FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
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Encyclopedia > Blog
Topics in Journalism  v  d  e 
Professional Issues

Ethics & News Values
Objectivity & Attribution
News Source & Libel Law
News & Investigation
Reporting & Writing
Business & Citizen
Alternative & Advocacy
Sports Journalism
Science Journalism
Computer and video game journalism
Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ... Journalism ethics and standards include principles of ethics and of good practice to address the specific challenges faced by professional journalists. ... News values determine how much prominence a news story is given by a media outlet. ... Objectivity is frequently held to be essential to journalistic professionalism (particularly in the United States); however, there is some disagreement about what the concept consists of. ... It has been suggested that Attribution (journalism) be merged into this article or section. ... Source is a term used in journalism to refer to any individual from whom information about a story has been received. ... Libel redirects here. ... Broadcast News redirects here. ... Investigative journalism is a kind of journalism in which reporters deeply investigate a topic of interest, often related to crime, scandals, government corruption, or white collar crime. ... A reporter is a type of journalist who researches and presents information in certain types of mass media. ... News style is the prose style of short, front-page newspaper stories and the news bulletins that air on radio and television. ... Business journalism includes coverage of companies, the workplace, personal finance, and economics, including unemployment and other economic indicators. ... Citizen journalism, also known as participatory journalism, is the act of citizens playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing and disseminating news and information according to the seminal report We Media: How Audiences are Shaping the Future of News and Information, by Shayne Bowman and Chris... As long as there has been media there has been alternative media. ... Advocacy journalism is a genre of journalism which is strongly fact-based, but may seek to support a point-of-view in some public or private sector issue. ... Sportswriting (also sports writing) is a form of journalism that reports on sports topics and events. ... Science journalism is a relatively new branch of journalism, which utilizes the art of reporting to convey information on science topics to a public forum. ... It has been suggested that New Games Journalism be merged into this article or section. ...


Journalism Education & Fourth Estate
Other Topics & Books
A journalism school is a school, usually a part of an established university, where journalists are trained. ... A reporter The term Fourth Estate refers to the press, both in its explicit capacity of advocacy and in its implicit ability to frame political issues. ... List of journalism topics A-D AP Stylebook Arizona Republic Associated Press Bar chart Canadian Association of Journalists Chart Citizen journalism Committee to Protect Journalists Conservative bias Copy editing Desktop publishing E-J Editor Freedom of the press Graphic design Hedcut Headline Headlinese Hostile media effect House style Information graphic... List of books related to journalism: The Art of Editing, by Floyd K. Baskette, Jack Z. Scissors, Brian S. Brooks Designing Infographics The Elements of Journalism What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect, by Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel Infographics, by James Glen Stovall Media Management in the...

Social Impact

Infotainment & Celebrity
'Infotainers' & Personalities
News Management
Distortion & VNRs
PR & Propaganda Model
'Yellow' Journalism
Press freedom
Infotainment refers to a general type of media broadcast program which provides a combination of current events news and feature news, or features stories. Infotainment also refers to the segments of programming in television news programs which overall consist of both hard news segments and interviews, along with celebrity interviews... Celebrity news is an aspect of the wider infotainment/news trade which focuses on celebrities and celebrity gossip. ... Infotainers are entertainers in infotainment media, such as news anchors or news personalities who cross the line between journalism (quasi-journalism) and entertainment within the broader news trade. ... Infotainment or soft news, refers to a part of the wider news trade that provides information in a way that is considered entertaining to its viewers, as evident by attraction of a higher market demographic. ... Managing the news refers to acts which are intended to influence the presentation of information within the news media. ... Distorted news or planted news are terms in journalism for two deviated aspects of the wider news media wherein media outlets deliberately present false data, evidence, or sources as factual, in contradiction to the ethical practices in professional journalism. ... Image:Screen. ... Public relations (PR) is the art of managing communication between an organization and its key publics to build, manage and sustain an accurate image. ... The propaganda model is a theory advanced by Edward S. Herman and Noam Chomsky that alleges systemic biases in the mass media and seeks to explain them in terms of structural economic causes. ... Nasty little printers devils spew forth from the Hoe press in this Puck cartoon of Nov. ... Freedom of the press (or press freedom) is the guarantee by a government of free public press for its citizens and their associations, extended to members of news gathering organizations, and their published reporting. ...

News media

Newspapers & Magazines
News Agencies
Broadcast Journalism
Online & Blogging
Alternative Media News media satellite up-link trucks and photojournalists gathered outside the Prudential Financial headquarters in Newark, New Jersey in August, 2004 following the announcement of evidence of a terrorist threat to it and to buildings in New York City. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A news agency is an organization of journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... Broadcast journalism refers to television news and radio news, as well as the online news outlets of broadcast affiliates. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Alternative media are defined most broadly as those media practices falling outside the mainstreams of corporate communication. ...

Roles

Journalist, Reporter, Editor, News presenter, Photo Journalist, Columnist, Visual Journalist The terms news trade or news business refers to news-related organizations in the mass media (or information media) as a business entity —associated with but distinct from the profession of journalism. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A reporter is a type of journalist who researches and presents information in certain types of mass media. ... Editing is the process of preparing language, images, or sound for presentation through correction, condensation, organization, and other modifications. ... ITV newscaster Mark Austin. ... Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Motor Speedway Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that creates images in order to tell a news story. ... A columnist is a journalist who produces a specific form of writing for publication called a column. Columns appear in newspapers, magazines and the Internet. ...

A blog is a website where entries are made in journal style and displayed in a reverse chronological order. Blog can refer to: Look up blog in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A journal (through French from late Latin diurnalis, daily) has several related meanings: a daily record of events or business; a private journal is usually referred to as a diary. ... An order is a way of sorting entries, also called elements, in a list. ...


Blogs often provide commentary or news on a particular subject, such as food, politics, or local news; some function as more personal online diaries. A typical blog combines text, images, and links to other blogs, web pages, and other media related to its topic. Most blogs are primarily textual although some focus on photographs (photoblog), videos (vlog), or audio (podcasting), and are part of a wider network of social media. An online diary is a personal diary or journal that is published on the world wide web on a personal website or a diary hosting website. ... A photograph (often shortened to photo) is an image created by focusing light onto material having a light-sensitive coating. ... A photoblog (or photolog) is a form of photo sharing and publishing in the format of a blog, but differentiated by the predominant use of and focus on photographs rather than text. ... Video is the technology of electronically capturing, recording, processing, storing, transmitting, and reconstructing a sequence of still images which represent scenes in motion. ... Videoblog, a portmanteau combining video, web, and log, (usually shortened to vlog) is a blog that includes video clips. ... Audio can mean: Sounding that can be heard. ... Podcasting is the method of distributing multimedia files, such as audio or video programs, over the Internet using syndication feeds, for playback on mobile devices and personal computers. ... Social media describes the online tools and platforms that people use to share opinions, insights, experiences, and perspectives with each other. ...


The term "blog" is derived from "Web log." "Blog" can also be used as a verb, meaning to maintain or add content to a blog.


