FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan performing at St. Lawrence University in New York, 1963.
Bob Dylan performing at St. Lawrence University in New York, 1963.
Background information
Birth name Robert Allen Zimmerman
Also known as Elston Gunn, Blind Boy Grunt, Lucky Wilbury/Boo Wilbury, Elmer Johnson, Sergei Petrov, Jack Frost, Jack Fate, Willow Scarlet, Robert Milkwood Thomas.
Born May 24, 1941 (1941-05-24) (age 66)
Duluth, Minnesota, U.S.
Genre(s) Folk, rock, blues, country
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, author, poet, artist, actor, screenwriter, disc jockey
Instrument(s) Vocals, guitar, bass guitar, harmonica, keyboards, accordion, percussion
Years active 1959–present
Label(s) Columbia, Asylum
Associated acts Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Al Kooper, The Band, Rolling Thunder Revue, Mark Knopfler, Traveling Wilburys, Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Van Morrison, Grateful Dead, Joan Baez
Influences Hank Williams, Rev. Gary Davis, Dave Van Ronk, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Woody Guthrie, Leadbelly, Blind Lemon Jefferson
Website www.bobdylan.com

Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter, author, musician, poet, artist, and, of late, disc jockey who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. Much of Dylan's most celebrated work dates from the 1960s, when he became an informal chronicler and a reluctant figurehead of American unrest. A number of his songs, such as "Blowin' in the Wind" and "The Times They Are a-Changin'",[1] became anthems of the anti-war and civil rights movements. His most recent studio album, Modern Times, released on August 29, 2006, entered the U.S. album charts at #1, making him, at age 65, the oldest living person to top those charts until Neil Diamond made #1 at age 67 in May 2008 with his album Home Before Dark.[2] Modern Times was later named Album of the Year by Rolling Stone magazine.[3] Bob Dylan is the eponymous debut album from American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (747x1119, 1220 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Bob Dylan List of people from Minnesota St. ... St. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... The Traveling Wilburys were a supergroup consisting of George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Location in St. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Folk song redirects here. ... This article is about the genre. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Country music is a blend of popular musical forms originally found in the Southern United States and the Appalachian Mountains. ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Screenwriters, scenarists, or script writers, are authors who write the screenplays from which movies and television programs are made. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... Harry Belafonte singing, photograph by C. van Vechten Singing is the act of producing musical sounds with the voice, which is often contrasted with speech. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Piano, a well-known instance of keyboard instruments A keyboard instrument is any musical instrument played using a musical keyboard. ... For other uses, see Accordion (disambiguation). ... Percussion instruments are played by being struck, shaken, rubbed or scraped. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Paul Butterfield (December 17, 1942 – May 4, 1987) was an American blues harmonica player and singer, and one of the earliest white exponents of the Chicago-originated electric blues style. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Band. ... Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson in October 1975 The Rolling Thunder Revue was a tour headed by Bob Dylan in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976. ... Mark Freuder Knopfler OBE (born August 12, 1949, Glasgow, Scotland) is an English guitarist, singer, songwriter, and film score composer. ... The Traveling Wilburys were a supergroup consisting of George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. ... Tom Petty Thomas Earl Petty (born October 20, 1953 in Gainesville, Florida) is an American musician. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a Grammy Award-winning Irish singer, songwriter, author, poet and multi-instrumentalist, who has been a professional musician since the late 1950s. ... This article is about the band. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Reverend Gary Davis also Blind Gary Davis (April 30, 1896 – May 5, 1972) was an African American blues and gospel singer as well as a renowned guitarist. ... Dave Van Ronk (June 30, 1936 – February 10, 2002) was a folk singer born in Brooklyn, New York, who settled in Greenwich Village, New York City, and was nicknamed the Mayor of MacDougal Street. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Leadbelly, also known as Lead Belly (born Huddie William Ledbetter; January 20, 1889 (although this is debatable) - December 6, 1949), was an American folk and blues musician, notable for his clear and forceful singing, his virtuosity on the twelve string guitar, and the rich songbook of folk standards he introduced. ... Blind Lemon Jefferson (October 26, 1894 – December 1929) was an influential blues singer and guitarist from Texas. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... The term singer-songwriter refers to performers who both write and sing their own material. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ... A poet is a person who writes poetry. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... In politics, a figurehead, by metaphor with the carved figurehead at the prow of a sailing ship, is a person who holds an important title or office yet executes little actual power. ... Blowin in the Wind is a song written by Bob Dylan, and released on his 1963 album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... The Times They Are a-Changin is a song written by Bob Dylan and released on his 1964 album The Times They Are a-Changin. Dylans friend, Tony Glover, recalls visiting Dylans apartment in September 1963, where he saw a number of song manuscripts and poems lying on... An anthem is a composition to an English religious text sung in the context of an Anglican service. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Martin Luther King is perhaps most famous for his I Have a Dream speech, given in front of the Lincoln Memorial during the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom This article is about the civil rights movement following the Brown v. ... Modern Times is Bob Dylans 32nd studio album, released on August 29, 2006 by Sony BMG. The album was Dylans third straight (following Time out of Mind and Love and Theft) to be met with nearly universal praise from fans and critics. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... Neil Leslie Diamond (born January 24, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and occasional actor. ... This article is about the magazine. ...


Dylan's early lyrics incorporated politics, social commentary, philosophy and literary influences, defying existing pop music conventions and appealing widely to the counterculture. While expanding and personalizing musical styles, he has shown steadfast devotion to many traditions of American song, from folk and country/blues to gospel, rock and roll and rockabilly, to English, Scottish and Irish folk music, even jazz and swing.[4][5] For other uses, see Politics (disambiguation). ... Social commentary is the act of expressing an opinion on the nature of society. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre of popular music. ... Counterculture (also counter-culture) is a sociological word used to describe the values and norms of behavior of a cultural group, or subculture, that run counter to those of the social mainstream of the day,[1] the cultural equivalent of political opposition. ... Folk song redirects here. ... In popular music, Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music that began to develop rapidly [1] in the... Blues music redirects here. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Swing music, also known as swing jazz, is a form of jazz music that developed during the 1920s and had solidified as a distinctive style by 1935 in the United States. ...


Dylan performs with the guitar, keyboard and harmonica. Backed by a changing lineup of musicians, he has toured steadily since the late 1980s on what has been dubbed the "Never Ending Tour". He has also performed alongside other major artists, such as John Fogerty, The Band, Tom Petty, Joan Baez, George Harrison, The Grateful Dead, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, Eric Clapton, Patti Smith, Emmylou Harris, Bruce Springsteen, U2, The Rolling Stones, Joni Mitchell, Jack White, Merle Haggard, Jeff Lynne, Neil Young, Van Morrison, Ringo Starr and Stevie Nicks. Although his accomplishments as performer and recording artist have been central to his career, his songwriting is generally regarded as his greatest contribution.[6] For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... An electronic keyboard. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... Bob Dylans Never Ending Tour is a popular term for the rock legends seemingly incessant performing schedule since June 7, 1988. ... This article is about the musician. ... For other uses, see Band. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... For other persons named Jack White, see Jack White (disambiguation). ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Jeff Lynne (born December 30, 1947 in Shard End, Birmingham) is a Grammy Award-winning English rock songwriter, singer, guitarist and record producer. ... This article is about the musician. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a Grammy Award-winning Irish singer, songwriter, author, poet and multi-instrumentalist, who has been a professional musician since the late 1950s. ... Richard Starkey, MBE (born 7 July 1940), better known by his stage name Ringo Starr, is an Academy Award-winning English musician, singer, songwriter and actor, best known as the drummer for The Beatles. ... Stephanie Lynn Stevie Nicks (born May 26, 1948) is an American singer and songwriter, best known for her work with Fleetwood Mac and an extensive solo career, which collectively have produced over twenty Top 50 hits. ...


Over many years, Dylan has been recognized and honored for his songwriting, performing, and recording. His records have earned Grammy, Golden Globe, and Academy Awards, and he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and Songwriters Hall of Fame. In 1999, Dylan was included in TIME Magazine's 100 most influential people of the 20th century, and 2004, he was ranked #2 in Rolling Stone magazine's list of "Greatest Artists of All Time", second only to The Beatles.[7] In January 1990, Dylan was made a Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres by French Minister of Culture Jack Lang; in 2000, he was awarded the Polar Music Prize by the Royal Swedish Academy of Music[8]; and in 2007, Dylan was awarded the Prince of Asturias Award in Arts. He has been nominated several times for the Nobel Prize in Literature.[9][10][11] Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... The Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame was established by the Nashville Songwriters Foundation, Inc. ... The Songwriters Hall of Fame is an arm of the National Academy of Popular Music. ... TIME Magazines 100 most influential people of the 20th century (called the TIME 100 for short) is a list of the 20th centurys most influential politicians, artists, innovators, scientists and icons, compiled by TIME Magazine. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... High honour given to worthy artists and intellectuals in the name of the French Republic. ... Jack Lang in Belém (Brazil) Jack Mathieu Emile Lang (born 2 September 1939) is a French politician and a member of the French Socialist Party. ... The Polar Music Prize is an international music prize and awarded to individuals, groups or institutions in recognition of exceptional achievements in the creation and advancement of music. The prize was founded in 1989 following a donation from Stig Anderson and is awarded annually by the Royal Swedish Academy of... The Royal Swedish Academy of Music or , founded in 1771 by King Gustav III, is one of the Royal Academies in Sweden. ... The Prince of Asturias Awards (in Spanish: Premios Príncipe de Asturias) is a series of annual prizes given in Spain by the Fundación Príncipe de Asturias to individuals from around the world who make notable achievements in the sciences, humanities, or public affairs. ... René-François-Armand Prudhomme (1839–1907), a French poet and essayist, was the first person to win the Nobel Prize in Literature, in 1901, in special recognition of his poetic composition, which gives evidence of lofty idealism, artistic perfection and a rare combination of the qualities of both heart...


In 2008, Dylan was awarded a Pulitzer Prize Special Citation for his "profound impact on popular music and American culture, marked by lyrical compositions of extraordinary poetic power."[12] Previous recipients of this award include Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane. [13] The Pulitzer Prize jury has the option of awarding special citations where they consider necessary. ... Thelonious Sphere Monk (October 10, 1917 – February 17, 1982) was a jazz pianist and composer. ... Coltrane redirects here. ...


For a complete list of awards won by Bob Dylan, see List of Bob Dylan awards and accolades.

Contents

Life and career

Origins and musical beginnings

Robert Allen Zimmerman (Hebrew name: Zushe ben Avraham)[14][15] was born on May 24, 1941, in Duluth, Minnesota,[16] and raised there and in Hibbing, Minnesota, on the Mesabi Iron Range west of Lake Superior. Research by Dylan’s biographers has shown that his paternal grandparents, Zigman and Anna Zimmerman, emigrated from Odessa in Russian Empire (now Ukraine) to the United States after the antisemitic pogroms of 1905.[17] Dylan himself has written (in his 2004 autobiography, Chronicles) that his paternal grandmother's maiden name was Kyrgyz and her family originated from Istanbul, although she grew up in the Kağızman district of Kars in Eastern Turkey. He also wrote that his paternal grandfather was from Trabzon on the Black Sea coast of Turkey.[18] His mother’s grandparents, Benjamin and Lybba Edelstein, were Lithuanian Jews who arrived in America in 1902.[17] is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Location in St. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Largest metro area Minneapolis-St. ... Hibbing is a city in St. ... The Mesabi Range, also known as the Mesabi Iron Range, is a vast deposit of iron ore in northern Minnesota, and the chief deposit of iron ore in the United States. ... For the Quebec municipality, see Lac-Supérieur. ... The ODESSA, which stands for the German phrase Organisation der ehemaligen SS-Angehörigen, which phrase in turn translates as “Organization of Former Members of the SS,” is the name commonly given to an international Nazi network alleged to have been set up towards the end of World War II... The subject of this article was previously also known as Russia. ... Antisemitism (alternatively spelled anti-semitism or anti-Semitism, also known as judeophobia) is prejudice and hostility toward Jews as a religious, racial, or ethnic group. ... Pogrom (from Russian: ; from громить IPA: - to wreak havoc, to demolish violently) is a form of riot directed against a particular group, whether ethnic, religious or other, and characterized by destruction of their homes, businesses and religious centres. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... For the language spoken by this ethnic group, see Kyrgyz language. ... Istanbul (Turkish: , Greek: , historically Byzantium and later Constantinople; see other names) is Turkeys most populous city, and its cultural and financial center. ... Kağızman (Armenian: Ô¿Õ¡Õ£Õ°Õ¦Ö‚Õ¡Õ¶ (Latin transliteration: Kaghzuan)) is a district of Kars Province of Turkey. ... Kars (Armenian: Ô¿Õ¡Ö€Õ½) is a city in northeast Turkey and the capital of the Kars Province, formerly at the head of a sanjak in the Turkish vilayet of Erzurum. ... Trabzon, formerly known as Trebizond (Greek: ), is a city on the Black Sea coast of north-eastern Turkey and the capital of Trabzon Province. ... For other uses, see Black Sea (disambiguation). ... Lithuanian Jews (known in Yiddish and Haredi English as Litvish (adjective) or Litvaks (noun)) are Ashkenazi Jews with roots in Lita, a region including not only present-day Lithuania but also Latvia, much of Belarus and the northeastern SuwaÅ‚ki region of Poland. ...


His parents, Abram Zimmerman and Beatrice "Beatty" Stone, were part of the area's small but close-knit Jewish community. Zimmerman lived in Duluth until age seven. When his father was stricken with polio, the family returned to nearby Hibbing, where Zimmerman spent the rest of his childhood.[19] Abram was recalled by one of Bob's childhood friends as strict and unwelcoming, whereas his mother was remembered as warm and friendly.[20] Poliomyelitis (polio), or infantile paralysis, is a viral paralytic disease. ... Hibbing is a city in St. ...


Zimmerman spent much of his youth listening to the radio — first to the powerful blues and country stations broadcasting from Shreveport, Louisiana and, later, to early rock and roll.[21] He formed several bands in high school: the first, The Shadow Blasters, was short-lived; but his next band, The Golden Chords, lasted longer playing covers of popular songs. Their performance of Danny and the Juniors' "Rock and Roll Is Here to Stay" at their high school talent show was so loud that the principal cut the microphone off.[22][23] In his 1959 school year book, Robert Zimmerman listed as his ambition "To join Little Richard."[24] The same year, using the name Elston Gunnn,[25] he performed two dates with Bobby Vee, playing piano and providing handclaps.[26] Blues music redirects here. ... In popular music, Country music, also called country and western music or country-western, is an amalgam of popular musical forms developed in the Southern United States, with roots in traditional folk music, Celtic Music, Blues, Gospel music, and Old-time music that began to develop rapidly [1] in the... : Port City , River City , Ratchet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... // In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Danny & The Juniors were a Philadelphia-based quartet comprising of Danny Rapp, Dave White, Frank Mattei and Joe Terranova. ... Richard Wayne Penniman (born December 5, 1932), better known by the stage name Little Richard, is an African-American singer, songwriter, and pianist, who began performing in the 1940s and was a key figure in the transition from rhythm & blues to rock and roll in the mid-1950s. ... Bobby Vee (born April 30, 1943) is an American pop music singer. ...


Zimmerman enrolled at the University of Minnesota in September 1959, moving to Minneapolis. His early focus on rock and roll gave way to an interest in American folk music, typically performed with an acoustic guitar. He has recalled, "The first thing that turned me onto folk singing was Odetta. I heard a record of hers in a record store. Right then and there, I went out and traded my electric guitar and amplifier for an acoustical guitar, a flat-top Gibson."[27] In the sleeve notes to his album Biograph, Dylan explained the attraction folk music exerted: "The thing about rock'n'roll is that for me anyway it wasn't enough...There were great catch-phrases and driving pulse rhythms...but the songs weren't serious or didn't reflect life in a realistic way. I knew that when I got into folk music, it was more of a serious type of thing. The songs are filled with more despair, more sadness, more triumph, more faith in the supernatural, much deeper feelings."[28] He soon began to perform at the 10 O'clock Scholar, a coffee house a few blocks from campus, and became actively involved in the local Dinkytown folk music circuit, fraternizing with local folk enthusiasts and occasionally "borrowing" many of their albums.[29][30] This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... Minneapolis redirects here. ... Odetta (b. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ... Dinkytown, USA (also known as just Dinkytown) is a neighborhood in the city of Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... Folk song redirects here. ...


During his Dinkytown days, Zimmerman began introducing himself as "Bob Dylan". In his autobiography, Chronicles (2004), he wrote, "What I was going to do as soon as I left home was just call myself Robert Allen.... It sounded like a Scottish king and I liked it." However, by reading Downbeat magazine, he discovered that there was already a saxophonist called David Allyn. Many say he took his name from the Welsh poet, Dylan Thomas, who he was often seen reading as a child. although, Dylan once told reporters "straighten out in your book that I did not take my name from Dylan Thomas." [31] Dylan Marlais Thomas (27 October 1914 - 9 November 1953) was a Welsh poet. ...


Relocation to New York and record deal

Dylan dropped out of college at the end of his freshman year. He stayed in Minneapolis, working the folk circuit there with temporary journeys to Denver, Colorado; Madison, Wisconsin; and Chicago, Illinois. In January 1961, he moved to New York City, to perform there and to visit his ailing musical idol Woody Guthrie, who was then dying in a New Jersey hospital. Guthrie had been a revelation to Dylan and was the biggest influence on his early performances. Dylan would later say of Guthrie's work, "You could listen to his songs and actually learn how to live."[30] In the hospital room, Dylan met Woody's old road-buddy Ramblin' Jack Elliott, who was visiting Guthrie the day after returning from his own trip to Europe. Dylan and Elliott became friends, and much of Guthrie's repertoire was actually channeled through Elliott. Dylan paid tribute to Elliott in Chronicles (2004).[32] Nickname: Location of Denver in the State of Colorado Location of Colorado in the United States Coordinates: , Country United States State State of Colorado City and County Denver[1] Founded 1858-11-22, as Denver City, K.T.[2] Incorporated 1861-11-07, as Denver City, C.T.[3] Consolidated... For other uses, see Madison (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital postcard Greystone Park Psychiatric Hospital (also known as Greystone Psychiatric Park, Greystone Psychiatric Hospital, or simply Greystone) refers to both the former psychiatric hospital and the historic building that it occupied in Parsippany-Troy Hills Township (formerly part of Hanover Township, New Jersey). ... Ramblin Jack Elliott Ramblin Jack Elliot (born Elliott Charles Adnopoz, August 1, 1931) is an American folk performer. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


From April to September 1961, he played at various clubs around Greenwich Village [33] and on 29th July, 1961 he was broadcast on the WRVR radio programme "Saturday Of Folk Music" playing Eric von Schmidt's "Acne" in duet with Ramblin' Jack Elliott [34], duetting with Danny Kalb on "Mean Old Southern Man," and covering three traditional folk songs ("Handsome Molly," "Omie Wise," and "Poor Lazarus") [35]. Dylan gained some public recognition after a positive review[36] in The New York Times by critic Robert Shelton of a show he played at Gerde's Folk City in September. Also in September, Dylan was invited to play harmonica by folk singer Carolyn Hester on her third album, entitled Carolyn Hester. This brought Dylan's talents to the attention of John Hammond, who was producing Hester's album[37] for Columbia Records. Hammond signed Dylan to Columbia that October. The performances on his first Columbia album Bob Dylan (1962), consisted of familiar folk, blues and gospel material combined with two of his own songs. Dylan's first album made little impact, selling only 5,000 copies in its first year, just enough to break even. Within Columbia Records some referred to the singer as 'Hammond's Folly' and suggested dropping his contract. Hammond defended Dylan vigorously, and Johnny Cash was also a powerful ally of Dylan at Columbia.[38] While Dylan continued to work for Columbia, he also recorded more than a dozen songs, under the pseudonym Blind Boy Grunt, for Broadside Magazine, a folk music magazine and record label. The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Eric Von Schmidt on the cover of Tomato CD 2053 Eric Von Schmidt (May 28, 1931 - February 2, 2007) was an American singer-songwriter associated with the folk/blues revival of the 1960s and a key part of the East Coast folk music scene ([1]) that included Bob Dylan ([2... Danny Kalb is a blues guitarist and former founder of the 1960s group, Blues Project. ... Omie Wise or Naomi Wise (1789-1808) was an American murder victim, who is remembered by a popular murder ballad about her death. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Robert Shelton (June 28, 1926, Chicago, Illinois, United States – December 11, 1995, Brighton, England) was a music and film critic. ... Gerdes Folk City was a legendary venue in the West Village. ... Carolyn Hester (b. ... John Henry Hammond (December 15, 1910–July 10, 1987) was a record producer, musician and music critic from the 1930s to the early 1980s. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Bob Dylan is the eponymous debut album from American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Gospel music is music that is written to express either personal or a communal belief regarding Christian life, as well as (in terms of the varying music styles) to give a Christian alternative to mainstream secular music. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Broadside Magazine Hugely influential in the folk-revival, Broadside Magazine was a small mimeographed publication founded in 1962 by Agnes Sis Cunningham and husband Gordon Friesen. ...


Dylan made two important career moves in August 1962. He went to the Supreme Court building in New York and changed his name to Robert Dylan. In the same month, he also signed a management contract with Albert Grossman. Grossman remained Dylan's manager until 1970, and was notable both for his sometimes confrontational personality, and for the fiercely protective loyalty he displayed towards his principal client.[39] In the documentary No Direction Home, Dylan described Grossman thus: "He was kind of like a Colonel Tom Parker figure...you could smell him coming." Tensions between Grossman and John Hammond led to Hammond being replaced as the producer of Dylan's second album by the young African American jazz producer Tom Wilson.[40] The Supreme Court of the State of New York is the basic New York State trial court of general jurisidiction. ... Albert Bernard Grossman (May 21, 1926 -- January 25, 1986) is best known as the manager of Bob Dylan. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... Colonel Tom Parker (born Andreas Cornelius van Kuijk on June 26, 1909 – January 21, 1997), was an American/Dutch entertainment impresario known best as the manager of Elvis Presley. ... John Henry Hammond (December 15, 1910–July 10, 1987) was a record producer, musician and music critic from the 1930s to the early 1980s. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


By the time Dylan's second album, The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, was released in May 1963, he had begun making his name as both a singer and a songwriter. Many of the songs on this album were labelled protest songs, inspired partly by Guthrie and influenced by Pete Seeger's passion for topical songs.[41] "Oxford Town", for example, was a sardonic account of James Meredith's ordeal as the first black student to risk enrollment at the University of Mississippi.[42] The Freewheelin Bob Dylan is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans second studio album, released in 1963 by Columbia Records. ... A protest song is a song which protests perceived problems in society and with world conflicts. ... Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), better known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist, and a key figure in the mid-20th century American folk music revival. ... Meredith walking to class accompanied by U.S. marshals James Howard Meredith (born June 25, 1933) is an American civil rights movement figure, although he vocally prefers not to be regarded as such. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ...


