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Encyclopedia > Blue Velvet
Blue Velvet

Film poster
Directed by David Lynch
Produced by Fred C. Caruso
Written by David Lynch
Starring Kyle MacLachlan
Isabella Rossellini
Dennis Hopper
Laura Dern
Dean Stockwell
Music by Angelo Badalamenti
Cinematography Frederick Elmes
Editing by Duwayne Dunham
Distributed by De Laurentiis Entertainment Group
Release date(s) Flag of Canada Canada:
12 September 1986 (premiere at Toronto Film Festival)
Flag of the United States United States:
19 September 1986 (theatrical release)
Flag of Australia Australia:
February 26, 1987
Running time 120 minutes
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $6,000,000 (estimated)
Gross revenue $8,551,228 (North America)
Allmovie profile
IMDb profile

Blue Velvet is a 1986 American neo-noir, mystery and thriller film written and directed by David Lynch. The film features Kyle MacLachlan, Isabella Rossellini, Dennis Hopper and Laura Dern. The title Blue Velvet is taken from the Bobby Vinton song of the same name. Blue Velvet is a song recorded by Bobby Vinton. ... Image File history File links Bvmovieposter. ... German Three sheet Movie poster for Metropolis. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and model. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Laura Elizabeth Dern-Harper (born February 10, 1967) is an American actress. ... Dean Stockwell (born March 5, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning American film and television actor, active for over 60 years. ... Angelo Badalamenti (born March 22, 1937) is an Italian-American composer, best known for his movie soundtrack work for movie director David Lynch, most notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1991-1992) and Mulholland Drive // He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Sicilian mother and an Italian... Frederick Elmes, also known as Fred Elmes, is a cinematographer. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) is generally considered to be one of the five top film festivals in the world. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... North American redirects here. ... // April 12 - Actor Morgan Mason marries The Go-Gos Belinda Carlisle Actor Arnold Schwarzenegger marries television journalist Maria Shriver. ... Neo-noir (from the Greek neo, new; and the French noir, black) is a type of motion picture that prominently utilizes elements of film noir, but with updated themes, content, style or visual elements that were absent in films noir of the 1940s and 1950s. ... Mystery fiction is a distinct subgenre of detective fiction that entails the occurrence of an unknown event which requires the protagonist to make known (or solve). ... The thriller is a broad genre of literature, film, and television. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and model. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Laura Elizabeth Dern-Harper (born February 10, 1967) is an American actress. ... Bobby Vinton (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer. ... Blue Velvet is a song recorded by Bobby Vinton. ...


Set in the small town of Lumberton, North Carolina, the film tells the story of college student Jeffrey Beaumont, who discovers a severed human ear in a grass field behind a neighbourhood. Jeffrey decides to investigate the case himself, with the assistance of Sandy Williams, a high school student and daughter of Lieutenant John Williams, town sheriff. Sandy provides Jeffrey with information she overheard from her father's office which aids them in their investigation of the ear. Jeffrey is eventually drawn into an underworld, home to Frank Booth, a sociopathic criminal, and leader of a gang involved in murder, rape and drug addiction. Blue Velvet opened to widespread critical acclaim[1][2][3] and was a box office success, considering its limited release in theatres across the United States. The film earned director David Lynch an Academy Award nomination for Best Director. The film has become a cult classic.[4][5] Lumberton is a city located in Robeson County, North Carolina. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... For other uses, see College (disambiguation). ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Frank Booth is a fictional character in David Lynchs 1986 film, Blue Velvet, portrayed by Dennis Hopper. ... Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a personality disorder which is often characterised by antisocial and impulsive behaviour. ... Drug addiction, or dependency is the compulsive use of drugs, to the point where the user has no effective choice but to continue use. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ...

Contents

Synopsis

Jeffrey Beaumont (Kyle MacLachlan) returns home from college after his father (Jack Harvey) suffers a near fatal stroke. While walking home from the hospital, he cuts through a vacant lot and happens upon a severed ear and puts it in a paper bag. Jeffrey takes the ear to local investigator Detective John Williams (George Dickerson). When he returns to the Williams house later to discuss the incident further, Jeffrey meets the detective’s daughter, Sandy (Laura Dern). She tells him details about the ear case and a suspicious woman, Dorothy Vallens (Isabella Rossellini). Increasingly curious, Jeffrey devises a plan to sneak into Dorothy’s apartment that involves posing as a maintenance man. Dorothy becomes distracted when a man dressed in a yellow suit (played by Fred Pickler) knocks at her door, and Jeffrey steals Dorothy's spare key. Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... George Dickerson (born 1933) is an American actor and poet. ... Laura Elizabeth Dern-Harper (born February 10, 1967) is an American actress. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and model. ...


Jeffrey and Sandy attend Dorothy's nightclub show at the Slow Club. While Dorothy performs at the nightclub, Jeffrey sneaks into her apartment to snoop. He hurriedly hides in a closet when she returns home. However, Dorothy, wielding a knife, finds him hiding and threatens to hurt him. When she realizes he is merely a curious boy, she assumes his intentions are sexual in nature, and is turned on by his voyeurism. She makes him undress at knifepoint, then fellates him. Frank Booth (Dennis Hopper) interrupts their encounter with a knock on the door. Dorothy urges Jeffrey to return to the closet and he then witnesses Frank's bizarre sexual proclivities, which include erotic asphyxiation, fisting, dry humping, and sadomasochistic tendencies. Frank is an extremely foul-mouthed, violent sociopath whose orgasmic climax is a fit of both pleasure and rage. When Frank leaves, a saddened and desperate Dorothy tries to seduce Jeffrey again. She demands that he hit her but when he refuses she demands to be left alone. Jeffrey again observes Dorothy's nightclub show at the Slow Club, where she performs the song Blue Velvet. Frank is also present at the nightclub. Later, in the car park, Jeffrey watches Frank and his cohorts drive away before going to Dorothy's apartment again. Laser lights illuminate the dance floor at a Gatecrasher dance music event in Sheffield, England A nightclub (or night club or club) is a drinking, dancing, and entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... Fellatio is oral sex performed upon the male human penis. ... Frank Booth is a fictional character in David Lynchs 1986 film, Blue Velvet, portrayed by Dennis Hopper. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Autoerotic asphyxiation, asphyxiophilia, or breath control play, is the practice of intentionally reducing the amount of oxygen to the brain during sexual stimulation in order to heighten the received pleasure from orgasm. ... Fisting or fist fucking (FF) is a sexual activity that involves inserting the hand and forearm into the vagina or anus. ... In the context of human sexual behavior, frottage or frotteurism is the act of achieving sexual gratification by rubbing ones (clothed or naked) body against another person. ... Flogging demonstration at Folsom Street Fair 2004. ... Antisocial personality disorder (APD) is a personality disorder which is often characterised by antisocial and impulsive behaviour. ... An orgasm (sexual climax) is the conclusion of the plateau phase of the sexual response cycle, and may be experienced by both males and females. ...