As of November 2006, blog search engine Technorati was tracking nearly 60 million blogs.[1] Technorati is an Internet search engine for searching blogs, competing with Google, Yahoo, PubSub and IceRocket. ...

Contents

History

Chronicles, commonplaces, diaries, and perzines can all be seen as predecessors of blogs. Generally a chronicle (Latin chronica) is historical account of facts and events in chronological order. ... Commonplace books (or commonplaces) emerged in the 15th century with the availability of cheap paper for writing, mainly in England. ... A diary or journal is a book for writing discrete entries arranged by date reporting on what has happened over the course of a day or other period. ... “Perzine” is short for “personal zine. ...


Before blogging became popular, digital communities took many forms, including Usenet, e-mail lists and bulletin board systems (BBS). In the 1990s, Internet forum software, such as WebEx, created running conversations with "threads". Threads are topical connections between messages on a metaphorical "corkboard". Usenet is a distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ... Electronic mailing lists are a special usage of e-mail that allows for widespread distribution of information to many Internet users. ... Ward Christensen and the first public Bulletin Board System, CBBS A Bulletin Board System or BBS is software that allows users to connect to the computer system on which the software is installed. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... WebEx Communications Inc. ...


1994 – 2001

Main article: Online diary
Brad Fitzpatrick, an early blogger.
Brad Fitzpatrick, an early blogger.

The modern blog is a form of Citizen Media which evolved from the online diary, where people would keep a running account of their personal lives. Most such writers called themselves diarists, journalists, or journalers. A few called themselves escribitionists. The Open Pages webring included members of the online-journal community. Justin Hall, who began eleven years of personal blogging in 1994 while a student at Swarthmore College, is generally recognized as one of the earliest bloggers.[2] An online diary is a personal diary or journal that is published on the world wide web on a personal website or a diary hosting website. ... Image File history File links Brad_Fitzpatrick. ... Image File history File links Brad_Fitzpatrick. ... Brad Fitzpatrick, creator of LiveJournal. ... Citizen Media, Participatory Media, or Democracatic Media refers to any form of content produced by private citizens, which has as its goal to inform and empower all members of society. ... An online diary is a personal diary or journal that is published on the world wide web on a personal website or a diary hosting website. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An escribitionist is a person who keeps a diary or journal via electronic means, and in particular, publishes their entries on the web. ... A webring is a collection of websites from around the Internet joined together in a basic ring fashion. ... Justin Hall Justin Hall (born December 16, 1974 in Chicago, Illinois), is an American freelance journalist who is best known as a pioneer blogger (internet-based diarist); and for writing reviews from game conferences such as E-3 and the Tokyo Game Show. ... Swarthmore College is a private liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1450 students. ...


Other forms of journals kept online also existed. A notable example was game programmer John Carmack's widely read journal, published via the finger protocol. Websites, including both corporate sites and personal homepages, had and still often have "What's New" or "News" sections, often on the index page and sorted by date. One example of a news based "weblog" is the "Drudge Report" founded by the self styled maverick reporter Matt Drudge, though apparently Drudge dislikes this classification. Another is the Institute for Public Accuracy which began posting news releases featuring several news-pegged one-paragraph quotes several time a week beginning in 1998. One noteworthy early precursor to a blog was the tongue-in-cheek personal website that was frequently updated by Usenet legend Kibo. John Carmack circa 2004 John D. Carmack II (born August 20, 1970) is a widely recognized figure in the video game industry. ... In computer networking, the Name/Finger protocol and the Finger user information protocol are simple network protocols for the exchange of human-oriented status and user information. ... A personal homepage is a web site belonging to one person. ... Homepage, Home page or Home may refer to: The URL or local file that is automatically loaded when a web browser starts is called homepage or startpage. ... Matthew Drudge (born October 27, 1966) is an American Internet journalist and a talk radio host. ... The Institute for Public Accuracy is a Washington, D.C.-based organization that encourages mainstream news media to interview alternative sources. ... Sarcasm is the making of remarks intended to mock the person referred to (who is normally the person addressed), a situation or thing. ... Usenet is a distributed Internet discussion system that evolved from a general purpose UUCP network of the same name. ... Kibo (which he pronounces to rhyme with eye-so) is the nickname, username and e-mail address of James Parry (b. ...


Early weblogs were simply manually updated components of common websites. However, the evolution of tools to facilitate the production and maintenance of web articles posted in said chronological fashion made the publishing process feasible to a much larger, less technical, population. Ultimately, this resulted in the distinct class of online publishing that produces blogs we recognize today. For instance, the use of some sort of browser-based software is now a typical aspect of "blogging". Blogs can be hosted by dedicated blog hosting services, or they can be run using blog software, such as WordPress, blogger or LiveJournal, or on regular web hosting services, such as DreamHost. This page as shown in the AOL 9. ... A blog hosting service is a service that hosts blogs. ... Blog software, also called blog publishing system is software for publishing blogs. ... WordPress is a blog publishing system written in PHP and backed by a MySQL database. ... Blogger is a weblog publishing system owned by Google since 2003. ... LiveJournal (often abbreviated LJ) is a virtual community where Internet users can keep a blog, journal, or diary. ... An example of rack mounted servers. ... DreamHost is a Los Angeles-based web hosting provider and domain name registrar. ...


The term "weblog" was coined by Jorn Barger on 17 December 1997. The short form, "blog," was coined by Peter Merholz, who jokingly broke the word weblog into the phrase we blog in the sidebar of his blog Peterme.com in April or May of 1999.[3][4][5] This was quickly adopted as both a noun and verb ("to blog," meaning "to edit one's weblog or to post to one's weblog"). Jorn Barger in 2005 Jorn Barger (born 1953 in Yellow Springs, Ohio) is an American blogger, best known today as editor of Robot Wisdom, an influential early weblog. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


After a slow start, blogging rapidly gained in popularity: the site Xanga, launched in 1996, had only 100 diaries by 1997, but over 20 million as of December 2005. Blog usage spread during 1999 and the years following, being further popularized by the near-simultaneous arrival of the first hosted blog tools: To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

  • Open Diary launched in October 1998, soon growing to thousands of online diaries. Open Diary innovated the reader comment, becoming the first blog community where readers could add comments to other writers' blog entries.
  • Brad Fitzpatrick started LiveJournal in March 1999.
  • Andrew Smales created Pitas.com in July 1999 as an easier alternative to maintaining a "news page" on a website, followed by Diaryland in September 1999, focusing more on a personal diary community.[6]
  • Evan Williams and Meg Hourihan (Pyra Labs) launched blogger.com in August 1999 (purchased by Google in February 2003)

Blogging combined the personal web page with tools to make linking to other pages easier — specifically permalinks, blogrolls and TrackBacks. This, together with weblog search engines enabled bloggers to track the threads that connected them to others with similar interests. The Open Diary is an online website where you can begin an online diary, which you can choose to be a private diary for yourself, or one which others can read. ... Brad Fitzpatrick, creator of LiveJournal. ... LiveJournal (often abbreviated LJ) is a virtual community where Internet users can keep a blog, journal, or diary. ... Evan Williams is a co-founder of Pyra Labs, creator of Blogger, which was acquired by Google. ... Meg Hourihan co-founded Pyra Labs, the company behind Blogger before its acquisition by Google. ... Pyra Labs is the company who coined the word Blogger, and made the service a big success. ... Blogger is a weblog publishing system owned by Google since 2003. ... Google, Inc. ... A permalink (a portmanteau made by contracting the phrase permanent link) is a type of URL designed to refer to a specific information item (often a news story or blog item) and to remain unchanged permanently, or at least for a lengthy period of time to prevent link rot. ... A blogroll is a collection of links to other weblogs. ... TrackBack is a mechanism for communication between blogs: if a blogger writes a new entry commenting on, or referring to, an entry found at another blog, and both blogging tools support the TrackBack protocol, then the commenting blogger can notify the other blog with a TrackBack ping; the receiving blog... The following is a list of World Wide Web search engine services for which Wikipedia has articles. ...