His most famous song of the time, "Blowin' in the Wind", partially derived its melody from the traditional slave song "No More Auction Block", while its lyrics questioned the social and political status quo. The song was widely recorded and became an international hit for Peter, Paul and Mary, setting a precedent for many other artists who would have hits with Dylan's songs. While Dylan's topical songs solidified his early reputation, Freewheelin' also included a mixture of love songs and jokey, surreal talking blues. Humor was a large part of Dylan's persona,[43] and the range of material on the album impressed many listeners, including The Beatles. George Harrison said, "We just played it, just wore it out. The content of the song lyrics and just the attitude — it was incredibly original and wonderful."[44] Blowin in the Wind is a song written by Bob Dylan, and released on his 1963 album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock... The trio Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) is a musical group from the United States; they were one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ...

With Joan Baez during the Civil Rights March in Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963
With Joan Baez during the Civil Rights March in Washington, D.C., August 28, 1963

The Freewheelin' song "A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall", built melodically from a loose adaptation of the folk ballad "Lord Randall", with its veiled references to nuclear apocalypse, gained even more resonance as the Cuban missile crisis developed only a few weeks after Dylan began performing it.[45] Like "Blowin' in the Wind", "A Hard Rain's a-Gonna Fall" marked an important new direction in modern songwriting, blending a stream-of-consciousness, imagist lyrical attack with traditional folk progressions.[46] Image File history File links Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. Entertainment: closeup view of vocalists Joan Baez and Bob Dylan, 08/28/1963 Source: NARA - ARC Identifier: 542021 File links The following pages link to this file: Joan Baez ... Image File history File links Civil Rights March on Washington, D.C. Entertainment: closeup view of vocalists Joan Baez and Bob Dylan, 08/28/1963 Source: NARA - ARC Identifier: 542021 File links The following pages link to this file: Joan Baez ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ... A Hard Rains a-Gonna Fall is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 in Chip Moncks apartment in the basement of the Village Gate (now The Village Theater) on the corner of Bleecker and Thompson Streets in Greenwich Village. ... For other uses, see Ballad (disambiguation). ... Lord Randall is a traditional ballad that includes dialogue. ... The Titan II ICBM carried a 9 Mt W53 warhead, making it one of the most powerful nuclear weapons fielded by the United States during the Cold War. ... St. ... For the video game based on the possible outcomes of this event, see Cuban Missile Crisis: The Aftermath. ... For other uses, see Stream of consciousness (psychology) In literary criticism, stream of consciousness is a literary technique that seeks to portray an individuals point of view by giving the written equivalent of the characters thought processes, either in a loose interior monologue, or in connection to his... Ezra Pound, one of the prime movers of Imagism. ...


The Freewheelin album presented Dylan as a singer accompanying himself on acoustic guitar. But other tracks recorded at these sessions, with a backing band, showed a willingness to experiment with a rockabilly sound. 'Mixed Up Confusion' was released as a single and then quickly withdrawn. Cameron Crowe described it as "a fascinating look at a folk artist with his mind wandering towards Elvis Presley and Sun Records".[47] Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Label of the fourth Sun Records Sun Records has been the name for four 20th century record labels. ...


Soon after the release of Freewheelin, Dylan emerged as a dominant figure of the so-called "new folk movement" centered in Greenwich Village. Dylan's singing voice was untrained and had an unusual edge to it, yet it was suited to the interpretation of traditional songs. Robert Shelton described Dylan's vocal style as "a rusty voice suggesting Guthrie's old performances, etched in gravel like Dave Van Ronk's"[48] Many of his most famous early songs first reached the public through other performers' versions that were more immediately palatable. Joan Baez became Dylan's advocate, as well as his lover. Baez was influential in bringing Dylan to national and international prominence, jumpstarting his performance career by inviting him onstage during her own concerts, and recording several of his early songs.[49] The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... Dave Van Ronk (June 30, 1936 – February 10, 2002) was a folk singer born in Brooklyn, New York, who settled in Greenwich Village, New York City, and was nicknamed the Mayor of MacDougal Street. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ...


Others who recorded and had hits with Dylan's songs in the early and mid-1960s included The Byrds, Sonny and Cher, The Hollies, Peter, Paul and Mary, Manfred Mann, and The Turtles. Most attempted to impart a pop feel and rhythm to the songs, while Dylan and Baez performed them mostly as sparse folk pieces, keying rhythmically off the vocals. The covers became so ubiquitous that CBS started to promote him with the tag "Nobody Sings Dylan Like Dylan". Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Sonny and Cher were an American rock and roll duo, made up of husband and wife team Sonny Bono and Cher in the 1960s and 1970s. ... ‹ The template below (Citations missing) is being considered for deletion. ... The trio Peter, Paul and Mary (often PP&M) is a musical group from the United States; they were one of the most successful folk-singing groups of the 1960s. ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... The Turtles were an American pop, psychedelic and folk rock band, defined by a good-natured, joyously melancholic and occasionally cheeky sound. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ...


Protest and Another Side

Bob Dylan performing at St. Lawrence University in New York, 1963.
Bob Dylan performing at St. Lawrence University in New York, 1963.

By 1963, Dylan and Baez were both prominent in the civil rights movement, singing together at rallies including the March on Washington where Martin Luther King, Jr. gave his "I have a dream" speech.[50] In January, Dylan appeared on British television in the BBC play Madhouse on Castle Street, playing the part of a "hobo guitar-player".[51] On May 12, 1963, Dylan experienced conflict with the media when he walked off The Ed Sullivan Show. Dylan had chosen to perform "Talkin' John Birch Paranoid Blues" but was informed by the 'head of program practices' at CBS Television that this song was potentially libellous to the John Birch Society. Rather than comply with TV censorship, Dylan refused to appear.[52] His next album, The Times They Are a-Changin', reflected a more sophisticated, politicized and cynical Dylan. This bleak material, addressing such subjects as the murder of civil rights worker Medgar Evers and the despair engendered by the breakdown of farming and mining communities ("Ballad of Hollis Brown", "North Country Blues"), was accompanied by two love songs, "Boots of Spanish Leather" and "One Too Many Mornings", and the renunciation of "Restless Farewell". The Brechtian "The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll" describes the true story of a young socialite's (William Zantzinger) killing of a hotel maid (Hattie Carroll). Though never explicitly mentioning their respective races, the song leaves no doubt that the killer is white and the victim is black.[53] St. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. ... Martin Luther King redirects here. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Madhouse on Castle Street is a British television play, broadcast by the BBC Television Service on the evening of January 13, 1963, as part of the Sunday-Night Play anthology strand. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... CBS (formerly an acronym for Columbia Broadcasting System, the former legal name of the network) is one of the largest television networks, and formerly one of the largest radio networks, in the United States. ... The John Birch Society is a conservative American exceptionalist organization founded in 1958 to fight what it saw as growing threats to the Constitution of the United States, especially a suspected communist infiltration of the United States government, and to support free enterprise. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Medgar Wiley Evers (July 2, 1925 – June 12, 1963) was an African American civil rights activist from Mississippi. ... North Country Blues is the fifth track on Bob Dylans The Times They Are A-Changin. Its apparently simple format ( 10 verses of ABCB rhyming scheme) and subject-matter (the run down of a mining community) appears influenced by Woody Guthrie. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll is the title of a topical song by Bob Dylan. ...


By the end of 1963, Dylan felt both manipulated and constrained by the folk and protest movements. Accepting the "Tom Paine Award" from the National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee at a ceremony shortly after the assassination of John F. Kennedy, a drunken, rambling Dylan questioned the role of the committee, insulted its members as old and balding, and claimed to see something of himself (and of every man) in Kennedy's alleged assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald. [54] For other persons of the same name, see Thomas Paine (disambiguation). ... In 1951 the National Emergency Civil Liberties Committee was formed to defend political activists (some Communists, some not) whom the ACLU and other civil rights groups refused to defend or did not defend when they were brought up before the House Un-American Activities Committee. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Lee Harvey Oswald (October 18, 1939 – November 24, 1963) was, according to four United States government investigations, the assassin of U.S. President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 in Dallas, Texas. ...


His next album, Another Side of Bob Dylan, recorded on a single June evening in 1964, had a lighter mood than its predecessor. The surreal Dylan reemerged on "I Shall Be Free #10" and "Motorpsycho Nightmare", accompanied by a sense of humor that has often reappeared over the years. "Spanish Harlem Incident" and "To Ramona" are romantic and passionate love songs, while "Black Crow Blues" and "I Don't Believe You (She Acts Like We Never Have Met)" suggest the rock and roll soon to dominate Dylan's music. "It Ain't Me Babe", on the surface a song about spurned love, has been described as a thinly disguised rejection of the role his reputation had thrust at him. His newest direction was signaled by two lengthy songs: the impressionistic "Chimes of Freedom", which sets elements of social commentary against a denser metaphorical landscape in a style later characterized by Allen Ginsberg as "chains of flashing images"; and "My Back Pages", which attacks the simplistic and arch seriousness of his own earlier topical songs and seems to predict the backlash he was about to encounter from his former champions as he took a new direction.[55] Another Side of Bob Dylan is Bob Dylans 4th studio album, released in 1964 by Columbia Records. ... Spanish Harlem Incident is a song written by Bob Dylan, released on his 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan. ... To Ramona is a folk waltz written by Bob Dylan for his fourth studio album Another Side of Bob Dylan. ... Black Crow Blues is a song written by Bob Dylan, released on his 1964 album Another Side of Bob Dylan. ... This article is about the art movement. ... Chimes of Freedom is a song by Bob Dylan. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... My Back Pages is a Bob Dylan song from the album Another Side of Bob Dylan (1964). ...


The times were changing faster than even Dylan could have foreseen. In 1964 and 1965, British groups such as The Beatles, The Animals, and The Rolling Stones took their own interpretation of Rock and Roll and R&B to the top of the American charts - the so-called British Invasion. During the week of April 4, 1964, The Beatles held the top five positions on Billboard's singles chart. Dylan heard The Beatles' music all over U.S. radio stations as he drove from state to state, going to and from concerts he gave in the spring of 1964 (he later marvelled to biographer Anthony Scaduto about the outrageous circumstance of The Beatles having eight of the top ten songs "in Colorado!") Dylan was intrigued by their success, enjoyed their music, and expressed an interest in meeting them (The Beatles, in turn, had heard and loved Dylan's first two albums prior to their February, 1964, U.S. debut on The Ed Sullivan Show). The historic meeting between Dylan and The Beatles took place on August 28, 1964, in The Beatles' New York hotel, during their first full-scale U.S. tour. According to journalist Al Aronowitz, who ushered Dylan into The Beatles' presence, the five musicians bonded via port wine and a bag of pot.[56] Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... The Animals were an English music group of the 1960s known in the United States as part of the British Invasion. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... Rhythm and blues (or R & B) is a musical marketing term introduced in the United States in the late 1940s by Billboard magazine. ... For other uses, see British Invasion (disambiguation). ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... The Ed Sullivan Show was an American television variety show that ran from June 20, 1948 to June 6, 1971, and was hosted by former entertainment columnist Ed Sullivan. ... Alfred Gilbert Aronowitz (May 20, 1920-August 1, 2005) was an American rock journalist best known for introducing Bob Dylan and The Beatles in 1964. ... A Cannabis sativa plant The drug cannabis, also called marijuana, is produced from parts of the cannabis plant, primarily the cured flowers and gathered trichomes of the female plant. ...


Even more pertinent to Dylan's career, the Newcastle-based group The Animals had taken a track from Dylan's eponymous first album - the song "The House of the Rising Sun" - and set it to a surging guitar and organ-driven backing. The Animals' recording reached Number One on the Billboard charts in the week of September 5, 1964. Tom Wilson, Dylan's producer at CBS, was so impressed by The Animals' recording that he went into the studio and tried dubbing a rock and roll backing onto Dylan's 1961 recording. Wilson recalled: " We tried overdubbing a Fats Domino early rock & roll thing on top of what Dylan had done, but it never quite worked out to our satisfaction."[57] This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... The Animals were an English music group of the 1960s known in the United States as part of the British Invasion. ... Bob Dylan is the eponymous debut album from American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... For other uses, see The House of the Rising Sun (disambiguation). ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Antoine Dominique Fats Domino (born February 26, 1928) is a classic R&B and rock and roll singer, songwriter and pianist. ...


In the latter half of 1964 and 1965, Dylan’s appearance and musical style changed rapidly, as he made his move from leading contemporary song-writer of the folk scene to Folk-Rock pop-music star. His scruffy jeans and work shirts were replaced by a Carnaby Street wardrobe, sunglasses day or night, and pointy 'Beatle boots'. His naturally-curly hair grew longer and somewhat unruly (and by 1966 would fully evolve into another Dylan trademark: the so-called "Dylan 'Fro"). A London reporter wrote: “Hair that would set the teeth of a comb on edge. A loud shirt that would dim the neon lights of Leicester Square. He looks like an undernourished cockatoo.”[58] Dylan also began to play with frequently hapless interviewers in increasingly cruel and surreal ways. Appearing on the Les Crane TV show and asked about a movie he was planning to make, he told Crane it would be a cowboy horror movie. Asked if he played the cowboy, Dylan replied. “No, I play my mother.”[59] Folk rock is a musical genre, combining elements of folk music and rock music. ... Londons Carnaby Street is in the district of Soho and just to the east of Regent Street. ... Modern Beatle boot replica. ... Les Crane was a San Francisco-based radio announcer and television talk show host who scored an unexpected spoken word hit with his recording of the poem, Desiderata, winning a Best Spoken Word Grammy for his efforts. ...


"Going electric"

His March 1965 album Bringing It All Back Home was yet another stylistic leap.[60] The album featured his first recordings made with electric instruments. The first single, "Subterranean Homesick Blues", owed much to Chuck Berry's "Too Much Monkey Business" and was provided with an early music video courtesy of D. A. Pennebaker's cinéma vérité presentation of Dylan's 1965 tour of England, Dont Look Back.[61] Its free association lyrics both harked back to the manic energy of Beat poetry and were a forerunner of rap and hip-hop.[62] In 1969, the militant Weatherman group took their name from a line in "Subterranean Homesick Blues." ("You don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows.") The electric Dylan controversy was the incident at the Newport Folk Festival on Sunday July 25, 1965, where folk singer Bob Dylan went electric, by playing with an electric blues band in concert for the first time. ... Bringing It All Back Home is Bob Dylans fifth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... Subterranean Homesick Blues is a song written by Bob Dylan, originally released on the album Bringing It All Back Home in March 1965. ... Charles Edward Anderson Chuck Berry (born 18 October 1926, St. ... A music video is a short film or video that accompanies a complete piece of music, most commonly a song. ... D.A. Pennebaker is a documentary filmmaker. ... This article is about filmmaking. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Dont Look Back (sic) is a 1967 documentary film by D.A. Pennebaker that covers Bob Dylans 1965 concert tour of England. ... For other uses, see Weatherman (disambiguation). ...


The B side of the album was a different matter. It included four lengthy acoustic songs whose undogmatic political, social, and personal concerns are illuminated with the semi-mystical imagery that became another Dylan trademark. One of these tracks, "Mr. Tambourine Man", which would become one of his best known songs, had already been a hit for The Byrds; while "Gates of Eden", "It's All Over Now Baby Blue", and "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" have been fixtures in Dylan's live performances for most of his career. During April - May, Dylan made a very successful tour in England (see Bob Dylan UK Tour 1965). “B-Sides” redirects here. ... Mr. ... Its All Over Now, Baby Blue is a song by Bob Dylan. ... Its Alright, Ma (Im Only Bleeding) is a song by Bob Dylan. ...


That summer Dylan made history by performing his first electric set (since his high school days) with a pickup group drawn mostly from the Paul Butterfield Blues Band, featuring Mike Bloomfield (guitar), Sam Lay (drums), Jerome Arnold (bass), plus Al Kooper (organ) and Barry Goldberg (piano), while headlining at the Newport Folk Festival (see The electric Dylan controversy).[63] Dylan had appeared at Newport twice before, in 1963 and 1964, and two wildly divergent accounts of the crowd's response in 1965 emerged. The settled fact is that Dylan, met with a mix of cheering and booing, left the stage after only three songs. As one version of the legend has it, the boos were from the outraged folk fans whom Dylan had alienated by appearing, unexpectedly, with an electric guitar. An alternative account claims audience members were merely upset by poor sound quality and a surprisingly short set. Whatever sparked the crowd's disfavor, Dylan soon reemerged and sang two much better received solo acoustic numbers, "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" and "Mr. Tambourine Man." His choice of the former has often been described as a carefully selected death knell for the kind of consciously sociopolitical, purely acoustic music that the cat-callers were demanding of him, with "New Folk" in the role of "Baby Blue". A pickup group (also called a pickup band, pickup orchestra, or jobbing band) is a term used to describe a group of musicians that are hired to play for a limited time period—ranging from a single concert or recording to several weeks of shows—before disbanding. ... Paul Butterfield (December 17, 1942 – May 4, 1987) was an American blues harmonica player and singer, and one of the earliest white exponents of the Chicago-originated electric blues style. ... For the astronaut, see Michael J. Bloomfield Michael Bernard Bloomfield (July 28, 1943 - February 15, 1981) was an American musician, guitarist, and composer, born in Chicago, Illinois, into a well-off Jewish family on Chicagos North Side. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Barry Goldberg (born 1941 in Chicago, Illinois) is a blues and rock keyboardist. ... The Newport Folk Festival is an annual folk-oriented music festival founded in 1959 by George Wein, founder of the already-well-established Newport Jazz Festival, and his partner, Albert Grossman. ... The electric Dylan controversy was the incident at the Newport Folk Festival where folk singer Bob Dylan first went electric, by playing alongside an electric blues band in concert. ...


Dylan's 1965 Newport performance provoked an outraged response from the folk music establishment.[64] Ewan MacColl wrote in Sing Out!, "Our traditional songs and ballads are the creations of extraordinarily talented artists working inside traditions formulated over time... But what of Bobby Dylan?... Only a non-critical audience, nourished on the watery pap of pop music could have fallen for such tenth-rate drivel." On July 29, just four days after his controversial performance at Newport, Dylan was back into the studio in New York and recorded "Positively 4th Street." The song teemed with images of paranoia and revenge. ("I know the reason/That you talk behind my back/I used to be among the crowd/You're in with.") It was widely interpreted as Dylan's put-down of former friends from the folk community — friends he had known in the clubs along West 4th Street.[65] Ewan MacColl (25 January 1915 - 22 October 1989) was a British folk singer, songwriter, socialist, actor, poet, playwright, and record producer. ... Sing Out! is a quarterly journal of folk music and folk songs that has been published since May 1950. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Many in the folk revival had embraced the idea that life equaled art, that a certain kind of life defined by suffering and social exclusion in fact replaced art.[66] Folksong collectors and singers often presented folk music as an innocent characteristic of lives lived without reflection or the 'false consciousness of capitalism'.[67] This philosophy, both genteel and paternalistic, was ultimately what Dylan had run afoul of by 1965. But at an Austin press conference in September of that year, on the day of his first performance with Levon and the Hawks, he described his music not as a pop charts-bound break with the past, but as “historical-traditional music.”[68] Dylan later told interviewer Nat Hentoff: “What folk music is... is based on myths and the Bible and plague and famine and all kinds of things like that which are nothing but mystery and you can see it in all the songs….All these songs about roses growing out of people’s brains and lovers who are really geese and swans that turn into angels…and seven years of this and eight years of that and it’s all really something that nobody can touch.... (the songs) are not going to die.”[69] It was this mystical, living tradition of songs that served as the palette for Bringing It All Back Home, but in a nod to the future first openly displayed at Newport, electrically amplified instruments would now become part of the mix. Levon and the Hawks evolved from the backup band for Ronnie Hawkins. ... Nat Hentoff (born June 10, 1925) is an American civil libertarian, free speech absolutist, pro-life advocate, anti-death penalty advocate, jazz critic, historian, biographer and anecdotist, and columnist for the Village Voice, Legal Times, Washington Times, The Progressive, Editor & Publisher, Free Inquiry and Jewish World Review. ...


Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde

In July 1965, Dylan released the single "Like a Rolling Stone", which peaked at #2 in the U.S. and at #4 in the UK charts. At over six minutes in length, this song has been widely credited with altering attitudes about what a pop single could convey. Bruce Springsteen said that on first hearing this single, “that snare shot sounded like somebody’d kicked open the door to your mind… I knew that I was listening to the toughest voice that I had ever heard.“[70] In 2004, Rolling Stone magazine listed it at number one on its list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.[71] Its signature sound — with a full, jangling band and an organ riff — also characterized his next album, Highway 61 Revisited, titled after the road that led from Dylan's native Minnesota to the musical hotbed of New Orleans. The songs passed stylistically through the birthplace of blues, the Mississippi Delta, and referenced a number of blues songs, including Mississippi Fred McDowell's "61 Highway". The songs were in the same vein as the hit single, with surreal litanies of the grotesque flavored by Mike Bloomfield's blues guitar, a rhythm section, and Dylan's obvious enjoyment of the sessions. The closing song, "Desolation Row", is an apocalyptic vision with references to many figures of Western culture. Highway 61 Revisited track listing Like a Rolling Stone (1) Tombstone Blues (2) Music sample: Bob Dylan - Like a Rolling Stone 30 seconds (of 6:10) Problems listening to the file? See media help. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Highway 61 Revisited is Bob Dylans sixth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... NOLA redirects here. ... This article is about the geographic region of the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Blues music redirects here. ... Fred McDowell (January 12, 1904 - July 3, 1972), called Mississippi Fred McDowell, was a blues singer and guitar player. ... For the astronaut, see Michael J. Bloomfield Michael Bernard Bloomfield (July 28, 1943 - February 15, 1981) was an American musician, guitarist, and composer, born in Chicago, Illinois, into a well-off Jewish family on Chicagos North Side. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... For this articles equivalent regarding the East, see Eastern culture. ...

A mix of folk music, rock and roll and Dylan's own brand of surrealism, Blonde on Blonde (1966) is often considered one of the finest recordings of American popular music.
A mix of folk music, rock and roll and Dylan's own brand of surrealism, Blonde on Blonde (1966)[72] is often considered one of the finest recordings of American popular music.

