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Encyclopedia > Board of Trade
The Board of Trade circa 1808.
The Board of Trade circa 1808.

The Board of Trade is a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, originating as a committee of inquiry in the 17th century and evolving gradually into a government department with a diverse range of functions. This department has been known as the Department of Trade and Industry since 1970, headed by a Secretary of State for Trade and Industry, who is also President of the Board of Trade. The full Board has met only once since the mid-19th Century, during commemorations of the bicentenary of the Board in 1986. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (807x605, 106 KB) Summary The Board of Trade from Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (807x605, 106 KB) Summary The Board of Trade from Ackermanns Microcosm of London (1808-11). ... Her Majestys Most Honourable Privy Council is a body of advisors to the British Sovereign. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Department of Trade and Industry is a United Kingdom government department. ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... The Secretary of State for Trade and Industry is a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... The President of the Board of Trade the title of a cabinet position in the United Kingdom government. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1621, King James I directed the Privy Council to establish a temporary committee to investigate the causes of a decline in trade and consequent financial difficulties. The Board's formal title remains The Lords of the Committee of Privy Council appointed for the consideration of all matters relating to Trade and Foreign Plantations. Events February 9 - Gregory XV is elected pope. ... James VI of Scotland/James I of England (Charles James Stuart) (June 19, 1566 – March 27, 1625) was King of England, King of Scotland and was the first to style himself King of Great Britain. ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, especially in a monarchy. ...


In 1696, King William III appointed eight paid commissioners to promote trade in the American plantations and elsewhere. The board carried on this work but also had long periods of inactivity, devolving into chaos after 1761 and abolished in 1782 by the Rockingham Whigs. The year 1696 had the earliest equinoxes and solstices for 400 years in the Gregorian calendar, because this year is a leap year and the Gregorian calendar would have behaved like the Julian calendar since March 1500 had it have been in use that long. ... William III of England (14 November 1650 – 8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland and William III of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and a Protestant Prince of Orange from his birth, King of England and King of Ireland from 13 February 1689, and King of Scots... 1761 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1782 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Rockingham Whigs or Rockinghamite Whigs in 18th century British politics were a faction of the Whigs led by Charles Watson-Wentworth, 2nd Marquess of Rockingham, who was Prime Minister 1765-66 and 1782. ...


William Pitt recreated the committee in 1784, and an Order-in-Council of August 23, 1786 provided the formal basis that still remains in force. A secretariat was established which included the president, vice president and board members. After 1820 the board ceased to meet regularly and the business was carried out entirely by the secretariat. William Pitt could refer to: William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham; Prime Minister of Great Britain 1766-1768; often known as William Pitt the Elder William Pitt the Younger; his son; Prime Minister of Great Britain (1783-1801) and (1804-1806) William Pitt, Comptroller of the Household to King James... 1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... An Order-in-Council is an executive order issued in Commonwealth Realms operating under the Westminster system. ... This is the song that never ends yes it gos on and on my friends some people started singing it not knowing what it was they just started singing it forever just becauseThis is the song that never ends yes it gos on and on my friends some... 1786 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1820 was a leap year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


In the 19th century the board had an advisory function on economic activity in the UK and its empire. During the second half of the 19th century it also dealt with legislation for patents, designs and trade marks, company regulation, labor and factories, merchant shipping, agriculture, transport, power etc. Colonial matters passed to the Colonial Office and other functions were devolved to newly created departments, a process that continued for much of the 20th century. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Secretary of State for the Colonies or Colonial Secretary was the British Cabinet official in charge of managing the various British colonies. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Reference

  • History of the Board of Trade


The Lords Commissioners of Trade and Foreign Plantations, appointed in 1696 and commonly known as the Board of Trade, did not constitute a committee of the Privy Council, but were, in fact, members of a separate body. Although established by the King, the Board was abolished by an act of Parliament in 1782. The original commission appointed the seven (later eight) of the Great Officers of State, who were not required to attend meetings, and the eight paid members, who were required to attend. The Board, so constituted, had little real power, and matters related to trade and the colonies were usually within the jurisdiction of the Secretaries of State and the Privy Council, with the Board confining itself mainly to colonial administration.


  Results from FactBites:
 
Board of Trade (239 words)
In 1696 William III agreed to the request from Parliament to establish a Board of Trade.
Rudolf Ackermann, Board of Trade, from Microcosm of London (1808)
The Board of Trade consists of a committee of the privy council, composed of all the great officers of state.
Board of Trade - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (429 words)
The Board of Trade is a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, originating as a committee of inquiry in the 17th century and evolving gradually into a government department with a diverse range of functions.
In 1621, King James I directed the Privy Council to establish a temporary committee to investigate the causes of a decline in trade and consequent financial difficulties.
The Lords Commissioners of Trade and Foreign Plantations, appointed in 1696 and commonly known as the Board of Trade, did not constitute a committee of the Privy Council, but were, in fact, members of a separate body.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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