2001 – 2004

Several broadly popular American blogs emerged in 2001: Andrew Sullivan's AndrewSullivan.com, Ron Gunzburger's Politics1.com, Taegan Goddard's Political Wire and Jerome Armstrong's MyDD — all blogging primarily on politics (two earlier popular American political blogs were Bob Somerby's Daily Howler launched in 1998 and Mickey Kaus' Kausfiles launched in 1999). Andrew Sullivan Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a journalist and political commentator, known for his popular and provocative style of political journalism. ... Ronald M. Ron Gunzburger (b. ... Politics1. ... Political Wire was one of the first political blogs. ... Jerome Armstrong (born 1964, in Los Angeles, California) is a political strategist aligned with the Democratic Party. ... MyDD Icon MyDD is a popular political blog specializing in American politics started by Jerome Armstrong. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Mickey Kaus is a journalist and author best known form writing Kausfiles, a mostly political blog featured on Slate. ...


By 2001, blogging was enough of a phenomenon that how-to manuals began to appear, primarily focusing on technique. The importance of the blogging community (and its relationship to larger society) increased rapidly. Established schools of journalism began researching blogging and noting the differences between journalism and blogging. Journalism is a discipline of collecting, analyzing, verifying, and presenting news regarding current events, trends, issues and people. ...


In 2002, Jerome Armstrong's friend and sometime business partner Markos Moulitsas Zúniga began DailyKos. With up to a million visits a day during peak events, it has now become one of the Internet's most trafficked blogs. Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Markos Kos Moulitsas Zúniga. ... Daily Kos (IPA: ) is an American political weblog aimed at Democrats, liberals, and progressives. ...


Also in 2002, many blogs focused on comments by U.S. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott. Senator Lott, at a party honoring U.S. Senator Strom Thurmond, praised Senator Thurmond by suggesting that the United States would have been better off had Thurmond been elected president. Lott's critics saw these comments as a tacit approval of racial segregation, a policy advocated by Thurmond's 1948 presidential campaign. This view was reinforced by documents and recorded interviews dug up by bloggers. (See Josh Marshall's Talking Points Memo.) Though Lott's comments were made at a public event attended by the media, no major media organizations reported on his controversial comments until after blogs broke the story. Blogging helped to create a political crisis that forced Lott to step down as majority leader. The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... Chester Trent Lott (born October 9, 1941 in Grenada, Mississippi) is a United States Senator from Mississippi and a member of the Republican Party. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) represented South Carolina in the United States Senate from 1954 to April 1956 and November 1956 to 1964 as a Democrat and from 1964 to 2003 as a Republican. ... The Rex Theatre for Colored People, Leland, Mississippi, June 1937 Racial segregation is characterized by separation of people of different races in daily life when both are doing equal tasks, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... A screenshot of TPMs old format Joshua Micah Marshall (born February 15, 1969 in St. ... Categories: Stub | 1969 births | Bloggers ...


The impact of this story gave greater credibility to blogs as a medium of news dissemination. Though often seen as partisan gossips, bloggers sometimes lead the way in bringing key information to public light, with mainstream media having to follow their lead. More often, however, news blogs tend to react to material already published by the mainstream media.


Since 2002, blogs have gained increasing notice and coverage for their role in breaking, shaping, and spinning news stories. The Iraq war saw bloggers taking measured and passionate points of view that go beyond the traditional left-right divide of the political spectrum. The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Broadcast News redirects here. ... This article regards the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A political spectrum is a way of comparing or visualizing different political positions. ...


Blogging by established politicians and political candidates, to express opinions on war and other issues, cemented blogs' role as a news source. (See Howard Dean and Wesley Clark.) Meanwhile, an increasing number of experts blogged, making blogs a source of in-depth analysis. (See Daniel Drezner and J. Bradford DeLong.) Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont. ... Wesley K. Clark Clarks signature Wesley Kanne Clark (born December 23, 1944) is a retired four-star general in the U.S. Army. ... J. Bradford DeLong (born June 24, 1960), a professor of economics at the University of California, Berkeley, writes a popular blog, Brad DeLongs Semi-Daily Journal which covers political, technical, and economic issues as well as criticism of their coverage in the media. ...


The second Iraq war was the first "blog war" in another way: Iraqi bloggers gained wide readership, and one, Salam Pax, published a book of his blog. Blogs were also created by soldiers serving in the Iraq war. Such "warblog" gave readers new perspectives on the realities of war, as well as often offering different viewpoints from those of official news sources. Salam Pax (aka Salam Al-Janabi) (Salam is Arabic and Pax is Latin for peace) is a pseudonymous blogger from Iraq whose site Where is Raed? (see external links) received notable media attention during (and after) the 2003 invasion of Iraq. ... A warblog is a weblog devoted mostly or wholly to covering news events concerning an ongoing war. ...


Blogging was used to draw attention to obscure news sources. For example, bloggers posted links to traffic cameras in Madrid as a huge anti-terrorism demonstration filled the streets in the wake of the March 11 attacks. The 11 March 2004 Madrid attacks (also known as 11/3, 3/11, M-11 and 11-M) were a series of coordinated terrorist bombings against the commuter train system of Madrid, Spain on the morning of 11 March 2004, which killed 191 people and wounded more than 1,800. ...


Bloggers began to provide nearly-instant commentary on televised events, creating a secondary meaning of the word "blogging": to simultaneously transcribe and editorialize speeches and events shown on television. (For example, "I am blogging Rice's testimony" means "I am posting my reactions to Condoleezza Rice's testimony into my blog as I watch her on television.") Real-time commentary is sometimes referred to as "liveblogging." An editorial is a statement or article by a news organization (generally a newspaper) that expresses an opinion rather than attempting to simply report news, as the latter should ideally be done without bias. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954 in Birmingham, Alabama) is the 66th and current United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ...


2004 – present

In 2004, the role of blogs became increasingly mainstream, as political consultants, news services and candidates began using them as tools for outreach and opinion forming. Even politicians not actively campaigning, such as the UK's Labour Party's MP Tom Watson, began to blog to bond with constituents. Political consulting is the business which has grown up around advising and assisting political campaigns, primarily in the United States. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal left wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Thomas Anthony Watson (born 8 January 1967) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ...


