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Encyclopedia > Bo McMillin

Alvin "Bo" McMillin (January 12, 1895 - March 31, 1952) was a Hall-of-Fame college football player, and later successful head coach, who served at both the collegiate and professional levels but who achieved his greatest success at the college level. His legendary "poor mouthing", pronounced in his distinctive Texas drawl, was in sharp contrast to his teams' successes. January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...

Contents


Playing career

McMillin played high school football at North Side High School in Fort Worth, Texas, before beginning a Hall-of-Fame collegiate career at Centre College in Kentucky, under coaches Charley Moran and Robert "Chief" Meyers. McMillin began playing football at Centre in 1917, making a major impact as a freshman when his 17-yard drop kick beat the University of Kentucky. The following year, McMillin missed the season, serving instead in the U.S. Navy during the final year of World War I, then returned to Centre for the first of three consecutive All-American seasons. Flag Seal Nickname: Cowtown Location Location in the state of Texas Coordinates , Government Counties Tarrant County Denton County Mayor Michael J. Moncrief Geographical characteristics Area     City 298. ... Centre College is an accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, USA, a community of about 15,000 located in Boyle County, approximately 35 miles (56. ... Official language(s) English Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Charles B. Uncle Charley Moran was a professional baseball player and collegiate and professional football coach. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The University of Kentucky (also as UK or simply Kentucky) is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... The United States Navy (USN) is the branch of the United States armed forces responsible for naval operations. ... Combatants Allied Powers: British Empire France Italy Russia United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary Bulgaria Germany Ottoman Empire Casualties Military dead: 5 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 8 million Military dead: 4 million Civilian dead: 3 million Total dead: 7 million The First World War, also known as... An All-America team is a sports team composed of star players. ...


In 1919, McMillin was selected to the Walter Camp All-America first team at quarterback, after helping the Praying Colonels to a 9-0 record including upsets over the Indiana University and West Virginia University. In 1920, McMillin garnered second team honors as Centre posted another successful season, albeit including a disappointing 31-14 loss to defending national champion Harvard University. 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Walter Camp (April 7, 1859 – March 14, 1925) was a football coach known as the the Father of American Football. He is generally regarded as the inventor of the game and the most significant person in the history of American football. ... Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... West Virginia University WVU Mountaineer Mascot statue in front of the Mountainlair Student Union. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 3 - Babe Ruth is traded by the Boston Red Sox to the New York Yankees for $125,000, the largest sum ever paid for a player at that time. ... Harvard University campus (old map) Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. ...


1921 was a most remarkable season for McMillin and Centre College. McMillin was a consensus All-American, and his extraordinary effort against Harvard on October 29 cemented his legend. After the loss the year before, McMillin had promised that Centre would beat Harvard in 1921, despite the fact that the Crimson had not lost since 1916. Then, in front of 43,000 fans, McMillin dashed 32 yards for the lone score of a 6-0 Centre victory, breaking Harvard's 25-game winning streak. MIT students who attended the game to cheer against Harvard tore down the goalposts and hoisted McMillin on their shoulders. For decades afterward, this was called "football's upset of the century." 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... October 29 is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 63 days remaining. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ...


Coaching career

Building upon his success as a player, McMillin entered the coaching arena, where he spent the next quarter century compiling a mark of 146-77-13. Using a combination of eloquence and determination, the teetotaling McMillin enjoyed nothing but success at the college level, beginning at Centenary College of Louisiana in 1922. Over a three-year period, McMillin lost only three of 28 games, success that allowed him to move on to Geneva College, where he was 27-5-1 from 1925 to 1927. Centenary College of Louisiana is an independent United Methodist, primarily undergraduate, liberal arts and sciences college in Shreveport, Louisiana. ... 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Geneva College was the original name of Hobart College in Geneva, New York. ... 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1928, McMillin was hired by Kansas State University to replace Hall of Fame coach Charlie Bachman. McMillin coached at Kansas State for six successful years, including an 8-2 season in 1931 that vaulted Kansas State to the cusp of the Rose Bowl. Elden Auker, McMillin's all-conference quarterback at Kansas State, wrote in his book Sleeper Cars and Flannel Uniforms: "McMillin was a great psychologist. He really knew how to give us talks that fired us up... The normal routine for McMillin was to bring us out onto the field to loosen up and then take us back into the locker room for a pep talk. By the time he was through talking, we believed we could take on the world." 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Kansas State University (sometimes referred to as K-State) is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... The College Football Hall of Fame, located in South Bend, Indiana, United States, is a hall of fame devoted to college football. ... 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link is to a full 1931 calendar). ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Elden Le Roy Auker (born September 21, 1910) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher, noted for his submarine pitching style. ...


