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Encyclopedia > Boat
A wooden boat operating near shore.
A wooden boat operating near shore.

A boat is a watercraft designed to float or plane on water, and provide transport over it. Usually this water will be inland (lakes) or in protected coastal areas. However, boats such as the whaleboat were historically designed to be operated from a ship in an offshore environment. In naval terms, a boat is something small enough to be carried aboard another vessel (a ship). Some boats too large for the naval definition include the Great Lakes freighter, riverboat, narrowboat and ferryboat. Modern submarines can also be called boats, despite their underwater capabilities and size. This may be because the first submarines could be carried by a ship and were not capable of making independent offshore passages. Boats may be used by the military or other government interests, or for research or commercial purposes; but regardless of size, a vessel in private, non-commercial usage is almost certainly a boat. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... A boat, while generally referring to the nautical craft, has several other meanings: A ship can be informally be known as a boat, especially by its crew. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 793 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Boat Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 793 KB) [edit] Summary [edit] Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Boat Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... A watercraft is a vehicle designed to float on and move across (or through) water for pleasure, physical exercise (in the case of many small boats), transporting people and/or goods, or military missions. ... A modern copy of a traditional whaleboat on display at Mystic Seaport. ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Ship (disambiguation). ... The ill-fated SS Edmund Fitzgerald, built in the classic dual superstructure style with her wheelhouse up near the bow. ... A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... Moored narrowboats near Tardebigge, Worcestershire, England Horse drawing a narrowboat on the Kennet and Avon Canal. ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... USS Los Angeles A submarine is a specialized watercraft that can operate underwater. ...

See also: Glossary of nautical terms and Naval architecture
A boat in an Egyptian tomb painting from about 1450 BCE

The roughly horizontal, but cambered structures spanning the hull of the boat are referred to as the "deck". In a ship there are often several, but a boat is unlikely to have more than one. The similar but usually lighter structure which spans a raised cabin is a coach-roof. The "floor" of a cabin is properly known as the sole but is more likely to be called the floor. (A floor is properly, a structural member which ties a frame to the keelson and keel.) The underside of a deck is the deck head. The keel is a lengthwise structural member to which the frames are fixed (sometimes referred to as a backbone). The vertical surfaces dividing the internal space are bulkheads. The front of a boat is called the bow or prow. The rear of the boat is called the stern. The right side is starboard and the left side is port. Boats of earlier eras often featured a figurehead protruding from the front of the bows. A list of nautical terms; some remain current, many date from the 17th-19th century. ... Steamer New York in c. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1590x696, 282 KB)Source: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Central Library. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1590x696, 282 KB)Source: National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Central Library. ... A hull is the body or frame of a ship or boat. ... Forecastle with figurehead Grand Turk Figurehead is a carved wooden decoration, often female or bestiary, found at the prow of ships of the 16th to the 19th century. ...

Contents

Types of boats

A passenger boat to the islands off the coast of the Sai Kung Peninsula of Hong Kong.
A passenger boat to the islands off the coast of the Sai Kung Peninsula of Hong Kong.
A sailboat (racing dinghy) and barge share the Mississippi River, USA.
A sailboat (racing dinghy) and barge share the Mississippi River, USA.
A Tug boat, used for towing or pushing other, larger, vessels.
A Tug boat, used for towing or pushing other, larger, vessels.