Minnesota Public Radio broadcast a program by Christopher Lydon and Matt Stoller called "The blogging of the President," which covered a transformation in politics that blogging seemed to presage. The Columbia Journalism Review began regular coverage of blogs and blogging. Anthologies of blog pieces reached print, and blogging personalities began appearing on radio and television. In the summer of 2004, both United States Democratic and Republican Parties' conventions credentialed bloggers, and blogs became a standard part of the publicity arsenal. Mainstream television programs, such as Chris Matthews' Hardball, formed their own blogs. Merriam-Webster's Dictionary declared "blog" as the word of the year in 2004.[7] Minnesota Public Radio logo Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) is a regional public radio network based in the U.S. state of Minnesota that has been broadcasting since 1967. ... Christopher Lydon born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1940 is an American media personality and author whose work in radio includes creating The Connection for WBUR. He is a former journalist with the New York Times, former WGBH Boston evening news anchor and was a candidate for mayor of Boston in... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) is an American magazine for professional journalists published bimonthly by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism since 1961. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... The Republican National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Republican Party, is held every four years to determine the partys candidate for the coming Presidential election and the partys platform. ... Chris Matthews Christopher John Matthews (born December 17, 1945) hosts a nightly, hour-long talk show called Hardball with Chris Matthews on the American cable television channel MSNBC, formerly on CNBC, and a syndicated NBC News-produced panel program called The Chris Matthews Show on weekends. ... Hardball with Chris Matthews is a talk show on MSNBC hosted by Chris Matthews. ... Merriam-Webster, originally known as the G. & C. Merriam Company of Springfield, Massachusetts, is a United States company that publishes reference books, especially dictionaries that are descendants of Noah Websters An American Dictionary of the English Language (1828). ...


Blogs were among the driving forces behind the "Rathergate" scandal, to wit: (television journalist) Dan Rather presented documents (on the CBS show 60 Minutes) that conflicted with accepted accounts of President Bush's military service record. Bloggers declared the documents to be forgeries and presented evidence and arguments in support of that view, and CBS apologized for what it said were inadequate reporting techniques (see Little Green Footballs). Many bloggers view this scandal as the advent of blogs' acceptance by the mass media, both as a source of news and opinion and as means of applying political pressure. The Killian documents (often referred to as the CBS documents during the 2004 US presidential campaign) were memos purportedly written by the late Lieutenant Colonel Jerry B. Killian. ... 60 Minutes is an investigative television newsmagazine on United States television, which has run on CBS News since 1968. ... Forgery is the process of making or adapting objects or documents (see false document), with the intention to deceive. ... Little Green Footballs (LGF) [1] is a political blog run by California web designer Charles Johnson. ...


Some bloggers have moved over to other media. The following bloggers (and others) have appeared on radio and television: Duncan Black (known widely by his pseudonym, Atrios), Glenn Reynolds (Instapundit) , Markos Moulitsas Zúniga (Daily Kos), Alex Steffen (Worldchanging) and Ana Marie Cox (Wonkette). Hugh Hewitt is an example of a media personality who has moved in the other direction, adding to his reach in "old media" by being an influential blogger. Dr. Duncan B. Black, known under his internet publishing pseudonym as Atrios, is the author of the popular United States liberal weblog Eschaton, which receives an average of over 100,000 hits per day. ... Glenn Reynolds (born August 27, 1960) is Beauchamp Brogan Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tennessee, and is best known as the Internets Instapundit. ... Instapundit is a United States political weblog produced by Glenn Reynolds, a law professor at the University of Tennessee. ... Markos Kos Moulitsas Zúniga. ... Daily Kos (IPA: ) is an American political weblog aimed at Democrats, liberals, and progressives. ... Alex Steffen is a Seattle-based writer, editor and futurist, part of the group of techno-environmentalists influenced by the Whole Earth Catalog and Bruce Sterlings Viridian movement. ... Worldchanging is a blog which covers environmental, humanitarian and design issues. ... Ana Marie Cox (b. ... Wonkette is a blog published by Gawker Media that details the goings-on of the political establishment in Washington, DC. The site focuses heavily on gossip, humor, and the downfall of the powerful, as well as more serious matters of politics or policy. ... Hugh Hewitt (born February 22, 1956) is a conservative American radio talk show host, author, and blogger. ...


Some blogs were an important source of news during the December 2004 Tsunami such as Medecins Sans Frontieres, which used SMS text messaging to report from affected areas in Sri Lanka and Southern India. Similarly, during Hurricane Katrina in August 2005 and the aftermath a few blogs which were located in New Orleans, including the Interdictor and Gulfsails were able to maintain power and an internet connection and disseminate information that was not covered by the Main Stream Media. The tsunami caused by the December 26, 2004 earthquake strikes Ao Nang, Thailand. ... Médecins Sans Frontières (abbreviated MSF; known as Doctors Without Borders in the United States, as Médicos Sin Fronteras in the Spanish language and as Médicos Sem Fronteiras in Portuguese language) is a nonprofit private organisation created in 1971 by a small group of French doctors led... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... // Mass media is a term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ...


In the United Kingdom, The Guardian newspaper launched a redesign in September 2005, which included a daily digest of blogs on page 2. Also in June 2006, BBC News launched a weblog for its editors, following other news companies.[8] The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ...


In January 2005, Fortune magazine listed eight bloggers that business people "could not ignore": Peter Rojas, Xeni Jardin, Ben Trott, Mena Trott, Jonathan Schwartz, Jason Goldman, Robert Scoble, and Jason Calacanis. Fortune magazine is Americas longest-running business magazine. ... Engadget is a popular technology weblog and podcast about consumer electronics. ... Xeni Jardin Xeni Jardin (IPA: ) (born August 5, 1972 [1]) is an American weblogger and journalist. ... Ben Trott and Mena G. Trott (born September 1977) are the married co-founders of Six Apart, creators of Movable Type and TypePad. ... Ben Trott and Mena G. Trott (born September 1977) are the married co-founders of Six Apart, creators of Movable Type and TypePad. ... Jonathan I. Schwartz (born 1967 ? [1]) is the current President and COO of Sun Microsystems. ... Robert Scoble Robert Scoble (born January 18, 1965) is a technical evangelist for Microsoft, who writes the popular blog, Scobleizer. ... Calacanis at Gnomedex 5 Jason McCabe Calacanis (born November 28, 1970 [1] in Brooklyn, New York) is an American internet entrepreneur and blogger. ...


Types of blogs

A photo of Joi Ito's moblog.
A photo of Joi Ito's moblog.

There are various types of blogs, and each differs in the way content is delivered or written. Image File history File links Moblog. ... Image File history File links Moblog. ...

