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Encyclopedia > Bob Woodward
Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007.
Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after a talk in March 2007.

Robert "Bob" Woodward (born March 26, 1943) is assistant managing editor of The Washington Post. While an investigative reporter for that newspaper, Woodward, working with his co-employee Carl Bernstein helped uncover the Watergate scandal that led to President Richard Nixon's resignation. Woodward has written 12 best-selling non-fiction books and has twice contributed reporting to efforts that collectively earned the Post and its National Reporting staff a Pulitzer Prize. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 456 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1116 × 1468 pixel, file size: 688 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after speaking at George Mason Universitys School of Public Policy on 7 March 2007. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 456 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1116 × 1468 pixel, file size: 688 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bob Woodward signs his book State of Denial after speaking at George Mason Universitys School of Public Policy on 7 March 2007. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or some other scandal. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... The presidential seal is a well-known symbol of the presidency. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 – April 22, 1994) was the 37th President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1974. ... Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ... A book is a set or collection of written, printed, illustrated, or blank sheets, made of paper, parchment, or other material, usually fastened together to hinge at one side. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Contents

Career

Early career

Commissioned as a naval officer (as was his father before him) after graduating from Yale in 1965, Woodward was discharged from the Navy as a Lieutenant in August 1970 after serving as an aide to the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral Thomas H. Moorer. Toward the end of his naval service he had his first chance meetings with Mark Felt ("Deep Throat"), later his inside source for information leading to his reporting on the Watergate scandal. YALE (Yet Another Learning Environment) is an environment for machine learning experiments and data mining. ... The Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) is the senior military officer in the United States Navy. ... Thomas Hinman Moorer (1912 February 9 - 2004 February 5) was a U.S. admiral. ... W. Mark Felt (circa 2005) William Mark Felt, Sr. ... Deep Throat is the pseudonym that was given to William Mark Felt, Sr. ... The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ...


He applied to several law schools, but also applied for a job as a reporter for The Washington Post. Harry Rosenfeld, the paper's metropolitan editor, hired him on a two-week trial basis, a tryout that failed because of his complete lack of experience as a journalist. Still interested in becoming a reporter, he got a job with the Montgomery Sentinel. A year after his on-the-job training at the Sentinel, he left that paper and joined The Washington Post in August 1971. Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... Harry M. Rosenfeld is a newspaper editor. ... The relevance of particular information in (or previously in) this article or section is disputed. ...


Watergate

Main article: Watergate scandal

Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein were assigned to investigate the June 17, 1972 burglary of the headquarters of the Democratic National Committee in a Washington, D.C. hotel called Watergate. Their work, under editor Ben Bradlee, led to the uncovering of a number of political "dirty tricks" used by the Nixon re-election committee during his campaign for reelection. Their book about the scandal, All the President's Men, became a #1 best-seller and was later turned into a movie. The 1976 film, starring Robert Redford as Woodward and Dustin Hoffman as Bernstein, transformed the reporters into celebrities and inspired a wave of interest in investigative journalism. The Watergate scandal was a 1972 break-in at the Democratic National Committee headquarters at a Watergate Office Building in Washington, D.C. by members of Richard Nixons administration and the resulting cover-up which led to the resignation of the President. ... Carl Bernstein (left) and Bob Woodward (right)This image is pending deletion. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Former Vermont Governor Dr. Howard Dean is the current Chairman of the DNC. The Democratic National Committee (DNC) is the principal campaign and fund-raising organization affiliated with the United States Democratic Party. ... Nickname: Motto: Justitia Omnibus (Justice for All) Location of Washington, D.C., in relation to the states Maryland and Virginia Coordinates: , Country United States Federal District District of Columbia Government  - Mayor Adrian M. Fenty (D)  - City Council Chairperson: Vincent C. Gray (D) Ward 1: Jim Graham (D) Ward 2: Jack... The Watergate complex is an office-apartment-hotel complex built in 1967 in northwest Washington, D.C., best known for being the site of burglaries that led to the Watergate scandal and the resignation of President Richard Nixon. ... Benjamin Crowninshield Bradlee (born August 26, 1921) is the vice president of the Washington Post. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Committee to Re-elect the President, often abbreviated to CRP or CREEP (which was also the way it was pronounced), was a Nixon White House fund-raising organization headed by John N. Mitchell, who had previously served as United States Attorney General. ... Cover of 2005 printing All the Presidents Men is a 1974 non-fiction book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, the two journalists investigating the Watergate first break-in and ensuing Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. ... All the Presidents Men is a 1976 film based on the 1974 non-fiction book by Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein, the two journalists investigating the Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often involving crime, political corruption, or some other scandal. ...


