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Encyclopedia > Blur (band)
Blur
Origin Colchester, Essex, England
Genre(s) Alternative rock
Britpop
Indie rock
Years active 1989–2003 on hiatus.
Label(s) Food Records
Parlophone
Virgin
Associated acts Gorillaz
The Good, the Bad & the Queen
The Ailerons
WigWam
Fat Les
Me Me Me
Website www.blur.co.uk
Members
Damon Albarn
Graham Coxon
Alex James
Dave Rowntree

Blur were an English rock band that formed in Colchester in 1989. The band was composed of Damon Albarn (vocals), Graham Coxon (guitar, backing vocals), Alex James (bass guitar) and Dave Rowntree (drums). For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of Essex, see Essex (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alternative music redirects here. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... In the music industry, a record label is a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Food Records is the record label of Blur, Jesus Jones and Dubstar. ... Parlophone is a record label, founded in Germany in 1896 by the Carl Lindström Company. ... Virgin Records was a British recording label founded by English entrepreneur Richard Branson, and Nik Powell in 1972. ... For the Gorillazs self-titled debut album, see Gorillaz (album). ... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band released in January 2007. ... The Ailerons are an indie rock band featuring Charity Hair, Dan Beattle, Dave Rowntree (notably drummer of English band Blur and Mike Smith. ... Apache wickiup, by Edward S. Curtis, 1903 A wigwam or wickiup is a domed single-room dwelling used by certain Native American tribes. ... Fat Les is a British band consisting of Alex James, the bassist from Blur; actor Keith Allen; and artist Damien Hirst. ... Hanging Around cover Me Me Me was a short lived British supergroup, consisting of four high profile Britpop musicians. ... Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... Graham Coxon singing in the video to Blurs Tender Graham Coxon (born Graham Leslie Coxon on 12 March 1969, in Rinteln, West Germany) is an English singer-songwriter, best known as the former guitarist in the rock band Blur. ... Alex James (born Steven Alexander James, 21 November 1968, in Boscombe, Bournemouth, Dorset, England) is the bass player in the band Blur, and one of the members of Fat Les. ... Dave Rowntree (born David Rowntree on 8 May 1964, in Colchester, Essex, England) is best known as the drummer in the band Blur. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre. ... For other places with the same name, see Colchester (disambiguation). ... Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... In music a singer or vocalist is a type of musician who sings, i. ... Graham Coxon singing in the video to Blurs Tender Graham Coxon (born Graham Leslie Coxon on 12 March 1969, in Rinteln, West Germany) is an English singer-songwriter, best known as the former guitarist in the rock band Blur. ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... A backup vocalist is a vocalist that sings in harmony with the lead vocalist, with other backup vocalists, or alone but in the background of a song. ... Alex James (born Steven Alexander James, 21 November 1968, in Boscombe, Bournemouth, Dorset, England) is the bass player in the band Blur, and one of the members of Fat Les. ... A sunburst-colored Fender Precision Bass The electric bass guitar (or electric bass[1][2]; pronounced , as in base) is a bass stringed instrument played primarily with the fingers (either by plucking, slapping, popping, or tapping) or using a pick. ... Dave Rowntree (born David Rowntree on 8 May 1964, in Colchester, Essex, England) is best known as the drummer in the band Blur. ... For other kinds of drums, see drum (disambiguation). ...