Jeffrey spends the next few days spying on Frank, and at one point sees him entering a building. Shortly afterwards, two men exit the building, a well-dressed man and someone Jeffrey recognizes as the Yellow Suited Man. He concludes the two men are criminals, as is Frank. He also visits Dorothy again, and this time she successfully seduces him. However, while they are making love she asks him to strike her. He refuses and she pressures him, becoming more emotional. Finally in blind rage he knocks her backwards, and is instantly horrified, but Dorothy, as a result of Frank's constant beatings, has come to take pleasure from it.


Afterwards, Frank catches Dorothy and Jeffrey together, and forces them both to accompany him to the typically Lynchian house of Ben (Dean Stockwell), a suave dandy and partner in crime. In a bizarre scene Ben mimes the singing of Roy Orbison's "In Dreams", sending Frank into maudlin sadness, then rage. He takes Jeffrey to a milling yard and savagely beats him to the overture of "In Dreams." Jeffrey wakes the next day and goes home, where he is overcome with guilt and despair. He decides to go to the police. At the police station, Jeffrey notices that Sandy's father's partner is Gordon — the Yellow Suited Man. Later at Sandy's home, her father is amazed by Jeffrey's story, but warns Jeffrey of the danger of the situation. Jeffrey and Sandy go to a dance party together, profess their newfound love and embrace. When they're tailed on their way home, Jeffrey is relieved to discover that it's only Sandy’s football-playing ex-boyfriend. A confrontation is avoided when they see a naked and distressed Dorothy waiting on Jeffrey’s front lawn. Barely conscious, Dorothy accidentally reveals that she slept with Jeffrey, causing Sandy to leave in tears, although she later forgives Jeffrey over the phone. Dean Stockwell (born March 5, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated and Emmy-winning American film and television actor, active for over 60 years. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... In Dreams is a 1963 song composed and sung by American rock and roll performer, Roy Orbison. ...


From the hospital, Jeffrey tells Sandy that he must return to Dorothy's apartment and tells Sandy to send her father there immediately. When he arrives back at Dorothy’s apartment, he finds the crudely lobotomized Yellow Man and dead body of Dorothy’s husband, who is missing an ear. When he tries to leave, he sees The Well Dressed Man coming up the steps and recognizes him as Frank. Jeffrey talks to Detective Williams over the police radio but lies about his location inside the apartment. Frank enters the apartment and brags about hearing Jeffrey's location over his own police radio. When Frank fails to find Jeffrey in the bedroom, he returns to the lounge. Jeffrey shoots Frank with the Yellow Man's gun. Detective Williams arrives with Sandy in tow. Days later, we see Jeffrey and Sandy together, with their lives back to normal, and before the credits, Dorothy and her son playing happily in the park together.


Development

Origins and inspiration

Blue Velvet's setting of Lumberton
Blue Velvet's setting of Lumberton

Lynch has admitted to certain autobiographical content in the film: Image File history File links Lumbertonbv. ... Image File history File links Lumbertonbv. ...

"Kyle is dressed like me. My father was a research scientist for the Department of Agriculture in Washington. We were in the woods all the time. I'd sorta had enough of the woods by the time I left, but still, lumber and lumberjacks, all this kinda thing, that's America to me like the picket fences and the roses in the opening shot. It's so burned in, that image, and it makes me feel so happy."[6] The U.S. Department of Agriculture, also called the Agriculture Department, or USDA, is a Cabinet department of the United States Federal Government. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ...

The actual story of the film originated from three ideas that crystallized in the filmmaker's mind over a period of time starting as early as 1973. The first idea only "a feeling" and the title Blue Velvet.[7] The second idea was an image of a severed, human ear lying in a field. "I don't know why it had to be an ear. Except it needed to be an opening of a part of the body a hole into something else...The ear sits on the head and goes right into the mind so it felt perfect," Lynch remarked in an interview.[8] The third idea was Bobby Vinton's classic rendition of the song Blue Velvet and "the mood that came with that song a mood, a time, and things that were of that time."[9] Bobby Vinton (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer. ...


Lynch and Roth pitched the script to Warner Bros. Pictures, who showed interest in the project. Lynch eventually spent two years writing two drafts, which he stated, were not very good. The problem with them, Lynch has said, was that "there was maybe all the unpleasantness in the film but nothing else. A lot was not there. And so it went away for a while."[10] “WB” redirects here. ...


Screenplay and early production

After finishing The Elephant Man in 1979, Lynch met producer Richard Roth over coffee. Roth had read and enjoyed Lynch's Ronnie Rocket script but did not think it was something he wanted to produce. He asked Lynch if the filmmaker had any other scripts but the director only had ideas. "I told him I had always wanted to sneak into a girl's room to watch her into the night and that, maybe, at one point or another, I would see something that would be the clue to a murder mystery. Roth loved the idea and asked me to write a treatment. I went home and thought of the ear in the field."[7][4] The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... Richard Henry Roth (1949-)is an American journalist, a CNN correspondent who covers the United Nations and was the host of Diplomatic License (until its cancellation in January 2006), a weekly program that was devoted to United Nations affairs. ... After finishing Eraserhead, David Lynch spent two years writing a script for a new project entitled, Ronnie Rocket, which was about a three-foot tall guy with red hair and physical problems, and about 60-cycle alternating current electricity. ...

David Lynch on the set of the film with Kyle MacLachlan.
David Lynch on the set of the film with Kyle MacLachlan.

Lynch wrote two more drafts before he was satisfied with the script of the film. Conditions at this point were ideal for Lynch's film: he had cut a deal with Dino De Laurentiis that gave him complete artistic freedom and final cut privileges with the stipulation that the filmmaker take a cut in his salary and work with a budget of only $6 million. This deal meant that Blue Velvet was the smallest film on the De Laurentiis' slate. Consequently, Lynch would be left mostly unsupervised during production.[11] "After Dune I was down so far that anything was up! So it was just a euphoria. And when you work with that kind of feeling, you can take chances. You can experiment."[10] Because the material was completely different from anything that would be considered mainstream at the time, Laurentiis had to start his own production company to distribute it.[12][13] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Agostino De Laurentiis, usually credited as Dino De Laurentiis, (born August 8, 1919) is an Italian movie producer born at Torre Annunziata in the province of Naples. ...