In support of the record, Dylan was booked for two U.S. concerts and set about assembling a band. Mike Bloomfield was unwilling to leave the Butterfield Band, so Dylan mixed Al Kooper and Harvey Brooks from his studio crew with bar-band stalwarts Robbie Robertson and Levon Helm, best known at the time for backing Ronnie Hawkins. On August 28 at Forest Hills Tennis Stadium, the group was heckled by an audience who, Newport notwithstanding, still demanded the acoustic troubadour of previous years. The band's reception on September 3 at the Hollywood Bowl was more uniformly favorable.[73] Cover of the Bob Dylan album Blonde on Blonde. ... Cover of the Bob Dylan album Blonde on Blonde. ... Folk song redirects here. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For the astronaut, see Michael J. Bloomfield Michael Bernard Bloomfield (July 28, 1943 - February 15, 1981) was an American musician, guitarist, and composer, born in Chicago, Illinois, into a well-off Jewish family on Chicagos North Side. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Harvey Brooks (born 1944, New York City) is an American bassist. ... Robbie Robertson (born Jaime Robert Robertson, 5 July 1943, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a songwriter, guitarist and singer, best known for his membership in The Band. ... Mark Lavon Helm (born May 26, 1940), better know as Levon Helm, is an American rock musician most famous as the drummer for the rock group The Band. ... Ronnie Hawkins, born January 10, 1935 in Huntsville, Arkansas, United States, is a pioneering rock and roll musician and cousin to fellow rockabilly pioneer Dale Hawkins. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Hollywood Bowl in 2005. ...


Neither Kooper nor Brooks wanted to tour with Dylan, and he was unable to lure his preferred band, a crew of west coast musicians best known for backing Johnny Rivers, featuring guitarist James Burton and drummer Mickey Jones, away from their regular commitments. So Dylan then hired Robertson and Helm's full band, The Hawks, as his tour group, and began a string of studio sessions with them in an effort to record the follow-up to Highway 61 Revisited. Johnny Rivers (born John Henry Ramistella, 7 November 1942, in New York) is an American rock and roll singer, songwriter, guitarist, and record producer. ... James Burton (born August 21, 1939 in Minden, Louisiana) is an American guitarist. ... Mickey Jones (born June 10, 1941 in Houston, Texas) is an American musician and actor. ... For other uses, see Band. ...


While Dylan and the Hawks met increasingly receptive audiences on tour, their studio efforts floundered. Producer Bob Johnston had been trying to persuade Dylan to record in Nashville for some time. In February 1966 Dylan agreed and Johnston surrounded him with a cadre of top-notch session men. At Dylan's insistence, Robertson and Kooper came down from New York City to play on the sessions.[74] The Nashville sessions produced the album Blonde on Blonde (1966), featuring what Dylan later called "that thin wild mercury sound." Al Kooper said the record was a masterpiece because it was "taking two cultures and smashing them together with a huge explosion": the musical world of Nashville and the world of the "quintessential New York hipster" Bob Dylan.[75] Bob Johnston (born 1933 in Fort Worth, Texas) is a noted record producer, best known for his work with Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and many Nashville recording artists, as well as Simon and Garfunkel. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


For many critics, Dylan's mid-'60s trilogy of albums — Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde — represents one of the great cultural achievements of the 20th century. In Mike Marqusee's words: "Between late 1964 and the summer of 1966, Dylan created a body of work that remains unique. Drawing on folk, blues, country, R&B, rock'n'roll, gospel, British beat, symbolist, modernist and Beat poetry, surrealism and Dada, advertising jargon and social commentary, Fellini and Mad magazine, he forged a coherent and original artistic voice and vision. The beauty of these albums retains the power to shock and console."[76] The term beat generation was introduced by Jack Kerouac in approximately 1948 to describe his social circle to the novelist John Clellon Holmes (who published an early novel about the beat generation, titled Go, in 1952, along with a manifesto of sorts in the New York Times Magazine: This is... Max Ernst. ... DaDa is a concept album by Alice Cooper, released in 1983. ... Federico Fellini (January 20, 1920 – October 31, 1993) was one of the most influential and widely revered film-makers of the 20th century. ... Harvey Kurtzmans cover for the first issue of the comic book Mad Mad is an American humor magazine founded by publisher William Gaines and editor Harvey Kurtzman in 1952. ...


On November 22, 1965, Bob Dylan married Sara Lownds. Some of Dylan’s friends (including Ramblin' Jack Elliott) claim that, in conversation immediately after the event, Dylan denied that he was married.[77] Journalist Nora Ephron first made the news public in the New York Post in February 1966 with the headline “Hush! Bob Dylan is wed.”[78] Ramblin Jack Elliott Ramblin Jack Elliot (born Elliott Charles Adnopoz, August 1, 1931) is an American folk performer. ... Nora Ephron Nora Ephron (born May 19, 1941 in New York City, New York) is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and novelist. ... The New York Post is the 13th-oldest newspaper published in the United States and the oldest to have been published continually as a daily. ...


Dylan undertook a "world tour" (see also Bob Dylan World Tour 1966) of Australia and Europe in the spring of 1966. Each show was split into two parts. Dylan performed solo during the first half, accompanying himself on acoustic guitar and harmonica. In the second half, backed by the Hawks, he played high voltage electric music. This contrast provoked many fans, who jeered and slowly handclapped. A steel string acoustic guitar is a modern form of guitar descended from the classical guitar, but strung with steel strings for a brighter, louder sound. ... A harmonica is a free reed wind instrument. ... The Band, circa 1969. ...


The tour culminated in a famously raucous confrontation between Dylan and his audience at the Manchester Free Trade Hall in England (officially released on CD in 1998 as The Bootleg Series Vol. 4: Bob Dylan Live 1966, The "Royal Albert Hall" Concert). At the climax of the concert, one fan, angry with Dylan's electric sound, shouted: "Judas!" to which Dylan responded, "I don't believe you... You're a liar!". However, there was also some conversation in the audience to which this may have been aimed. He then turned to the band and, just within earshot of the microphone, said "Play it fucking loud!"[79] They then launched into the last song of the night with gusto — "Like a Rolling Stone." The Free Trade Hall in Manchester, England, was for many years a focal point for public debate and cultural activity in the city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... John Cordwell (b. ... Iscariot redirects here. ...


After the crash: the Woodstock years and reclusion

After his European tour, Dylan returned to New York, but the pressures on him continued to increase. ABC Television had paid an advance for a TV show they could screen.[80] His publisher, Macmillan, was demanding a finished manuscript of the poem/novel Tarantula. Manager Albert Grossman had already scheduled an extensive concert tour for that summer and fall. On July 29, 1966, while Dylan rode his Triumph 500 motorcycle in Woodstock, New York, its brakes locked, throwing him to the ground. Though the extent of his injuries was never fully disclosed, Dylan said that he broke several vertebrae in his neck.[81] In commenting on the significance of the crash, Dylan made it plain that he had felt exploited at that time: “When I had that motorcycle accident ... I woke up and caught my senses, I realized that I was just workin' for all these leeches. And I didn't want to do that. Plus, I had a family and I just wanted to see my kids. "[82] This article is about the state. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Macmillan Publishers Ltd, also known as The Macmillan Group, is a privately-held international publishing company owned by Georg von Holtzbrinck Publishing Group. ... Tarantula is an experimental novel by Bob Dylan, written early in his musical career. ... Albert Bernard Grossman (May 21, 1926 -- January 25, 1986) is best known as the manager of Bob Dylan. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Triumph Motorcycles is an English motorcycle manufacturer, originally based in Coventry. ... For other uses, see Motorcycle (disambiguation). ... Woodstock is a town in Ulster County, New York, United States. ...


A sense of mystery still surrounds the circumstances of the accident.[83] Howard Sounes's biography, Down the Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, points out that no ambulance was called to the scene of the accident, and that Dylan was not taken to a hospital.[84] Sounes concludes that the crash offered Dylan the much-needed chance to escape from the pressures that had built up around him, and that it initiated a period of withdrawal from the public gaze lasting for 18 months. Howard Sounes (b. ...


Once Dylan was well enough to resume creative work, he began editing film footage of his 1966 tour for Eat the Document, a rarely exhibited follow-up to Dont Look Back. A rough-cut was shown to ABC Television and was promptly rejected as incomprehensible to a mainstream audience.[85] In 1967 he began recording music with the Hawks at his home and in the basement of the Hawks' nearby house, called "Big Pink". The relaxed atmosphere yielded renditions of many of Dylan's favored old and new songs and some newly written pieces.[86] These songs, initially compiled as demos for other artists to record, provided hit singles for Julie Driscoll ("This Wheel's on Fire"), The Byrds ("You Ain't Goin' Nowhere", "Nothing Was Delivered"), and Manfred Mann ("Quinn the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn)"). Columbia belatedly released selections from them in 1975 as The Basement Tapes. Over the years, more and more of the songs recorded by Dylan and his band in 1967 appeared on various bootleg recordings, culminating in a five-CD bootleg set titled The Genuine Basement Tapes, containing 107 songs and alternate takes.[87] Later in 1967, the Hawks re-named themselves The Band, and independently recorded the album Music from Big Pink, thus beginning a long and successful recording and performing career of their own. Eat the Document is a rarely exhibited documentary of Bob Dylans 1966 tour of England with the Hawks. ... Dont Look Back (sic) is a 1967 documentary film by D.A. Pennebaker that covers Bob Dylans 1965 concert tour of England. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Julie Driscoll (born June 8, 1947) is a British singer and actress, best known for her 1960s hit version of Wheels on Fire with the Brian Auger Trinity. ... This Wheels on Fire is a song written by Bob Dylan and Rick Danko. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... Cock-A-Hoop Manfred Mann was a British R&B and pop band of the 1960s, named after its keyboard player, who later led the successful 1970s follow-on group Manfred Manns Earth Band. ... Quinn the Eskimo (The Mighty Quinn) is a popular song written by Bob Dylan. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... For other uses, see Bootleg. ... For other uses, see Band. ... Music From Big Pink is the 1968 debut album by folk-rock band The Band. ...


In 1997, the critic Greil Marcus published an influential study of The Basement Tapes, entitled Invisible Republic. Marcus quoted Robbie Robertson’s memories of recording the songs: “(Dylan) would pull these songs out of nowhere. We didn’t know if he wrote them or if he remembered them. When he sang them, you couldn’t tell.”[88] Marcus called these songs “palavers with a community of ghosts”[89] He suggests that “these ghosts were not abstractions. As native sons and daughters they were a community. And they were once gathered in a single place: on the Anthology of American Folk Music, a work produced by a twenty-nine year old of no fixed address named Harry Smith.”[90] Marcus argued Dylan’s basement songs were a resurrection of the spirit of Smith’s Anthology, originally published by Folkways Records in 1952, a collection of blues and country songs recorded in the 1920s and 1930s, which proved very influential in the folk music revival of the 1950s and the 1960s. (The book was re-published in 2001 under the title The Old, Weird America.) Greil Marcus (2006) Greil Marcus (born 1945) is an American author, music journalist and cultural critic. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... Invisible Republic, fully entitled Invisible Republic Bob Dylans Basement Tapes by author Greil Marcus, is a treatise on the creation and cultural importance of The Basement Tapes, a series of recordings by Bob Dylan made during 1967 in collaboration with musicians who would subsequently be known as The Band. ... Robbie Robertson (born Jaime Robert Robertson, 5 July 1943, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a songwriter, guitarist and singer, best known for his membership in The Band. ... The Anthology of American Folk Music is a recording that collects several dozen folk and country songs which were initially recorded from the 1920s and 1930s, and were first released on 78 rpm records. ... Cover of Think of the Self Speaking: Harry Smith -- Selected Interviews; Singh, Rani, editor Seattle: Elbow/Cityful Press, 1999. ... Folkways Records is a record label founded by Moses Asch. ...


In October and November 1967, Dylan returned to Nashville. Back in the recording studio after a 19 months break, he was accompanied only by Charlie McCoy on bass, Kenny Buttrey on drums, and Pete Drake on steel guitar.[91] At the end of the year, Dylan released John Wesley Harding, his first album since the motorcycle crash. It was a quiet, contemplative record of shorter songs, set in a landscape that drew on both the American West and the Bible. The sparse structure and instrumentation, coupled with lyrics that took the Judeo-Christian tradition seriously, marked a departure not only from Dylan's own work but from the escalating psychedelic fervor of the 1960s musical culture.[92] It included "All Along the Watchtower", with lyrics derived from the Book of Isaiah (21:5–9). The song was later recorded by Jimi Hendrix, whose celebrated version Dylan himself acknowledged as definitive in the liner notes to Biograph. As proof, since 1974 Dylan and his bands have performed arrangements much closer to Hendrix's than to the John Wesley Harding version.[28] For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... For the African American blues musician, see Papa Charlie McCoy. ... Kenneth A. Buttrey (1945 - September 12, 2004) was an American drummer and arranger. ... Pete Drake (born Roddis Franklin Drake, 8 October 1932, Augusta, Georgia - died 29 July 1988, Nashville, Tennessee), was a major Nashville based record producer and steel guitar player. ... John Wesley Harding is an album of original songs by Bob Dylan, produced by Bob Johnston and released on December 27, 1967. ... The Western United States, also referred to as the American West or simply The West, traditionally refers to the region constituting the westernmost states of the United States (see geographical terminology section for further discussion of these terms). ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... For the Scottish TV comedy series, see All Along the Watchtower (TV series) All Along the Watchtower is a song written by folk-rock singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... This article is about the Book of Isaiah. ... Jimi Hendrix (November 27, 1942 – September 18, 1970) was an American guitar virtuoso, singer and songwriter. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ...


Woody Guthrie died on October 3, 1967, and Dylan made his first live appearance in twenty months at a Guthrie memorial concert held at Carnegie Hall on January 20, 1968. Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 Seventh Avenue, occupying the east stretch of Seventh Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Dylan's next release, Nashville Skyline (1969), was virtually a mainstream country record featuring instrumental backing by Nashville musicians, a mellow-voiced, contented Dylan, a duet with Johnny Cash, and the hit single "Lay Lady Lay", which had been originally written for the Midnight Cowboy soundtrack, but was not submitted in time to make the final cut. [93]. It was during these sessions that Dylan met Carl Perkins, and co-wrote the song "Champaign, Illinois" with him, which would appear on Perkin's album "On Top" released the following year. [94] [95] In May 1969, Dylan appeared on the first episode of Johnny Cash's new television show, duetting with Cash on "Girl from the North Country", "It Ain't Me Babe" and "Living the Blues". Dylan next traveled to England to top the bill at the Isle of Wight rock festival on August 31, 1969, after rejecting overtures to appear at the Woodstock Festival far closer to his home.[96] Nashville Skyline is an album by Bob Dylan, released in 1969. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Lay Lady Lay is a song written by Bob Dylan and originally released in 1969 on his Nashville Skyline album. ... This article is about the 1969 film. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... For other persons named Carl Perkins, see Carl Perkins (disambiguation). ... Champaign is a city in Champaign County, Illinois, in the United States. ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... Girl from the North Country is a song written by Bob Dylan in January, 1963 and released as the second track on his second studio album, The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... It Aint Me Babe is the title of a 1964 song by Bob Dylan, first included on his album, Another Side of Bob Dylan album. ... For other uses, see Isle of Wight (disambiguation). ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ...


In the early 1970s critics charged Dylan's output was of varied and unpredictable quality. Rolling Stone magazine writer and Dylan loyalist Greil Marcus notoriously asked "What is this shit?" upon first listening to 1970's Self Portrait. In general, Self Portrait, a double LP including few original songs, was poorly received. Later that year, Dylan released New Morning, which some considered a return to form. In the same year Dylan co-wrote "I'd Have You Anytime" with George Harrison, which appeared as the opening track on the ex-Beatle's album All Things Must Pass (which also included a cover of Dylan's "If Not For You"). His unannounced appearance at Harrison's 1971 Concert for Bangladesh was widely praised, particularly a snarling version of "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall". However, reports of a new album, a television special, and a return to touring came to nothing. Dylan's only other studio activity in 1970 consisted of two songs ("East Virginia Blues" and "Nashville Skyline Rag") recorded in December with banjo-player Earl Scruggs and his sons Randy and Gary, which would eventually appear on Scruggs' 1971 album Earl Scruggs Performing With His Family And Friends[97]. Greil Marcus (2006) Greil Marcus (born 1945) is an American author, music journalist and cultural critic. ... Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. ... New Morning was released in October 1970 by Bob Dylan, only four months after the controversial Self Portrait. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Alternate cover Cover of 2001 remaster All Things Must Pass is a triple album by George Harrison recorded and released after the break-up of The Beatles. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... This article is about the concert and film. ... Earl Scruggs performing at The Bonnaroo Music & Arts Festival on June 12th, 2005 Earl Eugene Scruggs (born January 6, 1924) is a musician noted for creating a banjo style (now called Scruggs style) that is a defining characteristic of bluegrass music. ... Randy Scruggs is a and music producer, songwriter and guitarist. ...


Between March 16th and 19th, 1971, Dylan reserved three days at Blue Rock Studios, a small studio in New York's Greenwich Village . These sessions resulted in one single "Watching The River Flow," and a new recording of "When I Paint My Masterpiece" (which The Band was about to release on their album Cahoots), but no album[98]. The only long-player released by Dylan in either '71 or '72 was his second greatest hits compilation, "Bob Dylan's Greatest Hits Vol. II", which included a number of re-workings of as-then unreleased Basement Tapes tracks, such as "I Shall Be Released" and "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere'" with Happy Traum on backup. On November 4th, 1971 Dylan recorded the single "George Jackson" which would be released a week later[99]. He then returned to the studio in mid-November for a series of as-yet-unreleased sessions with Beat poet Allen Ginsberg at the Record Plant in New York, intended for Ginsberg's "Holy Soul Jelly Roll" album. The sessions resulted in tracks such as the Dylan/Ginsberg compositions "Vomit Express", "September On Jessore Road" and "Jimmy Berman", as well as a number of Ginsberg originals and William Blake poems set to music. Ginsberg sang lead on most songs, with Dylan playing guitar and harmonica and providing backing vocals. [100][101] It is unknown at this time if the sessions will ever be released officially, however there are a number of bootlegs in circulation. The Washington Square Arch Greenwich Village (IPA pronunciation: ), also called simply the Village, is a largely residential area on the west side of downtown (southern) Manhattan in New York City named after Greenwich, London. ... For other uses, see Band. ... Cahoots was the fourth LP by Canadian-American rock group The Band, and their last all-original studio album for four years. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits Vol. ... The Basement Tapes is a studio album by Bob Dylan and The Band, released in 1975 by Columbia Records. ... Happy Traum (born Harry Peter Traum) is an American folk musician who started playing music in the Fifties. ... Beats redirects here. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Record Plant Studios (also known as just The Record Plant) is a famous recording studio, first opening in New York City at 321 West 44th Street map, in 1968. ... This article is about the state. ... For other persons named William Blake, see William Blake (disambiguation). ...


In May 1971, Time magazine questioned Dylan about the rumour that he had donated money to Rabbi Kahane's Jewish Defense League. Dylan denied giving any funds to the JDL, but said of Kahane, "He's a really sincere guy; he's really put it all together."[102] Rabbi Kahane claimed that Dylan attended several meetings of the Jewish Defense League in order to find out "what we're all about,"[103] (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... Meir David Kahane (Hebrew: מאיר דוד כהנא, Kahane being a variation on Cohen or priest) (August 1, 1932–November 5, 1990), Rabbi and member of the Israeli Knesset was famed first and foremost for his strong views and activities. ... JDL logo. ... JDL logo. ...


In 1972 Dylan signed onto Sam Peckinpah's film Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, providing the songs (see Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid) and taking a role as "Alias", a minor member of Billy's gang. Despite the film's failure at the box office, the song "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" has proven its durability, having been covered by over 150 recording artists.[104] David Samuel Sam Peckinpah (February 21, 1925 – December 28, 1984) was an American film director who achieved iconic status following the release of his 1969 Western epic The Wild Bunch. ... Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is a 1973 film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring James Coburn and Kris Kristofferson. ... Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid is a soundtrack album released by Bob Dylan in 1973 for the Sam Peckinpah film of the same name. ... Knockin on Heavens Door is a song written by Bob Dylan from Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid, the soundtrack of the 1973 film of the same name, Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid. ...


"On the Road Again"

Portrait of Allen Ginsberg and Bob Dylan by Elsa Dorfman, 1975.

Dylan started 1973 by contributing his own composition, "Wallflower", to Doug Sahm's "Doug Sahm and Band" album released on Atlantic Records, as well as sharing lead vocal and playing guitar on the track. (Dylan's own version of the song would later be released on The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3.) Dylan also signed with David Geffen's new Asylum label when his contract with Columbia Records expired in 1973, and he recorded Planet Waves with The Band while rehearsing for a major tour. The album included two versions of "Forever Young". Christopher Ricks has connected the chorus of this song with John Keats's Ode on a Grecian Urn[105], ("For ever panting, and for ever young"), and Dylan has recalled writing the song for one of his own children: “I wrote it thinking about one of my boys and not wanting to be too sentimental”.[106] It has remained one of the most frequently performed of his songs[107], and one critic described it as “something hymnal and heartfelt that spoke of the father in Dylan.”[108] Columbia Records simultaneously released Dylan, a haphazard collection of studio outtakes (almost exclusively cover songs), which was widely interpreted as a churlish response to Dylan's signing with a rival record label.[109] In January 1974 Dylan and The Band embarked on their high-profile, coast-to-coast Bob Dylan and The Band 1974 Tour of North America; promoter Bill Graham claimed he received more ticket purchase requests than for any prior tour by any artist. A live double album of the tour, Before the Flood which included Dylan with The Band, was released on Asylum Records. Later in the mid 70s Before the Flood was released by Columbia records. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Douglas Wayne Sahm (born November 6, 1941, San Antonio, Texas, died November 18, 1999, Taos, New Mexico) was a musician from Texas. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label, and operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... The Bootleg Series, Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961-1991 is a compilation box set by Bob Dylan. ... David Geffen (born February 21, 1943) is an American record executive, film producer, theatrical producer, philanthropist. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Planet Waves (1974) is an album by Bob Dylan, and was recorded with The Band at Village Recorder in Los Angeles during three different sessions in November 1973. ... For other uses, see Band. ... Christopher Ricks (born 1933) is a British literary critic and scholar. ... Keats redirects here. ... Ode on a Grecian Urn is a poem by John Keats, first published in January 1819 (c. ... Dylan (known as A Fool Such as I in Europe) is rock musician Bob Dylans 13th studio album, released by Columbia Records in 1973. ... For other uses, see Band. ... The Bob Dylan the The Band 1974 Tour was a two-month concert tour in early 1974 that featured Bob Dylan, in his first real tour in eight years, performing with The Band, who as The Hawks had once been his little-known backing band. ... Bill Graham (January 8, 1931–October 25, 1991) was a very well-known American rock concert promoter, who was prominent from the 1960s until his death. ... Before the Flood is the title of a 1974 live album by Bob Dylan and The Band. ... For other uses, see Band. ... For the label known as Asylum-Curb, see Curb Records. ... Before the Flood is the title of a 1974 live album by Bob Dylan and The Band. ...