Blur's debut album Leisure (1991) incorporated the influence of Madchester and shoegazing. Following a stylistic change in 1992—influenced by English guitar groups such as The Kinks, The Beatles and XTC—the band released Modern Life Is Rubbish (1993), Parklife (1994) and The Great Escape (1995). As a result, the band helped to popularise the Britpop genre and achieved mass popularity in the UK, aided by a famous chart battle with rival band Oasis dubbed "The Battle of Britpop". Leisure is the debut album by Blur, released in August 1991 and making # 7 in the UK. The US version of the album had some differences. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... The Kinks were an English rock group formed in 1963 by lead singer-songwriter Ray Davies, his brother, lead guitarist and vocalist Dave Davies, and bassist Pete Quaife. ... The White Album, see The Beatles (album). ... XTC are an influential new wave band from Swindon, England. ... Modern Life Is Rubbish is the second album by the British rock band Blur, released on May 10 1993. ... Parklife is a critically acclaimed Britpop album by the band Blur, released on April 25, 1994. ... The Great Escape is the fourth album by Blur. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... Oasis are an English rock band, formed in Manchester in 1991, led by lead guitarist and primary songwriter Noel Gallagher and his younger brother, lead vocalist and songwriter Liam Gallagher. ... The Battle of Britpop is the unofficial title given to the chart battle of 1995 which took place between leading Britpop groups, Blur and Oasis. ...


By the late 1990s, with the release of Blur (1997), the band underwent another reinvention, influenced by the indie rock and lo-fi style of American bands such as Pavement, in the process finally gaining success in the U.S. with the single "Song 2". The final album featuring the band's original lineup, 13 (1999), found Blur experimenting with electronic music and gospel music. In May 2002, Coxon left the band during the early recording of their seventh and last album Think Tank (2003), that was filled with electronic sounds and acoustic guitar in order to compensate Coxon's departure. Blur is the fifth album by Blur, first release in 1997. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Lo-fi is a subgenre of indie rock which uses lo-fi recording practices. ... Pavement was an influential American indie rock band in the 1990s. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ... Song 2 is a song by Blur, and the second single released from their eponymous fifth album, Blur in April 1997. ... 13 is the sixth album by English rock band Blur, first released in 1999. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Think Tank is the seventh studio album by English rock band Blur, released on May 5, 2003 in the United Kingdom and on May 6 in the United States. ...


Since the 2003 tour, Blur have done virtually no studio work or touring as a band, with band members engaging in other projects. In September 2007, Coxon rejoined, but the band stated they have no plans working together in the immediate future, leaving the state of the band in flux.

Contents

History

Formation and early success: 1988-1991

Childhood friends Damon Albarn and Graham Coxon met Alex James when they began studying at London's Goldsmiths College in 1988. Albarn was in a group named Circus, which was joined by drummer Dave Rowntree that October.[1] Circus requested the services of Coxon after the departure of their guitarist. That December Circus fired two members and James joined as the group's bassist. This new group named themselves Seymour, inspired by J.D. Salinger's Seymour: An Introduction.[2] Seymour performed live for the first time in summer 1989.[3] In November, Food Records' A&R man Andy Ross attended a Seymour performance that convinced him to court the group for his label. The only concern held by Ross and Food was that they disliked the band's name. Food drew up a list of alternative names, from which the band decided on "Blur". Food Records finally signed the newly-christened Blur in March 1990.[4] This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Main Building The Ben Pimlott Building Goldsmiths College, University of London (founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute) is a college of the University of London specialising in teaching of and research into creative, cultural and cognitive disciplines. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... Food Records is the record label of Blur, Jesus Jones and Dubstar. ... In the music industry, Artists and Repertoire (A&R) is the division of a record label company that is responsible for scouting and artist development. ...

Music sample:

"There's No Other Way"

Sample of "There's No Other Way", illustrating the band's early influences: Madchester and Shoegazing.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

