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Encyclopedia > Bob Kane
Bob Kane

Kane standing beside Michael Keaton as Batman on the set of the 1989 Batman film.
Birth name Robert Kahn
Born October 24, 1915(1915-10-24)
New York City, New York
Died November 3, 1998 (aged 83)
Los Angeles, California
Nationality American
Area(s) Penciller, Writer
Notable works Batman

Bob Kane (born Robert Kahn, October 24, 1915November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist and writer credited as the creator of the DC Comics superhero Batman. Image File history File links Batman_Kane. ... Michael John Douglas (born September 5, 1951), better known by the stage name Michael Keaton, is an American actor, perhaps best known for his early comedic roles in films such as Night Shift, Beetlejuice, and his portrayal of Batman in the two Tim Burton directed films of the series. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batman is a 1989 Academy Award-winning superhero film based on the DC Comics character of the same name. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... New York, New York redirects here. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Comic Book Artist is an American magazine primarily devoted to anecdotal histories of American comic books, with emphasis on comics published between the 1960s and the present-day. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...

Contents

Biography

Early life and career

A high school friend of fellow cartoonist and future The Spirit creator Will Eisner,[1] Robert Kahn graduated from De Witt CLinton High School and legally changed his name to Bob Kane at age 18.[2] He entered comics in 1936, freelancing original material to editor Jerry Iger's comic book Wow, What A Magazine!. The following year, Kane began working at Iger's subsequent studio, Eisner & Iger, one of the first comic book "packagers" that produced comics on demand for publishers entering the new medium during its late-1930s and 1940s Golden Age. Among his work there was the funny animal feature "Peter Pupp", published in the U.K. comic magazine Wags and later reprinted in Fiction House's Jumbo Comics; and for two of the companies that would later merge to form DC Comics, the humor features "Ginger Snap" in More Fun Comics, "Oscar the Gumshoe" for Detective Comics, and "Professor Doolittle" for Adventure Comics. For that last title he went to on to do his first adventure strip, "Rusty and his Pals". For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... For the religious or spiritual meaning of The Spirit, see Spirit. ... William Erwin Eisner (March 6, 1917 – January 3, 2005) was an acclaimed American comics writer, artist and entrepreneur. ... Wow, What a Magazine! #3 (Sept. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Eisner & Iger was a prominent comic book packager that produced comics on demand for publishers entering the new medium during its late-1930s and 1940s Golden Age. ... Gefen Publishing House, is dedicated to producing a broad range of quality titles relating to Judaism, Jewish thought, and Israel, including history, the Holocaust, art, childrens books, philosophy, science, biographies, and more. ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... Superman, catalyst of the Golden Age: Superman #14 (Feb. ... Bugs Bunny, a typical funny animal character Funny animal is a cartooning term for the genre of comics and animated cartoons in which the main characters are humanoid or talking animals. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and a member of the European Union. ... Jumbo Comics #1 (Sept. ... Look up Humour in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... More Fun Comics was a DC Comics title which began as New Fun Comics in February 1935 and changed to More Fun with its seventh issue. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). ... Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ...


Batman

Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). The first appearance of Batman. Art by Bob Kane.
Detective Comics #27 (May 1939). The first appearance of Batman. Art by Bob Kane.

In early 1939, DC's success with the seminal superhero Superman in Action Comics prompted editors to scramble for more such heroes. In response, Bob Kane conceived "the Bat-Man".[3] Kane said his influences for the character included actor Douglas Fairbanks' movie portrayal of the swashbuckler Zorro, Leonardo Da Vinci's diagram of the ornithopter, a flying machine with huge bat-like wings; and the 1930 film The Bat Whispers, based on Mary Rinehart's mystery novel The Circular Staircase.[4] Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) by Bob Kane. ... Cover of Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) by Bob Kane. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... Douglas Fairbanks (May 23, 1883 – December 12, 1939) was an American actor, screenwriter, director and producer, who became noted for his swashbuckling roles in silent movies such as The Mark of Zorro (1920), The Three Musketeers (1921), Robin Hood (1922), The Thief of Bagdad (1924) and The Black Pirate (1926). ... For other uses, see Swashbuckler (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Zorro (disambiguation). ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... An ornithopter (from Greek ornithos bird and pteron wing) is an aircraft that flies by flapping its wings. ... The second silent version of this spooky house story about people looking for hidden loot while a caped killer bumps them off. ... Mary Roberts Rinehart, 1914 Mary Roberts Rinehart (August 12, 1876-September 22, 1958) was an American author and the source of the phrase The butler did it. ...