The book and movie also led to one of Washington, D.C.'s most famous mysteries: the identity of Woodward's secret Watergate informant known as Deep Throat, a reference to the title of a popular pornographic movie at the time. Woodward said he would protect Deep Throat's identity until the man died or allowed his name to be revealed. For over 30 years, only Woodward, Bernstein, and a handful of others knew the informant's identity until it was revealed by his family to Vanity Fair magazine as former FBI Assistant Director W. Mark Felt in May 2005. Woodward has confirmed his identity and published a book, titled The Secret Man, which detailed his relationship with Felt. The protection of sources, sometimes also referred to as the confidentiality of sources, is a right accorded to journalists under the laws of many countries, as well as under international law. ... Deep Throat is the pseudonym that was given to William Mark Felt, Sr. ... Deep Throat is an American pornographic movie released in the summer of 1972, written and directed by Gerard Damiano and starring Linda Lovelace (the pseudonym of Linda Susan Boreman). ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ... The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is the primary investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ), serving as both a federal criminal investigative body and a domestic intelligence agency. ... William Mark Felt, Sr. ... 2005 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December- → Wikimedia Commons has media related to: May 2005 Deaths in May May 26: Eddie Albert May 25: Ismail Merchant May 25: Sunil Dutt May 25: Graham Kennedy May 22: Thurl Ravenscroft May 21: Howard Morris May 21...


George W. Bush Administration

Woodward has spent the most time of any journalist with President George W. Bush, interviewing him four times for more than seven hours total[1]. Woodward's three most recent books, Bush at War (2002) Plan of Attack (2004), and, State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III (2006) are detailed accounts of the Bush presidency, including the response to the September 11 terrorist attacks and the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. In a series of articles published in January 2002, he and Dan Balz described the events at Camp David in the aftermath of September 11. In these articles, they mention the Worldwide Attack Matrix. George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Cover of Bush at War (trade paperback) Bush at War is a 2002 book by Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward recounting President George W. Bushs responses to the September 11 terrorist attacks and his administrations handling of the subsequent war in Afghanistan. ... Plan of Attack (ISBN 074325547X) is a 2004 book by Washington Post investigative reporter Bob Woodward billed as a behind-the-scenes account of how and why President Bush decided to go to war against Iraq [1] The books chief contention, which provides the rationale for its title, is... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ... The West Wing, see NSF Thurmont (The West Wing). ... The Worldwide Attack Matrix is a document describing covert anti-terror operations in 80 countries in Asia, the Middle East and Africa created in the wake of September 11, 2001. ...


Woodward has been accused by a few critics of being too close to the Bush administration, and some say his relationship with the current administration is in stark contrast to his investigative role in Watergate. Others disagree, however. In 2004 both the Bush campaign and the Kerry-Edwards campaign recommended his book Plan of Attack, and The New York Times said the book contained “convincing accounts of White House failures... presented alongside genial encounters with the president.” Rick Hertzberg in the New Yorker wrote “Plan of Attack” is Woodward’s best book in years" and that "Woodward is welcomed as a fair witness." Woodward's latest book, State of Denial, describes alleged tensions and dysfunctions within the Bush administration in the lead-up to, and following, the invasion of Iraq. Plan of Attack (ISBN 074325547X) is a 2004 book by Washington Post investigative reporter Bob Woodward billed as a behind-the-scenes account of how and why President Bush decided to go to war against Iraq [1] The books chief contention, which provides the rationale for its title, is...


On Monday, October 2, 2006, Woodward's new book State of Denial was released. Peggy Noonan of The Wall Street Journal wrote, "It may be a great (book). It is serious, densely, even exhaustively, reported, and a real contribution to history in that it gives history what it most requires, first-person testimony. It is well documented, with copious notes."