From March to July 1990, Blur toured the UK, testing out new songs. After their tour was over, Blur released "She's So High" in October 1990, which reached number 48 in the UK. The band had trouble creating a follow-up single, but they made progress when paired with producer Stephen Street. The resulting single release, "There's No Other Way", became a hit, peaking at number eight.[5] As a result of the single's success, Blur became pop stars and were accepted into a clique of bands that frequented The Syndrome club in London dubbed "The Scene That Celebrates Itself".[6] NME magazine wrote in 1991, "[Blur] are [the] acceptable pretty face of a whole clump of bands that have emerged since the whole Manchester thing started to run out of steam."[7] An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Shoegazing (also known as shoegaze or shoegazer; practitioners referred to as shoegazers) is a genre of alternative rock that emerged from the United Kingdom in the late 1980s. ... In the music industry, a record producer (or music producer) has many roles, among them controlling the recording sessions, coaching and guiding the musicians, organizing and scheduling production budget and resources, and supervising the recording, mixing and mastering processes. ... Stephen Street is a music producer best known for his work with The Smiths in the 1980s and Blur in the 1990s. ... Theres No Other Way is a song and single by the band Blur. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Scene That Celebrates Itself was a term used to describe a social and musical scene in the early 1990s within London and the Thames Valley area. ... For other uses, see NME (disambiguation). ...


Blur's initial success was shortlived. The band's third single, "Bang", performed disappointingly, reaching only number 24.[8] Andy Ross and Food owner David Balfe were convinced Blur's best course of action was to continue drawing influence from the Madchester genre. Blur attempted to expand their musical sound, but the recording of the group's debut album was hindered by Albarn having to write his lyrics in the studio. The resulting album Leisure (1991) peaked at number seven on the British album charts, but the album "could not shake off the odour of anti-climax", according to journalist John Harris.[9] Bang is the third single by Blur from their debut album Leisure. ... David Balfe (c. ... An NME Originals issue covering the Madchester movement. ... Leisure is the debut album by Blur, released in August 1991 and making # 7 in the UK. The US version of the album had some differences. ...


The Britpop years: 1992-1996

After discovering they were £60,000 in debt, Blur journeyed to the United States in 1992 as part of the Rollercoaster tour in order to recoup their financial losses.[10] The group released the single "Popscene" to coincide with the start of the tour. "Popscene" was a turning point for the band musically.[11] However, upon its release it only charted at number 32. "We felt 'Popscene' was a big departure; a very, very English record," Albarn told the NME in 1993, "But that annoyed a lot of people [. . .] We put ourselves out on a limb to pursue this English ideal and no-one was interested."[12] As a result of the single's lacklustre performance, plans to release a single named "Never Clever" were scrapped and work on Blur's second album was pushed back.[13] This article is about the song by Blur. ...


During the two-month American tour, the band became increasingly unhappy, often venting frustrations on each other, leading to several physical confrontations.[14] The band members were homesick; Albarn said, "I just started to miss really simple things [. . .] I missed everything about England so I started writing songs which created an English atmosphere."[12] Upon the group's return to the United Kingdom, Blur (Albarn in particular) were upset by the success rival group Suede had achieved while they were gone.[15] After a poor performance at a 1992 gig that featured a well-received performance by Suede on the same bill, Blur was in danger of being dropped by Food.[16] By that time, Blur had underwent an ideological and image shift intended to celebrate their British heritage in contrast to the popularity of American grunge bands like Nirvana.[17] Although skeptical of Albarn's new manifesto for the band, Balfe gave assent for the band's choice of Andy Partridge of the band XTC to produce their follow-up to Leisure. The sessions with Partridge proved unsatisfactory, but a chance reunion with Street resulted in him returning to produce the group.[18] Suede (or The London Suede in the U.S.) were a popular and influential English rock band of the 1990s that helped start the Britpop musical movement of the decade. ... Grunge redirects here. ... This article is about the American grunge band. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... XTC are an influential new wave band from Swindon, England. ...


