Dermal punching is a body modification method by which larger sections of flesh or cartilage can be removed than is possible by using standard piercing needles. ...


Contemporary body piercing studios generally take numerous precautions to protect the health of the person being pierced and the piercer. Tools and jewelry are sterilized in autoclaves and non-autoclavable surfaces are cleaned with sterilizing agents on a regular basis and between clients. Sterile, single use gloves are worn by the piercer to protect both the piercer and the client. Commonly, a piercer will use multiple pairs of gloves per client, often one pair for each step of setup to avoid cross contamination. For example, after a piercer has cleaned the area to be pierced on a client, the piercer may change gloves to avoid recontaminating the area with the gloves he/she used to clean it. Front loading autoclaves are common Stovetop autoclaves need to be monitored carefully and are the simplest of all autoclaves Multiple large autoclaves are used for processing substantial quantities of laboratory equipment prior to reuse, and infectious material prior to disposal. ...


Most piercing studios in the United States use 316L (Less often 316LVM) stainless steel for initial jewelry in a fresh piercing. In Europe the initial jewelry is typically titanium. The choice of material is usually economically influenced, with Europe being close to titanium mines they chose titanium while the US favored the 316L series of stainless steels. The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304L) Gateway Arch defines St. ...


There are many myths and misconceptions surrounding appropriate material for an initial piercing, such as “solid 14 karat or higher white or yellow gold containing no nickel is safe as initial jewelry (in a fresh piercing) ”, but that ignores the fact that the common alternatives for nickel (copper, silver) in the alloy pose equal or greater risk to nickel. For example the APP (Association of Professional Piercers) does not allow the use of plastic jewelry in fresh piercings but the tattoo industry favors brands of tattoo ink that use ABS plastic as the colorant. IBAA (the International Body Arts Association) recognizes the tattoo industry has a good safety record with ABS plastic based inks, and many technical advances are possible in the body arts. GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... General Name, Symbol, Number silver, Ag, 47 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 11, 5, d Appearance lustrous white metal Standard atomic weight 107. ... For specification language, see Alloy Analyzer. ... ABS is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings: Able-bodied Seaman / Able-bodied Seamen — (the original term was Able Seaman, abbreviated AB) ABS, a popular clothing brand by Allen B. Schwartz Always Better Service, the brand name of a computer manufacturing company. ... ABS is a three-letter abbreviation with multiple meanings: Able-bodied Seaman / Able-bodied Seamen — (the original term was Able Seaman, abbreviated AB) ABS, a popular clothing brand by Allen B. Schwartz Always Better Service, the brand name of a computer manufacturing company. ...


Standard Needle Method

The standard method in the United States involves making an opening using a hollow medical needle. The needle is inserted into the body part being pierced. While the needle is still in the body, the initial jewelry to be worn in the piercing is pushed through the opening, following the back of the needle. Piercing using hollow medical needles does not actually remove any flesh—the method cuts a "C" shaped slit and holds it open in the shape of the cross section of the needle: in this case, a circle. In this method, the needle is the same gauge (or sometimes larger as with cartilage piercings) than the initial jewelry to be worn. Piercings that penetrate cartilage are often pierced one or two gauges larger than the jewelry, to reduce pressure on the healing piercing, allowing for a fistula (internal "skin tube" that connects the two ends of the piercing) to properly form. In medicine, a fistula (pl. ...


Indwelling Cannula Method

Many European (and other) piercers use a needle containing a cannula (hollow plastic tube placed at the end of the needle, also see catheter). Procedure is identical to the standard method, only that the initial jewelry is inserted into the back of the cannula and the cannula and the jewelry are then pulled through the piercing. This method reduces the chance of the jewelry slipping during the insertion procedure, and also protects the fresh piercing from possible irritation from external threading (if used) during initial insertion. A cannula (pl. ... Catheter disassembled In medicine, a catheter is a tube that can be inserted into a body cavity, duct or vessel. ...