The scene where Dorothy appears naked outside after being raped and beaten was inspired by a real-life experience Lynch had in his childhood when he and his brother saw a naked woman walking down a neighborhood street at night. The experience was so traumatic to the young Lynch at the time, it made him cry and he had never forgotten it.[14]


Principal photography of Blue Velvet began on February 10, 1986. The exterior scenes of Lumberton were filmed in Wilmington, North Carolina.[15] Principal Photography refers to the phase of film production during which the movie is actually shot, as distinct from pre-production and post-production. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ... Official language(s) English Demonym North Carolinian Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th in the US  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (340 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


Casting

The cast of Blue Velvet included several relatively unknown actors, including Laura Dern. Isabella Rossellini had experienced some recognition for her Lancôme ads in the early 1980s. Dennis Hopper was the biggest "name" in the film, having starred in Easy Rider (1969) and Apocalypse Now (1979), while Kyle MacLachlan had played the central role in Lynch's Dune (1984), a science fiction epic based on the novel of the same name, a critical and commercial failure. Blue Velvet's dark script and low budget limited the number of big names that Lynch could attract. The part of Frank Booth was originally offered to Robert Loggia, then Willem Dafoe and Richard Bright, all of whom turned it down because of the character's vulgar and intense personality.[15] In contrast, Dennis Hopper — Lynch's third choice — accepted the role, reportedly having exclaimed, "I've got to play Frank! I am Frank!"[16] Hopper confirmed this in the Blue Velvet "making-of" documentary The Mysteries of Love, produced in 2002 for the special edition of the film.[17] Laura Elizabeth Dern-Harper (born February 10, 1967) is an American actress. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and model. ... Lancôme Paris is a leading international manufacturer and marketer of perfume, cosmetic, and skin care products. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Wyatt, Mary (Toni Basil), Billy and Karen (Karen Black) wandering the streets of a parade filled New Orleans. ... Apocalypse Now is a 1979 Academy Award and Golden Globe winning American film set during the Vietnam War. ... Kyle MacLachlan (born February 22, 1959, in Yakima, Washington) is a Golden Globe award winning American actor. ... Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... Frank Booth is a fictional character in David Lynchs 1986 film, Blue Velvet, portrayed by Dennis Hopper. ... Robert Loggia (born January 3, 1930) is an American Academy Award and Emmy Award nominated film and television actor who specializes in character parts. ... William Dafoe, Jr. ... Richard J. Bright (June 28, 1937 – February 18, 2006) was an American actor best known for his role as Al Neri in the The Godfather films. ...


For the role of Dorothy Vallens, Lynch met Isabella Rossellini at a restaurant, and she accepted the role. Lynch only had one choice for the role of Jeffrey Beaumont: Val Kilmer, who turned the role down, deeming the script he read as "pornography". Kilmer later said he would have done the final version of the film; having become very fond of it.[15] Chris Isaak was offered the role of Jeffrey Beaumont, but he turned it down. Lynch used two songs from Isaak's 1985 debut album Silvertone in the film. Kyle MacLachlan, who had previously starred in one film directed by Lynch, Dune (1984), was asked to play the role of Jeffrey. He instantly agreed. For MacLachlan, who appears in nearly every scene in the film, the intense shooting schedule was exhausting.[17] In an interview, Lynch said that he initially wanted Molly Ringwald, then widely known as a "teen idol", to star as Sandy Williams; but Ringwald's mother objected to her starring in the film due to the graphic content, believing that it would tarnish her then-successful career in the film industry.[18] Val Edward Kilmer[1] (born December 31, 1959) is an American actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Silvertone is the first album by Chris Isaak, released in 1985. ... Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. ... Molly Kathleen Ringwald (born February 18, 1968) is an American actress, singer, and dancer. ...


Post-production

Lynch's original rough cut ran for approximately four hours.[15] He was contractually obligated to deliver a two-hour movie by De Laurentiis and cut many small subplots and character scenes.[19] He also made cuts at the request of the MPAA. For example, when Frank slaps Dorothy after the first rape scene, the audience was supposed to see Frank actually hitting her, instead it cuts away to Jeffrey in the closet, wincing at what he has just seen. This was removed to satisfy the MPAA concerns about violence. Lynch thought that the change only made the scene more disturbing.[15] To this day, footage of the deleted scenes has never been found and only stills remain. David Lynch's final cut of the film ran one frame under two hours.[15] The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is a non-profit trade association formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ...


Soundtrack

Main article: Blue Velvet (film soundtrack)
Blue Velvet (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)
Blue Velvet (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) cover
Soundtrack by Angelo Badalamenti
Released 1986
Genre Soundtrack
Length 43:03
Label Varese Sarabande
Professional reviews

The Blue Velvet soundtrack is by Angelo Badalamenti. The soundtrack uses vintage pop songs, such as Bobby Vinton’s "Blue Velvet" and Roy Orbison’s "In Dreams", juxtaposed with an orchestral score inspired by Shostakovich. During filming, Lynch placed megaphones on set and in streets and played Shostakovich to set the correct mood he wanted to convey.[17] The score makes direct quotations from Shostakovich's 15th Symphony, which Lynch had been listening to regularly while writing the screenplay.[20] The Blue Velvet soundtrack by Angelo Badalamenti is a dark combination of classic composition and vintage/modern pop songs, which mirrors the films un-stated setting envisioned by David Lynch and unsettling neo-noir atmosphere. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... In film formats, the soundtrack is the physical area of the film which records the synchronized sound. ... Angelo Badalamenti (born March 22, 1937) is an Italian-American composer, best known for his movie soundtrack work for movie director David Lynch, most notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1991-1992) and Mulholland Drive // He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Sicilian mother and an Italian... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the music industry, a record label can be a brand and a trademark associated with the marketing of music recordings and music videos. ... Varèse Sarabande is a record label, which specialises in soundtrack record releases, and reissues of hard-to-find (sometimes long- or previously-unavailable) albums, and singles collections. ... The All Music Guide (AMG) is a metadata database about music, owned by All Media Guide. ... Image File history File links 4. ... Angelo Badalamenti (born March 22, 1937) is an Italian-American composer, best known for his movie soundtrack work for movie director David Lynch, most notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1991-1992) and Mulholland Drive // He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Sicilian mother and an Italian... Bobby Vinton (born April 16, 1935) is an American pop music singer. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... In Dreams is a 1963 song composed and sung by American rock and roll performer, Roy Orbison. ... Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich (Russian Дмитрий Дмитриевич Шостакович) (September 25, 1906 – August 9, 1975) was a Russian composer of the Soviet period. ...