The band completed their second album Modern Life Is Rubbish in December 1992, but Food Records said the album required more potential hit singles and asked them to return to the studio for a second time. The band complied and Albarn wrote "For Tomorrow", which became the album's lead single.[19] "For Tomorrow" was a minor success, reaching number 28 on the charts.[20] Modern Life Is Rubbish was released in May 1993. The announcement of the album's released included a press photo featuring the phrase "British Image 1" spraypainted behind the band (who were dressed in a mixture of mod and skinhead attire) and a pitbull. At the time, such imagery was viewed as nationalistic and racially insensitive by the British music press; to quiet concerns, Blur subsequently released the "British Image 2" photo, which was "a camp restaging of a pre-war aristocratic tea party."[21] Modern Life Is Rubbish peaked at number 15 on the British charts, yet it did not make much of an impression in the U.S. Modern Life Is Rubbish is the second album by the British rock band Blur, released on May 10 1993. ... For Tomorrow is a song by British rock band Blur and is the lead track to their second album, Modern Life Is Rubbish. ...

Music sample:

"Parklife"

Sample of "Parklife", title track from Blur's third album, which features narration by Phil Daniels, the star of the film version of The Who's Quadrophenia.
Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Blur's 1994 album, Parklife, was to be their commercial breakthrough. The album's first single "Girls & Boys" found favour on BBC Radio 1 and peaked at number five on the singles chart.[22] Parklife entered the British charts at number one and stayed on the album charts for 90 weeks.[23] The album generated further hit singles, including the ballad "To the End" and "Parklife". Blur won four awards at the 1995 BRIT Awards, including Best Band and Best Album for Parklife[24] Philip Daniels (born October 25, 1958 in Islington, London) is an English actor. ... The Who are a British rock band that first formed in 1964, and grew to be considered one of the greatest[1] and most influential[2] bands in the world. ... Alternate cover Original soundtrack version Quadrophenia is a double album released by The Who on October 19, 1973, one of the groups two full-scale rock operas. ... Parklife is a critically acclaimed Britpop album by the band Blur, released on April 25, 1994. ... Girls & Boys (or Girls and Boys) is a song by British rock band Blur and is the lead track on their third album, Parklife. ... BBC Radio 1 (commonly referred to as just Radio 1) is a British national radio station operated by the BBC, specialising in popular music and speech and is aimed primarily at the 14-29[1] age group. ... Illustration by Arthur Rackham of the ballad The Twa Corbies A ballad is a story, usually a narrative or poem, in a song. ... To the End is a song by British rock band Blur and is featured on their third album, Parklife. ... Parklife is a song by Blur. ... The Brit Awards are the annual United Kingdom pop music awards founded by the British Phonographic Industry. ...


Blur began working on their fourth album The Great Escape (1995) at the start of 1995.[25] Building upon the band's previous two albums, Albarn's lyrics for the album consisted of several third-person narratives. James reflected, "It was all more elaborate, more orchestral, more theatrical,and the lyrics were even more twisted [. . .] It was all dysfunctional, misfit characters fucking up."[26] The release of the album's lead single "Country House" became part of a rivalry with Manchester band Oasis termed "The Battle of Britpop". Partly due to increasing antagonisms between the groups, Blur and Oasis ultimately decided to release their new singles on the same day, an event the NME called "The British Heavyweight Championship". The debate over which band would top the British singles chart became a media phenomenon, and Albarn appeared on the News at Ten.[27] At the end of the week, "Country House" ultimately outsold Oasis' "Roll With It" by 274,000 copies to 216,000, becoming Blur's first number one single.[28] Although The Great Escape entered the UK charts at number one, it was subsequently outsold by Oasis' (What's the Story) Morning Glory?. The Great Escape is the fourth album by Blur. ... A country house is a large dwelling, such as a mansion, located on a country estate. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... The Battle of Britpop is the unofficial title given to the chart battle of 1995 which took place between leading Britpop groups, Blur and Oasis. ... Roll With It is a song by British rock band Oasis written by their lead guitarist Noel Gallagher. ... Singles from (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? Released: 24 April 1995 Released: 14 August 1995 Released: 15 September 1995 (Australia only) Released: 30 October 1995 Released: 19 February 1996 Released: 13 May 1996 (Australia and USA only) (Whats the Story) Morning Glory? is the second album by the...


