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Encyclopedia > Blood agent
This article forms part of the series
(A subset of Weapons of mass destruction)
Lethal agents
Blood agents
Cyanogen chloride
Hydrogen cyanide
Blister agents
Lewisite
Sulfur mustard gas (HD and THD, HT)
Nerve agents
G-Agents
GA (tabun), GB (sarin)
GD (soman), GF (cyclosarin)
V-Agents
VE, VG, VM, VX
Pulmonary agents
Chlorine
Phosgene
Diphosgene
Non-lethal agents
Incapacitating agents
BZ / Agent 15
KOLOKOL-1
Riot control agents
Pepper spray
CS gas
CN gas
CR gas

A blood agent (also called a cyanogen agent) is a compound that prevents the normal transfer of oxygen from the blood to the body tissues, resulting in chemical asphyxiation. The term is a misnomer, however, because these agents are not effective at disrupting this transfer. Rather, they exert their toxic effect not in the blood but at the cellular level, by interrupting the electron transport chain in the inner membranes of mitochondria. Taken from Image:WMD.png by Wapcaplet File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Dressing the wounded during a gas attack by Austin O. Spare, 1918. ... Weapons of mass destruction (WMD) are weapons designed to kill large numbers of people, typically targeting civilians and military personnel alike. ... Categories: Stub | Chemical weapons ... Hydrogen cyanide is a chemical compound with chemical formula H-C≡N. A solution of hydrogen cyanide in water is called hydrocyanic acid or prussic acid. ... A vesicant (also known as a blister agent) is a chemical agent that causes blistering of the skin. ... Chemical structure of Lewisite Lewisite is a chemical compound from a chemical family called arsines. ... Chemical Structure of Mustard Gas Compound Mustard gas (HD) is a chemical compound that was first used as a chemical weapon in World War I. In pure form, it is a colourless, odourless, viscous liquid at room temperature and causes blistering of the skin. ... Nerve agentsare highly toxic chemical agents that poison the nervous system and disrupt bodily functions that are vital to an individuals survival. ... Tabun or GA (Ethyl N,N-dimethylphosphoramidocyanidate) is an extremely toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous weapons of war. ... Sarin or GB (O-Isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is an extremely toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous weapons of war. ... Soman or GD (O-Pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is an extrememly toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous weapons of war. ... Cyclosarin or GF (Cyclohexyl methylphosphonofluoridate) is an extremely toxic substance that is one of the worlds most dangerous weapons of war. ... VE (S-(Diethylamino)ethyl O-ethyl ethylphosphonothioate) is a V-series nerve agent closely related to the better-known VX nerve gas. ... VG (also called Amiton or Tetram) is a V-series nerve agent closely related to the better-known VX nerve gas. ... VM (Phosphonothioic acid, methyl-, S-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl) O-ethyl ester) is a V-series nerve agent closely related to the better-known VX nerve gas. ... The VX nerve agent is the most well-known of the V-series of nerve agents. ... Categories: Chemical weapons | Stub ... General Name, Symbol, Number chlorine, Cl, 17 Series halogens Group, Period, Block 17 (VIIA), 3, p Density, Hardness 3. ... Phosgene (also known as carbonyl chloride, COCl2) is a highly toxic gas or refrigerated liquid that was used as a chemical weapon in World War I. It has no color, but is detectable in air by its odor, which resembles moldy hay. ... Diphosgene (ClCO2CCl3) Diphosgene (Trichloromethyl chloroformate, ClCO2CCl3) is a chemical originally developed for chemical warfare, a few months after the first use of phosgene. ... The term incapacitating agent is defined by the U.S. Department of Defense as An agent that produces temporary physiological or mental effects, or both, which will render individuals incapable of concerted effort in the performance of their assigned duties. ... 3-quinuclidinyl benzilate (QNB) is an odorless military incapacitating agent. ... KOLOKOL-1 is an opiate-derived incapacitating agent. ... A riot control agent is a type of lachrymatory agent (or lacrimatory agent). ... Pepper spray is a non-lethal chemical agent which is used in riot control, crowd control and personal self-defense, including defence against dogs. ... chemical structure of CS gas CS gas (commonly called tear gas), or ortho-chloro-benzal malonitrile, is a usually non-lethal riot control agent. ... Categories: Stub | Chemical weapons | Less-lethal weapons ... CR gas, chemically dibenz[b,f][1,4]oxazepine, is a lachrymatory. ... General Name, Symbol, Number oxygen, O, 8 Chemical series nonmetals Group, Period, Block 16, 2, p Appearance colorless Atomic mass 15. ... Red blood cells (erythrocytes) are present in the blood and help carry oxygen to the rest of the cells in the body Blood is a circulating tissue composed of fluid plasma and cells (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets). ... Asphyxia is a condition of severely deficient supply of oxygen to the body. ...



Examples of blood agents include

Categories: Stub | Chemical weapons ... Hydrogen cyanide is a chemical compound with chemical formula H-C≡N. A solution of hydrogen cyanide in water is called hydrocyanic acid or prussic acid. ...

See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
Method and system for externally treating the blood - Patent 4612007 (7114 words)
When a photoactive chemical agent having an affinity for the nucleic acid of nucleated cells such as lymphocytes is employed in the present invention, the aforementioned intermolecular attractive forces draw the agent into an intercalated relationship with the nucleic acids of the lymphocytes.
Irradiation of the blood activates the photoactive moiety on the cortisone molecules in situ at the cortisone receptor sites and causes the formation of photo-adducts between the substituted cortisone and the cortisone receptor, as a consequence of which the receptor's ability to transmit cortisone vital to the continued metabolic activity of the cell is destroyed.
The agents are injected at a rate in comparison to the blood flow rate as to achieve a concentration in the blood thereafter passed to irradiation station 24 in a desired effective range for each of the chemical agents of the invention.
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