FACTOID # 12: It's not the government they hate: Washington DC has the highest number of hate crimes per capita in the US.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Boatswain" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Boatswain
The bosun aboard a modern merchant ship stands cargo watch as freight is lowered into an open hatch.
The bosun aboard a modern merchant ship stands cargo watch as freight is lowered into an open hatch.

A boatswain (often bosun or bos'un) is a member of the deck department of a ship. On naval vessels, the boatswain is a warrant officer or petty officer.[1] On merchant ships, the boatswain is the foreman of a ship's deck crew and is sometimes also third or fourth mate.[1] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixelsFull resolution (934 × 653 pixel, file size: 369 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source Originally from en. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 559 pixelsFull resolution (934 × 653 pixel, file size: 369 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Source Originally from en. ... The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... For Warrant Officers in the United States military, see Warrant Officer (United States). ... A Petty Officer is a noncommissioned officer or equivalent in many navies. ... Cargo ship or freighter is any sort of ship that carries goods and materials from one port to another. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ...

Contents

Background

Originally, on board sailing ships the boatswain was in charge of a ship's anchors, cordage, colors, deck crew and the ship's boats.[1] The boatswain would also be in charge of the rigging while the ship was in dock.[1] The boatswain's technical tasks have been modernized with the advent of steam engines and subsequent mechanisation.[1] Traditional wooden cutter under sail. ... For other uses, see Anchor (disambiguation). ... Rope is also the title of a movie by Alfred Hitchcock Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength, for pulling and connecting. ... For other uses, see Flag (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crew (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A dock is an area of water between two piers or alongside a pier, forming a chamber used for building or repairing one ship. ...


Military usage

United States

U.S. Navy

Boatswain's Mates
For more details on this topic, see Boatswain's Mate.

Onboard U.S. Navy and U.S. Coast Guard vessels, boatswain's mates and deck seamen comprise the deck department, under the supervision of the First Lieutenant.[2] The bosun of a civilian sail-training ship. ... USN redirects here. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ...


Boatswain's mates train, direct, and supervise personnel in ship's maintenance duties in all activities relating to marlinespike, deck, boat seamanship, painting, upkeep of ship's external structure, rigging, deck equipment, and boats.[3] Boatswain's Mates take charge of working parties; perform seamanship tasks; act as petty officer-in-charge of picketboats, self-propelled barges, tugs, and other yard and district craft.[3] They maintain discipline as master-at-arms and police petty officers.[3] They serve in, or take charge of, guncrews or damage control parties.[3] BM's also operate and maintain equipment used in loading and unloading cargo, ammunition, fuel, and general stores.[3]


Boatswain's mates also summon the crew to work by a whistle known as a boatswain's call or boatswain's pipe.[4] On the ancient row-galleys, the boatswain used his pipe to "call the stroke."[5] Later because its shrill tune could be heard above most of the activity on board, it was used to signal various happenings such as knock-off and the boarding of officials.[5] So essential was this signaling device to the well-being of the ship, that it became a badge of office and honor in the British and American Navies.[5] Boatswains pipe A boatswains pipe or boatswains call (or bosuns whistle) is a pipe that is made of a tube (called the gun), that directs air over a grape-sized metal sphere (called the buoy) with a hole cut in the top. ...


Ship's Boatswain

In the U.S. Navy the title Boatswain is reserved for the Ship's Boatswain, an officer who assists the First Lieutenant by supervising the deck force in the execution of major seamanship functions and the maintenance of topside gear.[6] The Ship's Boatswain supervises cargo handling [6] and inspects and maintains rigging and deck gear.[6] His duties also include supervising anchoring, mooring, fueling, towing, transferring of personnel and cargo, and the operation and maintenance of ship's boats.[6] The Ship's Boatswain is in charge of what the Navy deems "unusual" seamanship operations such as retrieving target drones,[6] and also schedules training for deck division personnel.[6] Another key duty of the Ships' Boatswain is supervision of the maintenance of abandon-ship equipment and instruction in abandon-ship techniques.[6] First Lieutenant is a military rank. ...


U.S. Coast Guard

U.S. Coast Guard Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Jessica Walsh practices her technique with the Boatswain's Pipe.
U.S. Coast Guard Boatswain's Mate 3rd Class Jessica Walsh practices her technique with the Boatswain's Pipe.