Bill Finger joined Bob Kane's nascent studio in 1938. An aspiring writer and part-time shoe salesperson, he had met Kane at a party, and Kane later offered him a job ghost writing the strips Rusty and Clip Carson.[5] [6] He recalled that Kane William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... This article is about a ghostwriter, the type of writer. ...

had an idea for a character called 'Batman', and he'd like me to see the drawings. I went over to Kane's, and he had drawn a character who looked very much like Superman with kind of ... reddish tights, I believe, with boots ... no gloves, no gauntlets ... with a small domino mask, swinging on a rope. He had two stiff wings that were sticking out, looking like bat wings. And under it was a big sign ... BATMAN.[6]

Finger said he offered such suggestions as giving the character a cowl and scalloped cape instead of wings; adding gloves; leaving the mask's eyeholes blank to connote mystery; and removing the bright red sections of the original costume, suggesting instead a gray-and-black color scheme. Finger additionally said[citation needed] his suggestions were influenced by Lee Falk's The Phantom, a syndicated newspaper comic strip character with which Kane was familiar as well. Finger, who said he also devised the character's civilian name, Bruce Wayne, wrote the first Batman story, while Kane provided art. Kane, who had already submitted the proposal for Batman at DC and held a contract, is the only person given official company credit for Batman's creation. Comics historian Ron Goulart, in Comic Book Encyclopedia, refers to Batman as the "creation of artist Bob Kane and writer Bill Finger".[7] Leon Harrison Gross, more known by the alias of Lee Falk, (April 28, 1911 - March 13, 1999) was an American writer, best known as the creator of the popular comic strip superheroes The Phantom and Mandrake the Magician, who at the height of their popularity secured him over a hundred... For other uses, see Phantom. ... Print Syndication is a form of syndication in which news articles, columns, or comic strips are made available to newspapers and magazines. ... This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Ron Goulart (born 1933) is an American pop-culture historian and mystery, fantasy, and science fiction author. ...


According to Kane,

Bill Finger was a contributing force on Batman right from the beginning. He wrote most of the great stories and was influential in setting the style and genre other writers would emulate ... I made Batman a superhero-vigilante when I first created him. Bill turned him into a scientific detective.[8]

The character debuted in Detective Comics #27 (May 1939) and proved a breakout hit. Within a year, Kane hired art assistants Jerry Robinson (initially as an inker) and George Roussos. Shortly afterward, when DC wanted more Batman stories than Kane's studio could deliver, the company assigned Dick Sprang and other in-house pencilers as "ghost artists", drawing uncredited under Kane's supervision. Future Justice League writer Gardner Fox wrote some early scripts, including the two-part story "The Monk" that introduced some of The Batman's first "Bat-" equipment.[9] Detective Comics #38 (May 1940), the first appearance of Robin. ... The inker is one of the two line artists in a traditional comic book, or graphic novel. ... George Roussos a. ... Richard Dick Sprang (b. ... For other uses, see Ghostwriter (disambiguation). ... Gardner Francis Fox (May 20, 1911, Brooklyn, New York – December 24, 1986) was an American writer best known for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. ...