Entertainment Weekly ranked Blue Velvet at #100 on their list of the 100 Greatest Film Soundtracks. Critic John Alexander wrote, "the haunting soundtrack accompanies the title credits, then weaves through the narrative, accentuating the noir mood of the film." Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ...


Lynch worked with music composer Angelo Badalamenti for the first time in this film and asked him to write a score that had to be “like Shostakovich, be very Russian, but make it the most beautiful thing but make it dark and a little bit scary.”[21] Badalamenti's success with Blue Velvet would later go on to contribute to all of Lynch's future full-length films.[15] Also included in the sound team was long time Lynch collaborator Alan Splet, sound editor and designer who had won an Academy Award for his work on The Black Stallion (1979) and been nominated for Never Cry Wolf (1983). Angelo Badalamenti (born March 22, 1937) is an Italian-American composer, best known for his movie soundtrack work for movie director David Lynch, most notably Blue Velvet, the Twin Peaks saga (1991-1992) and Mulholland Drive // He was born in Brooklyn, New York to a Sicilian mother and an Italian... Alan Splet (1939–1995) was an oscar winning sound designer and sound editor. ... A sound editor is a creative professional responsible for selecting and assembling sound recordings in preparation for the final sound mixing or mastering of a television program or motion picture. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Black Stallion, known as the Black or Shetan, is the title character from author Walter Farleys bestselling series about the wild stallion is his young friend Alec Ramsay. ... Never Cry Wolf is a book by Canadian author Farley Mowat, published in 1963. ...


Track listing

  1. "Main Title" 1:27
  2. "Night Streets/Sandy and Jeffrey" 3:42
  3. "Frank" 3:34
  4. "Jeffrey's Dark Side" 1:48
  5. "Mysteries of Love" 2:10
  6. "Frank Returns" 4:39
  7. "Mysteries of Love" [instrumental] 4:41
  8. "Blue Velvet/Blue Star" 3:14
  9. "Lumberton U.S.A./Going Down to Lincoln" 2:13
  10. "Akron Meets the Blues" 2:40
  11. Bill Doggett - "Honky Tonk, Pt. 1" 3:09
  12. Roy Orbison - "In Dreams" 2:48
  13. Ketty Lester - "Love Letters" 2:36
  14. Julee Cruise - "Mysteries of Love" 4:22

Bill Doggett (February 16, 1916 _ November 13, 1996) was an American jazz and rhythm and blues pianist and organist. ... Roy Kelton Orbison (April 23, 1936 – December 6, 1988), nicknamed The Big O, was an influential Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, guitarist and a pioneer of rock and roll whose recording career spanned more than four decades. ... In Dreams is a 1963 song composed and sung by American rock and roll performer, Roy Orbison. ... Ketty Lester (August 16, 1934 - ) is an American singer and television actress who is probably best recalled for her 1962 hit single Love Letters which reached into the Top 5 of the music charts in both the United States and the United Kingdom. ... Love Letters is a popular song. ... Julee Cruise (born 1 December 1956, in Creston, Iowa) is an American singer, and actress. ...

Reception

Box office performance

Blue Velvet was released in theatres in the United States on February 26, 1986. In its opening weekend, Blue Velvet grossed a total of (USD) $789,409 and was released in a total of 98 theaters in the United States. As of August 7, 2006, the film has grossed a total of $8,551,228 domestically.[5] It was also released internationally, in Australia, most of West Germany, China, Canada, Hong Kong, Western Europe and Japan, followed by subsequent video releases. The film grossed (AU) $900,000 in Australia, which was a large and impressive amount of money for a film to gross at the box office in Australia, in that day, and (HKD) 450,139 in Hong Kong. is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A current understanding of Western Europe. ... Look up Au, au in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Hong Kong Dollar (ISO 4217: HKD) is the official currency of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (SAR) within the Peoples Republic of China. ...


Critical reception

The film received an extremely positive reaction from critics in the United States.[1] Paul Attanasio of The Washington Post said that "the film showcases a visual stylist utterly in command of his talents" and that Angelo Badalamenti "contributes an extraordinary score, slipping seamlessly from slinky jazz to violin figures to the romantic sweep of a classic Hollywood score," but claims that Lynch "isn't interested in communicating, he's interested in parading his personality. The movie doesn't progress or deepen, it just gets weirder, and to no good end."[22] The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...


Janet Maslin, critic from The New York Times expressed her admiration for the film, and directed much praise toward the performances of Hopper and Rossellini: "Mr. Hopper and Miss Rossellini are so far outside the bounds of ordinary acting here that their performances are best understood in terms of sheer lack of inhibition; both give themselves entirely over to the material, which seems to be exactly what's called for." She concluded by saying that the movie, "is as fascinating as it is freakish. It confirms Mr. Lynch's stature as an innovator, a superb technician, and someone best not encountered in a dark alley."[23] Janet Maslin (b. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ...


Looking back in his Guardian/Observer review, critic Philip French felt that "The film is wearing well and has attained a classic status without becoming respectable or losing its sense of danger."[24] Blue Velvet holds a 90 percent "fresh" rating at Rotten Tomatoes and holds a consistently high rating on the Internet Movie Database. Peter Travers, film critic for Rolling Stone magazine, named Blue Velvet the best film of the 1980s, and referred to the film as an "American masterpiece".[citation needed] Film critic Gene Siskel included Blue Velvet on his list of the best films of 1986, at #6. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Peter Travers is the film critic for Rolling Stone magazine. ... This article is about the magazine. ... Eugene Gene Kal Siskel (January 26, 1946 – February 20, 1999) was one of the worlds most successful film critics. ...


Nevertheless, Blue Velvet was not without its detractors. A general criticism from critics in the United States was the films often vulgar approach to sexuality and violence that detracts the film from having a serious side.[25][26] Roger Ebert, noted film critic of the Chicago Sun-Times, supported that view, however praised Isabella Rosselini's performance as being "convincing and courageous", yet criticized how she was depicted in the film, even accusing David Lynch of misogyny: "degraded, slapped around, humiliated and undressed in front of the camera. And when you ask an actress to endure those experiences, you should keep your side of the bargain by putting her in an important film."[27] Ebert ended up giving the movie one star out of four. Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... In Eva Prima Pandora, by Jean Cousin (Louvre Museum), Eve, the equivalent of Pandora embodies Original Sin Misogyny (pronounced ) is hatred or strong prejudice against women; an antonym of philogyny. ...