The most versatile member of the Coast Guard's operational team is the Boatswain's Mate (BM).[7] Boatswain's Mates are masters of seamanship.[7] BMs are capable of performing almost any task in connection with deck maintenance, small boat operations, navigation and supervising all personnel assigned to a ship's deck force.[7] BMs have a general knowledge of ropes and cables, including different uses, stresses, strains and proper stowing.[7] BMs operate hoists, cranes, and winches to load cargo or set gangplanks, stand watch for security, navigation or communications.[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Seamanship is the art of operating a ship or boat. ... Table of geography, hydrography, and navigation, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ... The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Builders hoist, with small petrol engine Hoist or hoist can mean:- A verb meaning to lift. In flag terminology, the half of a flag nearest to the flagpole. ... Crane or Cranes may refer to any of the following: A crane is a piece of industrial machinery used for hoisting and handling materials, working on tall buildings, excavation with a clam bucket or dragline, pile driving, or loading and unloading cargo/containers onto and off of ships/rail cars. ... This article is about transported goods. ... Physical security describes measures that prevent or deter attackers from accessing a facility, resource, or information stored on physical media. ... Table of geography, hydrography, and navigation, from the 1728 Cyclopaedia. ...


Boatswain's Mates can be found in nearly every duty station available throughout the United States and various locations overseas.[7] They serve on every Coast Guard Cutter from harbor tugs to seagoing icebreakers.[7] Additionally, in many assignments act as a federal law enforcement officer.[7] BMs are Officers-In-Charge of many patrol boats, tugs, small craft and small shore units including search and rescue stations and aids to navigation teams.[7] BMs utilize their leadership and expertise to perform the missions of the Coast Guard, at sea and on shore.[7]


Leadership ability, physical strength, good hearing and vision and a high degree of manual dexterity are essential.[7] School courses taken in algebra, geometry and shop are helpful.[7] Any experience handling small boats is extremely valuable.[7]


Training for Boatswain's Mate is accomplished through 12-weeks of intensive training at Yorktown, VA or with on-the-job training through a striker program.[7] Upon completion of this training, BMs may go on to attend other advanced training such as Coxswain, Heavy Weather Coxswain, Aids to Navigation Basic and Advanced, Bouy Deck Supervisor, Law Enforcement including fisheries among others.[7]


Related Civilian Jobs include Pier Superintendent, Tugboat Crewman, Heavy Equipment Operator, Marina Supervisor, Marina Operator, and Ship Pilot.[7] An excavator. ... A small marina at Brixham, Devon, England. ... Signal flag H(Hotel) - Pilot on Board Boarding is tricky, as both vessels are moving and cannot afford to slow down. ...


Merchant usage

On board merchant vessels, the boatswain is the foreman of the crew.[8][1] Nowadays, the boatswain is often an able seaman.[9] On some vessels, the boatswain is also the third or fourth mate.[1] The boatswain generally reports to the Chief mate.[8] If the ship carries a carpenter or deck storekeeper, they generally report to the boatswain.[8] Merchants function as professionals who deal with trade, dealing in commodities that they do not produce themselves, in order to produce profit. ... A foreman is the leader of a group of workers, often in a construction industry. ... In the Royal Navy in the middle of the 18th century, the term Able Seaman referred to a seaman with at least two years experience at sea. ... The third officer of a merchant vessel. ... Mate may refer to: Relationships: Mate (term), a term for a friend, especially in the United Kingdom and Australasia; also used to address strangers One of a pair of animals, sometimes also applied to a human partner; see mating Nautical: A deck officer on a merchant marine vessel, usually ranked... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Mate (C/M) or Chief Officer is a licensed member and head of the deck department of a merchant ship. ...


History

The word boatswain has been in the English language since approximately 1450.[10] It is derived from late Old English batswegen, from bat ("boat") + Old Norse sveinn ("swain"), meaning a young man, a follower, retainer or servant.[10] The phonetic spelling bosun has been observed since 1868.[10] Old English redirects here. ... Old Norse is the Germanic language spoken by the inhabitants of Scandinavia and their overseas settlements during the Viking Age, until about 1300. ... Look up swain in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A retinue (O. Fr. ... A servant is a person who is hired to provide regular household or other duties, and receives compensation. ...