Reinvention after Britpop: 1997-2000

Despite their success in the Battle of Britpop, Blur became perceived as an "inauthentic middle class pop band" in comparison to the "working class heroes" Oasis, which Albarn said made him feel "stupid and confused".[27] Coxon became uncomfortable with the band's success. The guitarist struggled with drinking problems and, in a rejection of the group's Britpop aesthetic, made a point of listening to noisy American alternative rock.[29] The band took a brief hiatus between the end of their tour in March and the beginning of new recording sessions, which would begin in June 1996, Blur began recording their new album. The album was finished in November 1996.

Music sample:
  • "Song 2"
    Sample of "Song 2" from Blur. Inspired by lo-fi and American indie rock, "Song 2' was a hit in the US.
    "Tender"
    Sample of "Tender", which showcased electronic and gospel music influences.
  • Problems playing the files? See media help.

The group's fifth album Blur (1997) featured the influence of American lo-fi and indie rock on the band. Albarn explained to the NME in January 1997 that "We created a movement: as far as the lineage of British bands goes, there'll always be a place for us", but added, "We genuinely started to see that world in a slightly different way."[30] Blur's reinvention earned them much praise in the UK; the album and its first single, "Beetlebum" debuted at number one. In the U.S. also, the record received strong reviews as the album and its second single "Song 2" became a hit. The album reached number 61 on the Billboard 200 and achieved Gold status, while "Song 2" peaked at number six on the Modern Rock chart. After the success of Blur, the band embarked on a worldwide tour. However, at the conclusion of their tour, the band announced that they would take a different approach to their next album, and parted ways with long-time producer and collaborator Stephen Street. Lo-fi — from Low Fidelity — describes a sound recording which contains accidental artifacts, like distortion, or environmental noise, or a recording which has a limited frequency response. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Blur is the fifth album by Blur, first release in 1997. ... Beetlebum is a song by English band Blur and was released as the lead single from the bands eponymous fifth album, Blur. ... Song 2 is a song by Blur, and the second single released from their eponymous fifth album, Blur in April 1997. ... The Billboard 200 is a ranking of the 200 highest-selling music albums and EPs in the United States, published weekly by Billboard magazine. ...


Blur hired William Orbit to replace Street as producer. The resulting album, 13, was musically dominated by Orbit's electronic production. 13 was preceded by the single "Tender", which marked a new era of sonic experimentation for Blur, with its mix of gospel and electronic music. The album also spawned another hit single, "Coffee & TV", which featured lead vocals by Coxon. William Orbit ( born on 15 December 1956 as William Mark Wainwright in Shoreditch, Hackney) is an English musician and record producer, perhaps best known to most for his work on Madonnas album Ray of Light, which received four Grammy Awards. ... 13 is the sixth album by English rock band Blur, first released in 1999. ... Tender is a song by the band Blur. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Coffee & TV is a song by Blur. ...


Exhausted by incessant recording and touring through the world, Blur took a hiatus, releasing a box set of singles in August 1999 to celebrate the band's 10th anniversary.


Hiatus and Coxon's departure: 2001-2003

Early in 2002, however, Blur temporarily broke its hiatus to record a song that would be played for the European Space Agency's Mars Lander, however, the plan fell through when the lander was lost.[31] ESA redirects here. ...


Recording for Blur's next album, Think Tank, got under way in Marrakesh, Morocco in mid-2002. Tensions surfaced, however, when Coxon began to appear emotionally and creatively distant to his band mates, reportedly failing to attend recording sessions. Two of the main causes for this has been cited as the choice of dance DJ Fatboy Slim as the album's producer and also Coxon's alleged alcohol problems. After several weeks of uncertainty, Coxon confirmed that he had been asked to leave the band for reasons connected with his "attitude."[32] His last contribution to the band was a guitar line on the final track of Think Tank, "Battery in Your Leg" which Albarn said was the only song he ever wrote about the band.[33] Think Tank is the seventh studio album by English rock band Blur, released on May 5, 2003 in the United Kingdom and on May 6 in the United States. ... Marrakech (مراكش marrākish), known as the Pearl of the South, is a city in southwestern Morocco in the foothills of the Atlas Mountains. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of DJ, see DJ (disambiguation). ... FatBoy Slim (born Quentin Leo Cook on July 31, 1963,[1] also known as Norman Cook) is a British big beat musician. ...