Involvement in the Plame scandal

On November 14, 2005, Woodward gave a two-hour deposition to Special Counsel Patrick Fitzgerald. He testified that a senior administration official told him in June 2003 that Iraq war critic, Joe Wilson’s wife (later identified as Valerie Plame), worked for the CIA. Woodward therefore appears to have been the first reporter to learn about her employment (albeit not her name) from a government source. The deposition was reported in The Washington Post on November 16, 2005, and was the first time Woodward revealed publicly that he had any special knowledge about the case. Woodward testified the information was given to him in a “casual” and “offhand” manner, and said that he does not believe it was part of any coordinated effort to “out” Plame as a CIA employee.[1] Later, Woodward's source identified himself. It was Richard Armitage, Colin Powell's deputy and an internal critic of the Iraq War and the White House inner circle. November 14 is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Deposition is a word used in many fields to describe different processes: In law, deposition is the taking of testimony outside of court. ... Patrick J. Fitzgerald (born December 22, 1960) is an American attorney and the current United States Attorney for the Northern District of Illinois. ... The subject of this article is the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... This page is for the diplomat. ... Valerie E. Wilson (born Valerie Elise Plame April 19, 1963, in Anchorage, Alaska) is a former United States Central Intelligence Agency officer who held non-official cover (NOC) status prior to the public disclosure of her classified covert CIA identity in a syndicated American newspaper column. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Richard L. Armitage Richard Lee Armitage (born April 26, 1945) was the 13th United States Deputy Secretary of State, the second-in-command at the State Department, serving from 2001 to 2005, Previously, he was a high-ranking troubleshooter and negotiator in the Departments of State and Defense. ...


Woodward said the revelation came at the end of a long, confidential background interview for his 2004 book Plan of Attack. He did not reveal the official’s disclosure at the time because it did not strike him as important. Later, he kept it to himself because it came as part of a confidential conversation with a source. Plan of Attack (ISBN 074325547X) is a 2004 book by Washington Post investigative reporter Bob Woodward billed as a behind-the-scenes account of how and why President Bush decided to go to war against Iraq [1] The books chief contention, which provides the rationale for its title, is...


In his deposition, Woodward also said that he had conversations with Scooter Libby after the June 2003 conversation with his confidential administration source, and testified that it is possible that he might have asked Libby further questions about Joe Wilson’s wife before her employment at the CIA and her identity were publicly known. I. Lewis Libby I. Lewis Scooter Libby Jr. ... Valerie E. Wilson (born Valerie Elise Plame April 19, 1963, in Anchorage, Alaska) is a former United States Central Intelligence Agency officer who held non-official cover (NOC) status prior to the public disclosure of her classified covert CIA identity in a syndicated American newspaper column. ...


Woodward’s revelation was controversial because he had not told his editor at the Post about the conversation for more than two years, and also because he had publicly criticized the investigation. He had referred to Fitzgerald as a “junkyard dog prosecutor” on Larry King’s television show, [2], and said he believed that when “all of the facts come out in this case, it's going to be laughable because the consequences are not that great."[3]. On another occasion, he said of the investigation that he thought there was “nothing to it,” and that Fitzgerald’s behavior had been “disgraceful.” In later interviews after his deposition, Woodward said he had meant by his “junkyard dog” comment to suggest colorfully that Fitzgerald was a tenacious prosecutor, and that the “disgraceful” comment concerned the tactic of putting journalists in prison to coerce them to reveal their confidential sources. Larry King (born Lawrence Harvey Zeiger on November 19, 1933) is an award-winning American writer, journalist and broadcaster. ...


Woodward apologized to Leonard Downie, the editor of The Washington Post for not informing him earlier of the June 2003 conversation. Downie accepted the apology and said even had the paper known it would not have changed its reporting. The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C., the capital of the United States. ...