Origins in the Royal Navy

The rank of Boatswain was until recently the oldest rank in Great Britain's Royal Navy,[11] and its origins can be traced back to the year 1040.[11] The Royal Navy's last official Boatswain, Commander E W Andrew OBE, retired in 1990.[11] Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ...


In 1040 when five English ports began furnishing warships to King Edward the Confessor in exchange for certain privileges, they also furnished crews whose officers were the Master, Boatswain, Carpenter and Cook.[12] Later these officers were "warranted" by the British Admiralty.[12] They maintained and sailed the ships and were the standing officers of the navy.[12] Soldiers commanded by Captains would be on board the ships to do the fighting but they had nothing to do with running the ships.[12] The word "soldiering" came about as a seaman's term of contempt for the soldiers and anyone else who avoided shipboard duties.[12] Flag of the Cinque Ports Formally, in Kent and Sussex there are five Head Ports making up the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, often pronounced as the anglicised sink ports, and meaning five ports (cinque in French means five and ports is to be connected to the Italian word porto... Edward the Confessor or Eadweard III (c. ... Captain Sir Arthur Henry Rostron receiving a loving cup from Margaret Brown for his rescue of RMS Titanic survivors Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks Captain is the traditional customary title given to the person in charge of a ship at sea. ... Carpenter at work in Tennessee, June 1942. ... Main article: Seafarers professions and ranks A Chief Cook (often shortened to Cook) is a senior unlicensed crewmember working in the Stewards department of a merchant ship. ... For the international law of the sea, see Admiralty law. ...


The warranted officers were often the permanent members of the ships' companies.[12] They stayed with the ships in port between voyages as caretakers supervising repairs and refitting.[12] Other crewmen and soldiers might change with each voyage.[12] Early in the Fourteenth Century the Purser joined the warrant officers.[12] He was originally "the clerk of burser."[12] During the following centuries the Gunner, Surgeon, Chaplain, Master-at-arms, Schoolmaster and others signed on.[12] A ships purser, or just purser is the person on a ship responsible for the handling of money on board. ... The rating badge for Gunners Mate, two crossed cannons. ... A chaplain in the 45th Infantry Division leads a Christmas Day service in Italy, 1943. ... A Master-at-Arms (MAA) is a rating responsible for discipline aboard a naval ship. ...


In the Royal Navy the task of disciplining the crew fell to the quartermasters and quartermaster's mates.[citation needed] This was done using either a rattan boatswain's cane on the boys or with a rope's end on the adult sailors.[citation needed] Punishment could lawfully be inflicted on an officer's instruction or at his own will, or more formally on deck on captain's or court martial's orders.[citation needed] Birching or use of the cat o' nine tails would have been typical in the latter case.[citation needed] In a large crew he could delegate this to the boatswain's mates, who might alternate after each dozen lashes.[citation needed] Quartermaster is a term usually referring to a military unit which specializes in supplying and provisioning troops, or to an individual who does the same. ... Rattan cane Caning is a physical punishment (see that article for generalities and alternatives) consisting of a beating with a cane, generally applied on the bare or clad buttocks (see spanking), shoulders, hand(s) (palm, rarely knuckles) or even the soles of the feet (see falaka). ... Coils of rope used for long-line fishing A rope (IPA: ) is a length of fibers, twisted or braided together to improve strength for pulling and connecting. ... Birching is corporal punishment with a birch rod, typically a spanking (i. ... A leather cat o nine tails This article discusses an implement of punishment. ... The bosun of a civilian sail-training ship. ...


