FACTOID # 30: If Alaska were its own country, it would be the 26th largest in total area, slightly larger than Iran.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Blockbuster Video
Blockbuster video store
Blockbuster video store
This article is about the chain of video stores. For other uses, see Blockbuster.

Blockbuster Video is the largest chain of video tape, video game and DVD rental shops in North America. It is headquartered in Dallas, Texas, and has locations in twenty-nine countries, including the United States, Canada, Mexico, the UK, Australia, Brazil and Taiwan. Image File history File links Blockbuster. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Blockbustervideostore. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Blockbustervideostore. ... ... Chain stores are a range of retail outlets which share a brand and central management, usually with standardised business methods and practices. ... Top view VHS cassette with U.S. Quarter for scale Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed The Video Home System, first released in 1976, better known by its acronym VHS, is a recording and playing standard for video cassette recorders (VCRs), developed by JVC (with some of... A computer game is a game composed of a computer-controlled virtual universe that players interact with in order to achieve a defined goal or set of goals. ... DVD is an optical disc storage media format that can be used for data storage, including movies with high video and sound quality. ... A rental shop is a store where a consumer can borrow reusable products for a fee for a certain period of time before returning them. ... World map showing North America A satellite composite image of North America North America is a continent in the northern hemisphere bordered on the north by the Arctic Ocean, on the east by the North Atlantic Ocean, on the south by the Caribbean Sea, and on the west by the... Dallas redirects here. ... ...

Contents


History

Blockbuster opened its first store on October 19, 1985, and with Wayne Huizenga at the helm it soon grew into a multi-billion dollar corporation. It was sold to Viacom in 1994. On October 13, 2004 Viacom spun off Blockbuster as a separate company again. October 19 is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... H. Wayne Huizenga (born Harry Wayne Huizenga on December 29, 1937), has built several companies into multi-billion dollar enterprises, mostly through an aggressive process of acquisitions. ... Viacom is an international media conglomerate. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


At the end of 2004, Blockbuster's annual report put the number of U.S. stores at 5,803 (4,708 company-operated and 1,095 franchised). International stores (operating under Blockbuster and other brands) totalled 3,291, including 426 in Canada, 897 in Britain, and 408 in Australia. It has been claimed that there are more than 43 million U.S. households with Blockbuster memberships. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Blockbuster offers an internet-based DVD rental service in the United States and the United Kingdom. Also, Blockbuster rolled out Blockbuster Movie and Game Passes, which allow customers to watch whatever movies or games they wish for a monthly fee, although stores limit the number of movies or games a customer can have out at any one time.


Blockbuster also rolled out in-store Game Rush locations that provide a wide variety of games and systems, from older systems like the Nintendo Entertainment System to the modern PlayStation 2, Xbox and GameCube systems. Game Rush locations tend to offer special deals on game trading that seem to be focused on improving their inventory of used games rather than trying to actually cut a profit. The Nintendo Entertainment System (North America, Brazil, Europe, Asia, and Australia) The Nintendo Entertainment System, or NES, is an 8-bit video game console released by Nintendo in North America, Brazil, Europe, Asia, and Australia. ... The PlayStation 2 (PS2) (Japanese: プレイステーション2) is Sonys second video game console, the successor to the PlayStation and the predecessor to the PlayStation 3. ... The Xbox is a video game console first released on November 15, 2001 in North America. ... The Nintendo GameCube (Japanese: ゲームキューブ; originally code-named Dolphin during development; abbreviated as GCN) is Nintendos fourth home video game console, belonging to the 128-bit era; the same generation as Segas Dreamcast, Sonys PlayStation 2, and Microsofts Xbox. ...


Subsidaries

The company has a large Irish subsidiary, Xtravision, which does not operate under the Blockbuster brand name. Blockbuster also owns Rhino Video Games and briefly attempted to acquire its competitor, Hollywood Video, in 2004. Xtra-vision Limited is Irelands largest chain of video rental stores, founded in 1979. ... This article is about the concept in marketing. ... Rhino Video Games is one of Americas fastest growing video game retailers. ... Movie Gallery, based in Atlanta, Georgia, is the second largest movie and game rental company in the United States, behind Blockbuster Video. ...


Elimination of late fees

On January 1, 2005 Blockbuster introduced[1] their "End of Late Fees" program[2]. Instead of late fees, there is a seven day period after the due date when the item may be returned without charge. After this point, Blockbuster automatically charges the renter for the selling price of the unreturned item (minus the rental fee). Customers may return the item with 30 days to have this charge reversed to store credit, less a "restocking fee" of $1.25 (which may be higher in participating franchised stores). A late fee, also known as a late fine, is a charge levied against a client by an organization for not returning a rented or borrowed item by its due date. ... Franchising (from the French for free) is a method of doing business wherein a franchisor licenses trademarks and methods of doing business to a franchisee in exchange for a recurring royalty fee. ...