After the tour, Dylan and his wife became publicly estranged. He filled a small red notebook with songs about his marital problems, and quickly recorded a new album entitled Blood on the Tracks in September 1974.[110] Word of Dylan's efforts soon leaked out, and expectations were high. But Dylan delayed the album's release, and then, by years end he had re-recorded half of the songs at Sound 80 Studios in Minneapolis with production assistance from his brother David Zimmerman. During this time, Dylan returned to Columbia Records which eventually reissued his Asylum albums. Blood on the Tracks is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 15th studio album, released in 1975 by Columbia Records, which marked Dylans return to Columbia after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. ... Sound 80 was a recording studio in Minneapolis, Minnesota founded by Tom Jung and Herb Pilhofer in 1969. ... This article is about the city in Minnesota. ... David Zimmerman (Born in Hibbing, Minnesota) is a Minneapolis, Minnesota record producer. ...


Released in early 1975, Blood on the Tracks received mixed reviews. In the NME, Nick Kent described "the accompaniments [as] often so trashy they sound like mere practise takes." In Rolling Stone, reviewer Jon Landau wrote that "the record has been made with typical shoddiness". However, over the years critics have come to see it as one of Dylan's greatest achievements, perhaps the only serious rival to his great mid 60s trilogy of albums. In Salon.com, Bill Wyman wrote: "Blood on the Tracks is his only flawless album and his best produced; the songs, each of them, are constructed in disciplined fashion. It is his kindest album and most dismayed, and seems in hindsight to have achieved a sublime balance between the logorrhea-plagued excesses of his mid-'60s output and the self-consciously simple compositions of his post-accident years."[111] The songs have been described as Dylan's most intimate and direct.[112][113] A year later, Dylan recorded a duet of the song "Buckets of Rain" with Bette Midler on her Songs for the New Depression album.[3] When Dylan was initially approached to do a duet with Midler, he wanted to record a version of "Friends." While they rehearsed this song, it was the "Blood on the Tracks" closer which was eventually released.[4] Blood on the Tracks is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 15th studio album, released in 1975 by Columbia Records, which marked Dylans return to Columbia after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ... Nick Kent (born December 24, 1951) is a British rock critic. ... Jon Landau is an American music critic, manager, and record producer, most known for his association in all three capacities with Bruce Springsteen. ... Salon. ... Bette Midler (born December 1, 1945) is an American singer, actress and comedienne, also known to her fans as The Divine Miss M. She is named after the actress Bette Davis although Davis pronounced her first name in two syllables, and Midler uses one. ... Songs for the New Depression - released in 1976 Songs for the New Depression is an album involving Bette Midler released in 1976 1. ...


That summer Dylan wrote his first successful "protest" song in twelve years, championing the cause of boxer Rubin "Hurricane" Carter whom he believed had been wrongfully imprisoned for a triple murder in Paterson, New Jersey. After visiting Carter in jail, Dylan wrote "Hurricane", presenting the case for Carter's innocence. Despite its 8:32 minute length, the song was released as a single, peaking at #33 on the U.S. Billboard Chart, and performed at every 1975 date of Dylan's next tour, the Rolling Thunder Revue.[114] The tour was a varied evening of entertainment featuring many performers drawn mostly from the resurgent Greenwich Village folk scene, including T-Bone Burnett; Allen Ginsberg; Ramblin' Jack Elliott; Steven Soles; David Mansfield; former Byrds frontman Roger McGuinn; British guitarist Mick Ronson; Scarlet Rivera, a violin player Dylan discovered while she was walking down the street to a rehearsal, her violin case hanging on her back;[115] and Joan Baez (the tour marked Baez and Dylan's first joint performance in more than a decade). Joni Mitchell added herself to the Revue in November, and poet Allen Ginsberg accompanied the troupe, staging scenes for the film Dylan was simultaneously shooting. Sam Shepard was initially hired as the writer for this film, but ended up accompanying the tour as informal chronicler.[116] Rubin Hurricane Carter (born May 6, 1937) was an American middleweight boxer between 1961 and 1966, although he is better known for his controversial convictions (1967, 1976) for three June 1966 murders in Paterson, New Jersey, and his subsequent release from prison in 1985. ... “Paterson” redirects here. ... Hurricane is a protest song by Bob Dylan about the imprisonment of Rubin Hurricane Carter. ... “Hot 100” redirects here. ... Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson in October 1975 The Rolling Thunder Revue was a tour headed by Bob Dylan in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976. ... [[]] The True False Identity, 2006. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Ramblin Jack Elliott Ramblin Jack Elliot (born Elliott Charles Adnopoz, August 1, 1931) is an American folk performer. ... Steven Soles is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, and guitarist. ... David Mansfield (born c. ... Not to be confused with The Birds (band). ... James Roger McGuinn (known professionally as Roger McGuinn and born James Joseph McGuinn III on July 13, 1942) is a popular rock American singer-songwriter and guitarist of the 1960s and 1970s. ... Mick Ronson (May 26, 1946 – April 29, 1993) born in Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire was an English guitarist, composer, multi-instrumentalist, arranger and producer. ... Scarlet Rivera is an American violinist. ... For the Anne Rice novel, see Violin (novel). ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Sam Shepard (born November 5, 1943) is a unique American artist whose talents have been expressed in many different areas. ...


Running through late 1975 and again through early 1976, the tour encompassed the release of the album Desire (1976), with many of Dylan's new songs featuring an almost travelogue-like narrative style, showing the influence of his new collaborator, playwright Jacques Levy.[117][118] The spring 1976 half of the tour was documented by a TV concert special, Hard Rain, and the LP Hard Rain; no concert album from the better-received and better-known opening half of the tour was released until 2002, when Live 1975 appeared as the fifth volume in Dylan's official Bootleg Series. The single "Rita May", an outtake from the Desire sessions, backed with the Hard Rain version of "Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again" was also released in promotion of both releases [119]. Desire is an album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on the Columbia Records label in 1976. ... Travel literature is literature which records the people, events, sights and feelings of an author who is touring a foreign place for the pleasure of travel. ... Jacques Levy (29 July 1935 – 30 September 2004) was a Jewish American songwriter, theatre director, and clinical psychologist. ... Hard Rain is a live album by American musician Bob Dylan, captured during the second leg of the Rolling Thunder Revue. ...


The fall 1975 tour with the Revue also provided the backdrop to Dylan's nearly four-hour film Renaldo and Clara, a sprawling and improvised narrative mixed with concert footage and reminiscences. Released in 1978, the movie received generally poor, sometimes scathing, reviews[120][121] and had a very brief theatrical run. Later in that year, Dylan allowed a two-hour edit, dominated by the concert performances, to be more widely released. Renaldo and Clara is a surrealist movie, by and starring Bob Dylan. ...


In November 1976 Dylan appeared at The Band's "farewell" concert, along with other guests including Joni Mitchell, Muddy Waters, Van Morrison and Neil Young. Martin Scorsese's acclaimed[122] cinematic chronicle of this show, The Last Waltz, was released in 1978 and included about half of Dylan's set. In this year Dylan also wrote and duetted on the song "Sign Language" for Eric Clapton's "No Reason To Cry" album - no other versions of the song apart from the one which appears on this album have ever been released. In 1977 he also contributed backing vocals to Leonard Cohen's Phil Spector-produced album "Death of a Ladies' Man". Joni Mitchell, CC (born Roberta Joan Anderson on November 7, 1943) is a Canadian musician, songwriter, and painter. ... McKinley Morganfield (April 4, 1915 – April 30, 1983), better known as Muddy Waters, was an American blues musician and is generally considered the Father of Chicago blues. He is also the actual father of blues musician Big Bill Morganfield. ... George Ivan Morrison OBE (generally known as Van Morrison) (born August 31, 1945) is a Grammy Award-winning Irish singer, songwriter, author, poet and multi-instrumentalist, who has been a professional musician since the late 1950s. ... This article is about the musician. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... The Last Waltz was a concert by the Canadian-American rock group, The Band, held on Thanksgiving Day, November 25, 1976, at Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco. ... Eric Patrick Clapton, CBE[2] (born 30 March 1945) [3], nicknamed Slowhand, is a Grammy Award-winning English rock guitarist, singer, songwriter and composer. ... No Reason to Cry is an album by Eric Clapton, released in 1976. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... Harvey Philip Spector (born December 26, 1939) is an American musician, songwriter and record producer. ... Death of a Ladies Man is the fifth and most controversial of Leonard Cohens albums. ...


Dylan's 1978 album Street Legal was lyrically one of his more complex and cohesive;[123] it suffered, however, from a poor sound mix (attributed to his studio recording practices),[124] submerging much of its instrumentation in the sonic equivalent of cotton wadding until its remastered CD release nearly a quarter century later. Street Legal, a rock album, was released by Bob Dylan on June 15, 1978. ...


Born Again

Further information: Slow Train Coming

In the late 1970s, Dylan became a born-again Christian.[125][126][127] From January to April 1979, Dylan participated in Bible study classes at the Vineyard School of Discipleship in Reseda, Southern California. Pastor Kenn Gulliksen has recalled: “Larry Myers and Paul Emond went over to Bob’s house and ministered to him. He responded by saying, Yes he did in fact want Christ in His life. And he prayed that day and received the Lord.”[128][129][130] Dylan released two albums of Christian gospel music. Slow Train Coming (1979) is generally regarded as the more accomplished of these albums, winning him the Grammy Award as "Best Male Vocalist" for the song "Gotta Serve Somebody". The second evangelical album, Saved (1980), received mixed reviews, although Kurt Loder in Rolling Stone declared the album was far superior, musically, to its predecessor.[131] When touring from the fall of 1979 through the spring of 1980, Dylan would not play any of his older, secular works, and he delivered declarations of his faith from the stage, such as: Slow Train Coming is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 19th studio album, released in 1979 by Columbia Records. ... Born again is a term used originally and mainly in Christianity, where it is associated with salvation, conversion and spiritual rebirth. ... The Vineyard USA Logo The Association of Vineyard Churches, also known as the Vineyard Movement, is a Christian organization of over 1,500 churches worldwide. ... Slow Train Coming is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 19th studio album, released in 1979 by Columbia Records. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the Bob Dylan song. ... Saved was Bob Dylans first album of the 1980s, and his 24th overall. ... Promotional photo of Kurt Loder Kurt Loder (born May 5, 1945) is a film critic, author, and television personality. ... This article is about the magazine. ...

Years ago they... said I was a prophet. I used to say, "No I'm not a prophet" they say "Yes you are, you're a prophet." I said, "No it's not me." They used to say "You sure are a prophet." They used to convince me I was a prophet. Now I come out and say Jesus Christ is the answer. They say, "Bob Dylan's no prophet." They just can't handle it.[132]

Robert Hilburn interviewed Dylan about the new direction in his music for the Los Angeles Times. Hilburn’s article, published November 23, 1980, began: This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...

Bob Dylan has finally confirmed in an interview what he’s been saying in his music for 18 months: He’s a born-again Christian. Dylan said he accepted Jesus Christ in his heart in 1978 after “a vision and feeling” during which the room moved: “There was a presence in the room that couldn’t have been anybody but Jesus.”[133]

Dylan's embrace of Christianity was unpopular with some of his fans and fellow musicians.[134] Shortly before his December 1980 shooting, John Lennon recorded "Serve Yourself" in response to Dylan's "Gotta Serve Somebody".[135] By 1981, while Dylan's Christian faith was obvious, his "iconoclastic temperament" had not changed, as Stephen Holden wrote in the New York Times: Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is a monotheistic[1] religion centered on the life and teachings of Jesus of Nazareth as presented in the New Testament. ... John Winston Ono Lennon, MBE (October 9, 1940 – December 8, 1980), (born John Winston Lennon, known as John Ono Lennon) was an iconic English 20th century rock and roll songwriter and singer, best known as the founding member of The Beatles. ...

Mr. Dylan showed that neither age (he's now 40) nor his much-publicized conversion to born-again Christianity has altered his essentially iconoclastic temperament.[136]

Rolling Stone editor Jann Wenner, writing in his review for Slow Train Coming, commented: Jann S. Wenner (born 7 January 1946 in New York City) is the owner of Wenner Media and the publisher of several magazines, most prominently the pop music biweekly Rolling Stone. ... Slow Train Coming is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 19th studio album, released in 1979 by Columbia Records. ...

Slow Train Coming is pure, true Dylan, probably the purest and truest Dylan ever. The religious symbolism is a logical progression of Dylan's Manichaean vision of life and his pain-filled struggle with good and evil... since politics, economics and war have failed to make us feel any better – as individuals or as a nation – and we look back at long years of disrepair, then maybe the time for religion has come again, and rather too suddenly – "like a thief in the night."[137] Manichean priests, writing at their desk, with panel inscription in Sogdian. ...

Since the early 1980s Dylan's personal religious beliefs have been the subject of debate[138] among fans and critics. Since his trilogy of Christian albums, Dylan has been described as a supporter of the Chabad Lubavitch movement[139] and has publicly and privately participated in Jewish religious events, including the bar mitzvahs of his sons. More recently, it has been reported that Dylan has "shown up" a few times at various High Holiday services at various Chabad synagogues. He attended a Woodbury, New York synagogue in 2005,[140] and attended Congregation Beth Tefillah, in Atlanta, Georgia on September 22, 2007 (Yom Kippur), where he was called to the Torah for the sixth aliyah.[141] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Hasidic philosophy be merged into this article or section. ... When a Jewish child reaches the age of maturity (12 years and one day for girls, 13 years and one day for boys) that child becomes responsible for him/herself under Jewish law; at this point a boy is said to become Bar Mitzvah (בר מצווה, son of the commandment... Atlanta redirects here. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Yom Kippur (Hebrew:יוֹם כִּפּוּר , IPA: ), also known in English as the Day of Atonement, is the most solemn of the Jewish holidays. ... Template:Jews and Jewdaism Template:The Holy Book Named TorRah The Torah () is the most valuable Holy Doctrine within Judaism,(and for muslims) revered as the first relenting Word of Ulllah, traditionally thought to have been revealed to Blessed Moosah, An Apostle of Ulllah. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1997 he told David Gates of Newsweek: David Gates (born January 8, 1947) is an American journalist and novelist. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...

Here's the thing with me and the religious thing. This is the flat-out truth: I find the religiosity and philosophy in the music. I don't find it anywhere else. Songs like "Let Me Rest on a Peaceful Mountain" or "I Saw the Light" – that's my religion. I don't adhere to rabbis, preachers, evangelists, all of that. I've learned more from the songs than I've learned from any of this kind of entity. The songs are my lexicon. I believe the songs."[142] For other things called I Saw the Light, see I Saw the Light. ...

In an interview published in The New York Times on September 28, 1997, journalist Jon Pareles reported that "Dylan says he now subscribes to no organized religion."[143] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Jon Pareles is an American journalist who is chief music critic at the arts section of the New York Times. ...


1980s: Trust Yourself

In the fall of 1980 Dylan briefly resumed touring, restoring several of his most popular 1960s songs to his repertoire, for a series of concerts billed as "A Musical Retrospective". Shot of Love, recorded the next spring, featured Dylan's first secular compositions in more than two years, mixed with explicitly Christian songs. The haunting "Every Grain of Sand" reminded some critics of William Blake’s verses.[144] Shot of Love is Bob Dylans 21st studio album, released by Columbia Records in 1981. ... Every Grain of Sand is a song written by Bob Dylan and originally released on his 1981 album Shot of Love. ... For other persons named William Blake, see William Blake (disambiguation). ...


In the 1980s the quality of Dylan's recorded work varied, from the well-regarded Infidels in 1983 to the panned Down in the Groove in 1988. Critics such as Michael Gray condemned Dylan's 1980s albums both for showing an extraordinary carelessness in the studio and for failing to release his best songs.[145] ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... // Down in the Groove Down in the Groove is a 1988 album release by Bob Dylan. ...


The Infidels recording sessions produced several notable outtakes, and many have questioned Dylan's judgment in leaving them off the album. Most well-regarded of these were "Blind Willie McTell" (which was both a tribute to the dead blues singer and an extraordinary evocation of African American history reaching back to "the ghosts of slavery ships"[146]), "Foot of Pride" and "Lord Protect My Child";[147] these songs were later released on the boxed set The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961-1991. An earlier version of Infidels, prepared by producer/guitarist Mark Knopfler, contained different arrangements and song selections than what appeared on the final product. Blind Willie McTell is a song by Bob Dylan, titled after the blues singer Blind Willie McTell. ... The Bootleg Series Volumes 1-3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961-1991 is a compilation box set by Bob Dylan. ... Mark Freuder Knopfler OBE (born August 12, 1949, Glasgow, Scotland) is an English guitarist, singer, songwriter, and film score composer. ...


Dylan contributed vocals to USA for Africa's famine relief fundraising single "We Are the World". On 13 July 1985, he appeared at the climax of the Live Aid concert at JFK Stadium, Philadelphia. Backed by Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood, Dylan performed a ragged version of "Hollis Brown", his ballad of rural poverty, and then said to a worldwide audience exceeding one billion people: "I hope that some of the money ... maybe they can just take a little bit of it, maybe ... one or two million, maybe ... and use it to pay the mortgages on some of the farms and, the farmers here, owe to the banks." His remarks were widely criticised as inappropriate, but they did inspire Willie Nelson to organise a series of events, Farm Aid, to benefit debt-ridden American farmers.[148] USA for Africa (United Support of Artists for Africa), was the name under which forty-five U.S. artists, led by Harry Belafonte, Kenny Rogers, Michael Jackson, and Lionel Richie, recorded the hit single We Are the World in 1985. ... A famine is a phenomenon in which a large percentage of the population of a region or country are so undernourished that death by starvation becomes increasingly common. ... Not to be confused with We Are Here To Change The World, a song that was featured in Captain EO. For the album with the same title, see We Are the World (album). ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Live Aid was a multi-venue rock music concert held on July 13, 1985). ... John F. Kennedy Stadium (originally known as Municipal Stadium, later also referred to as JFK Stadium) was a stadium in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania that stood from 1925-1992. ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ... Ron Wood (born June 1, 1947 in London) is a British rock guitarist and best known as a member of The Rolling Stones and The Faces. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Farm Aid started as a benefit concert on September 22, 1985, in Champaign, Illinois, held to raise money for family farmers in the United States. ...


In 1986 Dylan made a foray into the world of rap music, appearing on Kurtis Blow's Kingdom Blow album. In an arrangement set up, in part, by Debra Byrd (one of Dylan's back-up singers) and Wayne K. Garfield (an associate of Blow's), Dylan contributed vocals to the track "Street Rock."[149] In his memoir, Chronicles, Dylan writes, "Blow familiarized me with that stuff, Ice-T, Public Enemy, N.W.A., Run-D.M.C.. These guys definitely weren't standing around bullshitting. They were all poets and knew what was going on."[150] Dylan's opening rap for "Street Rock" goes, "I've indulged in higher knowledge through scan of encyclopedia / keep in constant research of our report and news media / kids starve in Ethiopia and we are getting greedier / the rich are getting richer and the needy's getting needier." Hip hop music is a style of popular music. ... Kurtis Blow (born Curtis Walker, 9 August 1959, Harlem, New York) is one of the first commercially successful rappers and the first to sign with a major label. ... Debra Byrd is an American singer, musical theater actress, and author who is most notable as the head vocal coach on American Idol and Canadian Idol and also sings backup for the Idol contestants. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Tracy Marrow (born February 16, 1958)[1], better known by stage name Ice-T, and nickname is an American rapper, rock musician, author, former United States Army soldier, and actor. ... Public Enemy, also known as PE, is a hip hop group from Long Island, New York, known for their politically charged lyrics, criticism of the media, and active interest in the concerns of the African American community. ... This article is about the hip-hop group. ... Run-DMC is a famous hip hop crew founded by Jason Mizell (Jam Master Jay) and includes Joseph Run Simmons and Darryl DMC McDaniels, all from Hollis, Queens. ...


In July 1986 Dylan released Knocked Out Loaded, an album which consisted of three cover songs (by Little Junior Parker, Kris Kristofferson and the traditional gospel hymn "Precious Memories"), three collaborations with other songwriters (Tom Petty, Sam Shepard and Carole Bayer Sager), and two solo compositions by Dylan himself. The album received mainly negative reviews; Rolling Stone called it "a depressing affair"[151], and it was the first Dylan album since Freewheelin' (1963) to fail to make the Top 50.[152] Since then, some critics have called the eleven minute epic that Dylan co-wrote with Sam Shepard, 'Brownsville Girl', a work of genius[153], and some websites have even tried to claim that the entire album has been vastly underrated[154]. Knocked Out Loaded is a 1986 album release by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Junior Parkers style influenced early rockabilly artists, such as Elvis Presley. ... Kristoffer Kris Kristofferson (born June 22, 1936) is an influential American country music songwriter, singer and actor. ... Precious Memories is a traditional gospel hymn credited to J.B.F. Wright in 1925. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Sam Shepard (born November 5, 1943) is a unique American artist whose talents have been expressed in many different areas. ... Carole Bayer Sager (born March 8, 1947 in New York City, New York) is an American lyricist, songwriter and singer best-known for writing the lyrics to many popular songs performed on Broadway and in Hollywood films. ... This article is about the magazine. ... The Freewheelin Bob Dylan is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans second studio album, released in 1963 by Columbia Records. ... Brownsville Girl is an 11-minute epic song from the often-condemned 1986 Bob Dylan album Knocked Out Loaded. It is often considered the only saving grace of the album, which is known as one of, if not the worst effort in Dylans four decade career. ...


In 1986 and 1987, Dylan toured extensively with Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers, sharing vocals with Petty on several songs each night. The tour was filmed for the documentary Hard to Handle[155], directed by Gillian Armstrong. Dylan also toured with The Grateful Dead in 1987, resulting in a live album Dylan & The Dead. This album received some negative reviews.[156] After performing with these different musical permutations, Dylan initiated what came to be called The Never Ending Tour on June 7, 1988, performing with a tight back-up band featuring guitarist G. E. Smith. Dylan would keep on touring with this small but constantly evolving band for the next 20 years. Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... Gillian Armstrong (born December 18, 1950 in Melbourne, Australia) is a film director. ... This article is about the band. ... Dylan & The Dead is a collaborative live album by Bob Dylan and The Grateful Dead, released in 1989 by Columbia Records. ... Bob Dylans Never Ending Tour is a popular term for the rock legends seemingly incessant performing schedule since June 7, 1988. ... George Edward Smith (b. ...