In 1943, Kane left the Batman comic books to focus on penciling the daily Batman newspaper comic strip. DC Comics artists ghosting the comic-book stories now included Jack Burnley and Win Mortimer, with Robinson moving up as penciler and Fred Ray contributing some covers. In 1946, Kane returned to the comic books but, unknown to DC, had hired his own personal ghosts: Lew S. Schwartz from 1946-1953[10] and Sheldon Moldoff from 1953-1967.[11] This article is about the comic strip, the sequential art form as published in newspapers and on the Internet. ... Jack Burnley is the pen name of Hardin Burnley, a comic-book artist active from 1929 until 1976. ... James Winslow Mortimer (born May 1, 1919, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, died January 11, 1998) is a comic book and comic strip artist best known as one of the major illustrators of the DC Comics superhero Superman. ... In producing a comic book, the penciller (or penciler) draws the comic based on the script created by the writer. ... Frederic E. Ray Jr. ... Sheldon Shelly Moldoff (born April 14, 1920, New York City, New York) is an American comic book artist best known for co-creating such DC Comics characters as Hawkgirl and Poison Ivy, and as one of Bob Kanes primary ghost artists (uncredited collaborators) on the superhero Batman. ...


Robin

Bill Finger recalled that,

Robin was an outgrowth of a conversation I had with Bob. As I said, Batman was a combination of [Douglas] Fairbanks and Sherlock Holmes. Holmes had his Watson. The thing that bothered me was that Batman didn't have anyone to talk to, and it got a little tiresome always having him thinking. I found that as I went along Batman needed a Watson to talk to. That's how Robin came to be. Bob called me over and said he was going to put a boy in the strip to identify with Batman. I thought it was a great idea.[6]

Kane, who had previously created a sidekick for Peter Pupp, proposed adding a boy named Mercury who would have worn a "super-costume".[12] Robinson suggested a normal human, along with the name "Robin", after Robin Hood books he had read during boyhood, and noting in a 2005 interview he had been inspired by one book's N.C. Wyeth illustrations.[13] Robin was originally a diminutive of Robert, derived from Rob and the diminutive Old French suffix -in. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Newell Convers Wyeth (October 22, 1882 - October 19, 1945) was an American artist and illustrator. ...

The impetus came from Bill's wanting to extend the parameters of the story potential and of the drama. He saw that adding a sidekick would enhance the drama. Also, it enlarged the readership identification. The younger kids could then identify with Robin, which they couldn't with Batman, and the older ones with Batman. It extended the appeal on a lot of levels.[13]

The new character, orphaned circus performer named Dick Grayson, came to live with Bruce Wayne as his young ward in Detective Comics #38 (April 1940) and would inspire many similar sidekicks throughout the Golden Age of comic books. This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... In law, a ward is someone placed under the protection of a legal guardian. ...

The Joker

Batman's archnemesis the Joker was introduced near that same time, in Batman #1 (Spring 1940). Credit for that character's creation is disputed. Robinson has said he created the character.[14] Kane's position is that The Joker redirects here. ...

Bill Finger and I created the Joker. Bill was the writer. Jerry Robinson came to me with a playing card of the Joker. That's the way I sum it up. [The Joker] looks like Conrad Veidt — you know, the actor in The Man Who Laughs, [the 1928 movie based on the novel] by Victor Hugo. ... Bill Finger had a book with a photograph of Conrad Veidt and showed it to me and said, 'Here's the Joker'. Jerry Robinson had absolutely nothing to do with it. But he'll always say he created it till he dies. He brought in a playing card, which we used for a couple of issues for him [the Joker] to use as his playing card".[15]

Robinson, whose original Joker playing card was on public display in the exhibition "Masters of American Comics" at the Jewish Museum in New York City, New York, from Sept. 16, 2006 to Jan. 28, 2007, and the William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum in Atlanta, Georgia from Oct. 24, 2004 to Aug. 28, 2005, has countered that: Conrad Veidt in The Spy in Black (1939). ... The Man Who Laughs is a 1928 American silent Romantic drama film directed by German expressionist filmmaker Paul Leni. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (pronounced ) (February 26, 1802 — May 22, 1885) was a French poet, playwright, novelist, essayist, visual artist, statesman, human rights campaigner, and perhaps the most influential exponent of the Romantic movement in France. ... For the Russian group of artists, see Jack of Diamonds (artists). ... The Jewish Museum Berlin (Jüdisches Museum Berlin) is a museum in Berlin covering two millennia of German Jewish history. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article is about the state. ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ...