Awards and nominations

The film received an array of nominations, ranging from independent awards to mainstream. Isabella Rossellini won an Independent Spirit Award for the Best Female Lead in 1987. David Lynch and Dennis Hopper won a Los Angeles Film Critics Association award in 1987 for Blue Velvet in categories Best Director (Lynch) and Best Supporting Actor (Hopper). In 1987 National Society of Film Critics gave the film Best Film, Best Director (David Lynch), Best Cinematography (Frederick Elmes) and Best Supporting Actor (Dennis Hopper) awards. In addition, David Lynch was nominated for the 1987 Best Director Academy Award. Dennis Hopper received an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor for the film Hoosiers. At the time, it was believed that the Academy wanted to honor Hopper's portrayal of Frank in Lynch's film, but gave him the Oscar nomination for his appearance in Hoosiers instead because Frank was just too evil a character. Many feel that Isabella Rossellini was also snubbed by the awards for her performance in the film.[citation needed] Founded in 1984, the Independent Spirit Awards were originally known as the FINDIE (Friends of Independents) Awards and presented winners with Plexiglas pyramids containing suspended shoestrings representing the paltry budgets of independent films. ... The Los Angeles Film Critics Association (LAFCA) was founded in 1975. ... The National Society of Film Critics or NSFC is an American film critic organization. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to directors working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... This page is about the movie Hoosiers. Hoosiers is also the nickname of Indiana University athletic teams; see Indiana Hoosiers. ...


It has won the following accolades:

Year Award Category — Recipient(s)
1986 Avoriaz Fantastic Film Festival Best Film (Grand Prize) — David Lynch
1987 Boston Society of Film Critics Awards Best Cinematography — Frederick Elmes
Best Director — David Lynch
Best Film — David Lynch
Best Actor in a Supporting Role — Dennis Hopper
1987 Independent Spirit Awards Best Female Lead — Isabella Rossellini
1987 Montreal World Film Festival Best Male Actor — Dennis Hopper
1987 National Society of Film Critics Awards Best Cinematography — Frederick Elmes.

It was nominated for the following awards: For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... The Boston Society of Film Critics (BSFC) is organization of film reviewers from Boston-based publications. ... Frederick Elmes, also known as Fred Elmes, is a cinematographer. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Founded in 1984, the Independent Spirit Awards were originally known as the FINDIE (Friends of Independents) Awards and presented winners with Plexiglas pyramids containing suspended shoestrings representing the paltry budgets of independent films. ... Isabella Fiorella Elettra Giovanna Rossellini (born June 18, 1952) is an Italian actress, filmmaker, author, philanthropist, and model. ... The Montreal World Film Festival (Festival des Films du Monde - Montréal) is Montreals oldest current film festival. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ...

Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Academy Award for Directing is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; the awards are voted on by other people within the industry. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Founded in 1984, the Independent Spirit Awards were originally known as the FINDIE (Friends of Independents) Awards and presented winners with Plexiglas pyramids containing suspended shoestrings representing the paltry budgets of independent films. ... Frederick Elmes, also known as Fred Elmes, is a cinematographer. ... Laura Elizabeth Dern-Harper (born February 10, 1967) is an American actress. ... Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ...

Influence

Although it initially gained a small theatrical audience and was met with controversy over its artistic merit, Blue Velvet became a cult classic since its theatrical debut, had a myriad of VHS, laserdisc and DVD releases, and marked the comeback of Dennis Hopper after a significant hiatus from work and the entrance of David Lynch into the Hollywood mainstream. Its success has helped propel Hollywood mainstream toward more graphic displays of previously-censored themes, a similar case to Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), to which Blue Velvet has been frequently compared.[28] This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc - see Etymology) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Look up psycho in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Blue Velvet spawned countless imitators that borrowed elements instituted by Lynch in the film. Its dark, dream-like and symbolistic production design have served as a benchmark and its inspiration can be seen in many subsequent suburban-set thriller films and cinema in general, as well as television programs including The X-Files, Lynch's own Twin Peaks, American Gothic and Desperate Housewives, as well as films such as Heathers, X, Crash, Happiness, American Beauty, Donnie Darko and Lantana.[29] Some posters for the video release dubbed it "the most talked about movie of the decade". An increasing number of critics continue to regard it as one of recent cinema's finest achievements[citation needed], Lynch’s magnum opus[citation needed], and one of the most effective thriller films[citation needed], and credit the film with having revolutionized the genre[citation needed]. It has been recognized as one of the greatest films of all time by the following publications, among others: The X-Files is an American Peabody, Golden Globe and Emmy Award-winning science fiction television series created by Chris Carter, which first aired on 10 September 1993, and ended on 19 May 2002. ... For the hills in San Francisco, see Twin Peaks, San Francisco, California. ... American Gothic is an American television series created by Shaun Cassidy and executive produced by Sam Raimi. ... Desperate Housewives is an American television comedy-drama series, created by Marc Cherry, who also serves as show runner, and produced by ABC Studios and Cherry Productions. ... This article is about the film Heathers. ... For other uses, see X (disambiguation). ... –Our Crashing Diversity by Ralph C. Carmona in the San Francisco Chronicle, September 18, 2007. ... For other uses, see Happiness (disambiguation). ... American Beauty is a 1999 drama film that explores themes of romantic and paternal love, freedom, sexuality, beauty, self-liberation, existentialism, the search for happiness, and family against the backdrop of modern American suburbia. ... Donnie Darko is a 2001 drama/psychological thriller/science fiction film written and directed by Richard Kelly. ... For other uses, see Lantana (disambiguation). ...

The American Film Institute has awarded the film two distinguished honors in their lists: one on 100 Years... 100 Thrills in 2001, selecting cinema’s most important horror and thriller films, and ranked the film’s villain Frank Booth, as one of the 50 greatest villains in 100 Years... 100 Heroes and Villains in 2003. The film was ranked #84 on Bravo Television's four hour programme 100 Scariest Movie Moments (2004).[35] It is frequently sampled musically.[36] Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Sight and Sound is a British monthly magazine about film. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 100 most heart-pounding American films as described by the AFI on the evening of June 12, 2001. ... “Horror Movie” redirects here. ... // AFIs 100 Years. ...