In 1987 Dylan starred in Richard Marquand's movie Hearts of Fire, in which he played a washed-up-rock-star-turned-chicken farmer called "Billy Parker", whose teenage lover (Fiona) leaves him for a jaded English synth-pop sensation (Rupert Everett). Dylan also contributed two original songs to the soundtrack - "Night After Night", and 'I Had a Dream About You, Baby" - as well as a cover of John Hiatt's "The Usual". The film was a critical and commercial flop.[157] Richard Marquand Richard Marquand (April 17, 1938 - September 4, 1987) was a Welsh film director. ... Originally written by Scott Richardson, Hearts of Fire was rewritten by Joe Eszterhas because the studio felt that Richardson was, in their eyes, a baby writer and not experienced enough to take on the responsibility of a starring vehicle for Bob Dylan. ... Fiona (born Fiona Flanagan in Phillipsburg, New Jersey, September 13, 1961) is an American rock singer. ... Rupert James Hector Everett (born May 29, 1959) is a Golden Globe-nominated English actor and a former singer. ... John Hiatt (born August 20, 1952 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA) is an American rock guitarist, pianist, singer, and songwriter. ...


Dylan was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in January 1988. Bruce Springsteen made the induction speech, declaring: "Bob freed your mind the way Elvis freed your body. He showed us that just because music was innately physical did not mean that it was anti-intellectual."[158] Later that spring, Dylan joined Roy Orbison, Jeff Lynne, Tom Petty, and George Harrison to create a lighthearted, well-selling album as the Traveling Wilburys. Despite Orbison's death in December 1988, the remaining four recorded a second album in May 1990, which they released with the unexpected title Traveling Wilburys Vol. 3. The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Jeff Lynne (born December 30, 1947 in Shard End, Birmingham) is a Grammy Award-winning English rock songwriter, singer, guitarist and record producer. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Traveling Wilburys were a supergroup consisting of George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ...


Dylan finished the decade on a critical high note with the Daniel Lanois-produced Oh Mercy (1989).[159] Lanois's influence is audible throughout Oh Mercy.[160][161] The track "Most of the Time", a lost love composition, was later prominently featured in the film High Fidelity, while "What Was It You Wanted?" has been interpreted both as a catechism and a wry comment on the expectations of critics and fans.[162] The dense religious imagery of 'Ring Them Bells' struck some critics as a re-affirmation of faith. Scott Marshall wrote: "When Dylan sings that 'The sun is going down upon the sacred cow', it's safe to assume that the sacred cow here is the biblical metaphor for all false gods. For Dylan, the world will eventually know that there is only one God."[163] Dylan also made a number of music videos during this period, but only "Political World" found any regular airtime on MTV. Daniel Lanois (born September 19, 1951 in Hull, Québec) is a Canadian record producer and singer-songwriter. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... High Fidelity is a 2000 film directed by Stephen Frears, starring John Cusack, Iben Hjejle, Jack Black, Todd Louiso, Tim Robbins, Lisa Bonet, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Joan Cusack, Joelle Carter, and Lili Taylor. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ...


1990s: Not Dark Yet

Dylan performs at a 1996 concert in Stockholm.
Dylan performs at a 1996 concert in Stockholm.

Dylan's 1990s began with Under the Red Sky (1990), an about-face from the serious Oh Mercy. The album was dedicated to "Gabby Goo Goo", and contained several apparently simple songs, including "Under the Red Sky" and "Wiggle Wiggle". The "Gabby Goo Goo" dedication was later explained as a nickname for Dylan's four-year-old daughter.[164] Sidemen on the album included George Harrison, Slash from Guns N' Roses, David Crosby, Bruce Hornsby, Stevie Ray Vaughan, and Elton John. Despite the stellar line-up, the record received bad reviews and sold poorly. Dylan would not make another studio album of new songs for seven years.[165] Image File history File linksMetadata B_dylan_1996. ... Image File history File linksMetadata B_dylan_1996. ... Under the Red Sky is a 1990 album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Saul Hudson (born July 23, 1965), more widely known as Slash, is an English/American guitarist best known as the former lead guitarist of Guns N Roses and as the current lead guitarist of Velvet Revolver. ... Guns N Roses is an American hard rock band, formed in Los Angeles, California in 1985. ... David Van Cortlandt Crosby (born August 14, 1941) is an American guitarist, singer, and songwriter. ... Bruce Randall Hornsby (born November 23, 1954 in Williamsburg, Virginia) is an American singer, pianist, accordion player, and songwriter. ... Stephen Stevie Ray Vaughan (October 3, 1954 – August 27, 1990), born in Dallas, Texas, was an American blues guitarist. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ...


In 1991 Bob Dylan was inducted into the Minnesota Music Hall of Fame and in 1992 Dylan performed a brief tour with Santana.[166] The Minnesota Music Hall of Fame is located at First North Street and Broadway in New Ulm, Minnesota, USA, in the former public library. ... Santana (originally the Santana Blues Band) is a flexible number of musicians accompanying Carlos Santana since the late 1960s. ...


The next few years saw Dylan returning to his roots with two albums covering old folk and blues numbers: Good as I Been to You (1992) and World Gone Wrong (1993), featuring interpretations and acoustic guitar work. Many critics and fans commented on the quiet beauty of the song "Lone Pilgrim",[167] penned by a 19th century teacher and sung by Dylan with a haunting reverence. An exception to this rootsy mood came in Dylan's 1991 songwriting collaboration with Michael Bolton; the resulting song "Steel Bars", was released on Bolton's album Time, Love & Tenderness. Twenty-five years after famously failing to perform at the Woodstock Festival, Dylan appeared at the commemorative event entitled Woodstock 94.[168] In November of 1994 Dylan recorded two live shows for MTV Unplugged. He claimed his wish to perform a set of traditional songs for the show was overruled by Sony executives who insisted on a greatest hits package.[169] The album produced from it, MTV Unplugged, included "John Brown", an unreleased 1963 song detailing the ravages of both war and jingoism. The same year Dylan provided vocals and guitar on Mike Seeger's cover of "The Ballad of Hollis Brown" on Seeger's Rounder Records album Third Annual Farewell Reunion.[34] Good as I Been to You is a traditional folk music album made by Bob Dylan in 1992. ... World Gone Wrong is the twenty-ninth studio album (according to the list below)by Bob Dylan, released in 1993 by Columbia Records. ... Michael Bolotin (born February 26, 1953), better known as Michael Bolton, is an American singer-songwriter, known for his soft rock ballads and tenor vocals. ... Time, Love & Tenderness is an album by Michael Bolton. ... The Woodstock Music and Art Fair was a historic event held at Max Yasgurs 600 acre (2. ... Woodstock 94 was a rock concert that celebrated the 25th anniversary of the original Woodstock concert of 1969. ... MTV Unplugged is a series showcasing popular musical artists playing acoustic instruments. ... Sony Corporation ) is a Japanese multinational corporation and one of the worlds largest media conglomerates with revenue of $66. ... MTV Unplugged is Bob Dylans 1995 unplugged release, recorded and issued at the peak of that formats popularity. ... Ten Thousand Miles From Tip to Tip, an 1898 political cartoon depicting the extension of the United States dominion Jingoism is chauvinistic patriotism, usually associated with a War Hawk political stance. ... Mike Seeger Mike Seeger (b. ...


With a collection of songs reportedly written while snowed-in on his Minnesota ranch,[170] Dylan booked recording time with Daniel Lanois at Miami's Criteria Studios in January 1997. The subsequent recording sessions were, by some accounts, fraught with musical tension.[171] Late that spring, before the album's release, Dylan was hospitalized with a life-threatening heart infection, pericarditis, brought on by histoplasmosis. His scheduled European tour was cancelled, but Dylan made a speedy recovery and left the hospital saying, "I really thought I'd be seeing Elvis soon."[172] He was back on the road by midsummer, and in early fall performed before Pope John Paul II at the World Eucharistic Conference in Bologna, Italy. The Pope treated the audience of 200,000 people to a sermon based on Dylan's lyric "Blowin' in the Wind".[173] Daniel Lanois (born September 19, 1951 in Hull, Québec) is a Canadian record producer and singer-songwriter. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... Criteria Studios is a music studio in Miami, Florida started in 1958 by Mack Emerman. ... Pericarditis is inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart, the pericardium. ... Elvis redirects here. ... Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: , Polish: ) born   IPA: ; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church and Sovereign of the State of the Vatican City from 16 October 1978, until his death, almost 27 years later, making his the second-longest... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... Blowin in the Wind is a song written by Bob Dylan, and released on his 1963 album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ...


September saw the release of the new Lanois-produced album, Time Out of Mind. With its bitter assessment of love and morbid ruminations, Dylan's first collection of original songs in seven years became highly acclaimed. It also achieved an unforeseen popularity among young listeners, particularly the opening song, "Love Sick".[174] This collection of complex songs won him his first solo "Album of the Year" Grammy Award (he was one of numerous performers on The Concert for Bangladesh, the 1972 winner). The love song "Make You Feel My Love" has been covered by Garth Brooks, Billy Joel and, more recently, British singer Adele. Time Out of Mind is Bob Dylans critically-acclaimed comeback album, released in 1997. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Concert For Bangladesh was the event title for two concerts held on the afternoon and evening of August 1, 1971, playing to a total of 40,000 people at Madison Square Garden in New York. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Troyal Garth Brooks (born February 7, 1962) is an American country music singer-songwriter. ... William Joseph Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Adele Laurie Blue Adkins (born 5 May 1988 in Enfield, North London),[1] known professionally as Adele, is an English soul and jazz singer. ...


In December 1997 U.S. President Bill Clinton presented Dylan with a Kennedy Center Honor in the East Room of the White House, paying this tribute: "He probably had more impact on people of my generation than any other creative artist. His voice and lyrics haven't always been easy on the ear, but throughout his career Bob Dylan has never aimed to please. He's disturbed the peace and discomforted the powerful."[175] William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ...


In 1998 Dylan appeared on Ralph Stanley's album Clinch Mountain Country, duetting with the bluegrass legend on "The Lonesome River." [5].Between June and September, 1999, Dylan toured with Paul Simon. They performed a couple of songs together at each show, including "I Walk the Line" and "Blue Moon Of Kentucky". (Simon & Garfunkel had recorded "The Times They Are a-Changin'" on their debut album, Wednesday Morning, 3AM, and Dylan had covered "The Boxer" on his Self Portrait album.) Dylan ended the nineties by returning to the big screen after a break of ten years in the role of Alfred the Chaffeur alongside Ben Gazzara and Karen Black in Robert Clapsaddle's Paradise Cove.[176] Ralph Stanley (born February 25, 1927) is an American bluegrass musician. ... Bluegrass music is a form of American roots music. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... I Walk the Line is a song written by Johnny Cash and recorded in 1956. ... Blue Moon of Kentucky is a waltz written in 1947 by bluegrass musician Bill Monroe and recorded by his band, The Blue Grass Boys. ... Bridge Over Troubled Water was Simon and Garfunkels last album; the title track was their only number one hit in the United Kingdom. ... The Times They Are a-Changin is a song written by Bob Dylan and released on his 1964 album The Times They Are a-Changin. Dylans friend, Tony Glover, recalls visiting Dylans apartment in September 1963, where he saw a number of song manuscripts and poems lying on... For the 1997 film starring Daniel Day-Lewis, see The Boxer (film). ... Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. ... Ben Gazzara (born Biagio Anthony Gazzara on August 28, 1930, in New York City) is an American actor in television and motion pictures. ... Karen Black (born July 1, 1939) is an Academy Award-nominated American actress, screenwriter, singer and songwriter. ...


2000 and beyond: Things Have Changed

2000–2003

In 2000 his song "Things Have Changed", penned for the film Wonder Boys, won a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song and an Academy Award for Best Song. For reasons unknown, the Oscar (by some reports a facsimile) tours with him, presiding over shows perched atop an amplifier.[177] Things Have Changed is a song from the film Wonder Boys, written and sung by Bob Dylan. ... Wonder Boys is a 2000 film adaptation of the Michael Chabon novel of the same name. ... For the main article see Golden Globe Awards. ... The Academy Award for Best Song is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are songwriters and composers. ...

"Love and Theft" was released on 9/11. It has been described as one of Dylan's greatest recent albums.
"Love and Theft" was released on 9/11. It has been described as one of Dylan's greatest recent albums.[178]

"Love and Theft" was released on September 11, 2001. Dylan produced the album himself under the pseudonym Jack Frost,[179] and its distinctive sound owes much to the accompanists. Tony Garnier, bassist and bandleader, had played with Dylan for 12 years, longer than any other musician. Larry Campbell, one of the most accomplished American guitarists of the last two decades, played on the road with Dylan from 1997 through 2004. Guitarist Charlie Sexton and drummer David Kemper had also toured with Dylan for years. Keyboard player Augie Meyers, the only musician not part of Dylan's touring band, had also played on Time Out of Mind. The album was critically well-received[180] and nominated for several Grammy awards. Critics noted that at this late stage in his career, Dylan was deliberately widening his musical palette. The styles referenced in this album included rockabilly, Western swing, jazz, and even lounge ballads.[181][182] This is an album cover. ... This is an album cover. ... Love and Theft is the 31st studio album by Bob Dylan, released in 2001 by Sony BMG. The album continued Dylans artistic comeback following 1997s Time out of Mind, and was given an even more enthusiastic reception. ... The date that commonly refers to the attacks on United States citizens on September 11, 2001 (see the September 11, 2001 Attacks). ... Love and Theft is the 31st studio album by Bob Dylan, released in 2001 by Sony BMG. The album continued Dylans artistic comeback following 1997s Time out of Mind, and was given an even more enthusiastic reception. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Alias. ... Tony Garnier (born St. ... Larry Campbell is a musician who plays several string instruments (including guitar, mandolin, and violin) in genres including country, folk, and rock. ... Charles Wayne Sexton (born August 11, 1968) is an American guitarist, singer and songwriter. ... David Kemper is a drummer. ... August Augie Meyers (b. ... Rockabilly is one of the earliest styles of rock and roll music, and emerged in the early-1950s. ...


"Love and Theft" generated controversy when some similarities between the lyrics of the album to Japanese writer Junichi Saga's book Confessions of a Yakuza were pointed out.[183] It is unclear if Dylan intentionally lifted any material. Dylan's publicist had no comment. Confessions of a Yakuza ) is a book by Japanese doctor and author Junichi Saga (1991). ...


Between "Love and Theft" and Dylan's next studio album (to be released five years later) he recorded songs—both originals and covers—for a number of different projects. "I Can't Get You Off of My Mind", Dylan's contribution to the Hank Williams tribute album "Timeless" was released in September 2001. 2002 saw the release of Dylan's version of "Train Of Love" on a similar Johnny Cash tribute album called Kindred Spirits. (Dylan had recorded the song for a Johnny Cash TV tribute, broadcast in April 1999. In his spoken introduction, Dylan thanked Cash "for standing up for me way back when.") In 2002 Solomon Burke recorded a version of the rare Dylan composition "Stepchild" for his Don't Give Up on Me album. While the song has never surfaced as a studio recording, there are a number of bootlegs in circulation of Dylan playing the track at soundchecks in the late 70's. [184] In February 2003, the 8-minute long epic ballad "Cross The Green Mountain", written and recorded by Dylan, was released as the closing song on the soundtrack to the Civil War movie Gods and Generals, and later appeared as one of the 42 rare tracks on the iTunes Music Store release of Bob Dylan: The Collection. A music video for the song was also produced in promotion of the motion picture. For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... For the song of the same name, recorded by Tracy Byrd and later by Jason Aldean, see Johnny Cash (song). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dont Give Up On Me is an album featuring Solomon Burke, released 2002 on Fat Possum. ... For other uses, see Gods and Generals (disambiguation). ...


2003 also saw the release of the film Masked & Anonymous, a creative collaboration with television producer Larry Charles, featuring many well-known actors. Dylan and Charles cowrote the film under the pseudonyms Rene Fontaine and Sergei Petrov.[185] As difficult to decipher as some of his songs, Masked & Anonymous had a limited run in theaters, and was panned by many major critics.[186] A few treasured it as Dylan's bringing a dark and mysterious vision of the USA as a war-torn banana republic to the screen.[187][188] Masked & Anonymous is a film written by Bob Dylan and directed by Larry Charles, though they both credited themselves as writers under pseudonyms Sergei Petrov and Rene Fontaine. ... Larry Charles (1956 - ) is an American television writer, director and producer. ...


2004–2006

On 23 June 2004, Dylan was awarded an honorary degree by the University of St. Andrews and made a "Doctor of Music."[189] Professor Neil Corcoran, of the university's school of English department, and author of the collection of academic essays on Dylan entitled Do You Mr Jones: Bob Dylan with the Poets and the Professors, declared in his presentation speech that "For many of us, Bob Dylan has been an extension of our consciousness and part of our growing up." This is only the second time that Dylan has accepted an honorary degree, the other being an honorary doctorate in music conferred on him by Princeton University in 1970.[190] is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University of St Andrews The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410-1413 and is the oldest university in Scotland and the third oldest in the United Kingdom. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


After a lengthy delay, October 2004 saw the publishing of Dylan's autobiography Chronicles: Volume One, with which he once again confounded expectations.[191] Dylan wrote three chapters about the year between his arrival in New York City in 1961 and recording his first album. Dylan focused on the brief period before he was a household name, while virtually ignoring the mid-1960s when his fame was at its height. He also devoted chapters to two lesser-known albums, New Morning (1970) and Oh Mercy (1989), which contained insights into his collaborations with poet Archibald MacLeish and producer Daniel Lanois. In the New Morning chapter, Dylan expresses distaste for the "spokesman of a generation" label bestowed upon him, and evinces disgust with his more fanatical followers. Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Literature stubs ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... New Morning was released in October 1970 by Bob Dylan, only four months after the controversial Self Portrait. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Archibald MacLeish Archibald MacLeish (May 7, 1892 – April 20, 1982) was an American poet, writer and the Librarian of Congress. ... Daniel Lanois (born September 19, 1951 in Hull, Québec) is a Canadian record producer and singer-songwriter. ... New Morning was released in October 1970 by Bob Dylan, only four months after the controversial Self Portrait. ...


Despite the opacity of some passages, there is an overall clarity in voice that is generally missing in Dylan's earlier prose writings,[191] and a noticeable generosity towards friends and lovers of his early years.[192] At the end of the book, Dylan describes with great passion the moment when he listened to the Brecht/Weill song "Pirate Jenny", and the moment when he first heard Robert Johnson’s recordings. In these passages, Dylan suggested the process which ignited his own song writing. An opaque context is a linguistic context in which it is not possible to substitute co-referential terms while guaranteeing the preservation of truth values. ... {{dy justified his choice of form, and from about 1929 on he began to interpret its penchant for contradictions, much as had Eisenstein, in terms of the dialectic. ... Kurt Julian Weill (March 2, 1900 – April 3, 1950), born in Dessau, Germany and died in New York City, was a German and in his later years, a German-American composer active from the 1920s until his death. ... Die Dreigroschenoper, original German poster from Berlin, 1928. ... Robert Johnson, born Robert Leroy Johnson (May 8, 1911 – August 16, 1938) is among the most famous of Delta blues musicians. ...


Chronicles: Volume One reached number two on The New York Times' Hardcover Non-Fiction best seller list in December 2004 and was nominated for a National Book Award. Simultaneously, Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble reported the book as their number two best-seller among all categories.[193] The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... Amazon. ... A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ...

Dylan performing in Bologna in November 2005.
Dylan performing in Bologna in November 2005.

Martin Scorsese's film biography No Direction Home was shown on September 26 and September 27, 2005 on BBC Two in the United Kingdom and PBS in the United States.[194] The documentary concentrates on the years between Dylan's arrival in New York in 1961 and the 1966 motorbike crash. It features interviews with many who knew him in those years, including Suze Rotolo, Liam Clancy, Joan Baez, Allen Ginsberg, Dave Van Ronk, Pete Seeger, Mavis Staples, Bob Johnston, and with Bob Dylan himself. The film received a Peabody Award in April 2006, and a Columbia-duPont Award in January 2007.[195] An accompanying soundtrack was released in August 2005, which contained much previously unavailable early Dylan material. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1659 KB) Summary Author: Flickr user Gabriele Description: Bob Dylan live in Bologna Source: http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2592x1944, 1659 KB) Summary Author: Flickr user Gabriele Description: Bob Dylan live in Bologna Source: http://www. ... For the food product, see Bologna sausage. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... Susan Elizabeth Rotolo (born November 20, 1943[1]), nicknamed Suze Rotolo (pronounced Suze-ee), is an artist who specializes in artists books and who teaches at the Parsons School of Design in New York City. ... Liam Clancy with his brothers Tom, and Pat plus Tommy Makem played together as The Clancy Brothers and Tommy Makem Categories: Stub ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Irwin Allen Ginsberg (IPA: ) (June 3, 1926 – April 5, 1997) was an American poet. ... Dave Van Ronk (June 30, 1936 – February 10, 2002) was a folk singer born in Brooklyn, New York, who settled in Greenwich Village, New York City, and was nicknamed the Mayor of MacDougal Street. ... Peter Seeger (born May 3, 1919), better known as Pete Seeger, is a folk singer, political activist, and a key figure in the mid-20th century American folk music revival. ... Mavis Staples (born July 10, 1939 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American rhythm and blues singer. ... Bob Johnston (born 1933 in Fort Worth, Texas) is a noted record producer, best known for his work with Bob Dylan, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson and many Nashville recording artists, as well as Simon and Garfunkel. ... The George Foster Peabody Awards, more commonly referred to as the Peabody Awards, are annual international awards given for excellence in radio and television broadcasting. ...


Dylan himself returned to the recording studio at some point in 2005, where he recorded "Tell Ol' Bill" for the motion picture North Country. The song is an original composition, not a cover of the similarly titled traditional folk song. The melody is based on "I Never Loved But One" by the Carter Family. North Country is the name of an Academy Award-nominated film directed by Niki Caro and released in 2005. ... Maybelle, A.P. and Sara The Carter Family was a country music group that performed and recorded between 1927 and 1943. ...


In February 2006, Dylan recorded tracks in New York City that were to result in the album Modern Times, released on August 29, 2006. In a well-publicized interview to promote the album, Dylan criticised the quality of modern sound recordings and claimed that his new songs "probably sounded ten times better in the studio when we recorded 'em".[196] Modern Times is Bob Dylans 32nd studio album, released on August 29, 2006 by Sony BMG. The album was Dylans third straight (following Time out of Mind and Love and Theft) to be met with nearly universal praise from fans and critics. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Despite some coarsening of Dylan’s voice (The Guardian critic characterised his singing on the album as “a catarrhal death rattle”[197]) most reviewers gave the album high marks and many described it as the final installment of a successful trilogy, embracing Time Out of Mind and "Love and Theft".[198] Among the tracks most frequently singled out for praise were "Workingman's Blues #2" (the title was a nod to Merle Haggard's song of that name), and the final song “Ain’t Talkin’”, a nine minute talking blues in which Dylan appeared to be walking “through all-enveloping darkness, before finally disappearing into the murk”.[199] Modern Times made news by entering the U.S. charts at #1, making it Dylan's first album to reach that position since 1976's Desire, 30 years prior. At 65, Dylan became the oldest living musician to top the Billboard albums chart. The record also reached number one in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Ireland, New Zealand, Norway and Switzerland. For other uses, see Guardian. ... Merle Ronald Haggard (born April 6, 1937) is an American country music singer, guitarist and songwriter. ... Billboard can refer to: Billboard magazine Billboard (advertising) Billboard antenna In 3D computer graphics, to billboard is to rotate an object so that it faces the viewer. ...