Dermal Punching

In this method, a dermal punch is used to remove a circular area of tissue, into which jewelry is placed. This method is usually used to remove both skin and cartilage in upper ear piercings, where cartilage must be removed to relieve pressure on the piercing to ensure proper healing and long-term viability of the piercing. Like scalpelled piercings, the healed fistulas created or enlarged using a dermal punch will usually not shrink over time. Dermal punching is a body modification method by which larger sections of flesh or cartilage can be removed than is possible by using standard piercing needles. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ...


Piercing guns

Piercing guns are commonly used in retail settings to perform ear piercings. These gun-shaped devices are designed for piercing the earlobe only; they are not marketed or designed for use on any part of the body other than the earlobe. Piercing the upper ear (through cartilage) with a piercing gun often results in longer healing times, cartilage bumps (hypertrophic scarring) and probable increased discomfort. A typical ear piercing gun An ear piercing instrument, commonly referred to as an ear piercing gun, is a device designed to pierce earlobes by forcing a sharpened starter earring through the lobe. ... A little girls pierced ear with a small earring. ... On the ear of humans and many other animals, the earlobe (lobulus auriculæ, sometimes simply lobe or lobule) is the soft lower part of the external ear or pinna. ... Cartilage is a type of dense connective tissue. ...


Many professional body piercers discourage the use of these instruments. A major complaint is that ear-piercing instruments perform the piercing by using a great deal of force with a relatively blunt stud earring. The autoclaving of piercing guns is usually impossible, because certain materials used in their construction would be destroyed if autoclaved. Even though they are occasionally used for other purposes, ear piercing instruments are designed and advertised for earlobe piercing only. Front loading autoclaves are common Stovetop autoclaves need to be monitored carefully and are the simplest of all autoclaves Multiple large autoclaves are used for processing substantial quantities of laboratory equipment prior to reuse, and infectious material prior to disposal. ...


Internally threaded jewelry

Internal and external threads illustrated using a common nut and bolt.
Internal and external threads illustrated using a common nut and bolt.

A number of piercing shops exclusively use jewelry that is internally threaded. That is, the ball-ends of the jewelry screw into the bar, rather than the bar screwing into the ball. Though more expensive and difficult to produce than externally threaded jewelry, piercers who use internally threaded jewelry advise that since the bar that is being inserted into the skin has no sharp threads on the end, it will not cut or irritate skin; this allows for safer healing. Image File history File linksMetadata Internal_and_External_Thread. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Internal_and_External_Thread. ...


However, in today's world of body piercing, most manufacturers of quality body jewelry agree that if externally threaded jewelry is going to be used, it must have a tapered end on it so that at the very least, the threads can slip into the back end of the needle, thus protecting the piercee's tissue from being threaded during the initial piercing.


Arguments have arisen that using internally threaded jewelry can be just as, if not more, dangerous for the body on occasion. For example, if one gets one's tongue pierced with an internally threaded barbell and the threading is not properly screwed down by the piercer or becomes loose because of playing with the jewelry, one runs the risk of swallowing a ball. Whereas an externally threaded ball would simply pass through the body (because it has nothing protruding from it), an internally threaded ball would scrape the throat, stomach, and intestines with its threads as it passes through. However, this risk is only evident with oral and, rarely, nasal piercings.


The healing process and body piercing aftercare

A new piercing will be sore, tender or red for several days up to three weeks. Complete healing normally takes several weeks or more. Below are more specific healing time estimates. During this period, care must be taken to avoid infection. Touching - or, for genital and oral piercings, sexual activity - is usually discouraged. An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ...


Primary healing usually takes about as long as is listed below; the jewelry should not be removed during this period. The healing time should not be rushed. Very often a piercing that seemed to be healed will start to have problems when it is handled roughly, exposed to mouth contact or unwashed hands before it has truly healed.