Other professional activities

Woodward has continued to write books and report stories for The Washington Post, and serves as an assistant managing editor[4] at the paper. He focuses on the presidency, intelligence, and Washington institutions such as the U.S. Supreme Court, The Pentagon, and the Federal Reserve. He has also written the book, Wired, about the Hollywood drug culture and the death of comic John Belushi. Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the... This article is about the United States military building. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... Wired : The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi, is a 1985 non-fiction book by American journalist Bob Woodward about the American actor and comedian John Belushi. ... ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and musician, notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ...


Awards and recognition

Woodward has twice contributed to collective journalistic efforts that were awarded the Pulitzer Prize. In 1973, The Washington Post won the Pulitzer Prize for Public Service. Though the Prize was awarded to the entire Post staff, the citation specifically named his and Bernstein's reporting on Watergate as exemplary work. In addition, Woodward was the lead reporter for the Post's articles on the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist attacks that won the National Reporting Pulitzer in 2002. He also was awarded the Gerald R. Ford Prize for Distinguished Reporting on the Presidency in 2003. The Pulitzer Prize for Public Service has been awarded since 1918 for a distinguished example of meritorious public service by a newspaper through the use of its journalistic resources which may include editorials, cartoons, and photographs, as well as reporting. ... The Pulitzer Prize for National Reporting has been awarded since 1948 for a distinguished example of reporting on national affairs. ... this guy is awsome i played him in a school play he also has some pretty funky history Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Woodward is widely regarded as one of the top reporters of the last half-century, and has earned trust and accolades from government officials and journalists of all political persuasions. In 2003, Al Hunt of The Wall Street Journal called Woodward "the most celebrated journalist of our age." The Weekly Standard called him "the best pure reporter of his generation, perhaps ever." In 2004, Bob Schieffer of CBS News said "Woodward has established himself as the best reporter of our time. He may be the best reporter of all time." The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an influential international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers [2]. It was the... The Weekly Standard is an American neoconservative [1] magazine published 48 times per year. ... Bob Schieffer Bob Lloyd Schieffer (born February 25, 1937 in Austin, Texas) is an American journalist who has been with CBS News since 1969, serving 23 years as anchor on the Saturday edition of CBS Evening News from 1973-1996; chief Washington correspondent since 1982, moderator of the Sunday public... CBS News is the news division of American television and radio network CBS. Its current president is Sean McManus who is also head of CBS Sports. ...


Style and criticism

In writing his books, Woodward collects detailed records, including interviews, documents, transcripts, and recordings. He then uses them to describe events as a story with an omniscient narrator, present tense and dialogue. His books are often very visually descriptive. Omniscience is the capacity to know everything, or at least everything that can be known. ... The Narrator is the entity within a story that tells the story to the reader. ... A dialogue (often spelled dialog[1]) is a reciprocal conversation between two or more Entities. ...


While this style may have earned Woodward commercial success, many literary critics consider his prose awkward and his approach inappropriate for his subject matter. Nicholas von Hoffman complained that "the arrestingly irrelevant detail is [often] used" [5] while Michael Massing thinks the books are "filled with long, at times tedious passages with no evident direction." [6] Joan Didion said Woodward finds "[nothing] too insignificant for inclusion," including such details as shirts worn and food eaten in unimportant situations. "The reader attuned to the conventions of narrative might be led by the presentation of these quotidian details into thinking that a dramatic moment is about to occur," she noted, only to be disappointed by bland comments like how the President "thought a lot of the criticism he received was unfair." [7] Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to the patterns of everyday [[speech. ... Nicholas von Hoffman is an American journalist and author of German-Russian extraction, descendant of Melchior Hoffman and son of Carl von Hoffman. ... Michael Massing is a contributing editor of the Columbia Journalism Review. ... Joan Didion (born December 5, 1934) is an American writer, known as a journalist, essayist, and novelist. ...


The narrative, reporting-driven style of Woodward's books also draws criticism for rarely making conclusions or passing judgment on the characters and actions that he recounts in such detail. Didion concluded that Woodward writes "books in which measurable cerebral activity is virtually absent," and finds the books marked by "a scrupulous passivity, an agreement to cover the story not as it is occurring but as it is presented, which is to say as it is manufactured."