By media type
A blog comprising videos is called a vlog, one comprising links is called a linklog,[9] or one comprising photos is called a photoblog[10]
By device
Blogs can also be defined by which type of device is used to compose it. A blog written by a mobile device like a mobile phone or PDA is called a moblog.[11]
Genre
Some blogs focus on a particular subject, such as political blogs or travel blogs or legal blogs (often referred to as a blawg).
Legal status of publishers
A blog can be private, as in most cases, or it can be for business purposes. Blogs, either used internally to enhance the communication and culture in a corporation or externally for marketing, branding or PR purposes are called corporate blogs.
Blog search engines
Several blog search engines are used to search blog contents (also known as the blogosphere), such as blogdigger, Feedster, and Technorati. Technorati provides current information on both popular searches and tags used to categorize blog postings.

Videoblog, a portmanteau combining video, web, and log, (usually shortened to vlog) is a blog that includes video clips. ... A linklog (or linkblog) is a collection of URLs (hyperlinks) that the maintainer considers interesting enough to collect. ... A photoblog (or photolog) is a form of photo sharing and publishing in the format of a blog, but differentiated by the predominant use of and focus on photographs rather than text. ... Handheld devices (also known as handhelds) are pocket-sized computing devices that are rapidly gaining popularity as the access to information in every walk of life becomes more and more mission critical. ... PDA may stand for: Personal digital assistant, a digital device which can include the functionality of a computer, a cellphone, a music player and a camera Pitch detection algorithm, a mathematical method of finding the pitch of a signal Public display of affection, an area of study within social psychology... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Look up genre in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A travel journal, or road journal, is an initialliy blank book carried by a traveler for the purpose of documenting a journey. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... A weblog (now more commonly known as a blog) is a web-based publication consisting primarily of periodic articles (normally in reverse chronological order). ... In law legal status refers to the concept of individuals having a particular place in society, relative to the law, as it determines the laws which affect them. ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... A corporation is a legal person which, while being composed of natural persons, exists completely separately from them. ... Marketing is a social and managerial function that attempts to create, expand and maintain a collection of customers. ... Look up branding in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Public relations (PR) is the art of managing communication between an organization and its key publics to build, manage and sustain an accurate image. ... A corporate blog is a weblog published and used by the organization to reach the organizational goals. ... The following is a list of World Wide Web search engine services for which Wikipedia has articles. ... Blogosphere is the collective term encompassing all blogs as a community or social network. ... Blogdigger is a blog and media search engine founded in March 2003 by Greg Gershman. ... Feedster was founded in March 2003 by Scott Johnson. ... Technorati is an Internet search engine for searching blogs, competing with Google, Yahoo, PubSub and IceRocket. ... TAG may stand for: Tag, German for day Techniques dAvant Garde, an investment company that sponsored WilliamsF1 in the early 1980s and funded the construction of turbocharged Porsche engines to Team McLaren in the mid 1980s. ...

Business models

While the great majority of blogs are non-commercial, full-time bloggers have struggled to find a way to make a profit from their work. The most common and simplest method is to accept targeted banner advertising. However, some bloggers have been hesitant to use this because of negative reader response to the ads. A more discreet form of advertising is for bloggers to promote merchandise from other sites, receiving a commission when a customer buys the item after following a blog link. A web banner or banner ad is a form of advertising on the World Wide Web. ...


Others have tried a click-to-donate model. Prominent political blogger Andrew Sullivan claimed at one point that accepting voluntary donations to his blog was more lucrative than his magazine work for The New Republic. Following the practice of public television, Sullivan boosted donations with periodic "pledge drives," one of which was reported to net him $120,000. Sullivan's attempt at securing corporate sponsorship for his blog fell apart after strong negative reader response to the deal. Click to Donate is an online donation model in which charities receive funding from advertisers as a result of website visitors clicking on a banner or similar advertisement. ... Andrew Sullivan Andrew Michael Sullivan (born August 10, 1963) is a journalist and political commentator, known for his popular and provocative style of political journalism. ... For other uses, see the disambiguation section. ...


No other high-profile blogger has accepted a single corporate sponsor since Sullivan's failed deal. However, In the early twenty-first century, many magazines and newspapers began sponsoring personal blogs by their employees. The business model in this case is essentially the same as that of a traditional newspaper columnist. In a creative extension of the model, employees at other media companies began blogs focusing on the companies' products. For example, many actors in pornography blog about their work on company sites, creating a sense of personal connection between consumer and product.


Fairly new, and highly controversial, is the pay-per-blog model, in which the blogger writes a set number of words on a topic (usually a web page or product) provided by an advertiser. The post always includes at least one link to a web site relevant to the topic, as a way of creating "buzz" and helping the advertised page's rank in search engines. In return, the blogger receives a small amount of money, usually no more than 10 US dollars.


The reason for the controversy is that many bloggers do not reveal to their readers that they are being paid for a given post, leading to the impression that they are sincerely endorsing the product or service when in fact they're acting as writers of ad copy. In response, many bloggers denounce the practice of paid posting as "facilitating the pollution of the blogosphere[12]" and even "evil". Others claim that there is no ethical problem as long as the blogger discloses that he or she is being paid. This dispute seems unlikely to be resolved in the forseeable future.


Anatomy of a blog entry

A screenshot of a typical blog.
A screenshot of a typical blog.

A variety of different systems are used to create and maintain blogs. Dedicated web applications can eliminate the need for bloggers to manage this software. With web interfaces, these systems allow travelers to blog from anywhere on the Internet, and allow users to create blogs without having to maintain their own server. Such systems allow users to work with tools such as Ecto, Elicit and Blogger which allow users to maintain their Web-hosted blog without the need to be online while composing or editing posts. Blog creation tools and blog hosting are also provided by some Web hosting companies (Tripod), Internet service providers (America Online), online publications (Salon.com) and internet portals (Yahoo! 360° or Google). Some advanced users have developed custom blogging systems from scratch using server-side software, and often implement membership management and password protected areas. Others have created a mix of a blog and wiki, called a bliki. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (723x639, 76 KB)This is a screenshot of a typical blog. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (723x639, 76 KB)This is a screenshot of a typical blog. ... A screenshot of this page being displayed in the Mozilla web browser. ... In software engineering, a web application is an application delivered to users from a web server over a network such as the World Wide Web or an intranet. ... Blogger is a weblog publishing system owned by Google since 2003. ... Look up tripod in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Screenshot of Salon. ... Yahoo! 360° is a personal communication portal similar to Googles Orkut, Windows Live Spaces, Friendster and MySpace, currently in beta testing. ... Google, Inc. ... Server-side scripting is a web server technology in which a users request is fulfilled by running a script directly on the web server to generate dynamic HTML pages. ... A Bliki (also known as a WikiLog, Wog, WikiWeblog, Wikiblog, or Bloki), is a blog with wiki support. ...


A blog entry typically consists of the following:

  • Title, the main title, or headline, of the post.
  • Body, main content of the post.
  • Permalink, the URL of the full, individual article.
  • Post Date, date and time the post was published.

A blog entry optionally includes the following: A permalink (a portmanteau made by contracting the phrase permanent link) is a type of URL designed to refer to a specific information item (often a news story or blog item) and to remain unchanged permanently, or at least for a lengthy period of time to prevent link rot. ... A Uniform Resource Locator, URL (spelled out as an acronym, not pronounced as earl), or Web address, is a standardized address name layout for resources (such as documents or images) on the Internet (or elsewhere). ...