The loss of late fees eliminated a significant revenue stream for Blockbuster, and along with online rentals, has been dismissed by its main competitor, Movie Gallery[3]. Movie Gallery (NASDAQ: MOVI) based in Dothan, Alabama, is the second largest movie and game rental company in the United States, behind Blockbuster Video. ...


On February 18, 2005 the Attorney General of New Jersey filed suit[4] against Blockbuster, alleging that it had failed to clearly disclose the terms of the new policy, and that some franchises were not participating in the program, had shorter grace periods, or charged higher restocking fees. Other states began looking into the program as well. On March 29 Blockbuster signed an "Assurance of Voluntary Compliance"[5] with 46 states and the District of Columbia (not including New Jersey), in which it agreed to more clearly inform customers of the terms and limitations of the program. A refund program was set up for those affected by the purchase charges or restocking fees, and rental coupons offered to compensate for late fees paid in non-participating stores prior to the agreement. Blockbuster also paid $630,000 to the states involved to cover the costs of the investigation. In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D) Acting, Outgoing Jon Corzine (D) (Governor-Elect) Senators Jon Corzine (D) (Outgoing) Frank Lautenberg (D) Official language(s) None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378... ...


The "End of Late Fees" progam is a corporate policy and is not binding on franchised stores in the US (approximately 18% of the total). Blockbuster's 2004 annual report claimed that approximately half of the franchises were participating, and that could leave a few hundred (less than 10% of all US stores) that have opted not to participate in said policy. These franchises continue to charge late fees as usual. Several franchise locations that initally accepted the corporate policy have also since abandoned it due to activity termed "movie hogging" - renters who no longer fear the late fees and simply keep the movies.


The "End of Late Fees" policy was extended to Canada (where all stores are operated by the corporation) as of March 31, 2005 (See [6]). March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Online operations

United States

In August 2004 [7], Blockbuster introduced an online DVD rental service in the U.S. to compete with the established market leader, Netflix. The initial price of the standard three-disc plan was $19.95, which was below the Netflix price (which was raised from $19.95 to $21.99 in June) [8]. Online DVD rentals allow a person to rent DVDs by mail. ... Headquartered in Los Gatos, California, Netflix (NASDAQ: NFLX) is the first and largest major online DVD rental service, offering flat rate rental-by-mail to customers in the United States. ...


In October, Netflix changed course and reduced its own 3-disc price to $17.99, and Blockbuster responded by reducing to $17.49 [9]. It made a further reduction to $14.99 in December, and apparently had guaranteed this price to existing customers until January 2006 [10]. However, in August 2005, Blockbuster raised their prices for new customers to match the Netflix level of $17.99 [11].


Blockbuster's U.S. online operation started with around 10 warehouses; further expansions [12][13] have brought that number to 30 [14]. The company had 1 million customers by August 2005, and has stated a target of 2 million by the end of the first quarter of 2006 [15].


United Kingdom

In the UK, Blockbuster has been providing a version of online rentals since October 2002 [16] with its "Pay Per Rent" [17] service. This is more like a postal version of store rentals than the traditional online DVD rental subscription model, with per-rental prices of £3.50-£4.50, with a rental period of 5 nights (usually Monday-to-Friday, not including postal delivery times), and late fees (£0.70-0.90 per disc) [18].


In May 2004, Blockbuster also introduced [19] a conventional online subscription service [20]. The unlimited 3-disc plan is £14.99/month.


Concerns and Censorship

Blockbuster's massive international permeation and domination of the video market has placed certain business practices under scrutiny. Critics of the chain, including Naomi Klein in her anti-globalization book No Logo, say that they use their power to enact censorship - this accusation stemming from the fact that Blockbuster are reputed to edit videos for release beyond the standard retail cut, or at the very least use their significant market share to influence studios to edit in order to lower their certification and reach a wider market. Naomi Klein Naomi Klein (born 1970) is a Canadian journalist, author and activist. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies, a controversial book written by Canadian journalist Naomi Klein, first appeared in January 2000. ... Censorship is the control of speech and other forms of human expression, often in the context of government control. ...


Also on the subject of censorship, on November 27, 1990, the MPAA introduced the NC-17 rating in order to distinguish non-pornographic adult material from 'X-rated' materials. Under pressure from the Christian organisation the American Family Association, headed by Rev. Donald Wildmon, Blockbuster decided not to stock NC-17 titles, and certain "unrated" titles. The AFA also successfully campaigned against them carrying films such as The Last Temptation of Christ. November 27 is the 331st day (332nd on leap years) of the year. ... For the Temptations album, see 1990 (Temptations album) MCMXC redirects here; for the Enigma album, see MCMXC a. ... The Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) is a non-profit trade association formed to advance the interests of movie studios. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ... X-rated, X certificate, X classification or similar terms are labels for movies implying strong adult content, typically pornography or violence. ... The American Family Association (AFA) is a conservative, fundamentalist Christian non-profit organization founded in 1977 by Rev. ... Donald Wildmon, born 18 January 1938 in Dumas, Mississippi, is the founder and head of the fundamentalist Christian organisation, the American Family Association. ... The Last Temptation of Christ is a novel written by Nikos Kazantzakis, first published in December 1960. ...