Full healing starts after primary healing is complete and usually takes about as long as primary healing, during this period the skin thickens and starts to gain elasticity. An additional "toughening up" period takes place after full healing is complete, this "toughening up" period also takes about as long as the primary healing time. During "toughening up" the skin remodels itself developing an internal texture in the fistula tube that replaces the shiny scar-like internal surface. In medicine, a fistula (pl. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Approximate primary healing times:

Head

Torso This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nose piercing is the piercing of the skin or cartilage which forms any part of the nose, normally for the purpose of wearing jewelry; among the different varieties of nose piercings, the nostril piercing is the most common. ... Cheek piercing is facial body piercing through the cheek. ... For other uses, see Ear (disambiguation). ... An earring is a piece of jewelry that is worn on the ear. ... This June 2007 does not cite any references or sources. ... In front of the concha, and projecting backward over the meatus, is a small pointed eminence, the tragus, so called from its being generally covered on its under surface with a tuft of hair, resembling a goat’s beard. ... Lip piercings are a type of body piercings which penetrate the lips or, more commonly, the area surrounding the lips. ... Nose piercing is the piercing of the skin or cartilage which forms any part of the nose, normally for the purpose of wearing jewelry; among the different varieties of nose piercings, the nostril piercing is the most common. ... Nose piercing is the piercing of the skin or cartilage which forms any part of the nose, normally for the purpose of wearing jewelry; among the different varieties of nose piercings, the nostril piercing is the most common. ... A fully healed tongue piercing. ... A lip frenulum piercing is a body piercing through either the upper or lower lip frenulums. ...

Female Genital Piercings A nipple with a barbell piercing Male nipple piercings A nipple piercing is a piercing, centered usually at the base of the nipple. ... A nipple with a barbell piercing Male nipple piercings A nipple piercing is a piercing, centered usually at the base of the nipple. ... Two female navels, pierced and fitted with barbell jewelry. ... A hand web piercing is a piercing through the loose skin between two digits, such as between the fore-finger and middle-finger or middle-finger and thumb. ... Surface piercings are any body piercings that take place on the surface of the body through areas which are not particularly concave or convex, where the piercing canal transverses a surface flap of skin, rather than running completely through a piece of body tissue from one side to another. ...

Male Genital Piercings This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Christina piercing A Christina piercing is a female genital piercing. ... A fourchette piercing is a female genital piercing. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A triangle piercing is one of several forms of female genital piercing. ...

Over time, after the piercing, the resulting wound is allowed to heal, forming a tunnel of scar tissue called a fistula. When the piercing has fully healed, the initial jewelry may be changed or removed for short periods. The ampallang is a form of male genital body piercing that runs perpendicularly through the glans penis from one side to the other, either through the urethra or above it. ... Like the ampallang, the apadravya is a piercing that passes through the glans penis. ... A dydoe piercing is a body piercing of the (usually circumcised) penis that goes through the ridge of the glans. ... frenum piercing A frenum piercing is a type of body piercing located on the underside of the shaft of the penis. ... Guiche piercings are located between the scrotum and the anus (a female guiche piercing would be located between the genitalia and the anus, and hence in the same place as the male guiche — it is, however, extremely rare). ... A Prince Albert piercing The Prince Albert piercing (PA) is a common form of male genital piercing. ... The Reverse Prince Albert piercing (RPA) is a form of male genital piercing. ... In some male mammals, the scrotum is a protuberance of skin and muscle containing the testicles. ... A foreskin piercing is simply a piercing that passes through the foreskin of an uncircumcised male. ... A Pubic Piercing is a genital piercing on a man. ... A lorum piercing A lorum is a male genital piercing, placed horizontally on the underside of the penis at its base, where the penis meets the scrotum. ... In medicine, a fistula (pl. ...


Behavior that promotes healing

  • Revisiting the piercer for an evaluation at any time, if needed
  • Practicing good hygiene
  • Following the recommended aftercare guidelines
  • Taking sufficient supplement tablets Iron, Zinc[citation needed]

Hygiene refers to practices associated with ensuring good health and cleanliness. ... General Name, symbol, number iron, Fe, 26 Chemical series transition metals Group, period, block 8, 4, d Appearance lustrous metallic with a grayish tinge Standard atomic weight 55. ... General Name, Symbol, Number zinc, Zn, 30 Chemical series transition metals Group, Period, Block 12, 4, d Appearance bluish pale gray Standard atomic weight 65. ...