Before the album was released, Blur released a new single, "Don't Bomb When You're The Bomb" as a very limited white label release. A largely electronic song, sporting a chorus consisting of "Don't bomb when you're the bomb-ba-bomb-bomb-bomb" the single and the band's startling reinvention was a shock to Blur fans, who were expecting a return to the catchy pop tunes of the band's early career.[citation needed] Albarn, however, attempted to assuage fans' fears by explaining the impetus behind the song and providing reassurances that the band's new album would be a return to their roots.[34] Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ...


Think Tank, released in May 2003, was filled with atmospheric, brooding electronic sounds, featuring simpler guitar lines played by Albarn, and largely relying on other instruments to replace Coxon. Coxon's absence also meant that Think Tank was almost entirely written by Albarn. Its sound was seen as a testament to Albarn's increasing interest in African music, Middle Eastern music and electronic music, and to his control over the group's creative direction.[35] For the following tour the band hired Simon Tong, former guitarist and keyboardist of The Verve, who also played with Albarn in his Gorillaz project. Think Tank is the seventh studio album by English rock band Blur, released on May 5, 2003 in the United Kingdom and on May 6 in the United States. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Guitar (disambiguation). ... Africa is a large and diverse continent, consisting of dozens of countries, hundreds of languages and thousands of races, tribes and ethnic groups. ... The category Middle Eastern music refers to music from the Middle East and its different regions such as North Africa, the Levant and the Persian Gulf States. ... Simon Tong a British a musican, a school friend of Richard Ashcroft, Simon Jones and Peter Salisbury played with the The Verve on Urban Hymns and replaced Nick McCabe. ... The Verve (originally Verve) are an English rock band formed in Wigan, Greater Manchester in 1989 at Winstanley Sixth Form College, by vocalist Richard Ashcroft, guitarist Nick McCabe, bassist Simon Jones, and drummer Peter Salisbury. ...


While Think Tank was received well by critics and fans,[36] a minority of critics didn't warm to it.[37] However, Think Tank was yet another UK number one and managed Blur's highest US position of number 56.[38] The album was also nominated for best album at the 2004 BRIT Awards. The band supported the album with a tour and three singles: "Out of Time, "Crazy Beat" and "Good Song". The Brit Awards are the annual United Kingdom pop music awards founded by the British Phonographic Industry. ... Crazy Beat is a song by Blur and was released as the second single from their seventh album Think Tank in 2003 (see 2003 in music). ... Good Song is a song by Blur and was released as the last single from their seventh album Think Tank in 2003 (see 2003 in British music). ...


Solo, reunion and hiatus: 2004-present

In early 2004, the band announced, through XFM news, that they would be recording an EP, and there were also rumours that Coxon would return to Blur, which proved untrue. But in the news, the band explained that the workload on Albarn would be significant, as he was working on the second Gorillaz album, among other projects. In mid-2005, Blur recorded a couple of songs, without Coxon, conceived mainly acoustically by Albarn. In an interview with the NME, Albarn said that if Coxon wasn't to return to the band, he was not comfortable with reforming Blur. "Why don't I get another guitarist? Because there's none better than Coxon," was Albarn's reply. For the Gorillazs self-titled debut album, see Gorillaz (album). ...


After Coxon significantly thawed about rejoining the band,[39] James announced[40]in April and August 2007 that the band will reunite and will likely be recording a new album in October [41]. However, in early October 2007, the official band site revealed that although bandmembers all met for "an enjoyable lunch", they had no intentions of Blur work in the near future and that the media drew out the reunion talks far too much. [42] An official statement about the future of the band has yet to be released.