Unusual boats have been used for sports purposes - for example, in "big bathtub races" which use boats made from bathtubs. Pumpkins have been used as boats as in the annual Pumpkin Boat Race on Lake Otsego in New York state, USA. In this race, very large, hollowed out pumpkin shells are used for boats, powered by canoe paddles. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 1083 KB) Summary English: A kai-to carrying passengers to the out-lying islands off the Sai Kung Peninsula in Hong Kong This photograph was taken by Alan Mak in December, 2005 中文:一艘街渡船正接載乘客到香港西貢半島對外的一些島嶼 這張照片由Alan Makæ–¼2005å¹´12月拍攝。 Licensing File links The... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 1083 KB) Summary English: A kai-to carrying passengers to the out-lying islands off the Sai Kung Peninsula in Hong Kong This photograph was taken by Alan Mak in December, 2005 中文:一艘街渡船正接載乘客到香港西貢半島對外的一些島嶼 這張照片由Alan Makæ–¼2005å¹´12月拍攝。 Licensing File links The... Sai Kung (西貢; pinyin: Xi1gong4; Cantonese: sai1 gung3) is the second-largest of the 18 districts of Hong Kong. ... A sailboat on the Mississippi river above the Alton Dam with a barge in the background. ... A sailboat on the Mississippi river above the Alton Dam with a barge in the background. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... See Tug (disambiguation) for alternative meanings of tug. ... Airboat. ... A banana boat (or water sled), often referred to simply as a banana, is an unpowered recreational boat designed to be pulled by a larger boat. ... Outrigger canoe at El Nido, Philippines The outrigger canoe (Tagalog: bangka; Maori: waka; Hawaiian: waa) is a type of canoe featuring one or more lateral support floats known as outriggers, which are fastened to one or both sides of the main hull. ... A bareboat charter is an arrangement for the hiring of a boat, whereby no crew or provisions are included as party of the agreement; instead, the people who rent the boat from the owner are responsible for taking care of such things. ... Self propelled barge carrying bulk crushed stone A barge is a flat-bottomed boat, built mainly for river and canal transport of heavy goods. ... A Bow Rider is a kind of runabout boat with an open bow area where there are extra seats in front of the helm station. ... An example of a cabin cruiser A cabin cruiser is a type of boat that allows extra storage or camping space. ... This article is about the boat. ... A Cape Island style fishing boat is a single keeld flat bottom at the stern and more rownded towards the bow. ... A car-boat is a boat or marine vessel built from, or powered by, an automobile chassis and engine. ... Caravela Latina / Latin Caravel Caravela Redonda / Square-rigged Caravel A caravel is a small, highly maneuverable, two or three-masted ship used by the Portuguese and Spanish for long voyages of exploration beginning in the 15th century. ... It has been suggested that Catamaran History be merged into this article or section. ... The occupied boats are catboats, but with a mast and boom rig A catboat (alternate spelling: cat boat), or a cat-rigged sailboat, is a sailing vessel characterized by a single mast carried well forward (, near the front of the boat). ... A coble is a type of open decked fishing boat. ... Center Console is a type of single decked open hull boat where the console of the boat is in the center of the boat, there is no cabin and the boat deck surrounds the console so that a person on the boat can walk all around the boat from stern... Coracle: Ku-Dru or Kowa of Tibet—Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago A coracle is a primitive type of boat. ... A cruising sailboat anchored in the San Blas Islands, in Panama. ... A Cruising Trawler is a type of recreational powerboat and is so named because it looks similar to a commercial fishing trawler. ... A Cuddy is a small cabin in a boat. ... For other uses see cutter (disambiguation) An American-looking gaff cutter with a genoa jib set This French yawl has a gaff topsail set. ... A Dhow near Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Dinghy of the schooner Adventuress A dinghy is a small utility boat attached to a larger boat. ... A wooden dory used for cod fishing from the Gazela A dory is a small, shallow-draft boat of approximately 5 to 7 m (15 to 22 ft) in length. ... A Dragon boat (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a very long and narrow human powered boat used in the team paddling sport or Dragon boat racing which originated in China. ... // For other uses, see Dredge (disambiguation). ... The McKenzie dory or Rogue River dory is an evolution of the open-water dory, converted for use in rivers. ... The Durham Boat was a large wooden boat produced by the Durham Boat Company of Durham, Pennsylvania. ... An Express Cruiser is a fast cruising boat. ... For the fictional moon, see Felucca (Ultima). ... The ferryboat Dongan Hills, filled with commuters, about to dock at a New York City pier, circa 1945. ... The fireboat Guardian was a gift of survivors of the Loma Prieta earthquake to supplement San Franciscos fireboat Phoenix. ... A fishing boat can range from two-person pleasure fishing boats up to 7-8 ton commercial fishers that can haul in over a billion fish at one time. ... The Flyak lifts above the water with a hydrofoil The Flyak is a hydrofoil adaptation to the conventional kayak. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... // A go-fast is the preferred boat of many smugglers. ... A Venetian gondola A gòndola is a traditional Venetian sculling boat. ... The ill-fated SS Edmund Fitzgerald, built in the classic dual superstructure style with her wheelhouse up near the bow. ... A houseboat in Amsterdam Houseboat for Students in Zwolle, Netherlands. ... For the band, see Hovercraft (band). ... This article is about marine engineering. ... Look up hydroplane in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Two inflatable boats at Horsea Island, England. ... A rider on a Yamaha Waverunner XL performing a high-speed turn A jetboat is a boat propelled by a jet of water ejected from the back of the craft. ... Jet ski is the brand name of Kawasaki Heavy Industries personal water craft. ... Jon boats are aluminum or wood flat-bottomed boats designed for fishing purposes with 1 to 3 bench seats. ... A junk is a Chinese sailing vessel. ... Look up kayak in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Square Topsl Gaff Ketch Hawaiian Chieftain on San Francisco Bay A ketch is a sailing craft with two masts: A main mast, and a mizzen mast abaft the main mast. ... Today a Launch is a motorboat with an open or half open deck. ... Landing craft Rapière LCU 1656 departs USS Bataan (LHD-5) well deck during Hurricane Katrina relief operations. ... A dugout is a boat which is basically a hollowed tree trunk. ... A longboat is a large boat powered by multiple oars and carried on a ship (especially sailed merchant ships). ... A long-tail boat docking at a pier in Bangkok, Thailand. ... Saint-Tropez is famous for its luxury yachts. ... A 1962 Rebel. A wooden speedboat with an outboard engine. ... Motor Launch is a small military vessel of British design. ... Moored narrowboats near Tardebigge, Worcestershire, England Horse drawing a narrowboat on the Kennet and Avon Canal. ... // For other uses, see Nordland (disambiguation). ... The Norfolk wherry is a black-sailed trader, type of boat on the Norfolk Broads and Suffolk Broads, now part of The Broads National Park, in Norfolk, England. ... Outrigger canoe at El Nido, Philippines The outrigger canoe (Tagalog: bangka; Maori: waka; Hawaiian: waa) is a type of canoe featuring one or more lateral support floats known as outriggers, which are fastened to one or both sides of the main hull. ... A padded v-hull is a type of high performance watercraft. ... Pump-jet PWCs such as this Yamaha Waverunner are extremely popular for their speed and maneuverability. ... A pinnace is a light boat, propelled by sails or oars, formerly used as a tender for guiding merchant and war vessels. ... A pirogue on the Niger River in Mali. ... Some pleasure craft in Miami Beach, Florida, USA. A pleasure craft (or pleasure boat) is a boat used for personal recreational or sometimes sporting purpose. ... A pontoon boat, like this small pleasure boat, typically floats and balances by means of two pontoons mounted lengthwise. ... A 1962 Rebel. A wooden speedboat with an outboard engine. ... Punting while dressed for Cambridge graduation This article concentrates on the history and development of punts and punting in England, for other usages see the disambiguation pages at punt and punter. ... Traditional raft, from 1884 edition Huckleberry Finn and Jim Children successfully test their raft, in Brixham harbour, south Devon, England. ... Two RIBs at Castletown, Portland, England. ... A riverboat is a specialized watercraft (vessel) designed for operating on inland waterways. ... A runabout is any small motorboat holding between four and eight people, well suited to moving about on the water. ... Rowing in the Amstel River by a student rowing club. ... Diagram of Sailboat, in this case a typical monohull sloop with a bermuda or marconi rig. ... A sampan carrying passengers to the outlying islands off the Sai Kung Peninsula in Hong Kong Sampan on the Yangtze River (Chang Jiang), China A sampan (舢舨) is a relatively flat bottomed Chinese wooden boat from twelve to fifteen feet long. ... Two-masted fishing schooner A schooner (IPA: ) is a type of sailing vessel characterized by the use of fore-and-aft sails on two or more masts. ... A scow, in the original sense, is a flat bottomed boat with a blunt bow, often used to haul garbage or similar bulk freight; cf. ... Sharpies are long, narrow sailboats with flat bottoms, extremely shallow draft, centerboards and straight, flaring sides. ... Shikhara on Dal Lake, Srinagar, Jammu & Kashmir, India. ... A516 Donau, an Elbe class tender of the German Navy. ... In boating, a ski boat is a boat specifically designed to safely tow one or more water skiers. ... The term skiff is applied to various river craft, but a skiff is typically a small flat-bottomed open boat with a pointed bow and square stern. ... Paddle steamers - Lucerne-Switzerland Left: original paddlewheel from a paddle steamer on the lake of Lucerne. ... A slipper launch is a traditional River Thames pleasure boat normally of wooden construction to seat between 4 and 8 passengers. ... A sloop-rigged J-24 sailboat A sloop (From Dutch sloep) in sailing, is a vessel with a fore-and-aft rig. ... For other uses, see Submarine (disambiguation). ... A surfboat is an oar-driven boat designed to go out in heavy surf or severe waves. ... Swift Boat PCF71 in Vietnam, showing forward twin . ... A Tarai Bune or tub-turned boat is a traditional Japanese fishing boat found mainly on Sado Island. ... Photograph of an Orma 60 trimaran in Sandhamn before the Round Gotland Race 2005 A trimaran is a multihull boat consisting of a main hull (vaka) and two smaller outrigger hulls (amas), attached to the main hull with lateral struts (akas). ... A tugboat shown turning a large RORO cargo ship. ... U-boat is also a nickname for some diesel locomotives built by GE; see List of GE locomotives October 1939. ... A waka displayed at the Otago Museum, Dunedin In the Māori language and New Zealand English, waka are Māori watercraft, usually canoes. ... Wakeboard Boats have a device that creates a large wake for a skier (Wakeboarder) to jump the wakes from side to side doing aerial tricks. ... A Walkaround boat is a cross between a center console and a cuddy. ... A New York Water Taxi docks at Pier 11 near Wall Street. ... A modern copy of a traditional whaleboat on display at Mystic Seaport. ... Yachting is a physical activity involving boats. ... Yawl sailing vessel. ...