Notable boatswains

A number of boatswains mates have achieved notoriety in the military. Reuben James and William Wiley famous for their heroism in the Barbary Wars and namesakes of the ships USS Reuben James (FFG-57) and USS Wiley (DD-597) were U.S. Navy Boatswain's Mates.[13][14] Medal of Honor recipients Francis P. Hammerberg,[15] and George Robert Cholister[16] were U.S. Navy Boatswain's Mates, as was Navy Cross recipient Stephen Bass.[17] Reuben James saving the life of Stephen Decatur Reuben James (c. ... William Wiley was a sailor of the United States Navy in the 1800s who served in the First Barbary War. ... The Barbary Wars (or Tripolitan Wars) were two wars between the United States of America and Barbary States in North Africa in the early 19th century. ... USS Reuben James (FFG-57), an Oliver Hazard Perry class guided missile frigate is the third ship of the U.S. Navy named for Reuben James, a boatswains mate who distinguished himself fighting the Barbary pirates. ... USS Wiley (DD-597), a Fletcher-class destroyer, was a ship of the United States Navy named for William Wiley, a sailor of the Navy in the 1800s who served in the First Barbary War. ... The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States. ... Owen Francis Patrick Hammerberg (31 May 1920 – 17 February 1945) was a United States Navy diver who was awarded the Medal of Honor posthumously for rescuing two fellow divers. ... George Robert Cholister was a United States Navy sailor awarded a posthumous Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions on 20 October 1924. ... The Navy Cross is the second highest medal that can be awarded by the Department of the Navy and the second highest award given for valor. ... This article is considered orphaned, since there are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Victoria Cross recipients John Sheppard (VC), John Sullivan (VC), Henry Curtis, and John Harrison (VC 1857) were Royal Navy Boatswain's Mates. For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... Photo submitted by Simon Manchee John Sheppard (or Shepherd) (VC, CGM) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... For other men with this name, see John Sullivan (disambiguation). ... Photo submitted by Simon Manchee Henry Curtis VC (December 21, 1822 - November 23, 1896) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... John Harrison was an Irish recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ...


Lord Byron had a Newfoundland dog named Boatswain.[18] Byron wrote the famous poem Epitaph to a Dog and had a monument made for him at Newstead Abbey.[18] Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Newstead Abbey in 1880 Newstead Abbey, near Nottingham, originally an Augustinian foundation, is now best known as the ancestral home of Lord Byron. ...


There are also a handful of fictional boatswains and boatswain's mates. The main character Zack Mayo in An Officer and A Gentleman was a former Boatswain's Mate.[citation needed] Also, the character Bill Bobstay in Gilbert and Sullivan's musical comedy H.M.S. Pinafore is alternatively referred to as a "bos'un"[19] and a "Boatswain's Mate."[20] Another boatswain from literature is Smee from Peter Pan.[21] An Officer and a Gentleman is a 1982 film which tells the story of a United States Navy aviation Officer Candidate who comes into conflict with the Marine Corps Gunnery Sergeant who trains him. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: HMS Pinafore H.M.S. Pinafore, or The Lass that Loved a Sailor, is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W. S. Gilbert. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the play by J.M. Barrie. ...


Notes

The bosun of a civilian sail-training ship.
The bosun of a civilian sail-training ship.
  1. ^ a b c d e f g Chisholm, 1911:100.
  2. ^ USNI, 1992,309.
  3. ^ a b c d e Bureau of Naval Personnel. Navy Enlisted Occupational Standards for Boatswains's Mate (BM). United States Navy. Retrieved on 2007-05-24.
  4. ^ USNI, 1992,345-353.
  5. ^ a b c Origin of Navy Terminology. Naval Historical Center. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Bureau of Naval Personnel (October 2006). Manual of Navy Officer Manpower and Personnel Classifications, Volume I, Major Code Structures. Department of the Navy, p. 150. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p United States Coast Guard (2004-06-04). Boatswain's Mate (BM). Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  8. ^ a b c Hayler, 2003:xvi.
  9. ^ Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2007:1.
  10. ^ a b c Boatswain. Online Etymology Dictionary. Retrieved on 2007-05-25.
  11. ^ a b c HMS Victory. royalnavy.mod.uk. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Naval Historical Center (07-20-2005). Why is the Colonel Called "Kernal"? The Origin of the Ranks and Rank Insignia Now Used by the United States Armed Forces. United States Navy. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  13. ^ Ship's Namesake. USS Reuben James Official Website. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  14. ^ Naval Historical Center (1981). Wiley. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. United States Navy. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  15. ^ Naval Historical Center (1981). Hammerberg. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. United States Navy. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  16. ^ Naval Historical Center (1997). Navy Medal of Honor: Interim Period 1920-1940. Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships. United States Navy. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  17. ^ CPO Stephen Bass, U.S.N.. LegionOfValor.com. Retrieved on 2007-05-26.
  18. ^ a b Clinton, George (1828). Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Lord Byron. London: James Robbins and Company, 8. Retrieved on 2007-05-27. 
  19. ^ See quote from "The Complete Annotated Gilbert & Sullivan" at [1].
  20. ^ See quote from S.W. Gilbert in "The story of the H.M.S. Pinafore" at [2].
  21. ^ J M Barrie (December 27, 1904). "Act II: The Never Land", Peter Pan or The Boy Who Would Not Grow Up. Retrieved on 2007-05-27. 