Behavior that hinders healing

  • Contact between the new piercing and another person's skin or bodily fluids
  • Excessive and unnecessary touching of the piercing, especially with unwashed hands
  • Failure to take proper aftercare measures
  • Smoking and drinking alcohol (in the case of oral piercings)[citation needed]
  • Exposure to irritating substances such as cosmetics, perfume, lotion, some topical ointments, etc.
  • Immersion in chemically-treated pool water, or natural water (i.e. lakes, rivers, streams, and oceans) which contains bacteria, protozoa, and parasites
  • Cleaning with tea tree oil as it keeps the wound open

This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Lake Clearwater, Ontario, Canada A lake is a large body of water, usually fresh water, surrounded by land. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... Butchers Creek, Omeo, Victoria A stream, brook, beck, burn or creek, is a body of water with a detectable current, confined within a bed and banks. ... Animated map exhibiting the worlds oceanic waters. ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about: Protozoa Protozoa (in Greek proto = first and zoa = animals) are single-celled eukaryotes (organisms whose cells have nuclei) that commonly show characteristics usually associated with animals, most notably mobility and heterotrophy. ... A parasite is an organism that spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of a host organism and which causes harm to the host without immediately killing it. ...

Cleaning

Oral piercings

Dermatologists normally recommend no rinses after surgery to the oral mucosa because it heals itself extremely well without any interference; however body piercers have adopted ritualized healing techniques that are thought to work because the client heals. There is some evidence that the following body piercer recommended techniques can do harm if the solutions used are too strong, or if overused.


Common folk treatments recommended by body piercers include but are not limited to: For tongue, lip, cheek, and labret piercings, it is recommended to rinse the mouth after smoking, eating and drinking (except water). Listerine (or any mouthwash containing alcohol) is too harsh on the piercing and will most likely dry out the piercing, so it is recommended to get a non-alcoholic mouthwash, or a diluted saline solution, such as Biotène, or TECH 2000 or use a diluted Listerine solution (half Listerine, half water). Several companies make an alcohol-free mouthwash with sea salt as an ingredient. Using Gly-Oxide also aids in keeping the area clean after eating and drinking. Kissing and oral sex are advised against for 4-6 weeks after the initial piercing, as are excessively hot or spicy foods. Some recommended cold foods are ice cream bars, slushies, and the like to dull the pain. Additionally, anti-inflammatories (such as ibuprofen) can help reduce swelling. For the Kate Nash song see Mouthwash (song) Mouthwash or mouth rinse is a product used for oral hygiene. ... In medicine, saline is a solution of sodium chloride (a substance also commonly known as table salt) in sterile water, used frequently for intravenous infusion, rinsing contact lenses, and nasal irrigation (or the yogic practice called jala neti). ...


Body piercings

Piercers generally advise using a sea salt rinse (1/4 teaspoon per 8 oz./250 ml of distilled or boiled water) (proportionate mixes are marketed and sold by some companies) or a medical saline rinse, which could be placed in a small glass and held on the piercing for about 10 minutes, not more than twice a day. The solution could also be soaked into a cotton ball and used to gently cleanse the piercing twice a day. Regular table salt should not be substituted for sea salt becaues it's iodized and makes it harder on the piercing. NON IODIZED sea salt is the best one to use. Overcleaning and use of inappropriate cleansing agents are common causes of irritation and redness in a piercing. Cleaning the piercing 1-2 times a day should be sufficient. Epsom salt diluted in water is also very effective in the healing process or when swelling and pus, or other signs of a possible infection develop. Another technique is sometimes practiced in which a new piercing is left to heal completely on its own without any cleansing, under the philosophy that the body will treat it as any other minor wound. This is commonly called the LITHA method, which stands for "Leave It The Hell Alone." Piercers who use this method compare the healing process to getting stitches to heal up surgical wounds. Since one wants the body to accept the jewelry and create a clean, firm fistula, piercers who use this method advise that any solution or chemical could irritate the piercing, cause rejection, and promote scarring and keloids. Other cleansing solutions piercers sometimes recommend are: Bactine®, H20cean Spray, Would Wash Saline,Betadine (discolors gold), Hibiclens (May cause eye damage, may irritate the skin), Dettol and Tea Tree Oil. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A fluid ounce is a unit of volume in both the Imperial system of units and the U.S. customary units system. ... The millilitre (ml or mL, also spelt milliliter) is a metric unit of volume that is equal to one thousandth of a litre. ... Pus is a whitish-yellow or yellow substance produced during inflammatory responses of the body that can be found in regions of pyogenic bacterial infections. ... It has been suggested that suture material be merged into this article or section. ... In medicine, a fistula (pl. ... A keloid scar is a special case of a scar. ...