Boat building materials

See also: Boat building
A ship's lifeboat, built of steel, rusting away in the wetlands of Folly Island, South Carolina, United States.

Until the mid 19th century most boats were of all natural materials; primarily wood. Many boats had been built with iron or steel frames but still planked in wood. In 1855 ferro-cement boat construction was patented by yothe French. They called it Ferciment. This is a system by which a steel or iron wire framework is built in the shape of a boat's hull and covered (troweled) over with cement. Reinforced with bulkheads and other internal structure it is strong but heavy, easily repaired, and, if sealed properly, will not leak or corrode. These materials and methods were copied all over the world, and have faded in and out of popularity to the present. As the forests of Britain and Europe continued to be over-harvested to supply the keels of larger wooden boats, and the Bessemer Process (patented in 1855) cheapened the cost of steel, steel ships and boats began to be more common. By the 1930s boats built of all steel from frames to plating were seen replacing wooden boats in many industrial uses, even the fishing fleets. Private recreational boats in steel are uncommon. In the mid 20th century aluminum gained popularity. Though much more expensive than steel, there are now aluminum alloys available that will not corrode in salt water, and an aluminum boat built to similar load carrying standards could be built lighter than steel. Nonetheless, boats are generally built in such a manner as to keep water from invading the hull, which would cause the boats to sink. Traditional boat building in South East Maluku, Indonesia. ... Download high resolution version (1196x1740, 1086 KB)Public domain photograph. ... Download high resolution version (1196x1740, 1086 KB)Public domain photograph. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... A gardening trowel Trowel used by the Hon. ... The Bessemer process was the first inexpensive industrial process for the mass-production of steel from a molten pig iron. ...


Platt Monfort invented Metal Plank(r)(1969), Fer-a-Lite(r)(1972), Str-r-etch Mesh(r)(1975), and Geodesic Airolite Boats(r)(1981). Fer-A-Lite(r) is a mixture of polyester resin, fiberglass, and a filler. This, along with Str-r-etch Mesh(r), could be used to build a boat in the same fashion as a ferro-cement boat, but the resulting hull would be much lighter and more resilient. Wire Plank(r) was first used in ferro-cement construction, but could also be used with Fer-a-Lite to create a medium to heavy weight hull. Geodesic Airolite Boats(r) are built using very lightweight wooden frames (geodesic) that are covered over with some lightweight heatshrinkable plastic or a synthetic fabric such as dacron coated with sealant. This tensioned skin adds to the overall strength of the structure and boats built thus are of the ultra-light variety. In mathematics, a geodesic is a generalization of the notion of a straight line to curved spaces. In presence of a metric, geodesics are defined to be (locally) the shortest path between points on the space. ...


Around the mid 1960s, boats made out of glass-reinforced plastic, more commonly known as fiberglass, became popular, especially for recreational boats. The coast guard refers to such boats as 'FRP' (for Fiberglass Reinforced Plastic) boats. Fiberglass boats are extremely strong, and do not rust, corrode, or rot. They are, however susceptible to structural degradation from sunlight and extremes in temperature over their lifespan. Fiberglass provides structural strength, especially when long woven strands are laid, sometimes from bow to stern, and then soaked in epoxy or polyester resin to form the hull of the boat. Whether hand laid or built in a mold, FRP boats usually have an outer coating of gelcoat which is a thin solid colored layer of polyester resin that adds no structural strength, but does create a smooth surface which can be buffed to a high shine and also acts as a protective layer against sunlight. FRP structures can be made stiffer with sandwich panels, where the FRP encloses a lightweight core such as balsa or foam. Cored FRP is most often found in decking which helps keep down weight that will be carried above the waterline. The addition of wood makes the cored structure of the boat susceptible to rotting which puts a greater emphasis on not allowing damaged sandwich structures to go unrepaired. Plastic based foam cores are less vulnerable. The phrase 'advanced composites' in FRP construction may indicate the addition of carbon fiber, kevlar(tm) or other similar materials, but it may also indicate other methods designed to introduce less expensive and, by at least one yacht surveyor's eyewitness accounts [1], less structurally sound materials. It has been suggested that Fiber-reinforced plastic be merged into this article or section. ... Bundle of fiberglass Fiberglass (also called fibreglass and glass fibre) is material made from extremely fine fibers of glass. ... USCG HH-65 Dolphin USCG HH-60J JayHawk USCG HC-130H departs Mojave USCG HC-130H on International Ice Patrol duties The United States Coast Guard (USCG) is at all times a branch of the U.S. military, a maritime law enforcement agency, and a federal regulatory body. ...