References in popular culture

There have been a number of references to Blue Velvet in the media, including:

  • In Kevin Smith's Clerks (1994) the character of Jay (portrayed by Jason Mewes) announces that he will "F*ck anything that moves", an imitation of Dennis Hopper's Frank.
  • In Haute Tension, a French slasher film, there is a shot-for-shot homage to the scene in Blue Velvet that introduces Frank's character.
  • In The Squid and the Whale, set in 1986, a group of friends decide to view Blue Velvet in the cinema, over Short Circuit, another 1986 film.
  • Blue Velvet is referenced in an episode of the television series Arrested Development. Wayne Jarvis comments on Gob's puppet Franklin, asking (in an imitation of Kyle MacLachlan), "Why do there have to be puppets like Frank?"
  • In the Capcom video game Resident Evil 4, a recurring treasure is named Velvet Blue.
  • In the video game Conker's Bad Fur Day, the famous "Do you want to go for a ride?" scene is mimicked at the end of the game.
  • The video game Metal Gear Solid contains an allusion to the "love letter" quote.
  • On June 14, 2007, the Village Voice printed a story about a devoted fan of the film, artist Christian Tomaszewski. Tomaszewski re-built most of the film’s set pieces, and re-created several of the film’s most important moments. He claimed, "So much a part of our language is the movie . . . so much a part of our behavior."[37]
  • Rollins Band released a lengthy 'jam' song called "JoyRiding with Frank." The live version starts with Henry quoting Frank: "This Is IT!"
  • Pop Will Eat Itself Released a song on their album The Looks or the Lifestyle? called "Pretty Pretty" The lyrics are things Frank says while threatening to kill Jeffrey and references The Candy Coloured Clown Called The Sandman.
  • The beginning of the Fear Factory song "Concrete" from their album of the same title features a sample of Frank screaming "Next!" after Jeffrey punches him in the face.
  • Benediction wrote "Dark Is the Season," a song about Blue Velvet having lyrics directly referencing the movie. It is recorded on the Dark is the Season EP. The lyrics sheet further states, "See the film Blue Velvet by David Lynch, freak out & blow your mind!!!"
  • In a Friends episode, titled the "One with Frank Jr", the film is mentioned.
  • Iowa metalcore band A Well Dressed Man took their name from the disguise worn by Frank Booth, referred to by Jeffrey as "the well-dressed man disguise."
  • Mr. Bungle's self-titled album featured samples of dialog from Blue Velvet in the songs "Squeeze Me Macaroni," "Stubb (A Dub)," and "My Ass Is on Fire."
  • The San Diego band Deadbolt recorded the song "E Frank" with lyrics inspired by some of Frank Booth's lines in the film. The song, recorded live, appears on the B-side of a single issued by Trademark Records.
  • The band Anthrax wrote "Now It's Dark", a song about Blue Velvet on their State of Euphoria album. Many of the lyrics reference the movie, including the infamous "Don't you fucking look at me!"
  • The Pittsburgh d-beat band Drought has a song entitled "Don't You Fucking Look at Me!", named for Frank's line in the film.
  • A soundbite of Frank Booth screaming "Heineken? Fuck that shit!" is heard in the middle of the Green Day cover of "My Generation."
  • The Norwegian band Combichrist used "Fuck that shit" in the chorus to a song titled the same.
  • The CD accompanying Arthur Kroker's book "Spasm" contains a track that begins by repeating the line, "Stay alive baby. Do it for Van Gogh."
  • On the radio show Loveline, a quote from Frank Booth is often played when a caller admits to having an abusive home life, involving males.
  • In the television series Greg the Bunny, the entire plot of the film, as well as its most recognized scenes, are parodied.
  • In Bio Dome, while inhaling nitrous oxide from a tank with a mask, Pauly Shore's character says, "Dennis Hopper, Blue Velvet: 'Oh I'm slutty!, Oh I'm slutty!'" referencing Dennis Hopper's character's crude sexual nature and the scene while Frank Booth gets high using a mask to inhale nitrous oxide.
  • In the film Tarnation, Jonathan Caouette staged a musical reenactment of Blue Velvet in his high school years.
  • In an episode of the animated series The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy called "The Nerve," there's a scene where Billy is standing on top of Grim rubbing lipstick all over his face laughing insanely and yelling "Don't look at me! Don't you look at me!" This is similar to the scene where Frank sexually abuses Dorothy.

This article is about the American screenwriter, film director, actor and comic book writer. ... This article is about the film. ... Haute Tension also referred to as Switchblade Romance in the UK and High Tension (or H.T.) in the USA, is a French slasher film originally released in France during 2003, later released during 2004 in the UK and 2005 in the USA and Canada. ... The Squid and the Whale is a 2005 drama film written and directed by Noah Baumbach. ... For alternate meanings see Short circuit (disambiguation) A short circuit (sometimes known as simply a short) is a fault whereby electricity moves through a circuit in an unintended path, usually due to a connection forming where none was expected. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the original NASA meaning, see capsule communicator. ... Resident Evil 4, known in Japan as Biohazard 4 ), is a third-person shooter, published and developed by Capcom. ... Conkers Bad Fur Day is a Nintendo 64 video game developed and published by Rare, and distributed by Nintendo. ... This article is about the original PlayStation game. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... Rollins Band is a rock music group led by singer and songwriter Henry Rollins. ... Pop Will Eat Itself (also known as PWEI or the Poppies) were an English band formed in Stourbridge, with band members from Birmingham, Coventry and the Black Country. ... Fear Factory is a Los Angeles, California based metal band. ... Benediction is a British death metal band from Birmingham. ... Dark is the Season is an EP by Benediction. ... This article is about the television show. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Mr. ... Flag Seal Nickname: Americas Finest City Location Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates , Government County San Diego Mayor City Attorney         City Council District One District Two District Three District Four District Five District Six District Seven District Eight Jerry Sanders (R) Michael Aguirre Scott Peters Kevin... Hailing mostly from the San Diego, California area, The Scariest Band in the World, as Deadbolt musicians describe themselves, combines surf rock, psychobilly and blues sound with unusual and offbeat lyrics. ... Frank Booth is a fictional character in David Lynchs 1986 film, Blue Velvet, portrayed by Dennis Hopper. ... This article is about the band Green Day. ... Combichrist was formed in 2003 by Norwegian Andy LaPlegua (founder of the band Icon of Coil) as an Electronic body music project. ... A spasm is a sudden, involuntary contraction of a muscle, a group of muscles, or a hollow organ, or a similarly sudden contraction of an orifice. ... Loveline is a syndicated radio call-in program in the United States, Canada and Mexico, offering medical and relationship advice to listeners, often with the assistance of guests, including actors and members of popular bands. ... The cover for Greg the Bunny The Best of the Film Parodies DVD Greg the Bunny is a sitcom that aired on the American television network Fox in 2002. ... Bio-Dome is a 1996 movie starring Pauly Shore and Stephen Baldwin and directed by Jason Bloom. ... Free Desktop pattern #1 from the Tarnation Website Tarnation is a 2003 documentary film by Jonathan Caouette (born November 1973). ... The Grim Adventures of Billy & Mandy, created by Maxwell Atoms, is an American animated television series that currently airs on Cartoon Network and Teletoon. ... Billy is a made-up character from the TV show Billy and Mandy. ... Grim Reaper is a fictional character from the television series The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy. ...