Nominated for three Grammy Awards, Modern Times won Best Contemporary Folk/Americana Album and Bob Dylan also won Best Solo Rock Vocal Performance for "Someday Baby." Modern Times was ranked as the Album of the Year, 2006, by Rolling Stone magazine[200], and by Uncut in the UK.[201] Grammy Award statuette The Grammy Awards, presented by the Recording Academy (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards shows held annually in the United States (the Billboard Music Awards, the American Music... The Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album was first awarded in 1987. ... The Grammy Award for Best Rock Vocal Performance, Solo was presented in 1988, 1992, and 1994. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Uncut special issue on Queen. ...


On the same day that "Modern Times" was released the iTunes Music Store released Bob Dylan: The Collection, a digital box set containing all of his studio and live albums (773 tracks in total), along with 42 rare & unreleased tracks and a 100 page booklet. To promote the digital box set and the new album (on iTunes), Apple released a 30 second TV spot featuring Dylan, in full country & western regalia, lip-synching to "Someday Baby" against a striking white background. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into ITunes. ...


In September 2006 Scott Warmuth, an Albuquerque, N.M.-based disc jockey, noted similarities between Dylan's lyrics in the album, Modern Times and the poetry of Henry Timrod, the 'Poet Laureate of the Confederacy'. A wider debate developed in The New York Times and other journals about the nature of "borrowing" within the folk process and in literature.[202][203][204][205] Henry Timrod Courtesy of CyberHymnal: http://www. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


May 3, 2006, was the premiere of Dylan's DJ career, hosting a weekly radio program, Theme Time Radio Hour, for XM Satellite Radio.[206][207] Each one hour show revolved around a theme such as 'Flowers' 'Tears', 'The Bible', 'Rich man/Poor man'; the'Baseball'-themed show was even selected for inclusion in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in June 2006.[208]. Among the classic and obscure records played on his show from the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s, Dylan has also played tracks by Blur, Prince, Billy Bragg & Wilco, Mary Gauthier and even L.L. Cool J and The Streets. Each show was introduced with a few sentences spoken in a sultry voice by the actress Ellen Barkin.[209] BBC Radio 2 commenced transmission of Dylan's radio show in the UK on December 23, 2006, and BBC 6 Music started carrying it in January 2007. The show won praise from fans and critics for the way that Dylan conveyed his eclectic musical taste with panache and eccentric humor.[210][211] Music author Peter Guralnick commented: "With this show, Dylan is tapping into his deep love – and I would say his belief in – a musical world without borders. I feel like the commentary often reflects the same surrealistic appreciation for the human comedy that suffuses his music."[212] After 50 successful shows, a second season of Theme Time Radio Hour was commissioned to begin in September 2007.[213][214] is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... Theme Time Radio Hour (TTRH) is a one hour radio show hosted by Bob Dylan. ... “XM” redirects here. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, United States, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests that serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in North America, the display of baseball-related... Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. ... For other uses, see Prince (disambiguation). ... Stephen William Bragg (born December 20, 1957 in Essex, England), better known as Billy Bragg, is an English musician who blends elements of folk music, punk rock and protest songs. ... This article is about the music group. ... Mary Gauthier (born in Baton Rouge, Louisiana) is an American folk singer/songwriter. ... LL Cool J James Todd Smith (born January 14, 1968) is an American hip hop artist better known by his stage name, LL Cool J (an abbreviation of Ladies Love Cool James). He is best known for romantic ballads like I Need Love as well as hardcore rap like I... Mike Skinner (born November 27, 1978), more commonly known by his stage name The Streets, is a rapper from Birmingham, England. ... Ellen Rona Barkin (born April 16, 1954) is an Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-nominated American actress. ... BBC Radio 2 is one of the BBCs national radio stations and the most popular station in the UK. As well as having most listeners nationally, it ranks first in all regions above local radio stations. ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BBC 6 Music is one of the BBCs newest radio stations, launched on March 11, 2002 and originally codenamed Network Y. It is only available via digital media - DAB radio, the Internet and the various forms of digital television. ... Peter Guralnick is a music critic and historian of American popular music. ... Theme Time Radio Hour (TTRH) is a one hour radio show hosted by Bob Dylan. ...


2007–present

Bob Dylan performs at Air Canada Centre, Toronto, November 7, 2006
Bob Dylan performs at Air Canada Centre, Toronto, November 7, 2006

2007 saw the release of a new original Dylan song, "Huck's Tune", written and recorded for the soundtrack to the film Lucky You on April 24. Lucky You is a 2007 drama directed by Curtis Hanson and starring Eric Bana, Drew Barrymore, and Robert Duvall. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


August 2007 saw the unveiling[215] of the award-winning [216] film I'm Not There, written and directed by Todd Haynes, bearing the tagline "inspired by the music and many lives of Bob Dylan".[217] The movie uses six distinct characters to represent different aspects of Dylan's life, played by six different actors[218]: Christian Bale, Cate Blanchett, Marcus Carl Franklin, Richard Gere, Heath Ledger and Ben Whishaw[219]. (A seventh character, a Charlie Chaplin-like incarnation of Dylan, was present in the script but was dropped before filming began[220].) The title of the film was taken from a particularly mysterious song from the The Basement Tapes sessions[221] which had hitherto not been officially released. Dylan's 1967 recording was included on the film's original soundtrack; all other tracks on this album are covers of Dylan songs, specially recorded for the movie by a wide variety of artists, including Stephen Malkmus, Jeff Tweedy, Willie Nelson, Cat Power, and Tom Verlaine.[222] Im Not There is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated 2007 biographical film inspired by the life of iconic singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Maverick, onetime New Queer Cinema director Todd Haynes was born on January 2, 1961, in Encino, California, and has had a controversial career. ... Christian Charles Philip Bale (also known professionally as Christian Morgan Bale; born 30 January 1974) is a Screen Actors Guild Award-nominated, Saturn Award-winning Welsh actor[2][3] whose film credits include Empire of the Sun, American Psycho, Equilibrium, The Machinist, Batman Begins and the upcoming The Dark Knight. ... Catherine Élise Cate Blanchett (born May 14, 1969) is an Academy Award- and Golden Globe Award-winning Australian actress and stage director. ... Marcus Carl Franklin is an American actor set to star in the upcoming biopic Im Not There. ... Richard Tiffany Gere[1] (born August 31, 1949) is a Golden Globe- and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning American actor. ... Heath Andrew Ledger (April 4, 1979 – January 22, 2008) was an Academy Award, BAFTA, Golden Globe, and SAG Award-nominated Australian-born film actor who lived in New York City. ... Ben Whishaw (born 14 October 1980) is an English actor who trained at RADA. Whishaw is best known for his breakthrough role as Hamlet, and plays the lead character in Tom Tykwers Perfume: The Story of a Murderer. ... Charles Chaplin redirects here. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... Im Not There is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated 2007 biographical film inspired by the life of iconic singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Stephen Malkmus (born May 30, 1966 , Santa Monica, California) is an indie rock musician and a former member of the band Pavement. ... Jeffrey Scott Tweedy (born August 25, 1967 in Belleville, Illinois, United States) is an American songwriter, musician, and poet. ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... Cat Power is the stage name of American singer/songwriter Charlyn Chan Marshall (born Charlyn Marie Marshall on 21 January 1972). ... Tom Verlaine (born Thomas Miller, December 13, 1949, in Morristown, New Jersey)[1] is a singer, songwriter and guitarist, best-known as the frontman for the New York rock band, Television. ...


In a comment on Dylan's identity, and why six actors were employed to portray different facets of Dylan's personality, Haynes wrote:

The minute you try to grab hold of Dylan, he's no longer where he was. He's like a flame: If you try to hold him in your hand you'll surely get burned. Dylan's life of change and constant disappearances and constant transformations makes you yearn to hold him, and to nail him down. And that's why his fan base is so obsessive, so desirous of finding the truth and the absolutes and the answers to him - things that Dylan will never provide and will only frustrate.... Dylan is difficult and mysterious and evasive and frustrating, and it only makes you identify with him all the more as he skirts identity.[223]

On October 1, Columbia Records released a triple CD retrospective album entitled Dylan, anthologising his entire career.[224] As part of the marketing campaign for this album, using the Dylan 07 logo, British record producer Mark Ronson was asked to produce a re-mix of "Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I'll Go Mine)", originally released on Blonde on Blonde in 1966. This was the first time Dylan had sanctioned a re-mix of one of his classic recordings.[225] Ronson's re-mix was released as a maxi-single in October but not included in the Dylan triple album. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Columbia Records is the oldest brand name in recorded sound, dating back to 1888, and was the first record company to produce pre-recorded records as opposed to blank cylinders. ... Mark Ronson (born 4 September 1975)[1] is the bastardised version of what is now called a English music producer, cover-artist and co-founder of Allido Records. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


The sophistication of the Dylan 07 marketing campaign was a reminder that Dylan’s commercial profile was far higher in the first decade of the new millennium than it had been in the 1990s. In 2004, much publicity surrounded Dylan’s agreeing to appear in a TV advertisement for Victoria’s Secret lingerie.[226] In October 2007, Dylan appeared in a multi-media campaign to promote the 2008 Cadillac Escalade.[227] He also devoted an hour of his Theme Time Radio Hour to the theme of the Cadillac.[228] Adriana Lima on the face of Victorias Secret Ana Beatriz Barros from the cover of the Victorias Secret catalog Victorias Secret is a retail marketer of lingerie and beauty products. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Theme Time Radio Hour (TTRH) is a one hour radio show hosted by Bob Dylan. ...


Also released in October, the DVD The Other Side of the Mirror: Bob Dylan Live at the Newport Folk Festival 1963-1965 featured previously unseen footage, chronicling the changes in Dylan’s style when he appeared at Newport in three successive years. This film was broadcast by BBC Four on October 14, 2007. Director Murray Lerner commented: “Over the course of three Newport gigs, Dylan becomes more conscious of his power. His charisma is startling. With electricity and radio, he did what Yeats, Lorca, T. S. Eliot and Ezra Pound never achieved. He reached a mass audience with poetry."[229] For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 4. ... Murray Lerner is a Documentary and Experimental motion picture Director and Producer who created the 1980 Oscar winning documentary: From Mao to Mozart: Isaac Stern in China. ... Yeats redirects here. ... Federico García Lorca Federico García Lorca (June 5, 1898 - August 19, 1936) was a Spanish poet and dramatist, also remembered as a painter, pianist, and composer. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Ezra Weston Loomis Pound (Hailey, Idaho Territory, United States, October 30, 1885 – Venice, Italy, November 1, 1972) was an American expatriate poet, critic and intellectual who was a major figure of the Modernist movement in early-to-mid 20th century poetry. ...


Random House had published a book of Dylan's drawings and paintings, Drawn Blank, in 1994. German art gallery director Ingrid Mössinger approached Dylan to suggest an exhibition of his work. The result was the October 2007 opening[230] of the first public exhibition of Dylan's paintings, The Drawn Blank Series at the Kunstsammlungen in Chemnitz, Germany, showcasing 170 watercolours and gouaches.[231][232] The publisher, Prestel Verlag, simultaneously published a catalog of the exhibition.[233] // Random House is a publishing house based in New York City. ... Chemnitz (Sorbian/Lusatian Kamjenica, 1953-1990 called Karl-Marx-Stadt; Czech: Saská Kamenice) is a city in the Free State of Saxony, Germany. ... Corridor in the Asylum, black chalk and gouache on pink paper by Van Gogh Gouache (from the Italian guazzo, water paint, splash) or Bodycolour (or Bodycolor, the terms preferred by Art historians) is a type of paint consisting of pigment suspended in water. ...


At the end of 2007, Dylan recorded a new version of "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall" exclusively for Expo Zaragoza 2008 world fair, scheduled to open on June 8, 2008, to highlight the Expo theme of "water and sustainable development". As well as choosing local-band Amaral to record a version of the song in Spanish, Dylan's new version ended with a few spoken words about his "being proud to be a part of the mission to make water safe and clean for every human being living in this world."[234][235]. A Hard Rains a-Gonna Fall is a song written by Bob Dylan in 1962 in Chip Moncks apartment in the basement of the Village Gate (now The Village Theater) on the corner of Bleecker and Thompson Streets in Greenwich Village. ... For other uses, see Zaragoza (disambiguation). ... Amaral is a music group from Zaragoza, Spain. ...


In February 2008, Dylan released a personal selection of music in the 'Artist's Choice' series on the Starbucks Entertainment record label. The sixteen tracks included such well-known artists as Billie Holliday and Flaco Jimenez, old Dylan favourites including the Stanley Brothers and Junior Wells, and lesser known performers such as Pee Wee Crayton and Ethiopian singer Gétatchéw Kassa[236]. Dylan also contributed liner notes on the historical significance of each artist. It has been suggested that Frappucino be merged into this article or section. ... Billie Holiday photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1949 Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 - July 17, 1959), also called Lady Day is generally considered one of the greatest jazz singers of all time. ... Flaco Jimenez is a Tejano musician from San Antonio, New Mexico. ... The Stanley Brothers (Carter Stanley, 1925-1966, and Ralph Stanley, born 1927) were American bluegrass musicians. ... Junior Wells (December 9, 1934 – January 15, 1998), born Amos Blakemore, was a blues vocalist and harmonica player based in Chicago who was famous for playing with Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, Magic Sam, Lonnie Brooks, The Rolling Stones and Van Morrison. ... Compilation album cover Connie Curtis Crayton (b 18 December 1914, Rockdale, Texas – d 25 June 1985, Los Angeles), known as Pee Wee Crayton, was an American R&B guitarist and singer. ...


Also released in February by Ace Records was a double CD, Theme Time Radio Hour With Your Host Bob Dylan. The record contained fifty songs that had been featured on Dylan's radio show, ranging from Billie Holiday and George Jones, through Aretha Franklin to The Clash and the White Stripes. Released with Dylan's blessing[237] , the tracks were selected by the producer of Dylan's radio show, Eddie Gorodetsky, and by Roger Armstrong from Ace Records. Ace Records Ltd was started in 1981 as a separate company from Swift Records Ltd the limited company trading as Chiswick Records. ... Billie Holiday (born Eleanora Fagan; April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959) was an American jazz singer and songwriter. ... For other persons named George Jones, see George Jones (disambiguation). ... Aretha Louise Franklin (born March 25, 1942) is an American singer, songwriter, and pianist. ... This article is about the English punk rock band. ... The White Stripes are a minimalist rock and roll duo from Detroit, formed in 1997. ...


Dylan is currently curating a project to set some of Hank Williams's "lost" lyrics to music, similar to the one undertaken by Billy Bragg and Wilco with Woody Guthrie's unaccompanied lyrics on "Mermaid Avenue". Dylan is overseeing contributions by Jack White, Willie Nelson, Lucinda Williams, Alan Jackson and Norah Jones, who will put the lyrics to music.[238] [239] The project started when Dylan acquired the lyrics that were in Wiliams's briefcase on the night he died.[240]. For other persons named Hank Williams, see Hank Williams (disambiguation). ... Stephen William Bragg (born December 20, 1957 in Essex, England), better known as Billy Bragg, is an English musician who blends elements of folk music, punk rock and protest songs. ... This article is about the music group. ... Woodrow Wilson Guthrie (July 14, 1912–October 3, 1967) was a prolific American songwriter and folk musician. ... Cover of Mermaid Avenue (1998) Mermaid Avenue is a 1998 album of previously unheard lyrics written by American folk singer Woody Guthrie, put to music written and performed by British singer Billy Bragg and the American band Wilco. ... For other persons named Jack White, see Jack White (disambiguation). ... Willie Hugh Nelson (born April 30, 1933) is an American singer-songwriter and actor. ... For other persons named Lucinda Williams, see Lucinda Williams (disambiguation). ... Alan Eugene Jackson (born 17 October 1958 in Newnan, Georgia) is an American country singer-songwriter who has sold over 40 million records. ... Norah Jones (born Geethali Norah Jones Shankar on March 30, 1979) is an American singer-songwriter, pianist, keyboardist, guitarist, and occasional actress of Anglo-American and Bengali descent. ...


In April 2008, it was confirmed by Simon & Schuster that Dylan is working on the next volume of his planned three part autobiography, the follow up to Chronicles: Volume One. It may be released by the end of 2008.[241] Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Categories: Wikipedia cleanup | Literature stubs ...


Recent live performances and the Never Ending Tour

Bob Dylan (right on keyboards) at the Roskilde Festival, 2006.
Bob Dylan (right on keyboards) at the Roskilde Festival, 2006.

Dylan has played roughly 100 dates a year for the entirety of the 1990s and the 2000s, a heavier schedule than most performers who started out in the 1960s.[242][243] The "Never Ending Tour" continues, anchored by longtime bassist Tony Garnier and filled out with talented musicians better known to their peers than to their audiences. To the dismay of some fans,[244] Dylan refuses to be a nostalgia act; his reworked arrangements, evolving bands and experimental vocal approaches keep the music unpredictable night after night. Some fans have complained that, as Dylan's vocal range has diminished, he has resorted to a technique they have labelled "upsinging". One critic described the technique as Dylan's "dismantling melodies by delivering phrases in a monotone and ending them an octave higher".[245] The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Bob Dylans Never Ending Tour is a popular term for the rock legends seemingly incessant performing schedule since June 7, 1988. ...


For a two and a half year period, between 2003 and 2006, Dylan ceased playing guitar, and stuck to the keyboard during concerts. Various rumors circulated as to why Dylan gave up guitar during this period, none very reliable. According to David Gates, a Newsweek reporter who interviewed Dylan in 2004, ". . . basically it has to do with his guitar not giving him quite the fullness of sound he was wanting at the bottom. He's thought of hiring a keyboard player so he doesn't have to do it himself, but hasn't been able to figure out who. Most keyboard players, he says, like to be soloists, and he wants a very basic sound."[246] Dylan's touring band has two guitarists along with a multi-instrumentalist who plays steel guitar, mandolin, banjo and fiddle. From 2002 to 2005, Dylan's keyboard had a piano sound. In 2006, this was changed to an organ sound. At the start of his Spring 2007 tour in Europe, Dylan played the first half of the set on electric guitar and switched to keyboard for the second half.[247] The 2008 installment of Dylan's "Never Ending Tour" commenced with performances in Texas, Mexico, and South America in February and March. In May, the next swing of his tour, began in Massachusetts, Maine and Eastern Canada, going on to perform in Iceland, Russia and Europe in May, June and July[248]. The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Bob Dylans Never Ending Tour is a popular term for the rock legends seemingly incessant performing schedule since June 7, 1988. ...


Personal life

Dylan married Sara Lownds on November 22, 1965; their first child, Jesse Byron Dylan, was born on January 6, 1966. Dylan and Lownds had four children: Jesse Byron, Anna Lea, Samuel Isaac Abraham, and Jakob Luke (born December 9, 1969). Dylan also adopted Sara Lownds' daughter from a prior marriage, Maria Lownds (later Dylan), (born October 21, 1961 now married to musician Peter Himmelman). In the 1990s the youngest of his children, Jakob Dylan, became well known as the lead singer of the band The Wallflowers. Jesse Dylan is a film director and a successful businessman. Bob and Sara Dylan were divorced on June 29, 1977[249]. Sara Dylan (born Wilmington, Delaware, USA, October 28, 1939), born as Shirley Marlin Noznisky and later known as Sara Lownds, was the first wife of singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Jesse Dylan, son of musician Bob Dylan, is an American director whose credits include the 2001 Redman comedy How High, the third film in the American Pie trilogy American Wedding (2003), and the 2005 Will Ferrell film Kicking & Screaming. ... Jakob Luke Dylan, born December 9, 1969 in New York City, is best known as the lead singer and songwriter of the rock band The Wallflowers. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ... Jakob Luke Dylan, born December 9, 1969 in New York City, is best known as the lead singer and songwriter of the rock band The Wallflowers. ... The Wallflowers are a Grammy Award-winning rock band from Los Angeles, California. ... Jesse Dylan, son of musician Bob Dylan, is an American director whose credits include the 2001 Redman comedy How High, the third film in the American Pie trilogy American Wedding (2003), and the 2005 Will Ferrell film Kicking & Screaming. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...


In June 1986, Dylan married his longtime backup singer Carolyn Dennis (often professionally known as Carol Dennis).[250] Their daughter, Desiree Gabrielle Dennis-Dylan, was born on January 31, 1986. The couple divorced in October 1992. Their marriage and child remained a closely guarded secret until the publication of Howard Sounes' Dylan biography, Down the Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan in 2001.[251] Carolyn Dennis (born 1954), sometimes professionally known as Carol Dennis or Carol Dennis-Dylan is an African-American singer and actor, best known for her work with, and marriage to Bob Dylan. ... is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Howard Sounes (b. ...


Fan base

Bob Dylan's large and vocal fan base writes books, essays, 'zines, etc. at a furious rate. They also maintain a massive Internet presence with daily Dylan news: a site which documents every song he has ever played in concert; one that documents bootlegs that have been released; and one where visitors bet on what songs he will play on upcoming tours;[252] along with hundreds of other Dylan-themed sites. Within minutes of the end of concerts, set lists and reviews are posted by his loyal following.[253] A zine—an abbreviation of the word fanzine, and originating from the word magazine[1][2]—is most commonly a small circulation, non-commercial publication of original or appropriated texts and images. ...


The Dylan Pool, created in 2001 has been featured on CNN, CBC, BBC, and the Associated Press. The Associated Press reported: "The pool reflects both the obsessive interest Dylan still draws 45 years into his career and the way this road warrior has structured his career."[252] It allows interaction between fans while adding a level of competition through the unique online Bob Dylan fantasy game. In the summer of 2007 the Dylan Pool went offline but some fans, having anticipated this eventuality, launched a new website: The neverending pool.