  • Comments
  • Categories (or tags) - subjects that the entry discusses
  • Trackback and or pingback - links to other sites that refer to the entry

TAG may stand for: Tag, German for day Techniques dAvant Garde, an investment company that sponsored WilliamsF1 in the early 1980s and funded the construction of turbocharged Porsche engines to Team McLaren in the mid 1980s. ... TrackBack is a mechanism for communication between blogs: if a blogger writes a new entry commenting on, or referring to, an entry found at another blog, and both blogging tools support the TrackBack protocol, then the commenting blogger can notify the other blog with a TrackBack ping; the receiving blog... Pingback is a method for Web authors to request notification when somebody links to one of their documents. ...

Comments

Comments are a way to provide discussion on blog entries. Readers can leave a comment on a post, which can correct errors or contain their opinion on the post or the post's subject. Services like coComment aim to ease discussion through comments, by allowing tracking of them. A comment system allows users to post their own comments on an article or thread. ... Look up Comment on Wiktionary, the free dictionary In computer programming, comments are parts of the source code which, together with its layout, are used to explain the code. ... coComment is website that allows a user to track comments across blogs, storing the users comments and follow-up comments on a central server. ...


Blog popularity

Recently, researchers have analyzed the dynamics of how blogs become popular. There are essentially two measures of this: popularity through citations, as well as popularity through affiliation (i.e. blogroll). The basic conclusion from studies of the structure of blogs is that while it takes time for a blog to become popular through blogrolls, permalinks can boost popularity more quickly, and are perhaps more indicative of popularity and authority than blogrolls, since they denote that people are actually reading the blog's content and deem it valuable or noteworthy in specific cases.[13] A blogroll is a collection of links to other weblogs. ...


The blogdex project was launched by researchers in the MIT Media Lab to crawl the web and gather data from thousands of blogs in order to investigate their social properties. It gathered this information for over 4 years, and autonomously tracked the most contagious information spreading in the blog community. The project is no longer active. Blogdex. ... The Wiesner Buildings Atrium The MIT Media Lab in the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology engages in education and research in the digital technology used for expression and communication. ...


Blogs are also given rankings by Technorati based on the amount of incoming links and Alexa Internet based on the web hits of Alexa Toolbar users. In August 2006, Technorati listed the most linked-to blog as that of Chinese actress Xu Jinglei and the most-read blog as group-written Boing Boing.[14] Technorati is an Internet search engine for searching blogs, competing with Google, Yahoo, PubSub and IceRocket. ... Alexa Internet is a California-based subsidiary company of Amazon. ... Xu Jinglei (Chinese: ; pinyin: xú jìnglěi; born 16 April 1974) is a famous actress, singer and director in Mainland China. ... 1990 Boing Boing logo, from a t-shirt Boing Boing (originally bOING bOING) is a publishing entity, first established as a magazine, later becoming an award winning group blog. ...


It was reported by Chinese media Xinhua that the blog of Xu Jinglei received more than 50 million page views, claiming to be the most popular blog in the world.[15] In mid-2006, it also had the most incoming links of any blogs on the Internet.[14] Xinhua (Chinese:新华通讯社/新華通訊社, pinyin:xīnhuá tōngxùnshè) is also the short for Xinhua News Agency Xinhua (Chinese:新化县/新化縣, pinyin:xīnhuà xiàn) is a county in Hunan,China, See Xinhua... Xu Jinglei (Chinese: ; pinyin: xú jìnglÄ›i; born 16 April 1974) is a famous actress, singer and director in Mainland China. ...


Blogging and the mass media

Many bloggers differentiate themselves from the mainstream media, while others are members of that media working through a different channel. Some institutions see blogging as a means of "getting around the filter" and pushing messages directly to the public. Some critics worry that bloggers respect neither copyright nor the role of the mass media in presenting society with credible news. Mass media is the term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ... Message in its most general meaning is the object of communication. ... Like John says copyright law in the UK is u make something and its copyrighted but in america u must make a patent haaaa ... Mass media is a term used to denote, as a class, that section of the media specifically conceived and designed to reach a very large audience (typically at least as large as the whole population of a nation state). ...


Many mainstream journalists, meanwhile, write their own blogs -- well over 300, according to CyberJournalist.net's J-blog list. The first known use of a Weblog on a news site was in August 1998, when Jonathan Dube of The Charlotte Observer published one chronicling Hurricane Bonnie.[16] Jonathan Dube is an award-winning print and online journalist and a pioneer in the online journalism world. ... The Charlotte Observer, serving Charlotte, North Carolina, is the oldest daily newspaper in the United States (other newspapers, such as The New York Times began circulation before The Observer but were not daily). ...


Blogs have also had an influence on minority languages, bringing together scattered speakers and learners; this is particularly so with blogs in Gaelic languages, whose creators can be found as far away from traditional Gaelic areas as Kazakhstan and Alaska. Minority language publishing (which may lack economic feasibility) can find its audience through inexpensive blogging. A minority language is a language spoken by a minority of the population of a country. ... The Goidelic languages (also sometimes called the Gaelic languages or collectively Gaelic) are one of two major divisions of modern-day Insular Celtic languages (the other being the Brythonic languages). ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  Ranked 1st  - Total 663,267 sq mi (1,717,854 km²)  - Width 808 miles (1,300 km)  - Length 1,479 miles (2,380 km)  - % water 13. ...


Legal issues

The emergence of blogging has brought a range of legal liabilities. Employers have "dooced" (fired) employees who maintain personal blogs that discuss their employers.[17] The major areas of concern are the issues of proprietary or confidential information, and defamation. Several cases have been brought before the national courts against bloggers and the courts have returned with mixed verdicts. In John Doe v. Patrick Cahill, the Delaware Supreme Court held that stringent standards had to be met to unmask anonymous bloggers, and also took the unusual step of dismissing the libel case itself (as unfounded under American libel law) rather than referring it back to the trial court for reconsideration. In a bizarre twist, the Cahills were able to find the ISP address of John Doe, who turned out to be the person they suspected: the town's mayor, Councilman Cahill's political rival. The Cahills amended their original complaint, and the mayor settled the case rather than going to trial.[18] Dooce is the pseudonym of Heather Armstrong (July 19, 1975 _ ), a humorist who resides in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The Supreme Court of Delaware is the sole appellate court in the United States state of Delaware. ... A trial court or court of first instance is the court in which most civil or criminal cases begin. ...


In Singapore, on the other hand, two ethnic Chinese were punished under the country’s anti-sedition law for posting anti-Muslim remarks in their weblogs.[19] Internet Service Providers, in general, are immune from liability for information that originates with Third Parties (U.S. Communications Decency Act and the EU Directive 2000/31/EC). Sedition is a deprecated term of law to refer to covert conduct such as speech and organization that is deemed by the legal authority as tending toward insurrection against the established order. ... Islamophobia is a neologism that according to the 2003 edition of the New Oxford Dictionary of English refers to hatred or fear of Islam or Muslims, especially as a political force. ... The Communications Decency Act (CDA) was Title V of the United States Telecommunications Act of 1996. ...