Themes and interpretation

Blue Velvet introduced several common elements of Lynch's work, including distorted characters, a polarized world, debilitating damage to the skull or brain and the dark underbelly of large cities, or in this case, small towns.[38] Red curtains also show up in key scenes, which have since become a trademark of Lynch films.[38] For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ...


Blue Velvet owes a debt to 1950s film noir, containing and exploring such conventions as the femme fatale, a seemingly unstoppable villain, and the questionable moral outlook of the Hero.[39] Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Two silhouetted figures in The Big Combo (1955). ... Convicted spy Mata Hari made her name synonymous with femme fatale during WWI. A femme fatale (plural: femmes fatales) is an alluring and seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire, often leading them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ...


Feminist psychoanalytic film theorist Laura Mulvey argues that the film establishes a metaphorical family — Jeffrey Beaumont (the 'child') and his 'parents' Frank Booth and Dorothy Vallens — through deliberate references to film noir and its underlying Oedipal theme.[40] The resulting violence, she claims, can be read as symbolic of domestic violence within 'real' families. For instance, Frank's violent acts can be seen to reflect the different types of abuse within families, and the control he has over Dorothy might represent the hold an abusive husband has over his wife. Michael Atkinson reads Jeffrey as an innocent youth who is both horrified by the violence inflicted by Frank, but also tempted by it as the means of possessing Dorothy for himself.[41][42] Feminism is a social theory and political movement primarily informed and motivated by the experience of women. ... Psychoanalysis is the revelation of unconscious relations, in a systematic way through an associative process. ... Film theory debates the essence of the cinema and provides conceptual frameworks for understanding films relationship to reality, the other arts, individual viewers, and society at large. ... Laura Mulvey (born August 15, 1941) is a British feminist film theorist. ... The Oedipus complex is a concept developed by Sigmund Freud, who was inspired by Carl Jung (he described the concept and coined the term Complex), to explain the maturation of the infant through identification with the father and desire for the mother. ...


In an interview, Lynch mentioned that he deliberately placed recurring symbols, such as insects, into the film.[10] A symbol or (in many senses) token is a representation of something — an idea, object, concept, quality, etc. ...


Frank's drug

Throughout the film, Frank Booth uses a mask to breathe a gas from a tank. Lynch's script specified helium, to raise Frank's voice and have it resemble that of an infant. However, during filming, Hopper, an experienced drug user, claimed to have insight into Frank's choice of drug and that helium was inappropriate: General Name, symbol, number helium, He, 2 Chemical series noble gases Group, period, block 18, 1, s Appearance colorless Standard atomic weight 4. ...

"...I'm thankful to Dennis," Lynch said, "because up until the last minute it was gonna be helium — to make the difference between 'Daddy' and the baby that much more. But I didn't want it to be funny. So helium went out the window and became just a gas. Then, in the first rehearsal, Dennis said, 'David, I know what's in these different canisters.' And I said, 'Thank God, Dennis, that you know that!' And he named all the gases."[10]

In The Mysteries of Love documentary on the DVD version of the film, Hopper claims that the drug was amyl nitrite, an angina medication. Amyl nitrite is the chemical compound with the formula C5H11ONO. A variety of isomers are known, but they all feature an amyl group attached to the nitrito functional group. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Blue Velvet (1986). Rotten Tomatoes. Retrieved on 2007-06-17.
  2. ^ Blue Velvet (1986): Reviews. Metacritic. Retrieved on 2007-06-11.
  3. ^ Blue Velvet (1986) - Movie Info. Yahoo! Movies. Retrieved on 2007-06-11.
  4. ^ a b Peary, Danny (1988). Cult Movies 3. New York: Simon & Schuster Inc., Pages 38–42. ISBN 0-671-64810-1. 
  5. ^ a b Blue Velvet. Box Office Mojo. Retrieved on 2006-10-30.
  6. ^ Chute, David (October 1986). "Out to Lynch". Film Comment: p. 35. 
  7. ^ a b Bouzereau, Laurent (1987). "An Interview with David Lynch". Cineaste: p. 39. 
  8. ^ Robertson, Nan. "The All-American Guy Behind Blue Velvet", The New York Times, October 11, 1986. 
  9. ^ Lizzie, Borden. "The World According to Lynch", Village Voice, September 23, 1986. Retrieved on 2007-06-18. 
  10. ^ a b c d Lynch, David; Chris Rodley (editor) (March 24, 2005). Lynch on Lynch. Faber & Faber. ISBN 0-571-22018-5. 
  11. ^ Blue Velvet Essay on the films of David Lynch and there background; accessed July 24, 2007
  12. ^ Trivia for Blue Velvet (1986). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  13. ^ Blue Velvet - David Lynch. LynchNet. Retrieved on 2007-06-11.
  14. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Biting into Blue Velvet", Chicago Sun-Times, October 2, 1986. Retrieved on 2007-02-16. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g Blue Velvet (1986). Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2006-10-30.
  16. ^ Trivia on Blue Velvet (1986). Internet Movie Database.
  17. ^ a b c Mysteries of Love: The Making of Blue Velvet, Blue Velvet Special Edition DVD documentary, [2002]
  18. ^ Blue Velvet trivia at the Internet Movie Database; accessed September 30, 2007.
  19. ^ Blue Velvet; a two-part search for the films deleted scenes at DVD Talk; accessed July 24, 2007.
  20. ^ Blue Velvet score at The City of Absurity; accessed June 24, 2007
  21. ^ Chion, Michael (1995). "". British Film Institute, London: p. 89. 
  22. ^ Attanasio, Paul. "Blue Velvet", The Washington Post, September 19, 1986. Retrieved on 2006-10-30. 
  23. ^ Maslin, Janet. "Blue Velvet, Comedy of the Eccentric", The New York Times, September 19, 1986. Retrieved on 2006-10-30. 
  24. ^ French, Philip. "Blue Velvet", Guardian Unlimited, December 16, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-10-30. 
  25. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Blue Velvet", Chicago Sun-Times, September 19, 1986. Retrieved on 2006-10-30. 
  26. ^ Blue Velvet review at the Movie Snobs; accessed September 30, 2007.
  27. ^ Ebert, Roger. "Blue Velvet", Chicago Sun-Times, September 19, 1986. Retrieved on 2006-10-30. 
  28. ^ Müller, Jürgen (2002). The 25 Greatest Films of the 1980s. Taschen Books, 325 ISBN 3-8228-4783-6. 
  29. ^ Leyland, Matthew (2006). Film's 100 Greatest Films of All Time. Derwent Howard, 258 ISBN 9-771833-976008-01. 
  30. ^ The 100 Greatest Films of All Time. Entertainment Weekly Magazine. Retrieved on 2006-12-02.
  31. ^ Blue Velvet at Filmsite.org; accessed September 11, 2007.
  32. ^ Blue Velvet at Filmsite.org; accessed September 11, 2007.
  33. ^ Blue Velvet at Filmsite.org; accessed September 11, 2007.
  34. ^ Blue Velvet at Filmsite.org; accessed September 11, 2007.
  35. ^ The 100 Scariest Movie Moments: 100 Scariest Moments in Movie History when .. BRAVOtv.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-17.
  36. ^ Cigéhn, Peter (2004-09-01). The Top 1319 Sample Sources (version 60). Sloth.org.
  37. ^ "Ears to David Lynch!", Village Voice. Retrieved on 2007-06-15. 
  38. ^ a b Biography for David Lynch. Internet Movie Database. Retrieved on 2007-06-17.
  39. ^ Rubin, Martin (1999). Thrillers. Britain: Cambridge University Press, Pages 175. ISBN 0-521-58839-1. 
  40. ^ Mulvey, Laura (1996). Cult etherworlds and the Unconscious: Oedipus and Blue Velvet", Fetishism And Curiosity 3. Suffolk: British Film Institute, Pages 137–154. ISBN 0-671-64810-1. 
  41. ^ Atkinson, Michael (1997). BFI Modern Classics: 'Now It's Dark': The Child's Dream in David Lynch's Blue Velvet", The Fatal Woman: Sources Of Male Anxiety In American Film Noir". Madison: British Film Institute, Pages 144–155. ISBN 0-671-64810-1. 
  42. ^ Prince, Stephan (2007). American Cinema of the 1980s. New Brunswick: Rutgers University Press, Pages 160–167. ISBN 0-8135-4034-8. 