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1001 KB) Summary Fliss Green, Bosun of the TSYTs tall ships Prince William and Stavros S Niarchos (crew alternate between the ships). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1001 KB) Summary Fliss Green, Bosun of the TSYTs tall ships Prince William and Stavros S Niarchos (crew alternate between the ships). ... Logo BUPERS is an acronym for the United States Navys Bureau of Naval Personnel. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo BUPERS is an acronym for the United States Navys Bureau of Naval Personnel. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Naval Historical Center (NHC) is the official history program of the United States Navy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Naval Historical Center (NHC) is the official history program of the United States Navy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Naval Historical Center (NHC) is the official history program of the United States Navy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Naval Historical Center (NHC) is the official history program of the United States Navy. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Bureau of Labor Statistics (U.S.A.) (2007). Water Transportation Occupations (PDF). Occupational Outlook Handbook. Government Printing Office. Retrieved on 2007-04-23.
  • Encyclopædia Britannica (1911). "Boatswain". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition) 4. Ed. Chisholm, Hugh. 100. Retrieved on 2007-04-17. 
  • Hayler, William B. (2003). American Merchant Seaman's Manual. Cornell Maritime Press. ISBN 0-87033-549-9. .
  • United States Naval Institute [1902] (1996). The Bluejackets' Manual, 21st ed., Annapolis, MD: United States Naval Institute. ISBN 1-55750-050-9. 

The Bureau of Labor Statistics was founded in 1884 by President Chester A. Arthur. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 107th day of the year (108th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Nautical Portal

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Bootsmann was a Petty Officer position in German naval forces. ... The deck department is responsible for safely receiving, discharging, and caring for cargo during a voyage. ... A vessel is, say, like a town in that everything works such that. ... Serang is the capital town of Banten province in Indonesia. ...

External links

  Typical ship transport occupations
←Junior   
Unlicensed   
   Senior→
   Licensed
Deck: Ordinary Seaman Able Seaman BoatswainCarpenter 3rd Mate2nd MateChief Mate CaptainPilot
Engine: WiperOiler QMED Electrician 3rd Engr2nd Engr1st Engr Chief Engineer
Steward: Steward's Assistant Chief Cook Chief Steward Purser  

  Results from FactBites:
 
Boatswain - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (281 words)
A boatswain, often phonetically spelled and pronounced bosun, is a warrant officer or petty officer who is foreman of a ship's crew and is sometimes also third or fourth mate.
The word boatswain, recorded in English since the fifteenth century, is derived from boat and swain meaning a young man, a follower, retainer or servant - compare mate.
Originally, onboard a sailing ship such as a man-of-war or a galleon, the boatswain was in charge of a ship's anchors, cordage, colors, deck crew and the ship's boats, and would also be in charge of the rigging while the ship was in dock; with steam and further mechanisation, the technical tasks have been modenized.
WHEN BOATSWAIN'S MATES WHISTLE (828 words)
And until the raw recruit has washed the first salt from his dungarees and spun a good sea story, he regards the boatswain’s mate as a “guy” with a stone heart, whose hand were made to carry nothing but bull whips, and whose lungs are made of leather.
To the crew’s ear, the boatswain’s pipe sounds sweet or harsh, depending not only on how it’s blown, but on what the occasion is. When “chow” is piped down, for instance, it has the melodic quality of a sweet inviting symphony, while “turn to” (especially at five a.
The history of the boatswain’s pipe dates back to the days of the Crusades, when it was employed to transmit orders across the sweeping battle fields.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m