Bill Finger knew of Conrad Veidt because Bill had been to a lot of the foreign films. Veidt ... had this clown makeup with the frozen smile on his face. When Bill saw the first drawing of the Joker, he said, 'That reminds me of Conrad Veidt in The Man Who Laughs.' He said he would bring in some shots of that movie to show me. That's how that came about. I think in Bill's mind, he fleshed out the concept of the character.[16]

Later life and career

As Kane's comic work tapered off in the 1960s, Kane parlayed his Batman status into minor celebrity. He enjoyed a post-comic book career in TV animation, creating the characters Courageous Cat and Cool McCool, and as a painter, showing his work in art galleries, although even some of these paintings were produced by ghost artists.[17] In 1989, Kane published the autobiography Batman and Me, with a second volume Batman and Me, The Saga Continues, in 1996. // From the big screen to the small screen Cartoons were never just for children. ... Courageous Cat and Minute Mouse was a childrens cartoon television show that was syndicated in 1960. ... Cool McCool was an animated series that ran on NBC from September 10, 1966 to August 30, 1969 with two episodes per show, running to 40 episodes in all. ... An art gallery or art museum is a space for the exhibition of art, usually visual art, and usually primarily paintings and sculpture. ... Batman and Me (1989) (with Tom Andrae) is the autobiography of comic book illustrator and writer Bob Kane, nominally the creator of Batman. ...


He was set to have a cameo in the 1989 movie Batman as the newspaper artist who prepares the drawing of the "Bat-man" for Alexander Knox, but scheduling conflicts prevented this. Kane's trademark square signature can still be seen clearly on the drawing. Kane died on November 3, 1998, leaving behind wife, Elizabeth Sanders (Kane), an actress who appeared in three Batman films, a daughter, and grandson. [18] Kane is interred in Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Hollywood Hills) in Los Angeles, California. Batman DVD cover, 1997 release version Batman was released in U.S. theaters on June 23, 1989 by Warner Bros. ... Forest Lawn - Hollywood Hills Cemetery is located at 6300 Forest Lawn Drive in Los Angeles, California, on the south edge of the San Fernando Valley by Burbank (and on the north side of the Santa Monica Mountains from Hollywood). ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


Quotes

  • Jerry Robinson: "A lot of people don't give him [Kane] as much credit for his art, but I thought he had a flair. It was rudimentary, but in a way that worked to his benefit in the strip. He didn't know much about perspective and anatomy, so he had to improvise."[19]
  • George Roussos: "Jerry was an excellent, very meticulous inker, but slow. Bob and I got on very well during the years I worked on Batman. He was a mild-mannered individual who made no demands on Jerry and me, and in general, he was terrific to work for."[20]