This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section should be merged with Yahoo! Yahoo! Movies provides information on current movie theater releases, including showtimes, critical reviews and general popular opinion. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Box Office Mojo is a website that tracks box office revenue in a systematic way. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Film Comment is a renowned film journal published by the Film Society of Lincoln Center. ... This article is about the year 1987. ... Cineaste is a film magazine published quarterly. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 284th day of the year (285th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Faber and Faber is a celebrated publishing house in the UK, notable in particular for publishing the poetry of T. S. Eliot. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 47th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Guardian Unlimited is a British website owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Entertainment Weekly (sometimes abbreviated EW) is a magazine published by Time Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... This article is about the U.S. cable network. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Village Voice is a New York City-based weekly newspaper featuring investigative articles, analysis of current affairs and culture, arts reviews and events listings for New York City. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • Atkinson, Michael (1997). Blue Velvet. Long Island, New York.: British Film Institute. ISBN 0-851-70559-6.
  • Drazin, Charles (2001). Blue Velvet: Bloomsbury Pocket Movie Guide 3. Britain. Bloomsbury Publishing. ISBN 0-747-55176-6.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Blue Velvet

Reviews: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... All Movie Guide is a commercial database of information about movie stars, movies and television shows. ... For the in-memory database management system, see In-memory database. ... Turner Classic Movies (TCM) is a cable television channel featuring commercial-free classic movies, mostly from the Turner Entertainment and Warner Bros. ...

This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other persons named David Lynch, see David Lynch (disambiguation). ... Eraserhead (released in France as The Labyrinth Man) is a 1977 surrealist-horror film written and directed by David Lynch. ... The Elephant Man is a 1980 biopic loosely based on the story of the 19th century British deformed celebrity, Joseph Merrick (called John Merrick in the film). ... Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. ... Wild at Heart is a 1990 American film written for the screen and directed by David Lynch, based on Barry Giffords novel Wild at Heart: The Story of Sailor and Lula about a young couple from South Carolina who, after Sailors return from prison, decide to go on... Fire Walk With Me is a 1992 movie directed by David Lynch and starring Sheryl Lee, Ray Wise, Chris Isaak, Kiefer Sutherland, Mädchen Amick, Phoebe Augustine and Dana Ashbrook. ... For the Bon Jovi album, see Lost Highway (album). ... The Straight Story is a motion picture, released in 1999 and directed by David Lynch. ... For the street in Los Angeles, see Mulholland Drive. ... This article is about the film. ... The Short Films of David Lynch (2002) is a DVD collection of the early student and commissioned film work of American filmmaker David Lynch. ... Lumière and Company (1996) was a collaboration between several film directors in which each made a short film using the original Lumière brothers camera. ... Darkened Room is a short film that appeared on www. ... Boat is a short film directed by David Lynch, released in 2007 on the DVD anthology Dynamic:01. ... For the hills in San Francisco, see Twin Peaks, San Francisco, California. ... American Chronicles was a documentary television program which was run by Fox Broadcasting Company as part of its 1990 fall lineup. ... This article is about the TV series, for the Billy Preston album, see On the Air (album) On the Air (1992) was an ABC sitcom created by David Lynch and Mark Frost. ... Hotel Room was a three episode 1993 HBO TV-Series produced by David Lynch (who directed two of them). ... Industrial Symphony No. ... Rabbits redirects here, for the animal, see Rabbit Rabbits is a 2002 film written and directed by David Lynch. ... Images, first published in 1994 (now out of print), is a book by David Lynch. ... Dumbland is a series of eight crudely animated shorts written, directed, and voiced by director David Lynch in 2002. ... The Angriest Dog in the World is a comic strip created by film director David Lynch. ... David Lynch is known for his constant collaboratios with various of the same actors and crew in his productions. ... BlueBob is an album of music cowritten and performed by David Lynch and John Neff. ... Lynch on Lynch is a book of interviews with David Lynch, conducted, edited, and introduced by Chris Rodley, himself a filmmaker. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is under construction. ... This article is under construction. ... . ... This article is under construction. ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ... . ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
ook - movie capsules - a-d (3721 words)
Also watch for Serge Gainsbourg's future gal, Jane Birkin, in a small role as an aspiring model.
Blue Velvet (1986) David Lynch does a Scooby Doo adventure.
Or maybe it's an Encyclopedia Brown mystery gone horribly wrong.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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