Brad DeLong has also noticed strong inconsistencies between the accounts of the making of Clinton economic policy described both in Woodward's book Maestro and his book The Agenda. [8] Didion, meanwhile, complains about inconsistencies even within the same book. On page 16 of The Choice, she notes, Clinton complains about Dole using the Whitewater scandal to attack him the day after his mother passed away. But on page 346, Dole says "he had never used Whitewater to attack the president personally." [9] J. Bradford DeLong (b. ...


Some of Woodward's critics accuse him of abandoning critical inquiry to maintain his access to high-profile political actors. Anthony Lewis called the style "a trade in which the great grant access in return for glory." [10] Christopher Hitchens accused Woodward of acting as "stenographer to the rich and powerful." [11] Woodward believed the Bush Administration's claims of Iraqi WMDs prior to the war, and the publication of the book "At the Eye of the Storm" by former DCI George Tenet led Woodward to engage in a rather torturous account of the extent of his pre-war conversations with Tenet in an article in The New Yorker Magazine in which he also chastised New York Times op-ed columnist Maureen Dowd for being critical of him.[12] Anthony Lewis (born March 27, 1927, New York City) is a prominent liberal intellectual, writing for the New York Times op-ed page and the New York Review of Books, among other publications. ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born April 13, 1949) is an Anglo-American author, journalist and literary critic. ... George Tenet George John Tenet (born January 5, 1953) is Distinguished Professor in the Practice of Diplomacy at Georgetown University and was previously the Director of Central Intelligence for the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. ... Maureen Dowd (born January 14, 1952) is a columnist for The New York Times. ...


Woodward has said that his books "really are self portraits, because I go to people and I say — I check them and I double check them but — but who are you? What are you doing? Where do you fit in? What did you say? What did you feel?" [13] Critics complain that this style allows the biases and beliefs of his sources to steer the narrative and that those who talk to Woodward are painted more favorably than those who don't.


The Brethren, for example, painted a picture of the Supreme Court based partly on the comments of its clerks; some believe that, as a result, the book suggests that the Supreme Court Justices do little of the actual work. Woodward points out recently that the ex-Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld was one of his primary sources for "State of Denial," yet is perhaps the most harshly portrayed figure in the book. Other sources who have spoken to Woodward also confess to having failed to "spin" him, as they had hoped to do.


Woodward's dual role as journalist and author has opened him up to occasional criticism for sitting on information for publication in a book, rather than presenting it sooner when it might affect the events at hand. In The Commanders (1991), for instance, he indicated that Colin Powell had opposed Operation Desert Storm, yet Woodward did not publish this information before Congress voted on a war resolution, when it may have made a difference. And in Veil, he indicates that former CIA Director William Casey personally knew of arms sales to the Contras, but he did not reveal this until after the Congressional investigation. General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Combatants U.S.-led coalition Iraq Commanders George H. W. Bush, Norman Schwarzkopf, Colin Powell Saddam Hussein, Ali Hassan Al-Majid, Hussein Kamel Strength 660,000 ~545,000 Casualties 345 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 - 100,000 dead, 100,000 - 300,000 wounded The 1991 Gulf War (also Persian... William Joseph Casey (March 13, 1913 - May 6, 1987) was the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 1981 to 1987. ... Look up contra in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Woodward has also been accused of exaggeration and fabrication by other journalists, most notably regarding "Deep Throat", his famous Watergate informant. Before he was revealed to be W. Mark Felt, some contended that Deep Throat was a composite character based on more than one Watergate source. W. Mark Felt, on the set of CBSs Face the Nation in 1976. ...


Martin Dardis, the chief investigator for the Dade County State Attorney, who in 1972 discovered that the money found on the Watergate burglars came from the Committee to Re-elect the President, has complained that All the President's Men misrepresented him. The Committee to Re-elect the President, often abbreviated to CRP or CREEP (which was also the way it was pronounced), was a Nixon White House fund-raising organization headed by John N. Mitchell, who had previously served as United States Attorney General. ...


Woodward was also accused of fabricating his deathbed interview with Casey, as described in Veil; critics say the interview simply could not have taken place as written in the book. However, the CIA's own internal report found that Casey spoke to Woodward 43 times, sometimes alone at Casey's home, and his deputy Bob Gates wrote in his own book that he was able to communicate with Casey at that same time and quoted Casey making short statements similar to those reported by Woodward. The author Ronald Kessler reported similar findings in his book on the CIA.