In Malaysia, eight Royal Dutch Shell Group companies collectively obtained in June 2004 an Interim Injunction and Restraining Order against a Shell whistleblower, a Malaysian geologist and former Shell employee, Dr John Huong. The proceedings are in respect of alleged defamatory postings attributed to Dr Huong on a weblog hosted in North America but owned and operated by an 89 year old British national, Alfred Donovan, a long term critic of Shell. The Shell action is directed solely against Dr Huong. Further proceedings against Dr Huong were issued by the same plaintiff companies in 2006 in respect of publications on Donovan weblog sites in 2005 and 2006. The further proceedings include a "Notice to Show Cause" relating to a "contempt of court" action potentially punishable by imprisonment. The contempt hearing and a related application by the eight Royal Dutch Shell plaintiff companies for Dr Huong to produce Alfred Donovan for cross-examination in connection with an affidavit Donovan provided, was scheduled to be heard in the High Court of Malay in Kuala Lumpur on 17th August 2006. Donovan's principle weblog is royaldutchshellplc.com. Royal Dutch Shell PLC is a multinational oil company of Anglo Dutch origins, which is amongst the largest energy corporations in the world, and one of the six supermajors (vertically integrated private-sector oil, natural gas, and petrol (gasoline) companies). ... A whistleblower is an employee, former employee, or member of an organization who reports misconduct to people or entities that have the power to take corrective action. ... A geologist is a contributor to the science of geology, studying the physical structure and processes of the Earth and planets of the solar system (see planetary geology). ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of publishing (meaning to a third party) a false statement that negatively affects someones reputation. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America. ... A plaintiff, also known as a claimant or complainant, is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... Contempt of court is a court ruling which, in the context of a court trial or hearing, deems an individual as holding contempt for the court, its process, and its invested powers. ... A prison is a place in which people are confined and deprived of a range of liberties. ... A plaintiff, also known as a claimant or complainant, is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... In law, cross-examination is the interrogation of a witness called by ones opponent. ... An affidavit is a formal sworn statement of fact, written down, signed, and witnessed (as to the veracity of the signature) by a taker of oaths, such as a notary public. ... Nickname: KL Motto: Maju dan makmur (Malay: Peace and progress) Location in Malaysia Coordinates: Country Malaysia State Federal Territory Establishment 1857 Granted city status 1974 Mayor Ruslin Hasan Area    - City 243. ... // royaldutchshellplc. ...


In Britain, a college lecturer contributed to a blog in which she referred to a politician (who had also expressed his views in the same blog) using various uncomplimentary names, including referring to him as a "Nazi". The politician found out the real name of the lecturer (she wrote under a pseudonym) via the ISP and successfully sued her for £10,000 in damages and £7,200 costs.[20] In the spring of 2006, Erik Ringmar, a tenured senior lecturer at the London School of Economics was ordered by the convenor of his department to "take down and destroy" a blog in which he discussed student life at the school.[21] ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom Inflation 2. ... The London School of Economics and Political Science, often referred to as the London School of Economics or simply the LSE, is a specialist university, located on Houghton Street in Central London, off the Aldwych and next to the Royal Courts of Justice. ...


Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks, was recently fined during the 2006 NBA playoffs for criticizing NBA officials on the court and in his blog.[22] Mark Cuban Mark Cuban (born July 31, 1958 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania)[1] is an American entrepreneur and billionare. ... The Dallas Mavericks (also known as the Mavs) are a professional basketball team based in Dallas, Texas. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) is the worlds premier mens professional basketball league and one of the major professional sports leagues of North America. ...


Ellen Simonetti, a US airline attendant, lost her job after posting photos of herself in uniform displaying more cleavage than ordinary on her blog "The Queen of the Sky".[23] Simonetti took legal action against the airline for "wrongful termination, defamation of character and lost future wages".[24] Ellen Simonetti, aka Queen of Sky (born December 1974) is an American blogger, writer, and fired flight attendant. ... Aria Giovanni wearing a shirt revealing cleavage. ...


In India, blogger Gaurav Sabnis resigned from IBM after his posts exposing the false claims of a management school, IIPM, led to management of IIPM threatening to burn their IBM laptops as a sign of protest against him.[25][26][27] now. ...


In the United States blogger Aaron Wall was sued by Traffic Power for defamation and publication of trade secrets in 2005.[28] According to Wired Magazine, Traffic Power had been "banned from Google for allegedly rigging search engine results."[29] Wall and other "white hat" search engine optimization consultants had exposed Traffic Power in what they claim was an effort to protect the public. The case was watched by many bloggers because it addressed the murky legal question of who's liable for comments posted on blogs.[30] Aaron Wall is a writer and search engine optimization expert. ... In English and American law, and systems based on them, libel and slander are two forms of defamation (or defamation of character), which is the tort or delict of making a false statement of fact that injures someones reputation. ... A trade secret is a confidential practice, method, process, design, or other information used by a company to compete with other businesses. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Search engine optimization (SEO) is a subset of search engine marketing, and deals with improving the number and/or quality of visitors to a web site from natural (aka organic or algorithmic search engine) listings. ...


See also

Internet Portal

Image File history File links Portal. ... The following is a list of World Wide Web search engine services for which Wikipedia has articles. ... Blog software, also called blog publishing system is software for publishing blogs. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Blogebrity was an internet project which was born in May of 2005 as a contest entry, and nevertheless managed to have an impact upon the blogosphere. ... A buzzword (also known as a fashion word or vogue word) is an idiom, often a neologism, commonly used in managerial, technical, administrative, and sometimes political environments. ... A corporate blog is a weblog published and used by the organization to reach the organizational goals. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... An online diary is a personal diary or journal that is published on the world wide web on a personal website or a diary hosting website. ... A virtual community or online community is a group of people that primarily or initially communicates or interacts via the Internet. ... The term massively distributed collaboration was coined by Mitchell Kapor, in a presentation at UC Berkeley on November 9 2005, to describe an emerging activity of wikis and econferences and blogs and other content-creating virtual communities online. ... Citizen journalism, also known as participatory journalism, is the act of citizens playing an active role in the process of collecting, reporting, analyzing and disseminating news and information according to the seminal report We Media: How Audiences are Shaping the Future of News and Information, by Shayne Bowman and Chris... A content management system is a computer software system for organising and facilitating collaborative creation of documents and other content. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... MySpace is a social networking website offering an interactive, user-submitted network of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, music, and videos. ... For other uses, see Facebook (disambiguation). ... Windows Live Spaces (WLSpaces for short) is Microsofts Social Networking platform. ... An aggregator or news aggregator is a type of software that retrieves syndicated Web content that is supplied in the form of a web feed (RSS, Atom and other XML formats), and that are published by weblogs, podcasts, vlogs, and mainstream mass media websites. ... Podcasting is the method of distributing multimedia files, such as audio or video programs, over the Internet using syndication feeds, for playback on mobile devices and personal computers. ... TagWorld is an Internet start-up competing directly with MySpace. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Yahoo! 360° is a personal communication portal similar to Googles Orkut, Windows Live Spaces, Friendster and MySpace, currently in beta testing. ... This is a list of notable social networking websites. ... BROG is the acronym for the (We)blog Research on Genre project based in the School of Library and Information Science at Indiana University, Bloomington. ... YouTube is a popular free video sharing web site which lets users upload, view, and share video clips. ... Blogger can refer to at least two things: Blogger, one who maintains a blog Blogger. ... WordPress is a blog publishing system written in PHP and backed by a MySQL database. ...