For the most part, piercers agree that hydrogen peroxide and isopropyl alcohol are effective in sanitation but are too strong for fresh piercings and often result in irritated piercings or excess scar tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid which appears colourless in a dilute solution, slightly more viscous than water. ... Isopropyl alcohol (also isopropanol or rubbing alcohol) is a common name for propan-2-ol, a colorless, flammable chemical compound with a strong odor. ...


The debate over what constitutes proper aftercare is belied by the simple fact that a healthy clean piercing that isn’t made to become irritated through harsh treatment (of any kind) will almost always heal perfectly; but personal preferences will vary.


Changing of initial jewelry to allow for swelling

For some piercings (in particular tongue piercings) changing the initial jewelry is an essential step. In the case of tongue piercing this is because the initial jewelry is significantly longer than the jewelry for a healed piercing, to allow for swelling.


Discharge on the jewelry

Dried sebum deposit on body jewelry.
Dried sebum deposit on body jewelry.

During the primary healing process, it is normal for a white or slightly yellow discharge to be noticeable on the jewellery. Provided there is no pain or swelling, it does not usually signify an infection. This is the dead skin cells and body fluid, blood plasma, It can look unsightly, and may be a little difficult to remove as it can set solid very quickly. Another name for such discharge is "lymph" which is a fluid produced by the body's lymph nodes - this tends to be a regular occurrence in the healing of a piercing as well as long as there are no signs of pain or swelling. Image File history File links Plasma_on_body_ring. ... Image File history File links Plasma_on_body_ring. ... Blood plasma is the liquid component of blood, in which the blood cells are suspended. ...


Risks associated with body piercing

Body piercing is an invasive procedure and is not without risks. When properly performed, these risks can be minimized, and most individuals who receive their piercing from a professional piercer, and who take care of their new piercing as recommended by their piercer, will enjoy a safe and healthy piercing experience.

A nipple piercing 4 months after removing the jewelry, most likely an allergic reaction to the metal used
A nipple piercing 4 months after removing the jewelry, most likely an allergic reaction to the metal used

Risks of note include: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (433x650, 130 KB) Summary Taken By Joss Redfern Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (433x650, 130 KB) Summary Taken By Joss Redfern Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... A nipple with a barbell piercing Male nipple piercings A nipple piercing is a piercing, centered usually at the base of the nipple. ...