Finally, a review by Anthony Lewis in the New York Review of Books challenged the claim in The Brethren (written by Woodward and Scott Armstrong) that Supreme Court Justice William Brennan once voted in a way he thought was wrong to avoid hurting the feelings of Justice Blackmun. Woodward and Armstrong insisted they had one of Brennan's clerks confirm the story on the record; Lewis interviewed everyone who clerked that term; all found the story false or implausible. Woodward showed the notes he'd taken on the subject to a third-party; the notes themselves were unclear but Lewis located the source of the notes who insisted that Woodward misrepresented him. [14] Anthony Lewis (born March 27, 1927, New York City) is a prominent liberal intellectual, writing for the New York Times op-ed page and the New York Review of Books, among other publications. ... The New York Review of Books (or NYRB) is a biweekly magazine on literature, culture, and current affairs published in New York which takes as its point of departure that the discussion of important books is itself an indispensable literary activity. ... William Joseph Brennan (April 25, 1906 - July 24, 1997) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Harold Andrew Blackmun (November 12, 1908 - March 4, 1999) was an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1970 to 1994. ...


Despite these criticisms and challenges, Woodward has been praised as an authoritative and balanced journalist. The New York Times Book Review said in 2004 that "No reporter has more talent for getting Washington’s inside story and telling it cogently." The publication of a Woodward book, perhaps more than any other contemporary author's, is treated as a major political event that dominates national news for days. The New York Times Book Review is a weekly paper-magazine supplement to The New York Times in which current non-fiction and fiction books are reviewed. ...


Commentator David Frum has said, perhaps partly tongue-in-cheek, that Washington officials can learn something about the way Washington works from Woodward's books: "From his books, you can draw a composite profile of the powerful Washington player. That person is highly circumspect, highly risk averse, eschews new ideas, flatters his colleagues to their face (while trashing them to Woodward behind their backs), and is always careful to avoid career-threatening confrontation. We all admire heroes, but Woodward's books teach us that those who rise to leadership are precisely those who take care to abjure heroism for themselves."[2] David J. Frum (born 1960) is a former speechwriter for President George W. Bush, and the author of the first insider book about the Bush presidency. ...


Personal

Woodward was born in Geneva, Illinois to Alfred and Jane Woodward. He was brought up in nearby Wheaton. He enrolled in Yale University with an NROTC scholarship, and studied history and English literature. He received his B.A. degree in 1965, and began a four-year tour of duty in the Navy to fulfill his NROTC commitment. He is a member of the fraternity of Phi Gamma Delta. Incorporated City in 1835. ... Alfred E. Woodward II (born December 15, 1913, Sandwich, Illinois) is the Chief Judge of the 18th Judicial Circuit Court, DuPage County, Illinois from 1973 to 1975 Birth and siblings Alfred was the son of Alfred E. Woodward I (1870-?), and Mabel (1873-?). Mabel was previously married to a Coleman. ... Incorporated City in 1859. ... “Yale” redirects here. ... The Naval Reserve Officer Training Corps commissions individiuals into either the United States Navy or United States Marine Corps. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Woodward now lives in the Georgetown section of Washington. He is married to Elsa Walsh, a writer for The New Yorker and the author of Divided Lives, The Public and Private Lives of Three American Women which Entertainment Weekly cited as one of the 10 best books of 1995, and has two daughters. The familiar golden dome of Washingtons once venerable Riggs Bank, now amalgamated into PNC Bank, at the northeast corner of Wisconsin Avenue and M Street NW. Georgetown in red Georgetown is a neighborhood located in the Northwest quadrant of Washington, D.C., along the Potomac River waterfront. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The New Yorker is an American magazine that publishes reportage, criticism, essays, cartoons, poetry and fiction. ...


References

Books

Woodward has co-authored or authored ten #1 national best-selling non-fiction books, more than any other contemporary American writer. They are: Non-fiction is an account or representation of a subject which is presented as fact. ...