McMillin's success at Kansas State propelled him into his most noteworthy achievements at the Indiana University. For 14 years, beginning in 1934, McMillin helped elevate the nondescript program to new heights, topped by an undefeated season in 1945. That year marked the first time ever that the Hoosiers had captured the Big Nine Conference. He even enjoyed success at the annual College All-Star game, winning the 1938 and 1946 clashes against the defending NFL champions. Indiana University, founded in 1820, is a nine-campus university system in the state of Indiana. ... 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Big Ten Conference The Big Ten Conference is the United States oldest college athletic conference. ... 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


Despite having become the school's athletic director and seemingly earning lifetime security with seven years remaining on his most recent contract, the 63-year-old McMillin sought new challenges following the 1947 campaign. He accepted a five-year contract to coach the National Football League's Detroit Lions on February 19, 1948. 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... The National Football League (NFL) is the largest professional American football league, consisting of thirty-two teams from American cities and regions. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... February 19 is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...


However, the coaching success he had always enjoyed disappeared with the Lions, as the team dropped its first five games in 1948 and finished with a 2-10 mark. In addition to the many on-field changes he had implemented, McMillin also briefly changed the team's colors from the now-familiar Hawaiian blue to maroon, the color of his teams at Indiana. 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1948 calendar). ...


The team also struggled in 1949 at 4-8, but picked up the rights to future star Doak Walker. The team then brought in quarterback Bobby Layne and Heisman Trophy winner Leon Hart the following year. Continued conflict with players, though, led to McMillin's departure after the end of the 1950 NFL season, which saw the Lions finish with a 6-6 record. 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1949 calendar). ... Ewell Doak Walker, Jr. ... Robert Lawrence Layne was born December 19, 1926, in Santa Ana, Texas. ... The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award (also known simply as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), named after former college football player and coach John W. Heisman, is considered the most prestigious award in American college football. ... Leon Hart (November 2, 1928 near Pittsburgh - September 24, 2002) was an American football player. ... The 1950 NFL season was the 31st regular season of the National Football League. ...


McMillin then took on the challenge of returning the Philadelphia Eagles to their previous glory when he was hired on February 8, 1951. However, after just two games (both wins), McMillin underwent surgery for what was believed to be ulcer troubles. The verdict was far worse: stomach cancer, which ended his coaching career. City Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Other nicknames The Birds, The Iggles Team colors Midnight Green, Black, Silver, and White Head Coach Andy Reid Owner Jeffrey Lurie General manager Tom Heckert Fight song Fly, Eagles Fly Mascot Swoop Local radio Flagship stations: WYSP (94. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... Stomach cancer (also called gastric cancer) can develop in any part of the stomach and may spread throughout the stomach and to other organs, particularly the esophagus, small intestine. ...


On the final day of March 1952, McMillin suffered a fatal heart attack and was buried days later with many fellow coaches and former player in attendance. 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Awards and accolades

In November 1951, in the final months of his life, McMillin was selected for induction in the College Football Hall of Fame for his noteworthy successes as a player. Two months later, McMillin was also awarded the Amos Alonzo Stagg Award for his contributions to the sport by the American Football Coaches Association. 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The College Football Hall of Fame, located in South Bend, Indiana, United States, is a hall of fame devoted to college football. ... Amos Alonzo Stagg (August 16, 1862 - March 17, 1965), was a renowned American collegiate coach in multiple sports, primarily football, and an overall athletic pioneer. ...


References

  • Richard Goldstein, Ivy League Autumns (ISBN 0312146299, 1996)
  • Elden Auker, Sleeper Cars and Flannel Uniforms (ISBN 1892049252, 2001)
Preceded by:
Charlie Bachman
Kansas State University Head Football Coach
1928- 1933
Succeeded by:
Pappy Waldorf
Preceded by:
E.C. (Billy) Hayes
Indiana University Head Coaches
19341947
Succeeded by:
Clyde Smith
Preceded by:
Gus Dorais
Detroit Lions Head Coaches
19481950
Succeeded by:
Buddy Parker
Preceded by:
Earle "Greasy" Neale
Philadelphia Eagles Head Coaches
1951
Succeeded by:
Wayne Millner
Portsmouth Spartans/Detroit Lions Head Coaches
Griffin • G. Clark • D. Clark • Henderson • G. Clark • Edwards • Karcis • Dorais • McMillinParkerWilson • Gilmer • SchmidtMcCaffertyForzanoHudspethM. ClarkRogersFontesRossMoellerMornhinwegMariucciJauronMarinelli

 
 

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