Footnotes

  1. ^ Weinstein, Simcha (2006). Up, Up, and Oy Vey!, 1st, Leviathan Press. ISBN 978-1-881927-32-7. 
  2. ^ Kane, Bob; Tom Andrae (1989). Batman & Me. Forestville, CA: Eclipse Books, 44. 1-56060-017-9. 
  3. ^ Daniels, Les. Batman: The Complete History. Chronicle Books, 1999. ISBN 0-8118-4232-0, pg. 18.
  4. ^ Daniels, Ibid., page 20
  5. ^ Walker, Brian. The Comics Since 1945 (Harry N. Abrams), pp. 10-12
  6. ^ a b c Steranko, Jim. The Steranko History of Comics (Supergraphics, Reading, Pa., 1970; ISBN 0-517-50188-0), p. 44
  7. ^ Goulart, Ron, Comic Book Encyclopedia (Harper Entertainment, New York, 2004) ISBN 0-06-053816-3.
  8. ^ Kane, Andrae, Ibid., p. 43
  9. ^ Kane, Andrae,page 103 Ibid., and Daniels, page 29
  10. ^ Lew Schwartz interview, Alter Ego #51 (Aug. 2005)
  11. ^ Moldoff, in a 1994 interview given while Kane was alive, described his clandestine arrangement in Alter Ego #59 (June 2006, p. 15)
  12. ^ Comic Book Interview Super Special: Batman (Fictioneer Press, 1989
  13. ^ a b Groth, Gary (October 2005). "Jerry Robinson". The Comics Journal 1 (271): 80-81. ISSN 0194-7869. Retrieved on 2007-11-18. 
  14. ^ Per many sources, including The Comics Journal #271 (Oct. 2005): Jerry Robinson interview (online excerpts posted Oct. 15, 2005)
  15. ^ Entertainment Weekly writer Frank Lovece official site: Web Exclusives — Bob Kane interview
  16. ^ Newsarama (Oct. 18. 2006): "The Joker, the Jewish Museum and Jerry: Talking to Jerry Robinson" (interview)
  17. ^ POV Online (column of March 15, 2007): "News from Me: Arnold", by Mark Evanier
  18. ^ Elizabeth Sanders (I). IMDb. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  19. ^ The Comics Journal, Ibid.
  20. ^ Dark Knight Archives Volume Two (DC Comics, 1995)

Rabbi Simcha Weinstein (1975 - ) is an American author. ... Les Daniels (born 1943) is an American writer of historical horror fiction. ... Ibid (Latin, short for ibidem, the same place) is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the last endnote or footnote. ... Captain America #111 (March 1969): Sterankos signature surrealism. ... Ron Goulart (born 1933) is an American pop-culture historian and mystery, fantasy, and science fiction author. ... HarperCollins is a publishing company owned by News Corporation. ... Ibid (Latin, short for ibidem, the same place) is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the last endnote or footnote. ... Ibid (Latin, short for ibidem, the same place) is the term used to provide an endnote or footnote citation or reference for a source that was cited in the last endnote or footnote. ... Gary Groth (born 1954) is an American comic book publisher, critic, editor in chief of the Comics Journal and co-founder of Fantagraphics Books. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The cover of TCJ #115 (April 1987) celebrated their court victory in defending a libel suit. ...

References

  • Goulart, Ron, Over 50 Years of American Comic Books (BDD Promotional Books Company, 1991) ISBN-10 0792454502; ISBN-13 978-0792454502