  • Allergic reaction to ingredients of products used to clean the new piercing, or of ancillary products used in proximity to the piercing (e.g., soap, hydrogen peroxide, isopropyl alcohol, antibacterial products, antiseptic medicines, makeup, hairspray, swimming pool chlorine, etc.). This risk can be minimized by cleaning the piercing as recommended by a professional body piercer (different piercers will have differing recommendations), by not contaminating the fresh piercing with irritating products, and by not swimming in chlorinated water.
  • Chlorine from swimming pools may cause the pierced area to dry out, which may cause the piercing to be torn out very easily.
  • Allergic reaction to the metal in the piercing jewelry, particularly nickel. This risk can be minimized by using high quality jewelry manufactured from surgical stainless steel or similar inert metals.
  • Bacterial infection, particularly from Staphylococcus aureus. However, this risk is greatly reduced when the piercing is performed by a professional body piercer using best practice piercing techniques, and when appropriate steps are taken during the aftercare period to avoid infection. Blunt force piercing, such as that associated with the use of ear piercing instruments, increases the chance of a bacterial infections. For that reason, among others, piercing guns should never be used to pierce any part of the body other than earlobes.
  • Parasitic and protozoan infections may occur by swimming in lakes, rivers, streams, and oceans during the healing period. The best way to reduce this risk is to avoid swimming in these locations.
  • Excess scar tissue, which can be caused by improper piercing, cleansing, and stretching. This may result in loss of sensation and difficulty piercing and stretching that area of skin in the future.
  • Keloid formation can sometimes occur, particularly among people who are pre-disposed to this condition through heredity.
  • Trauma to a fresh piercing, usually associated with unintended entanglement of the piercing jewelry with another object. This risk is always present, but can be reduced by using jewelry appropriate for the piercing, and covering or taping over jewelry during sports activities. Also, larger gauge piercings will tend to resist tearing better than smaller gauge piercings.
  • Viral infection, particularly from hepatitis B, hepatitis C and HIV. However, it is important to note that although hepatitis has been transmitted through the practices of ear piercing, body piercing, and tattooing, there have not been any documented cases of HIV transmission associated with these procedures (see CDC Fact Sheet: HIV and Its Transmission). As with bacterial infections, the risk of viral infection is minimized when proper piercing techniques are used, particularly by the use of autoclaved disposable piercing needles and the autoclaving of jewelry prior to installation.
  • Erosion of gums (in lip and tongue piercings). In some cases, gum bleeding can be induced. In extreme cases, teeth may fall out if there isn't enough gum to hold them in place.
  • Piercing may become addictive. Psychologically, one may become addicted to the experience of obtaining a new piercing, or the response of one's peers or oneself to the consequent alteration in body image. [citation needed]

This article is about the computer protocol. ... Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid which appears colourless in a dilute solution, slightly more viscous than water. ... Isopropyl alcohol (also isopropanol or rubbing alcohol) is a common name for propan-2-ol, a colorless, flammable chemical compound with a strong odor. ... An antiseptic is a substance that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria on the external surfaces of the body. ... An antiseptic solution of Povidone-iodine applied to an abrasion Antiseptics (Greek αντί, against, and σηπτικός, putrefactive) are antimicrobial substances that are applied to living tissue/skin to reduce the possibility of infection, sepsis, or putrefaction. ... Cosmetics or makeup are substances to enhance the beauty of the human body, apart from simple cleaning. ... This article is about Hairspray, the musical that started performances on Broadway in 2002. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... For other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). ... Phyla Actinobacteria Aquificae Chlamydiae Bacteroidetes/Chlorobi Chloroflexi Chrysiogenetes Cyanobacteria Deferribacteres Deinococcus-Thermus Dictyoglomi Fibrobacteres/Acidobacteria Firmicutes Fusobacteria Gemmatimonadetes Lentisphaerae Nitrospirae Planctomycetes Proteobacteria Spirochaetes Thermodesulfobacteria Thermomicrobia Thermotogae Verrucomicrobia Bacteria (singular: bacterium) are unicellular microorganisms. ... An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ... Species S. aureus S. caprae S. epidermidis S. haemolyticus S. hominis S. lugdunensis S. saprophyticus S. warneri S. xylosus Staphylococcus (in Greek staphyle means bunch of grapes and coccos means granule) is a genus of Gram-positive bacteria. ... A typical ear piercing gun An ear piercing instrument, commonly referred to as an ear piercing gun, is a device designed to pierce earlobes by forcing a sharpened starter earring through the lobe. ... A parasite is an organism that spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of a host organism and which causes harm to the host without immediately killing it. ... Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about: Protozoa Protozoa (in Greek proto = first and zoa = animals) are single-celled eukaryotes (organisms whose cells have nuclei) that commonly show characteristics usually associated with animals, most notably mobility and heterotrophy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In medicine, a trauma patient has suffered serious and life-threatening physical injury resulting in secondary complications such as shock, respiratory failure and death. ... This article is about biological infectious particles. ... Hepatitis (plural hepatitides) implies injury to liver characterised by presence of inflammatory cells in the liver tissue. ... Hepatitis (plural hepatitides) implies injury to liver characterised by presence of inflammatory cells in the liver tissue. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... A little girls pierced ear with a small earring. ... For other uses, see Tattoo (disambiguation). ... Front loading autoclaves are common Stovetop autoclaves need to be monitored carefully and are the simplest of all autoclaves Multiple large autoclaves are used for processing substantial quantities of laboratory equipment prior to reuse, and infectious material prior to disposal. ...