James maintains that "It would be a disaster thinking there would never be another Blur record. And anyone who has ever been in a band thinks they can get back together and make the best album ever."[43] Albarn is more pessimistic about the possibility of a band reunion: "You'd be very unwise to put money on it. I'm starting my own betting service and I'll just keep feeding things to the press saying 'Maybe, maybe'. It's like the polar ice-caps staying frozen: unlikely."[44] In an article published in NME on 1 February, 2008, Albarn gave further indication of the obstacles to a Blur reunion. Specifically, he said that "They all hate me... a reunion is not going to happen." [45] The day before that (31 January) Coxon said that beside the lunch the band never discussed potential recording: "We met for a catch-up and it was great, but there was no real talk of recording."[46]


Discography

Main article: Blur discography

This page lists albums, singles and compilations by the English rock band Blur. ... Leisure is the debut album by Blur, released in August 1991 and making # 7 in the UK. The US version of the album had some differences. ... Modern Life Is Rubbish is the second album by the British rock band Blur, released on May 10 1993. ... Parklife is a critically acclaimed Britpop album by the band Blur, released on April 25, 1994. ... The Great Escape is the fourth album by Blur. ... Blur is the fifth album by Blur, first release in 1997. ... 13 is the sixth album by English rock band Blur, first released in 1999. ... Think Tank is the seventh studio album by English rock band Blur, released on May 5, 2003 in the United Kingdom and on May 6 in the United States. ...

References

  • Harris, John. Britpop! Cool Britannia and the Spectacular Demise of English Rock, 2004. ISBN 0-306-81367-X
  • Live Forever: The Rise and Fall of Brit Pop. Passion Pictures, 2004.

Notes

  1. ^ Harris, John. Britpop!: Cool Britannia and the Spectacular Demise of English Rock, 2004. ISBN 0-306-81367-X, pg. 45
  2. ^ Harris, pg. 46
  3. ^ Harris, pg. 47
  4. ^ Harris, pg. 49-50
  5. ^ Harris, pg. 53-55
  6. ^ Harris, pg. 56-57
  7. ^ Kelly, Danny. "Sacre Blur!" NME. 20 July 1991.
  8. ^ Harris, pg. 58
  9. ^ Harris, pg. 59
  10. ^ Harris, pg. 66
  11. ^ Harris, pg. 67, 77
  12. ^ a b Harris, John. "A shite sports car and a punk reincarnation." NME. 10 April 1993
  13. ^ Harris, pg. 68
  14. ^ Harris, pg. 73
  15. ^ Harris, pg. 73-75
  16. ^ Harris, pg. 78
  17. ^ Harris, pg. 79
  18. ^ Harris, pg. 82
  19. ^ Harris, pg. 82-83
  20. ^ Harris, pg. 90
  21. ^ Harris, pg. 89
  22. ^ Harris, pg. 141
  23. ^ Harris, pg. 142
  24. ^ Harris, pg. 192
  25. ^ Harris, pg. 222
  26. ^ Harris, pg. 223-24
  27. ^ a b Live Forever: The Rise and Fall of Brit Pop. Passion Pictures, 2004.
  28. ^ Harris, pg. 235
  29. ^ Harris, pg. 259-60
  30. ^ Mulvey, John. "We created a movement...there'll always be a place for us". NME. 11 January 1997.
  31. ^ Blur song on Mars Rover. BBC News. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  32. ^ Special Relationships. The Observer (2003-09-21). Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  33. ^ Blur - Think Tank (Parlophone). MusicOMH.com (2003-05-05). Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  34. ^ Blur to Rock for World Peace. MTV News. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  35. ^ Artist Profile: Blur. VH1.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  36. ^ Metacritic: Blur-Think Tank:2003.. Metacritic.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  37. ^ allmusic: Think Tank-Overview.. All Music Guide. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  38. ^ The Official UK Charts Company: Think Tank. Retrieved on 2007-03-11.
  39. ^ http://www.nme.com/news/blur/25150 = Graham considers Blur reunion
  40. ^ Blur to return to the studio in August. Digital Spy. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  41. ^ NME
  42. ^ Blur Forum Post. blur.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-10-05.
  43. ^ Blur Planning A New Album. Dailyrecord.co.uk. Retrieved on 2007-12-23.
  44. ^ Blur and Solo
  45. ^ Damon Albarn: 'the rest of Blur hate me' | News | NME.COM
  46. ^ NME