  • All the President's Men - about the Watergate scandal; (1974) ISBN 0-671-21781-X, 25th Anniversary issue in (1999) ISBN 0-684-86355-3
  • The Final Days - about Nixon's resignation; (1976) ISBN 0-671-22298-8
  • The Brethren - about the Supreme Court in the Warren Burger years; (1979) ISBN 0-671-24110-9
  • Wired - on the death of John Belushi and the Hollywood drug culture; (1984) ISBN 0-671-47320-4
  • Veil - about the CIA's "secret wars" during the reign of William J. Casey; (1987) ISBN 0-671-60117-2
  • The Commanders - on The Pentagon, the first Bush administration and the Gulf War; (1991) ISBN 0-671-41367-8
  • The Agenda - about Bill Clinton's first term; (1994) ISBN 0-7432-7407-5
  • Shadow - on the legacy of Watergate and the scandals that faced later Presidential administrations; (1999) ISBN 0-684-85262-4
  • Bush at War - about the path to war with Afghanistan following September 11; (2002) ISBN 0-7432-0473-5
  • Plan of Attack - about how and why President George W. Bush decided to go to war with Iraq; (2004) ISBN 0-7432-5547-X
  • State of Denial: Bush at War, Part III - which revealed some interesting information about the Bush administration and the War in Iraq. Highly controversial, it appeared on the Today show just before its release; (2006) ISBN 0-7432-7223-4

Other books, which have also been best-sellers but not #1, are: Cover of 2005 printing All the Presidents Men is a 1974 non-fiction book by Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, the two journalists investigating the Watergate first break-in and ensuing Watergate scandal for the Washington Post. ... The Final Days is arguably the best of all non - fiction, and journalistic accounts of an American presidency under crisis. ... The Brethren is a 1979 book by Bob Woodward and Scott Armstrong, which gives a nonfiction look behind the scenes of the United States Supreme Court during Earl Warrens latter years and Warren Burgers early years as Chief Justice of the United States. ... Warren Burger at a press conference in May 1969 shortly after he was nominated to be Chief Justice of the United States. ... Wired : The Short Life and Fast Times of John Belushi, is a 1985 non-fiction book by American journalist Bob Woodward about the American actor and comedian John Belushi. ... John Adam Belushi (January 24, 1949 – March 5, 1982) was an Emmy Award-winning American actor, comedian and musician, notable for his work on Saturday Night Live, National Lampoons Animal House and The Blues Brothers. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is about the United States military building. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States, serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Combatants UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf, Peter de la Billière, Khalid bin Sultan, Saleh Al-Muhaya, Mohamed Hussein Tantawi Saddam Hussein Strength 883,863 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded see section below The Gulf War or the Persian Gulf War (16 January 1991... Shadow - Five Presidents and the Legacy of Watergate is a 1999 book by Washington Post journalist Bob Woodward written with a highly narrative voice while utilizing firsthand interviews and news reports for its historical basis. ... Cover of Bush at War (trade paperback) Bush at War is a 2002 book by Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward recounting President George W. Bushs responses to the September 11 terrorist attacks and his administrations handling of the subsequent war in Afghanistan. ... Plan of Attack (ISBN 074325547X) is a 2004 book by Washington Post investigative reporter Bob Woodward billed as a behind-the-scenes account of how and why President Bush decided to go to war against Iraq [1] The books chief contention, which provides the rationale for its title, is...

  • The Choice - about Clinton's re-election bid; (1996) ISBN 0-684-81308-4
  • Maestro - about Federal Reserve chairman Alan Greenspan; (2000) ISBN 0743204123
  • The Secret Man - about Mark Felt's disclosure, after more than thirty years, that he was Deep Throat. The book was written before Felt admitted his title, as he was sickly and Bob expected that someway or another, it would come out; (2005) ISBN 0-7432-8715-0

Newsweek has excerpted five of Woodward's books in cover stories; 60 Minutes has done segments on five; and three have been made into movies. The Choice is an episode of The Outer Limits television show. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Not to be confused with a BBC news magazine program of the same name. ...


Criticism of Bob Woodward

Rich, Frank. "All the President's Flacks," New York Times. (December 4, 2005) The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ...