References

  1. ^ Technorati: about us (2006-11-11). Retrieved on 2006-11-11.
  2. ^ Harmanci, Reyhan (2005-02-20). Time to get a life — pioneer blogger Justin Hall bows out at 31. San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved on 2006-06-09.
  3. ^ "It's the links, stupid", The Economist, 2006-4-20. Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  4. ^ Merholz, Peter (1999). Peterme.com. The Internet Archive. Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  5. ^ Kottke, Jason (August 26, 2003). kottke.org. Retrieved on 2006-07-21.
  6. ^ Jensen, Mallory A Brief History of Weblogs
  7. ^ "Wikinews blog declared Word of the Year", Wikinews, 2004-12-01. Retrieved on 2006-06-22.
  8. ^ Wilson, Dawn. "Down with blogs... so here's another", BBC News, 2006-06-26. Retrieved on 2006-06-26.
  9. ^ Perrone, Jane. "What is a weblog?", Guardian Unlimted, 2004-05-20. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  10. ^ What is a photoblog. Photoblogs.org Wiki. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  11. ^ "Blogging goes mobile", BBC News, 2003-02-23. Retrieved on 2006-06-25.
  12. ^ TechCrunch on PayPerPost.
  13. ^ Marlow, C. Audience, structure and authority in the weblog community. Presented at the International Communication Association Conference, May, 2004, New Orleans, LA.
  14. ^ a b Fickling, David, Internet killed the TV star, The Guardian NewsBlog, 15 August 2006
  15. ^ "Xu Jinglei most popular blogger in world", China Daily, 2006-08-24. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  16. ^ "blogging Bonnie.", Poynter.org, 18 September, 2003.
  17. ^ "Queen of the Sky gets marching orders", The Register, 2004-11-03. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  18. ^ "John Doe No. 1 v. Patrick Cahill and Julia Cahill
  19. ^ Kierkegaard, Sylvia (2006). "Blogs, lies and the doocing: The next hotbed of litigation?". Computer Law & Security Report.
  20. ^ Gibson, Owen. "Warning to chatroom users after libel award for man labelled a Nazi", The Guardian, 2006-03-23. Retrieved on 2006-05-17.
  21. ^ "Lecturer's Blog Sparks Free Speech Row", The Guardian, 2006-05-03. Retrieved on 2006-10-15.
  22. ^ "NBA fines Cuban $200K for antics on, off court", ESPN, 2006-05-11. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  23. ^ Philip L. Gordon and Christopher E. Cobey of Littler Mendelson (October 2005). DOOCES WILD: How Employers Can Survive the New Technological Poker Game of Employee Blogging. FindLaw.
  24. ^ "Queen of the Sky gets marching orders", The Register, 2004-11-03. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  25. ^ "Gaurav Sabnis's blog entry after quitting IBM", Vantage point, 2005-10-10. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  26. ^ "Gaurav Sabnis's blog entry when he got the Legal notice from IIPM", Vantage point, 2005-10-10. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  27. ^ "Gaurav Sabnis's blog entry which offended the management of IIPM and lead to the chain of events resulting in him quitting his job at IBM", Vantage point, 2005-10-10. Retrieved on 2006-06-23.
  28. ^ Kesmodel, David. "Wall Street Journal Blogger Faces Lawsuit Over Comments Posted by Readers", Wall Street Journal Online, 2005-08-31. Retrieved on 2006-11-18.
  29. ^ Wired Magazine, Legal Showdown in Search Fracas, Sept 8, 2005
  30. ^ Slashdot, Aug 31

2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 9 is the 160th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (161st in leap years), with 205 days remaining. ... The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication of The Economist Newspaper Ltd edited in London, UK. It has been in continuous publication since September 1843. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... Internet Archive headquarters. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... Jason Kottke (born September 27, 1973) is a well known American blogger and former web designer currently living in New York City. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 26 is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 188 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... The current BBC News logo BBC News and Current Affairs is a major arm of the BBC responsible for the corporations newsgathering and production of news programmes on BBC television, radio and online. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... August 15 is the 227th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (228th in leap years), with 138 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... Sylvia Mercado Kierkegaard is one of the world’s leading authorities in computer law. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 23 is the 82nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (83rd in Leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 17 is the 137th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (138th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... October 15 is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Wired is a full-color monthly magazine and on-line periodical published in San Francisco, California since March 1993. ...

Further reading

  • Alavi, Nasrin. We Are Iran: The Persian Blogs, Soft Skull Press, New York, 2005. ISBN 1-933368-05-5.
  • Bruns, Axel, and Joanne Jacobs, eds. Uses of Blogs, Peter Lang, New York, 2006. ISBN 0-8204-8124-6.
  • Kline, David; Burstein, Dan. Blog!: How the Newest Media Revolution is Changing Politics, Business, and Culture, Squibnocket Partners, L.L.C., 2005. ISBN 1593151411.

External links

Look up Blog in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • blog software comparison chart by Online Journalism Review, USC Annenberg
  • blogging, personal participation in public knowledge-building on the web (PDF file) by Mark Brady, Chimera Working Paper 2005-02 Colchester: University of Essex
  • Computer Law and Security Report Volume 22 Issue 2, Pages 127-136 blogs, Lies and the Doocing by Sylvia Kierkegaard (2006)
  • Legal Guide for bloggers by the Electronic Frontier Foundation

  Results from FactBites:
 
Blog - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3759 words)
Most blogs are primarily textual although some focus on photographs (photoblog), videos (vlog), or audio (podcasting), and are part of a wider network of social media.
Blogs were among the driving forces behind the "Rathergate" scandal, to wit: (television journalist) Dan Rather presented documents (on the CBS show 60 Minutes) that conflicted with accepted accounts of President Bush's military service record.
Blogs have also had an influence on minority languages, bringing together scattered speakers and learners; this is particularly so with blogs in Gaelic languages, whose creators can be found as far away from traditional Gaelic areas as Kazakhstan and Alaska.
Urban Dictionary: blog (1019 words)
While blogs have many purposes, some of which can be useful, most people seem to use blogs as a way of having an online diary.
These blogs still exist, and are quite enjoyable to read, however the advent of blogger.com and livejournal.com has changed this once meaningful application into utter shit, allowing every day idiots to write about how shitty their lives are and why everyone should care.
Before it became an internet word, blog was a very strong drink of indeterminate recipe invented by sf fans, worse even than their Nuclear Fizz; like Monty Python’s Australian “fighting” wine, it is generally believed that blog is best left in the bottle so it can be used for hitting people over the head with.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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