Further criticism is that their business model has led to a dilution of availability. The standard model for video rental stores was that they would pay a large flat fee per video, approximately US$65, and have unlimited rentals from the lifetime of the cassette itself. The new system, controlled by the distribution company Rentrak, and perhaps influenced by the studios due to the smaller space constraints and longer shelf-life of the DVD format, is based on royalties. Blockbuster obtain videos for little or no cost, and takes approximately half of the rental fee, paying the other half back to the studio and to Rentrak. Under this model, there is little incentive to purchase movies that have enduring interest for fewer people. Riding on the hype generated by the vast marketing campaigns of Hollywood blockbusters, they fill their shelves with multiple copies of the same brand-new film, which may have a shelf life of only 2-3 months, and combine this with a promise that the video will be in stock or you rent it for free the following time. This often leads to shelf-saturation, where there may be fifty copies of the latest hyped movie available, yet little, if any, older or foreign movies. The Rentrak Corporation, founded in 1984, is an entertainment industry information management company that provides services to Movie studios and Video Rental Shops. ... A royalty is a sum paid to the creator of performance art for the use of that art. ...


Advertising

Tippett-produced television commercial for Blockbuster, with Carl and Ray.
Tippett-produced television commercial for Blockbuster, with Carl and Ray.

One of Blockbuster's most well known advertising campaigns was launched during the 2002 Superbowl. It starred the voices of Jim Belushi and James Woods, as a rabbit and a guinea pig in a pet shop, located across the road from a Blockbuster store. Download high resolution version (2324x1765, 2737 KB)Blockbuster ad promo This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (2324x1765, 2737 KB)Blockbuster ad promo This work is copyrighted. ... Advertising campaign is series of advertisement messages that share a single idea and theme which make up an integrated marketing communication (IMC). ... The Super Bowl is the championship game of the National Football League, the pinnacle of American football. ... James Belushi (also known as Jim Belushi) (born June 15, 1954) is an American film and television actor. ... James Woods James Howard Woods (born April 18, 1947) is an American actor. ... Genera Pentalagus Bunolagus Nesolagus Romerolagus Brachylagus Sylvilagus Oryctolagus Poelagus The bane of Australian farmers - the wild rabbit Rabbits are small mammals in the family Leporidae, found in many parts of the world. ... Species Cavia porcellus Cavia aperea Cavia tschudii Cavia guianae Cavia anolaimae Cavia nana Cavia fulgida Cavia magna Guinea pigs (also called cavies) are rodents belonging to the family Caviidae and the genus Cavia. ...


Slogans

  • "Wow! What a difference!"
  • "Make it a Blockbuster Night."
  • "Let the good times roll!"
  • "Go home happy."
  • "Bringing entertainment home." (UK)
  • "The end of late fees. The start of more."
  • "Feel The Rush" (Note: Only applies to special "Game Rush" stores)
  • "Renting is BETTER Than Ever."
  • "Feel the FREE." (used in Canada for the Blockbuster REWARDS)
  • "MORE from BLOCKBUSTER." (used in Canada)
  • "Don't rely on anyone else to entertain you!" (UK, 2005)

External links

  • Blockbuster Video website

  Results from FactBites:
 
Blockbuster Video - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1281 words)
Blockbuster opened its first store on October 19, 1985, and with Wayne Huizenga at the helm it soon grew into a multi-billion dollar corporation.
On February 18, 2005 the Attorney General of New Jersey filed suit[4] against Blockbuster, alleging that it had failed to clearly disclose the terms of the new policy, and that some franchises were not participating in the program, had shorter grace periods, or charged higher restocking fees.
Blockbuster's 2004 annual report claimed that approximately half of the franchises were participating, and that could leave a few hundred (less than 10% of all US stores) that have opted not to participate in said policy.
Blockbuster dropping late fees as of Jan. 1 - Dec. 14, 2004 (580 words)
Blockbuster (Research) has been competing with the growth of by-mail rental services, such as Netflix (Research), which allow customers to keep movies as long as they want in return for a monthly fee.
Blockbuster, which was spun off earlier this year by media conglomerate Viacom (Research), is in the process of bidding for competitor Hollywood Entertainment (Research), the second largest video rental chain.
Blockbuster is offering $11.50 a share for Hollywood, or about $700 million, and it has said it would be willing to raise its bid subject to a review of company financial information.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m