Cold molding is similar to FRP in as much as it involves the use of epoxy or polyester resins, but the structural component is wood instead of fiberglass. In cold molding very thin strips of wood are laid over a form or mold in layers. This layer is then coated with resin and another directionally alternating layer is laid on top. In some processes the subsequent layers are stapled or otherwise mechanically fastened to the previous layers, but in other processes the layers are weighted or even vacuum bagged to hold layers together while the resin sets. Layers are built up thus to create the required thickness of hull.


People have even made their own boats or watercraft out of commonly available materials such as styrofoam or plastic, but most homebuilts today are built of plywood and either painted or covered in a layer of fiberglass and resin. Styrofoam is a trademark name for polystyrene thermal insulation material, manufactured by Dow Chemical Company. ...


Boat propulsion

The most common means are:

Severn class lifeboat in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England. This is the largest class of UK lifeboat at 17 metres long
Severn class lifeboat in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England. This is the largest class of UK lifeboat at 17 metres long

A setting pole is a pole, handled by a single individual, made to move watercraft by pushing the craft in the desired direction. ... A sail is a surface intended to generate thrust by being placed in a wind; basically it is a vertically oriented wing. ... For other uses, see Propeller (disambiguation). ... An inboard motor is a marine propulsion system for boats. ... An oil tanker taking on bunker fuel. ... A stern drive engine & propeller configuration in watercraft is an attempt to marry the best characteristics of a stronger inboard engine with the flexibility of a propeller that can be positioned in the same way that an outboard motor can. ... This article is about the fuel. ... Bolinders two cylinder Trim outboard engine. ... A paddle steamer, paddleboat, or paddlewheeler is a ship or boat propelled by one or more paddle wheels driven by a steam engine. ... Jet ski is the brand name of Kawasaki Heavy Industries personal water craft. ... Pump-jet PWCs such as this Yamaha Waverunner are extremely popular for their speed and maneuverability. ... A rider on a Yamaha Waverunner XL performing a high-speed turn A jetboat is a boat propelled by a jet of water ejected from the back of the craft. ... For the band, see Hovercraft (band). ... An air boat Aft view of safety cage during operation Air boats, also called fan boats, are flat-bottomed punts powered by a propeller attached to an automobile or aircraft engine. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2756x1972, 967 KB) Severn class lifeboat in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England, the largest class of UK lifeboat at length 17 metres. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2756x1972, 967 KB) Severn class lifeboat in Poole Harbour, Dorset, England, the largest class of UK lifeboat at length 17 metres. ... The Severn class lifeboat is the largest lifeboat used by the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI), a UK organisation dedicated to saving life at sea. ... Poole Harbour is a harbour in Dorset, southern England, with the towns of Poole and Wareham on its shores. ... Dorset (pronounced DOR-sit or [dɔ.sət], and sometimes in the past called Dorsetshire) is a county in the south-west of England, on the English Channel coast. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...

How boats float

See also: Buoyancy

A boat stays afloat because its weight is equal to that of the water it displaces. The material of the boat itself may be heavier than water (per volume), but it forms only the outer layer. Inside it is air, which is negligible in weight. But it does add to the volume. The central term here is density, which is mass ('weight') per volume. The mass of the boat (plus contents) as a whole has to be divided by the volume below the waterline. If the boat floats, then that is equal to the density of water (1 kg/l). To the water it is as if there is water there because the average density is the same. If weight is added to the boat, the volume below the waterline will have to increase too, to keep the mass/weight balance equal, so the boat sinks a little to compensate. In physics, buoyancy is the upward force on an object produced by the surrounding fluid (i. ... In fluid mechanics, displacement occurs when an object is immersed in a fluid, pushing it out of the way and taking its place. ... For other uses, see Density (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Volume (disambiguation). ...


Subtopics

Boat Maintenance
Boat Buying
Boat Engines
Boat Electronics


References

External links

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