The poet laureate of England, Andrew Motion, is a vocal supporter of Dylan's work [188], as is literary critic Christopher Ricks[254], and musicians Lou Reed, Bono[255], Neil Young[256], Bruce Springsteen,[257] Tom Petty, The Go-Betweens, David Bowie[258], Bryan Ferry[259], Mike Watt,[260] Roger Waters, Ian Hunter, Paul Simon, David Gilmour, Nick Cave[261], Keith Richards, Patti Smith, Iggy Pop, Jack White, Noel Gallagher, Ronnie Wood, Billy Joel, Glen Hansard, Robyn Hitchcock and Tom Waits [262]. A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... Christopher Ricks (born 1933) is a British literary critic and scholar. ... Lou Reed (born March 2, 1942) is an influential American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... For other uses, see Bono (disambiguation). ... This article is about the musician. ... Springsteen redirects here. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... The Go-Betweens during recording of Oceans Apart: l-r Robert Forster and Grant McLennan The Go-Betweens were an internationally influential indie rock band from Australia, formed by guitarists Robert Forster and Grant McLennan in Brisbane in 1977. ... David Bowie (pronounced ) (born David Robert Jones on 8 January 1947) is an English musician, actor, producer, arranger, and audio engineer. ... Bryan Ferry (born 26 September 1945 in Washington, Tyne and Wear) is an English singer, musician, songwriter and occasional actor famed for his suave visual and vocal style, who came to public prominence in the 1970s as lead vocalist and principal songwriter with Roxy Music, with whom he became well... Michael David Watt (born December 20, 1957 in Portsmouth, Virginia) is a bass guitarist, singer and songwriter, best-known for co-founding the punk rock bands The Minutemen and fIREHOSE; as of 2003, he is also the bassist for the reunited Iggy Pop & The Stooges. ... George Roger Waters (born 6 September 1943) is an English rock musician; singer, bassist, guitarist, songwriter, and composer. ... Ian Hunter (born Ian Hunter Patterson on June 3, 1939 in Oswestry, Shropshire, England) was the lead singer of the band Mott the Hoople from 1969 until the band broke up in 1974. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... For the Canadian writer and television journalist, see David Gilmour (writer), for the jazz guitarist see David Gilmore. ... Nicholas Edward Cave (born 22 September 1957) is an Australian musician, songwriter, author, screenwriter, and occasional actor. ... Keith Richards (born 18 December 1943) is an English guitarist, songwriter, singer, producer and founding member of The Rolling Stones. ... Patricia Lee (Patti) Smith (born December 30, 1946) is an American musician, singer, and poet. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... For other persons named Jack White, see Jack White (disambiguation). ... Noel Thomas David Gallagher (born May 29, 1967 in Longsight, Manchester, England) is an English songwriter, guitarist and occasional vocalist with the Manchester rock band Oasis. ... Ron Wood (born June 1, 1947 in London) is a British rock guitarist and best known as a member of The Rolling Stones and The Faces. ... William Joseph Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American pianist and singer-songwriter. ... Glen Hansard at a music workshop in Uherske Hradiste, Summer film school, July 27, 2005. ... Robyn Rowan Hitchcock (born March 3, 1953) is a singer-songwriter, psych folk artist, and occasional actor. ... Thomas Alan Waits (born December 7, 1949) is an American singer-songwriter, composer, and actor. ...


ISIS Magazine was founded in 1985 and is the longest running publication about Bob Dylan. Edited since its inception by Derek Barker, the magazine, which is published bimonthly, has subscribers in 32 countries.


Discography, film, books

Further information: Bob Dylan discography

// The Concert for Bangla Desh (George Harrison, 1971) - 6 songs Rock of Ages (The Band, 1972) - 4 songs The Last Waltz (The Band, 1978) - 5 songs Postcards of the Hanging (The Grateful Dead, 2002) - 1 song A Musical History (The Band, 2005) - 7 songs Hard To Handle (1986) The 30th...

See also

Lithuanian Jews (known in Yiddish and Haredi English as Litvish (adjective) or Litvaks (noun)) are Ashkenazi Jews with roots in Lita, a region including not only present-day Lithuania but also Latvia, much of Belarus and the northeastern Suwałki region of Poland. ... Susan Elizabeth Rotolo (born November 20, 1943[1]), nicknamed Suze Rotolo (pronounced Suze-ee), is an artist who specializes in artists books and who teaches at the Parsons School of Design in New York City. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... For other uses, see Band. ... This is the list of best selling music artists (including groups) worldwide, alltime. ... The Traveling Wilburys were a supergroup consisting of George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. ... Sara Dylan (born Wilmington, Delaware, USA, October 28, 1939), born as Shirley Marlin Noznisky and later known as Sara Lownds, was the first wife of singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Jesse Dylan, son of musician Bob Dylan, is an American director whose credits include the 2001 Redman comedy How High, the third film in the American Pie trilogy American Wedding (2003), and the 2005 Will Ferrell film Kicking & Screaming. ... Jakob Luke Dylan, born December 9, 1969 in New York City, is best known as the lead singer and songwriter of the rock band The Wallflowers. ... The Wallflowers are a Grammy Award-winning rock band from Los Angeles, California. ... Carolyn Dennis (born 1954), sometimes professionally known as Carol Dennis or Carol Dennis-Dylan is an African-American singer and actor, best known for her work with, and marriage to Bob Dylan. ... Woodstock 94 poster design Woodstock 94 is a rock concert that was held in order to celebrate the 25th anniversary of the original Woodstock concert of 1969. ... A protest song is a song which protests perceived problems in society and with world conflicts. ...

Notes

  1. ^ "Dylan 'reveals origin of anthem'", BBC news, 2004-04-11. Retrieved on 2006-08-04. 
  2. ^ "Dylan back on top at 65", ABC News, 2006-09-07. Retrieved on 2007-05-29. 
  3. ^ "The Top 50 Albums of The Year", Rolling Stone, 2006-12-11. Retrieved on 2007-09-13. 
  4. ^ "Love and Theft". Entertainment Weekly (2001-10-01).
  5. ^ "Intelligence Data: Bob Dylan's Love & Theft", The Village Voice, 2001-10-01. 
  6. ^ "Bob Dylan by Jay Cocks", Time magazine, 1999-06-04. Retrieved on 2006-08-10. 
  7. ^ Bob Dylan. Robbie Robertson. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  8. ^ Polar Music Prize, 2000. Polar Music Prize (2000-05-01).
  9. ^ "Dylan Formally Launched as Candidate for Nobel Prize", Expecting Rain, 1996-10-01. Retrieved on 2006-10-17. 
  10. ^ Dylan and the Nobel by Gordon Ball. Journal of Oral Tradition (2007-03-07). Retrieved on 2007-07-22.
  11. ^ "Dylan's Words Strike Nobel Debate", CBS News, 2004-10-06. Retrieved on 2006-10-17. 
  12. ^ The Pulitzer Prize Winners: Special Citation. Pulitzer.org (2008-04-07).
  13. ^ "Bob Dylan wins Pulitzer prize". news.com.au (2008-04-07).
  14. ^ Singer/Songwriter Bob Dylan Joins Yom Kippur Services in Atlanta. chabad. Retrieved on 2007-11-07.
  15. ^ but see Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.14, who gives his Hebrew name as Shabtai Zisel ben Avraham and other sources which include the matronym v'Rachel Riva
  16. ^ Bob Dylan. Retrieved on 2007-07-17.
  17. ^ a b Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.12-13
  18. ^ Dylan, Bob (2004). "Chronicles, Volume One". Simon & Schuster, 92–93. ISBN 0306812312. 
  19. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 25–33
  20. ^ Gill (with Kevin Odegard), Andy (2004). "A Simple Twist of Fate: Bob Dylan and the Making of Blood on the Tracks". Da Capo, 99. ISBN 0743230760. 
  21. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 38–39.
  22. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 29–37
  23. ^ "Early Zimmerman bands in 1950s including 1957 photo", Expecting Rain, 2007-04-01. Retrieved on 2007-03-01. 
  24. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 39–43.
  25. ^ "Gunnn, Elston", Expecting Rain, 2007-04-01. Retrieved on 2007-03-21. 
  26. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 26–27.
  27. ^ Playboy interview with Bob Dylan, March 1978
  28. ^ a b Biograph (album), 1985, Liner notes & text by Cameron Crowe.
  29. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 65–82
  30. ^ a b No Direction Home. Paramount Pictures. Directed by Martin Scorsese. Released July 21, 2005.
  31. ^ Dylan, Chronicles, Vol. 1, 78–79.
  32. ^ Dylan, Chronicles, Vol. 1, 250–252.
  33. ^ American Masters (2006 Season) — "No Direction Home: Bob Dylan" Timeline. Thirteen WNET New York. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  34. ^ a b Bob Dylan's Duets. Flying Pig. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  35. ^ TRANSCRIPTION OF RIVERSIDE CHURCH FOLK MUSIC HOOTENANNY, WRVR-FM, NEW YORK, NY, Jul 29, 1961. bobdylanroots.com.
  36. ^ Shelton, Robert. "BOB DYLAN: A DISTINCTIVE STYLIST", The New York Times, 1961-09-29. Retrieved on 2006-08-04. 
  37. ^ Unterberger, Richie. [1], "allmusic". Accessed June 30, 2007.
  38. ^ Scaduto, Bob Dylan, 110
  39. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 283–4
  40. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 115-116.
  41. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 138–142
  42. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 156
  43. ^ Scaduto, Bob Dylan, 35
  44. ^ Mojo magazine, December 1993
  45. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 101–103
  46. ^ Ricks, Dylan's Visions of Sin, 329–44.
  47. ^ Biograph (album), 1985, Liner notes & text by Cameron Crowe. Musicians on 'Mixed Up Confusion': George Barnes & Bruce Langhorne (guitars); Dick Wellstood (piano); Gene Ramey (bass); Herb Lovelle (drums)
  48. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 108–111
  49. ^ Joan Baez entry, Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 28–31
  50. ^ Dylan performed Only a Pawn in Their Game and When the Ship Comes In
  51. ^ "Dylan in the Madhouse". Retrieved on 2006-08-04. 
  52. ^ Dylan had recorded the song for his Freewheelin' album, but the song was replaced by later compositions, including "Masters of War". see Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 114–115
  53. ^ Ricks, Dylan's Visions of Sin, 221–233
  54. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 200–205
  55. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 160–161 Ramblin' Jack Elliott sang harmony on the Another Side of Bob Dylan version of Mr. Tambourine Man.
  56. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 172–173.
  57. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 173.
  58. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 267–271, 288–291
  59. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 178–181
  60. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 181–182
  61. ^ Gill, My Back Pages, 68–69
  62. ^ Marqusee, Wicked Messenger, 144
  63. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 208–216
  64. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, 305–314
  65. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 186
  66. ^ Georgina Boyes: The Imagined Village: Culture, ideology and the English Folk Revival
  67. ^ Greil Marcus: The Old, Weird America, 28
  68. ^ Alan Jacobs: “The Songs Are My Lexicon” http://www.bobdylan.com/etc/ajacobs.html
  69. ^ Nat Hentoff, quoted in The Playboy Interview, March 1966; quoted in the Ralph J. Gleason interview, Ramparts, March 1966
  70. ^ Springsteen’s speech on Dylan’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, January 20, 1988. Quoted in Wanted Man, edited John Bauldie, p.191
  71. ^ "Like a Rolling Stone", Rolling Stone. Retrieved on 2006-08-04. 
  72. ^ Gill, My Back Pages, 93–95
  73. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 189–90
  74. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 238–243
  75. ^ Gill, My Back Pages, 95
  76. ^ Marqusee, Wicked Messenger, 139
  77. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.393
  78. ^ Shelton, No Direction Home, p.325
  79. ^ Dylan's dialogue with the Manchester audience is recorded (with subtitles) in Scorsese's documentary No Direction Home.
  80. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.215
  81. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.219
  82. ^ Cott (ed.), Dylan on Dylan: The Essential Interviews, p.300, reprinted from Rolling Stone, June 21, 1984.
  83. ^ "The Bob Dylan Motorcycle-Crash Mystery". American Heritage (2006-07-29). Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  84. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.218
  85. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, p.216
  86. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 222–5
  87. ^ Marcus, The Old, Weird America, 236-265
  88. ^ Marcus, The Old, Weird America, xvi
  89. ^ Marcus, The Old, Weird America, 86
  90. ^ Marcus, The Old, Weird America, 87
  91. ^ Bob Dylan's 1967 recording sessions. Bjorner's Still On the Road. Retrieved on 2007-12-09.
  92. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 282–288
  93. ^ Trager, Oliver. Keys to the Rain, the Definitive Bob Dylan Encyclopedia. Billboard Books, 2004. (ISBN 0-8230-7974-0)
  94. ^ RAB Hall of Fame: Carl Perkins. Rockabilly Hall of Fame. Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  95. ^ On Top - Carl Perkins. AOL Music. Retrieved on 2007-01-18.
  96. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 248–253
  97. ^ Earl Scruggs (and Lester Flatt). bobdylanroots.com.
  98. ^ http://www.bjorner.com/DSN01885%201971.htm#DSN01960 |the Bob Dylan Recording Sessions 1971
  99. ^ http://www.bjorner.com/DSN01885%201971.htm#DSN01960 |the Bob Dylan Recording Sessions 1971
  100. ^ The Ginsberg/Dylan sessions. University of Oslo. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  101. ^ Vomit Express. Dylanchords. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  102. ^ "Time magazine, May 31, 1971", Time magazine, 1971-05-31. 
  103. ^ "The Wandering Kind by Douglas Wolk", Nextbook, a new read on Jewish culture, 2007-11-21. 
  104. ^ "Bob Dylan cover versions", Bjorner.com, 2002-04-16. Retrieved on 2006-09-01. 
  105. ^ Ricks, Dylan's Visions of Sin, 453
  106. ^ Dylan's comment in booklet notes to Biograph.
  107. ^ Log of performances of Forever Young. Bjorner's Still on the Road (August 20, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-08-22.
  108. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 354.
  109. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 358
  110. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 368–383
  111. ^ "Bob Dylan", Salon.com, May 5, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-08-21. 
  112. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 368–387
  113. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 59–61
  114. ^ "Log of every performance of Hurricane", Bjorner's Still on the Road, August 20, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-08-22. 
  115. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 579
  116. ^ Shepard, Rolling Thunder Logbook, 2–49
  117. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 386–401
  118. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 408
  119. ^ Mr D's Apocrypha. Flying Pig. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  120. ^ Maslin, Janet. "Renaldo and Clara Film by Bob Dylan", The New York Times, January 22, 1978. Retrieved on 2006-08-05. 
  121. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 313
  122. ^ Last Waltz, The (re-release). MetaCritic.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  123. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 643
  124. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 480–1
  125. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 323–337, Interview with Assistant Pastor Bill Dwyer, Vineyard Church
  126. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 490–526, Interview with Pastor Kenn Gulliksen, Vineyard Church
  127. ^ "Karen Hughes interview with Bob Dylan, May 1980", The Dominion (NZ), 2 August 1980. 
  128. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 494
  129. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 76–80
  130. ^ "Extract from interview with Pastor Larry Myers", Interview from On The Tracks, Issue No.4, Fall 1994. Retrieved on 2007-04-23. 
  131. ^ Bob Dylan's Saved. Rolling Stone (1980-09-18).
  132. ^ Still On The Road, 1980 Second Gospel Tour (January 25, 1980). Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  133. ^ Cott (ed.), Dylan on Dylan: The Essential Interviews, 279–285
  134. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 334–6
  135. ^ "'Serve Yourself' - Reply song to Bob Dylan", John Lennon Museum. 
  136. ^ Stephen, Holden. "Rock: Dylan, in Jersey, Revises Old Standbys", The New York Times, 1981-10-29, p. c19. 
  137. ^ "Slow Train Coming", Rolling Stone, 1979-09-20. Retrieved on 2006-09-11. 
  138. ^ Kawowski, Arthur (2001-09-01). Bob Dylan's Dilemma: Which blonde. Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  139. ^ Fishkoff, The Rebbe's Army: Inside the World of Chabad-Lubavitch, 167
  140. ^ Shmais, News Service. "Bob Dylan @ Yom Kippur davening with Chabad in Long Island", Shmais News Service, 2005-10-13. 
  141. ^ Sheva, Arutz. "Day of Atonement Draws Dylan to the Torah", Arutz Sheva -- Israel National News, 2007-09-24. 
  142. ^ Newsweek magazine, October 6, 1997
  143. ^ Pareles, Jon. "A Wiser Voice Blowin' In the Autumn Wind", The New York Times, 1997-09-28. 
  144. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 215–221
  145. ^ Gray, Song & Dance Man III: The Art of Bob Dylan, 11–14
  146. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 56–59
  147. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 354–6
  148. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 365–7
  149. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 63
  150. ^ Dylan, Chronicles, Vol. 1, 219
  151. ^ Knocked Out Loaded review. Rolling Stone (1986-11-09).
  152. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 595–595.
  153. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 95-100
  154. ^ Knocked Out Loaded analysis. Weebly.com.
  155. ^ Hard To Handle. IMDb.com.
  156. ^ Dylan & The Dead. All Music Guide.
  157. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 599–604
  158. ^ Bruce Springsteen on Bob Dylan. The Columbia World of Quotations. Bartleby.com.
  159. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 387–8
  160. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 515
  161. ^ Dylan, Chronicles, Vol. 1, 145–221
  162. ^ Ricks, Dylan's Visions of Sin, 413–20
  163. ^ Marshall, Restless Pilgrim, 103
  164. ^ "Biography of Carolyn Dennis", IMDb.com. Retrieved on 2006-09-06. 
  165. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 391
  166. ^ .[2]
  167. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 423
  168. ^ Dylan performance, Woodstock '94, August 14, 1994. Bjorner's Still on the Road (1994-08-14).
  169. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 408–9
  170. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited, 693
  171. ^ How Dylan's Time Out of Mind Survived Stormy Studio Sessions. www.gibson.com (2008-01-02).
  172. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 420
  173. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 426
  174. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 426–9
  175. ^ "Remarks by the President at Kennedy Center Honors Reception", Clinton White House, 1997-12-7. Retrieved on 2006-08-23. 
  176. ^ Paradise Cove (1999). IMDb. Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  177. ^ "Dylan Tours Australia with Oscar", Undercover, Australia, 2007-08-20. 
  178. ^ "It is, deliberately and liberatingly, the album of an old bloke in his garden shed. It is Highway 61 Revisited on a bus pass: one of the 10 albums you'd have to rescue if God were determined to destroy all the rest". Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 428
  179. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 556–7
  180. ^ "Love and Theft". MetaCritic.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  181. ^ ""Love and Theft"", Entertainment Weekly, 2001-10-01. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  182. ^ "Intelligence Data: Bob Dylan's Love & Theft", The Village Voice, 2001-10-01. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  183. ^ "Did Bob Dylan Lift Lines From Dr Saga?", Wall Street Journal, 2003-07-08. Retrieved on 2006-09-22. 
  184. ^ Björner, Olof. Bob Dylan live bootlegs. Expecting Rain. Retrieved on 2007-11-25.
  185. ^ Full Cast and Crew for Masked and Anonymous. IMDB. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  186. ^ Masked & Anonymous. Metacritic.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  187. ^ Masked & Anonymous. The New Yorker (2003-07-24). Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  188. ^ a b Motion, Andrew. Masked and Anonymous. Sony Classics. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  189. ^ "Dylan receives honorary degree", BBC News, 2004-06-23. Retrieved on 2007-07-13. 
  190. ^ Heylin, Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades The Biography, 208.
  191. ^ a b Maslin, Janet (2004-10-05). So You Thought You Knew Dylan? Hah! 2. The New York Times. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  192. ^ Taylor, Charles (2004-10-08). Chronicles, Volume 1 3. Salon.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  193. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 136–8
  194. ^ No Direction Home: Bob Dylan A Martin Scorsese Picture. PBS. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  195. ^ Columbia-duPont Award Winners, 2007. The Journalism School, Columbia University. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  196. ^ "The Genius of Bob Dylan", Rolling Stone, 2006-08-21. Retrieved on 2006-09-11. 
  197. ^ "Bob Dylan's "Modern Times"", The Guardian, 2006-08-28. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  198. ^ ""Modern Times"", Metacritic. Retrieved on 2006-09-05. 
  199. ^ John Harris, Mojo magazine, October 2006, p 94
  200. ^ "Modern Times, Album of the Year, 2006", Rolling Stone, 2006-12-16. 
  201. ^ "Modern Times, Album of the Year, 2006", Uncut, 2006-12-16. 
  202. ^ ""Who’s This Guy Dylan Who’s Borrowing Lines From Henry Timrod?"", The New York Times, 2006-09-14. Retrieved on 2006-09-19. 
  203. ^ ""The Ballad of Henry Timrod", The New York Times, 2006-09-17. Retrieved on 2006-09-20. 
  204. ^ ""The Answer, My Friend, Is Borrowin’ ... (3 Letters)", The New York Times, 2006-09-20. Retrieved on 2006-09-20. 
  205. ^ "Bob Dylan: Henry Timrod Revisited", The Poetry Foundation, 2006-10-10. Retrieved on 2006-10-11. 
  206. ^ "XM Theme Time Radio Hour", XM Satellite Radio. Retrieved on 2007-01-21. 
  207. ^ "Theme Time Radio playlists", Not Dark Yet. Retrieved on 2006-10-18. 
  208. ^ "Bob Dylan in Baseball Hall of Fame", Washington Post, 2006-06-28. 
  209. ^ "The Joys of Dylan the DJ", The Telegraph, Nashua NH, 2007-11-11. 
  210. ^ "The Great Sound of Radio Bob", The Observer, 2006-12-31. Retrieved on 2007-01-21. 
  211. ^ "Dylan Spinnin' Those Coool Records", New Critics, 2007-02-16. Retrieved on 2007-02-18. 
  212. ^ "The Joys of Dylan the DJ", The Telegraph, Nashua NH, 2007-11-11. Retrieved on 2007-11-11. 
  213. ^ "Season Two of Dylan's Award Winning Radio Show", P R Newswire, 2007-04-18. Retrieved on 2007-04-19. 
  214. ^ "TTRH Playlists as per Year of Release", Expecting Rain, 2007-04-18. Retrieved on 2007-04-19. 
  215. ^ "Haynes' Dylan Stories Stir Telluride", Indie Wire, 2006-09-01. 
  216. ^ "Blanchett wins top Venice award", BBC news, 2007-09-09. 
  217. ^ "I'm Not There", Variety, 2007-09-04. 
  218. ^ "The Lives of Others: Haynes' anti-biopic is about "Bob Dylan", not Bob Dylan", Film Society of Lincoln Centre, 2007-09-05. 
  219. ^ I'm Not There (2007). IMDb. Retrieved on 2007-06-16.
  220. ^ Dylan Director Comes Clean. Mojo. Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  221. ^ Marcus, The Old, Weird America, 198-204, Marcus writes: "There is nothing like ‘I’m Not There’ in the rest of the basement recordings, or anywhere else in Bob Dylan’s career. Very quickly the listener is drawn into the sickly embrace of the music, its wash of half-heard, half-formed words and the increasing bitterness and despair behind them. Words are floated together in a dyslexia that is music itself – a dyslexia that seems to prove the claims of music over words, to see just how little words can achieve."
  222. ^ "Dylan covered by... very long list.", Uncut, 2007-10-01. 
  223. ^ Haynes in Weinstein Company press notes for "I'm Not There", quoted in Footnote fetishism & "I'm Not There" by Jim Emerson. Jim Emerson's scanners::blog (2007-10-10).
  224. ^ "Dylan 07", Sony BMG Music Entertainment, 2007-08-01. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  225. ^ "A Zombie on Halloween", The Scotsman, 2007-09-08. 
  226. ^ What's Bob Dylan Doing In A Victoria's Secret Ad?. Slate (2004-04-12).
  227. ^ Dylan, Cadillac. XM Radio (2007-10-22).
  228. ^ Dylan had first sung about this car in his 1963 nuclear war fantasy, “Talkin’ World War III Blues”, when he described it as a “good car to drive – after a war”.
  229. ^ "Dylan projects are blowin’ in", USA Today, 2007-09-06. 
  230. ^ "Dylan's drawings to go on display - alongside Picasso's", The Independent, 2007-08-10. 
  231. ^ "Bob Dylan and Chemnitz", Chemnitz, 2007-10-01. 
  232. ^ "Dylan Goes On Show", Sky News, 2007-10-22. 
  233. ^ The Drawn Blank Series. Prestel Verlag (2007-10-31).
  234. ^ "Dylan reworks "Hard Rain's" for Spanish expo", Reuters. Retrieved on 2007-11-24. 
  235. ^ Expo Zaragoza 2008. Expo web site. Retrieved on 2007-12-02.
  236. ^ Dylan's Annotated Starbucks CD. All Along the Watchtower. Retrieved on 2008-02-21.
  237. ^ Richard Williams. Ace Records. The Guardian.
  238. ^ Jack White, Bob Dylan Rework Hank Williams Lyrics. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  239. ^ Dylan gets Jack White to bring Hank Williams to life. guardian News and Media Ltd..
  240. ^ Dylan, Jack White, others finish Hank songs. Retrieved on 2007-11-19.
  241. ^ Bob Dylan Begins 'Chronicles: Volume 2'
  242. ^ Muir, Razor's Edge, 7–10
  243. ^ "Log of every Dylan performance, 1958 to Today", Bjorner's Still on the Road, 2006-08-20. Retrieved on 2006-08-22. 
  244. ^ Mark Ellen argues with Andy Kershaw about the merits of Dylan's current live performances on BBC Radio FourThat Dylan Argument In Full. The Word. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  245. ^ ""Dylan and fans ageing gracefully" by Mike Doherty", National Post, 2006-11-08. Retrieved on 2007-09-05. 
  246. ^ ""Another Look at Bob Dylan" by David Gates", Newsweek, 2004-10-29. Retrieved on 2006-09-06. 
  247. ^ "March 27, 2007, Stockholm, Sweden", Bob Links. Retrieved on 2007-03-30. 
  248. ^ 2008 Tour Guide. Bob Links.com (2008-04-07).
  249. ^ Gray, The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia, 198–200
  250. ^ Sounes, Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan, 372–3
  251. ^ "Dylan's Secret Marriage Uncovered", BBC news, 2001-04-12. Retrieved on 2007-06-20. 
  252. ^ a b Bauder, David. "Game Plays on Dylan's Unpredictability", Associated Press. Retrieved on 2006-08-04. 
  253. ^ Muir, Razor's Edge, 22–25
  254. ^ Author of Dylan's Visions of Sin, Viking Books, 2003
  255. ^ Bono Interviews Bob Dylan, July 8, 1984. 'Hot Press' Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-10-26.
  256. ^ Bob Dylan & Neil Young. Thrasher's Wheat - A Neil Young Archive. Retrieved on 2007-09-02.
  257. ^ Bruce Springsteen on Bob Dylan. The Columbia World of Quotations. Bartleby.com. Retrieved on 2006-08-04.
  258. ^ Song for Bob Dylan on the album Hunky Dory, David Bowie, 1971
  259. ^ In 2007, Ferry released an album of his versions of Dylan songs, Dylanesque
  260. ^ "Bob Dylan Wrote Propaganda Songs" on The Minutemen's What Makes A Man Start Fires?, SST Records, 1982
  261. ^ Nick Cave and Bob Dylan. Maurice Maes. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  262. ^ Tom Waits on his cherished albums of all time. Observer Music Monthly. Retrieved on 2007-01-08.

Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 101st day of the year (102nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 203rd day of the year (204th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-François Millet Le Semeur (The Sower) Simon & Schuster logo, circa 1961. ... Andy Gill is the guitarist for the British rock group Gang of Four. ... Da Capo is a musical term in Italian, meaning from the beginning, often abbreviated D.C.. It is a composer or publishers directive to repeat the previous part of music. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... Paramount Pictures Corporation is an American motion picture production and distribution company, based in Hollywood, California. ... Martin Marcantonio Luciano Scorsese (IPA: AmE: ; Ita: []) (b. ... is the 202nd day of the year (203rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Anthony Scaduto is a journalist and biographer of rock musicians. ... Anthony Scaduto is a journalist and biographer of rock musicians. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ... Cameron Bruce Crowe (born July 13, 1957) is an Academy Award winning American writer and film director. ... Bruce Langhorne is an American folk musician. ... Only a Pawn in their Game is a song written by Bob Dylan about the assassins of civil rights activist Medgar Evers. ... When the Ship Comes In is a song by Bob Dylan, released on his 3rd studio album The Times They Are a-Changin in 1964. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Freewheelin Bob Dylan is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans second studio album, released in 1963 by Columbia Records. ... Masters of War is a song by Bob Dylan, written in 1963 and released on the album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... Ramblin Jack Elliott Ramblin Jack Elliot (born Elliott Charles Adnopoz, August 1, 1931) is an American folk performer. ... Another Side of Bob Dylan is Bob Dylans 4th studio album, released in 1964 by Columbia Records. ... Mr. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 210th day of the year (211th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar, known as the year of cyclohexanol. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Highway 61 Revisited is Bob Dylans sixth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 291st day of the year (292nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 328th day of the year (329th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... BBC Radio 4 is a British domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of chiefly spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 89th day of the year (90th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (98th in leap years). ... This article is about the year. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 216th day of the year (217th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Song for Bob Dylan is a song written by David Bowie in 1971 for the album Hunky Dory. ... Hunky Dory is the fourth album by English singer-songwriter David Bowie, released by RCA Records in 1971. ... Dylanesque is a covers album by the legendary Bryan Ferry. ... What Makes a Man Start Fires? is the second full-length album and fifth release overall by influential punk/alternative power trio The Minutemen. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Bjorner, Olof (2002). Olof's Files: A Bob Dylan Performance Guide (Bob Dylan all alone on a shelf). Hardinge Simpole. ISBN 184382020X. 
  • Bauldie (ed.), John (1992). Wanted Man: In Search of Bob Dylan. Penguin Books. ISBN 0140153616. 
  • Cott (ed.), Jonathan (2006). Dylan on Dylan: The Essential Interviews. Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN 0340923121. 
  • Dylan, Bob (2004). Chronicles: Volume One. Simon and Schuster. ISBN 0-7432-2815-4. 
  • Fishkoff, Sue (2003). The Rebbe's Army: Inside the World of Chabad-Lubavitch. Schocken Books. ISBN 0805211381. 
  • Gill, Andy (1999). Classic Bob Dylan: My Back Pages. Carlton. ISBN 1-85868-599-0. 
  • Gray, Michael (2000). Song & Dance Man III: The Art of Bob Dylan. Continuum International. ISBN 0-8264-5150-0. 
  • Gray, Michael (2006). The Bob Dylan Encyclopedia. Continuum International. ISBN 0-8264-6933-7. 
  • Harvey, Todd (2001). The Formative Dylan: Transmission & Stylistic Influences, 1961–1963. The Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0-8108-4115-0. 
  • Heylin, Clinton (2003). Bob Dylan: Behind the Shades Revisited. Perennial Currents. ISBN 0-06-052569-X. 
  • Marcus, Greil (2001). The Old, Weird America: The World of Bob Dylan's Basement Tapes. Picador. ISBN 0-312-42043-9. 
  • Marqusee, Mike (2005). Wicked Messenger: Bob Dylan and the 1960s. Seven Stories Press. ISBN 1-58322-686-9. 
  • Marshall, Scott (2002). Restless Pilgrim: The Spiritual Journey of Bob Dylan. Relevant Books. ISBN 0-9714576-2-X. 
  • Muir, Andrew (2001). Razor's Edge: Bob Dylan & the Never Ending Tour. Helter Skelter. ISBN 1-900924-13-7. 
  • Ricks, Christopher (2003). Dylan's Visions of Sin. Penguin/Viking. ISBN 0-670-80133-X. 
  • Scaduto, Anthony. Bob Dylan. Helter Skelter, 2001 reprint of 1972 original. ISBN 1-900924-23-4. 
  • Robert Shelton, No Direction Home, Da Capo Press, 2003 reprint of 1986 original, 576 pages. ISBN 0-306-81287-8
  • Sam Shepard, Rolling Thunder Logbook, Da Capo, 2004 reissue, 176 pages. ISBN 0-306-81371-8
  • Sounes, Howard (2001). Down The Highway: The Life Of Bob Dylan. Grove Press. ISBN 0-8021-1686-8. 
  • Bob Dylan. Robbie Robertson. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.
  • The Immortals: The First Fifty. Rolling Stone Issue 946. Rolling Stone.

Robert Shelton (June 28, 1926, Chicago, Illinois, United States – December 11, 1995, Brighton, England) was a music and film critic. ... Sam Shepard (born November 5, 1943) is a unique American artist whose talents have been expressed in many different areas. ...

Further reading

  • Gilmore, Michael T. Tangled Up in the Bible: Bob Dylan and Scripture, Continuum, 2004, 160 pages. ISBN 0-8264-1602-0
  • Hajdu, David Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina, and Richard Farina Farrar Straus Giroux, 2001, 328 pages. ISBN 0-374-28199-8
  • Heylin Clinton, Bob Dylan: A Life In Stolen Moments, Schirmer Books, 1986, 403 pages. ISBN 0-8256-7156-6. Also known as Bob Dylan: Day By Day
  • Heylin, Clinton, Bob Dylan: The Recording Sessions, 1960-1994. New York: St Martin's Press, 1995.
  • Hinchey John, Like a Complete Unknown: The Poetry of Bob Dylan’s Songs, 1961–1966. Stealing Home Press, 2002. 277 pages. ISBN 0-9723592-0-6
  • Greil Marcus, Like a Rolling Stone: Bob Dylan at the Crossroads, PublicAffairs, 2005. ISBN 1-58648-254-8
  • Mellers Wilfrid, A Darker Shade Of Pale: A Backdrop To Bob Dylan Oxford University Press, 1985, 255 pages. ISBN 0-19-503622-0
  • Porter, Carl and Peter Vernezze (editors), Bob Dylan and Philosophy, Open Court Books, 2005, 225 pages. ISBN 0-8126-9592-5
  • Riley, Tim Hard Rain: A Dylan Commentary, Vintage, 1992, 356 pages. ISBN 0-679-74527-0
  • Varesi Anthony, The Bob Dylan Albums, Guernica Editions, 2002, 264 pages. ISBN 1-55071-139-3
  • Webb, Stephen H. "Dylan Redeemed: From Highway 61 to Saved." Continuum Publishers. 2006
  • Williams, Paul, Bob Dylan, Performing Artist: The Early Years, 1960–1973. New York Omnibus Press, 1990.
  • Williams, Paul, Bob Dylan, Performing Artist: The Middle Years, 1974–1986. New York: Omnibus Press, 1992.
  • Williams, Paul, Bob Dylan, Performing Artist: Mind Out of Time, 1986 to 1990 and Beyond. New York: Omnibus Press, 2004.

Greil Marcus (2006) Greil Marcus (born 1945) is an American author, music journalist and cultural critic. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Bob Dylan
Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Bob Dylan
  • BobDylan.com — Official web site, including lyrics
  • Expecting Rain — Dylan news and events, updated daily
  • BobLinks — Comprehensive log of concerts & set lists with categorized link collection
  • Still on the Road — Information on all known recording sessions by Bob Dylan
  • Bob Dylan at the Internet Movie Database
  • Bob Dylan: Tangled up in Jews — Information on Bob Dylan's evolving Jewish identity, by Larry Yudelson.
  • Bob Dylan Collection — Hibbing, MN public library collection of Bob Dylan memorabilia
  • RightWingBob.com — General commentary on the political and moral themes in Dylan's work, by Sean Curnyn
  • Come Writers And Critics — A list of books, magazines, fanzines, and songbooks published in the world about Bob Dylan
  • Songs that Inspired Bob Dylan — A two-hour internet-radio show playing old songs Bob Dylan has used to base his own compositions
  • "Bob Dylan’s American Journey, 1956-1966" - traveling museum exhibition at Morgan Library, from Experience Music Project, Seattle.
  • The Bob Dylan Ticket Stub & Concert Poster Archive — Scans and photos of thousands of ticket stubs and concert posters
  • The Jewish Bob Dylan — Bernard Timberg analyzes the songs of Bob Dylan looking for Jewish themes and imagery, 1972
Persondata
NAME Dylan, Bob
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Zimmerman, Robert Allen (birth name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Rock and folk musician
DATE OF BIRTH May 24, 1941
PLACE OF BIRTH Duluth, Minnesota
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Larry Yudelson, also known by his pen name Reb Yudel, is editorial director and owner of Ben Yehuda Press, a specialty publisher of Jewish religious texts. ... Bob Dylan is the eponymous debut album from American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... The Freewheelin Bob Dylan is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans second studio album, released in 1963 by Columbia Records. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Another Side of Bob Dylan is Bob Dylans 4th studio album, released in 1964 by Columbia Records. ... Bringing It All Back Home is Bob Dylans fifth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... Highway 61 Revisited is Bob Dylans sixth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... John Wesley Harding is an album of original songs by Bob Dylan, produced by Bob Johnston and released on December 27, 1967. ... Nashville Skyline is an album by Bob Dylan, released in 1969. ... Self-portrait by Vincent Van Gogh A portrait is a painting, photograph, or other artistic representation of a person. ... New Morning was released in October 1970 by Bob Dylan, only four months after the controversial Self Portrait. ... Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid is a soundtrack album released by Bob Dylan in 1973 for the Sam Peckinpah film of the same name. ... Dylan (known as A Fool Such as I in Europe) is rock musician Bob Dylans 13th studio album, released by Columbia Records in 1973. ... Planet Waves (1974) is an album by Bob Dylan, and was recorded with The Band at Village Recorder in Los Angeles during three different sessions in November 1973. ... Blood on the Tracks is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 15th studio album, released in 1975 by Columbia Records, which marked Dylans return to Columbia after a two-album stint with Asylum Records. ... The Basement Tapes are a series of recordings by North American folk-rockers Bob Dylan and The Band, recorded in mid-1967. ... Desire is an album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan, released on the Columbia Records label in 1976. ... Street Legal, a rock album, was released by Bob Dylan on June 15, 1978. ... Slow Train Coming is singer-songwriter Bob Dylans 19th studio album, released in 1979 by Columbia Records. ... Saved was Bob Dylans first album of the 1980s, and his 24th overall. ... Shot of Love is Bob Dylans 21st studio album, released by Columbia Records in 1981. ... ‹The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Empire Burlesque is Bob Dylans 23rd studio album, released in 1985 on Columbia Records. ... Knocked Out Loaded is a 1986 album release by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... // Down in the Groove Down in the Groove is a 1988 album release by Bob Dylan. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Under the Red Sky is a 1990 album by American singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... Good as I Been to You is a traditional folk music album made by Bob Dylan in 1992. ... World Gone Wrong is the twenty-ninth studio album (according to the list below)by Bob Dylan, released in 1993 by Columbia Records. ... Time Out of Mind is Bob Dylans critically-acclaimed comeback album, released in 1997. ... Love and Theft is an album by Bob Dylan, released in 2001. ... Modern Times is Bob Dylans 32nd studio album, released on August 29, 2006 by Sony BMG. The album was Dylans third straight (following Time out of Mind and Love and Theft) to be met with nearly universal praise from fans and critics. ... Alternate cover Cover of the 2005 remaster of The Concert for Bangla Desh The Concert For Bangla Desh is a live triple album and double DVD by George Harrison and celebrity friends performed in aid of the homeless Bengali refugees of the 1971 Bangladesh Liberation War. ... Before the Flood is the title of a 1974 live album by Bob Dylan and The Band. ... Hard Rain is a live album by American musician Bob Dylan, captured during the second leg of the Rolling Thunder Revue. ... Bob Dylan At Budokan is an audio recording taken from two different shows on February 28 and March 1, 1978. ... Real Live is a live album by Bob Dylan. ... Dylan & The Dead is a collaborative live album by Bob Dylan and The Grateful Dead, released in 1989 by Columbia Records. ... The 30th Anniversary Concert Celebration is a live double-album release in recognition of Bob Dylans 30 years as a recording artist. ... MTV Unplugged is Bob Dylans 1995 unplugged release, recorded and issued at the peak of that formats popularity. ... Live at The Gaslight 1962 is a single CD release including ten songs from early Bob Dylan performances at the Gaslight cafe in New York Citys Greenwich Village. ... Live at Carnegie Hall 1963 is a six-song live set by Bob Dylan. ... The Traveling Wilburys were a supergroup consisting of George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... The Traveling Wilburys Collection is a 2007 box set compilation album comprising both albums by the Traveling Wilburys, a DVD with their videos and a documentary about the group. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits (1967) was the first compilation album released by Bob Dylan. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits Vol. ... Masterpieces was released in Japan and Australia in anticipation for Bob Dylans 1978 tour. ... Biograph is a collection of Bob Dylan tracks, both rare and popular, that was released in 1985. ... Bob Dylans Greatest Hits Volume 3 is the third official compliation album by Bob Dylan, released in 1994. ... The Essential Bob Dylan is the fourth official compilation by Bob Dylan, released as a double-CD set in 2000. ... Dylan is a 2007 compilation album by Bob Dylan. ... The Bootleg Series Volumes 1–3 (Rare & Unreleased) 1961–1991 is a compilation box set by Bob Dylan. ... The electric Dylan controversy was the incident at the Newport Folk Festival on Sunday July 25, 1965, where folk singer Bob Dylan went electric, by playing with an electric blues band in concert for the first time. ... This article is about the concert and film. ... The Bob Dylan the The Band 1974 Tour was a two-month concert tour in early 1974 that featured Bob Dylan, in his first real tour in eight years, performing with The Band, who as The Hawks had once been his little-known backing band. ... Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Eric Anderson in October 1975 The Rolling Thunder Revue was a tour headed by Bob Dylan in the fall of 1975 and the spring of 1976. ... Bob Dylans Never Ending Tour is a popular term for the rock legends seemingly incessant performing schedule since June 7, 1988. ... Dont Look Back (sic) is a 1967 documentary film by D.A. Pennebaker that covers Bob Dylans 1965 concert tour of England. ... Eat the Document is a rarely exhibited documentary of Bob Dylans 1966 tour of England with the Hawks. ... Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid is a 1973 film directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring James Coburn and Kris Kristofferson. ... Renaldo and Clara is a surrealist movie, by and starring Bob Dylan. ... Originally written by Scott Richardson, Hearts of Fire was rewritten by Joe Eszterhas because the studio felt that Richardson was, in their eyes, a baby writer and not experienced enough to take on the responsibility of a starring vehicle for Bob Dylan. ... Masked and Anonymous is a 2003 film written and directed by Seinfeld writer Larry Charles. ... For other uses, see No direction home (disambiguation). ... Im Not There is a Golden Globe Award-winning and Academy Award-nominated 2007 biographical film inspired by the life of iconic singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. ... 65 Revisited is a documentary by D. A. Pennebaker, made from footage the director shot for his famous 1967 film, Dont Look Back. ... Tarantula is an experimental novel by Bob Dylan, written early in his musical career. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... // The Concert for Bangla Desh (George Harrison, 1971) - 6 songs Rock of Ages (The Band, 1972) - 4 songs The Last Waltz (The Band, 1978) - 5 songs Postcards of the Hanging (The Grateful Dead, 2002) - 1 song A Musical History (The Band, 2005) - 7 songs Hard To Handle (1986) The 30th... The Traveling Wilburys were a supergroup consisting of George Harrison, Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison, Tom Petty, and Bob Dylan. ... For other persons named George Harrison, see George Harrison (disambiguation). ... Jeff Lynne (born December 30, 1947 in Shard End, Birmingham) is a Grammy Award-winning English rock songwriter, singer, guitarist and record producer. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... Thomas Earl Tom Petty (born October 20, 1950) is a singer, songwriter, and guitarist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... The Traveling Wilburys Collection is a 2007 box set compilation album comprising both albums by the Traveling Wilburys, a DVD with their videos and a documentary about the group. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... End of the Line is a song from Traveling Wilburys first album, Volume 1, released in 1989. ... Traveling Wilburys Vol. ... Wilbury Twist is a song by supergroup Traveling Wilburys and is the final track on their 1990 studio album Traveling Wilburys Vol. ... Jim Keltner (born April 27, 1942 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a distinguished session drummer who has contributed to the work of many well-known artists. ... Dhani Harrison (born August 1, 1978) is an English musician. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Location in St. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bob Dylan Biography (2801 words)
Bob Dylan, born Robert Allen Zimmerman May 24 1941 in Duluth, Minnesota in the USA, is widely regarded as America's greatest popular songwriter born in the Twentieth Century.
Bob Dylan was raised in Hibbing, Minnesota and spent much of his youth listening to the radio, at first the powerful blues and country music stations and later early rock and roll.
By 1963, Bob Dylan was becoming increasingly prominent in the civil rights movement, singing at rallies and performing at the same march at which Martin Luther King gave his "I have a dream" speech.
The History of Rock Music. Bob Dylan: biography, discography, reviews, links (10679 words)
Dylan is heir to the preachers and the proselytizers of the prairies, not to the dramatic actors of London's stages.
Dylan was a bursting visionary who addressed the times in apocalyptic terms, who commented as a universal judge would, who threw mournful condemnations against the forces of evil ("the masters of war) and who raised gentle tributes to his guardian angels ("sad-eyed lady of the lowlands").
Bob Dylan (as he renamed himself in honor of the poet Dylan Thomas) moved to New York at the end of 1960 to pay a personal visit to the dying Woody Guthrie, and also to be part of the Greenwich Village circle.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m