External links

  • Bob Kane at the Internet Movie Database
  • Comic Book Artist #3 (Winter 1999): "The Bob Kane Letter" (September 14, 1965 open letter by Bob Kane)
  • The New York Times November 7, 1998: "OBITUARY: Bob Kane, 83, the Cartoonist Who Created 'Batman,' Is Dead", by Sarah Boxer
The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... William Bill Finger (February 8, 1914–January 18, 1974) was an American writer best known as the uncredited co-creator, with Bob Kane, of the DC Comics character Batman, as well as the co-architect of the series development. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ... Azrael (Jean-Paul Valley) is a fictional character from DC Comics. ... Batgirl is a DC Comics superhero. ... Bette Kane is a fictional character in DC comics. ... Barbara Babs Gordon is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics and related media, created by Gardner Fox and Carmine Infantino. ... Cassandra Cain is a fictional character in the DC Universe, and the most recent Batgirl. ... Robin (also referred to as The Boy Wonder) is the name of several fictional characters appearing in comic books published by DC Comics, originally created by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, as a junior counterpart to DC Comics superhero Batman. ... This article is about the DC Comics hero and former sidekick of Batman. ... Nightwing is a name used by at least six fictional characters in the DC Comics Universe. ... Jason Peter Todd is a fictional character published in stories by DC Comics. ... Timothy Tim Drake is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... A classic image of Batman and Robin reinterpreted by painter Alex Ross. ... Batwoman (originally referred to as the Bat-Woman) is a fictional character, a female counterpart to DC Comics popular superhero Batman. ... This article is about the supervillainess. ... The Huntress is a superheroine from DC Comics. ... Man-Bat (real name Dr. Kirk Langström) is a fictional character in DC Comics universe who first appeared in Detective Comics #400, illustrated by Neal Adams. ... Bat-Mite, astride Ace the Bat-Hound, on the cover of Batman #133 (August 1960). ... The comic book character Ace the Bat-Hound was the canine crime-fighting partner of Batman and Robin in DC Comics of the 1950s and 1960s. ... Cover to Batman Allies: Secret Files & Origins 2005. ... Alfred Pennyworth is a fictional supporting character in the DC Comics Batman series. ... Lucius Fox is a fictional character appearing in Batman comic books by DC Comics. ... James Jim Worthington Gordon is a supporting character in DC Comics Batman series. ... Renee Montoya is a fictional character in DC Comics. ... This article is about the DC Comics character. ... Bane is a fictional character, associated with DC Comics Batman. ... Black Mask is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe. ... Clayface is a name used by several DC Comics fictional characters, most of them possessing clay-like bodies and shapeshifting abilities. ... For the Agatha Christie character Harley Quin, see The Mysterious Mr. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Killer Croc (Waylon Jones) is a fictional character in the DC universe, an enemy of Batman. ... The Mad Hatter is a fictional character in the Batman comics, published by DC Comics. ... Mr. ... The Penguin (Oswald Chesterfield Cobblepot), is a DC Comics supervillain and is an enemy of Batman. ... For other uses of Poison ivy, see Poison ivy (disambiguation). ... Ras al Ghul, sometimes written Rās al Ghūl (Arabic: رأس الغول), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... The Riddler, (Edward E. Nigma, also spelled Nygma by some writers), is a DC Comics supervillain and an enemy of Batman. ... This article deals with the Scarecrow of DC Comics. ... Talia al Ghul is a fictional character in the DC Comics universe, the now-estranged daughter of the supervillain Ras al Ghul, and a love interest of Batman. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Ventriloquist is a DC Comics villain, an enemy of Batman. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... The Batcave. ... This article is about the fictional place. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... Wayne Manor in 1989s Batman. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batman surrounded by batarangs. ... The Batboat from Batman: The Movie[1]. The Batboat is the fictional personal boat of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batcopter from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batcycle from Batman: The Movie. ... The Batmobile as seen in the 2005 movie Batman Begins. The Batmobile is the fictional personal automobile of comic book superhero Batman. ... The Batplane (or Batwing) is the fictional aircraft for the comic book superhero Batman. ... Batmans current costume, as shown in the Hush story arc. ... Batmans utility belt is the most characteristic portion of Batmans costume, much like Wonder Womans Lasso of Truth, or Green Lanterns power ring. ... This is a list of the alternate versions of Batman from all media, including DC Comics multiverse, Elseworlds, television and film. ... Batman #1 Spring 1940 Art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. ... This article is about the various depictions of the fictional character Batman, the DC Comics superhero. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bob Kane - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (727 words)
Bob Kane (October 24, 1915 – November 3, 1998) was an American comic book artist who is known well as the creator of Batman, although many feel that Bill Finger should be unofficially acknowledged as the co-creator of the character.
Kane, the more business-savvy of the Kane-Finger creative team, negotiated a contract with National, signing away any ownership that he might have in the character in exchange for, among other compensations, a mandatory byline on all Batman comics stating "Batman created by Bob Kane", regardless of whether he was involved in the specific issue.
Kane's major contributions to Batman were in the 1940s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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