Removal

Proper removal of piercings is rather simple. Carefully remove the jewelry making sure not to pull or irritate the piercing. Once removed the piercing should heal on its own. It is not advised to remove jewelry when there is an infection present, and doing so may result in trapping infectious waste in your body if the hole closes, causing an abscess. Once the infection has passed, then it is safe to remove the jewelry if it is no longer desired. Look up Abscess in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


References

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Body piercing jewelry is jewelry manufactured specifically for use in body piercing. ... In modern Western body piercing, a wide variety of materials are used. ... A typical ear piercing gun An ear piercing instrument, commonly referred to as an ear piercing gun, is a device designed to pierce earlobes by forcing a sharpened starter earring through the lobe. ... An earring is a piece of jewelry that is worn on the ear. ... Hepatitis A (formerly known as infectious hepatitis) is an acute infectious liver disease caused by the hepatovirus hepatitis A virus. ... Hepatitis B is an inflammation of the liver and is caused by the Hepatitis B virus (HBV), a member of the Hepadnavirus family[1] and one of hundreds of unrelated viral species which cause viral hepatitis. ... Hepatitis C is a blood-borne, infectious, viral disease that is caused by a hepatotropic virus called Hepatitis C virus (HCV). ... Hepatitis D is a disease caused by a small circular RNA virus (Hepatitis delta virus); this virus is replication defective and therefore cannot propagate in the absence of another virus. ... Hepatitis E is an acute viral hepatitis (liver inflammation) caused by infection with a virus called hepatitis E virus (HEV). ... ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... Scalpelling is a form of body piercing for the creation of decorative perforations through the skin and other body tissue. ... In Malayan culture, susuks, or charm needles, are needles made of gold or other precious metals, which are inserted in the soft tissues of the face to act as talismans. ... STD is a three-letter abbreviation used in several different contexts that stand for different terms. ... For other uses, see Tattoo (disambiguation). ...

Related Media

External links

References

Types of body piercing
Ear piercings
Earlobes and helix | Stretching (body piercing) | Tragus | Antitragus | Daith | Conch | Rook | Industrial
Facial and oral piercings
Bridge | Cheek | Eyebrow | Anti-eyebrow | Lip | Labret | Vertical labret | Lip frenulum | Nose | Tongue venoms | Tongue frenulum | Uvula | Monroe | Medusa
Body piercings
Corset | Hand web | Madison | Navel | Nipple | Nape | Surface
Male genital piercings
Ampallang | Apadravya | Hafada | Foreskin | Deep shaft | Dolphin | Dydoe | Frenum | Frenum ladder | Guiche | Lorum | Prince Albert | Reverse Prince Albert | Pubic | Transscrotal
Female genital piercings
Christina piercing | Clitoris | Clitoral hood | Triangle | Fourchette | Isabella | Labia | Nefertiti | Princess Albertina |
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  Results from FactBites:
 
Piercings, Body Piercing (2232 words)
Piercing may be considered cool, but there are things you need to know before you get that piercing done.
Piercing are susceptible to infection during the healing period.
Piercing heals by the formation epithelial cells along the inside of the piercing to protect the body from the foreign object.
Body Piercing (719 words)
Facial piercings are common on the eyebrows, nose, lips, cheeks and the chin.
Body piercing is performed without anesthesia and is a rather quick procedure.
Piercings should be done only in a salon that follows proper sterilization procedures, where the equipment used is sterilized in autoclaves (270 degrees Fahrenheit under high-pressure steam for at least ten minutes).
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