is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 70th day of the year (71st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Damon Albarn, (born March 23, 1968 in Leytonstone, London), is an English singer-songwriter who gained fame as the lead singer and keyboard player of rock band Blur. ... Graham Coxon singing in the video to Blurs Tender Graham Coxon (born Graham Leslie Coxon on 12 March 1969, in Rinteln, West Germany) is an English singer-songwriter, best known as the former guitarist in the rock band Blur. ... Alex James (born Steven Alexander James, 21 November 1968, in Boscombe, Bournemouth, Dorset, England) is the bass player in the band Blur, and one of the members of Fat Les. ... Dave Rowntree (born David Rowntree on 8 May 1964, in Colchester, Essex, England) is best known as the drummer in the band Blur. ... Leisure is the debut album by Blur, released in August 1991 and making # 7 in the UK. The US version of the album had some differences. ... Modern Life Is Rubbish is the second album by the British rock band Blur, released on May 10 1993. ... Parklife is a critically acclaimed Britpop album by the band Blur, released on April 25, 1994. ... The Great Escape is the fourth album by Blur. ... Blur is the fifth album by Blur, first release in 1997. ... 13 is the sixth album by English rock band Blur, first released in 1999. ... Think Tank is the seventh studio album by English rock band Blur, released on May 5, 2003 in the United Kingdom and on May 6 in the United States. ... The Special Collectors Edition was released in Japan in 1994. ... Live at Budokan is a 1995 live album by British band Blur, recorded during their 1995 tour for their album The Great Escape at Budokan. ... Bustin + Dronin is a remix compilation/live album by the band Blur. ... The 10 Year Limited Edition Anniversary Box Set is a box set by the band Blur released in limited quantities on August 17, 1999. ... Blur: The Best of is a greatest hits compilation by Blur released on CD, cassette tape, MiniDisc, double 12 vinyl record, DVD and VHS. The CD album includes 18 of Blurs 23 singles from 1990 to 2000. ... This page lists albums, singles and compilations by the English rock band Blur. ... Food Records is the record label of Blur, Jesus Jones and Dubstar. ... Honest Jons is a British independent record label created by musician Damon Albarn. ... Stephen Street is a music producer best known for his work with The Smiths in the 1980s and Blur in the 1990s. ... Transcopic is a record company created in 1998 by (now ex) Blur guitarist Graham Coxon for his solo releases. ... The Battle of Britpop is the unofficial title given to the chart battle of 1995 which took place between leading Britpop groups, Blur and Oasis. ... Britpop was a mid-1990s British alternative rock genre and movement. ... The Ailerons are an indie rock band featuring Charity Hair, Dan Beattle, Dave Rowntree (notably drummer of English band Blur and Mike Smith. ... Fat Les is a British band consisting of Alex James, the bassist from Blur; actor Keith Allen; and artist Damien Hirst. ... The Good, the Bad and the Queen is the debut album by an unnamed alternative rock band released in January 2007. ... For the Gorillazs self-titled debut album, see Gorillaz (album). ... Hanging Around cover Me Me Me was a short lived British supergroup, consisting of four high profile Britpop musicians. ... Apache wickiup, by Edward S. Curtis, 1903 A wigwam or wickiup is a domed single-room dwelling used by certain Native American tribes. ...

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