Pease, Lisa. "Bob Woodward" Probe Magazine, January-February 1996 (Vol. 3 No. 2)


Pop Culture References

On The Simpsons episode Whacking Day, Bart reads a book called "The Truth About Whacking Day", written by Bob Woodward. Simpsons redirects here. ... Richard Nixon on Whacking Day Whacking Day is the 20th episode of The Simpsons fourth season. ... Bart can refer to: A diminutive of Bartholomew Barts is the frequently used abbreviation for St Bartholomews Hospital in the City of London. ...


In the movie The Skulls, the character Will Beckford tries to compare himself to Woodward while reading his column in the school newspaper. The Skulls was a 2000 film starring Joshua Jackson, Paul Walker, and Leslie Bibb; and directed by Rob Cohen. ...


In the movie Dick, which is about Watergate, Woodward is played by actor/comedian Will Ferrell. Woodward and Bernstein are depicted as two bickering, childish near-incompetents, small-mindedly competitive with each other. Dick is a 1999 US comedy movie directed by Andrew Fleming from the script he co-wrote with Sheryl Longin. ... The Watergate building. ... John William Will Ferrell (born July 16, 1967[1]) is an Emmy and Golden Globe nominated Irish-American comedian, impressionist and actor who first established himself as a cast member of Saturday Night Live, and has since gone on to a successful film career. ...


The graphic novel Watchmen by Alan Moore is set in a version of 1985 where Nixon is a fifth-term President. A throwaway line reveals that a pair of unknown journalists, Woodward and Bernstein, were found murdered in the early seventies. For the 2008 film based on the comic book, see Watchmen (film). ... Alan Moore (born November 18, 1953, in Northampton) is an English writer most famous for his influential work in comics, including the acclaimed graphic novels Watchmen, V for Vendetta and From Hell. ...


In "The Long Lead Story", episode 5 of the NBC television series Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip, Matthew Perry's character Matt Albie is talking to reporter Martha O'Dell, played by Christine Lahti. She points to his show board and says "The Lobster sketch isn't funny yet", to which he replies "Tell me something else I don't know, Woodward"; a sarcastic jab at O'Dell's decision to report on a sketch comedy show despite being a Pulitzer Prize-winning political reporter. Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip is a dramatic television program airing on NBC for its debut season in 2006-2007. ... Matthew Perry may be: Matthew Perry (1794-1858), American naval officer. ... Christine Lahti (born April 4, 1950) is an American actress. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


Quotes

  • "I called my father and said I'm not going to law school, but have this job at a newspaper he had never heard of. And my father said probably the severest thing he has ever said to me. He said, 'You're crazy.' So he didn't think it was a good idea."
  • "You won't achieve understanding of a person or an issue in a day. Take your time, dig, go back."

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Bob Woodward
Persondata
NAME Woodward, Robert Upshar
ALTERNATIVE NAMES
SHORT DESCRIPTION Journalist
DATE OF BIRTH March 26, 1943
PLACE OF BIRTH Geneva, Illinois
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH

  Results from FactBites:
 
Woodward Shares War Secrets, Journalist Describes Secret Details On White House's Plans For War - CBS News (3112 words)
Woodward permitted 60 Minutes to listen to tapes he recorded of his most important interviews, to read the transcripts, and to verify that the quotes he uses are based on recollections from participants in the key meetings.
Woodward says he described Powell as semi-despondent “because he knew that this was a war that might have been avoided.
Bob Woodward describes the "broken down" relationship between Dick Cheney and Colin Powell, and asks President Bush how history will judge the war on Iraq.
CNN.com - Woodward adds twist to CIA leak case - Nov 17, 2005 (1248 words)
Woodward said he was contacted to testify after his source went to Fitzgerald to discuss his contact with Woodward related to the leak investigation.
Woodward said he testified that the official's reference to Plame, referred to as "Joe Wilson's wife," was "casual and offhand, and that it did not appear to me to be either classified or sensitive." Woodward said he believed that CIA analysts usually were not undercover.
Woodward said it was possible that he could have asked Libby about Wilson's wife, according to his statement, but no references to her appear in his interview notes.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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