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Encyclopedia > Blockbuster (entertainment)

Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, denotes a very popular and/or successful production. The term was originally derived from theater slang referring to a particularly successful play but is now used primarily by the film industry. Film is a term that encompasses individual motion pictures, the field of film as an art form, and the motion picture industry. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212... Slang is the use of highly informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speakers dialect or language. ... Romeo and Juliet by Ford Madox Brown A play, written by a playwright, or dramatist, is a form of literature, almost always consisting of dialog between characters, and intended for performance rather than reading. ...


The etymology of the term is uncertain; some histories cite it as originally referring to a play that is so successful that competing theaters on the block are "busted" and driven out of business; others claim a derivation from the nickname of a type of World War II-era bomb capable of destroying an entire city block. Still others note that the term may stem from crowds of people that might flock to line up for a hit play, perhaps stretching over several city blocks. Whatever its origin, the term quickly caught on as a way to describe a hit, and has subsequently been applied to productions other than plays and films, including novels and multimillion selling computer/console game titles. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Massive Ordnance Air Blast (MOAB) bomb produced in the United States. ... A novel (from French nouvelle Italian novella, new) is an extended, generally fictional narrative, typically in prose. ...


Since about 1975, the threshold for a blockbuster film in North America has often been placed at $100,000,000 in ticket sales, an amount first achieved by the film Jaws, although The Sound of Music (1965), the first film to make more money than Gone with the Wind, was a gigantic hit in its day. (It played more than a year in some first-run houses.) Jaws is a 1975 horror–thriller film directed by Steven Spielberg, based on Peter Benchleys best-selling novel of the same name, which was inspired in turn by the Jersey Shore Shark Attacks of 1916. ... Rodgers and Hammersteins The Sound of Music is a 1965 film directed by Robert Wise and starring Julie Andrews in the lead role. ... Gone with the Wind is a 1939 film adapted from Margaret Mitchells 1936 novel of the same name. ...


In response to the huge success of Jaws, many Hollywood producers attempted to create "event films" with wide commercial appeal. Film companies began greenlighting increasingly high budgeted films and relying extensively on massive advertising blitzes leading up to their theatrical release, thus ushering in the so-called "blockbuster era". Spielberg and director/producer George Lucas (whose 1977 film Star Wars was the most successful film of the decade) are the filmmakers most closely associated with the beginning of the blockbuster era. The focus on creating blockbusters grew so intense that a backlash occurred, with critics decrying the prevalence of a "blockbuster mentality" and lamenting dearth of personal, small-scale films. Many within Hollywood were wary of attempting to create blockbusters or event movies due to the high financial risk entailed in big-budget filmmaking. This debate prevailed for a long time after the successes of early blockbusters such as Jaws or Star Wars. It has been suggested that Amanda Lucas be merged into this article or section. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological...


When a film made on a low budget is particularly successful or exceeds the expectations of films in its genre, then those films are considered blockbusters as well. Examples include Fried Green Tomatoes (made at a budget of about $13,000,000, and earner of about $80,000,000 at the box office), The Rugrats Movie (the first non-Disney animated feature to gross over $100,000,000), The Blair Witch Project (amateur-produced first person narrative film); Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (non-English language foreign film); Fahrenheit 9/11 (political documentary film); Rocky and Borat: Cultural Learnings for Make Benefit Glorious Nation of Kazhakstan (satirical documentary); all of which have made over $100 million each. Fried Green Tomatoes is a 1991 film based on the novel Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe by Fannie Flagg. ... The Rugrats Movie is a 1998 animated film, produced by Paramount Pictures and Nickelodeon Movies. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... The Blair Witch Project is a low-budget American horror film released in 1999. ... ... UK DVD cover Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is a Chinese-language wuxia (chivalric martial arts) film released in 2000. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A foreign film is a film that is considered foreign in a particular country. ... Fahrenheit 9/11 is an award-winning documentary film by American filmmaker Michael Moore, which had a general release in the United States and Canada on June 25, 2004. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Rocky is a 1976 film written by and starring Noah Rajswing and directed by John G. Avildsen. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ...


See also

Cleopatra is the biggest box-office bomb of all time. ... A sleeper hit (often simply called a sleeper) refers to a film, book, album, TV show, or video game that gains unexpected success or recognition. ... This is the list of the 200 films that had made the most by the end of their first weekend on release in the United States of America and Canada. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ...

External links

Look up blockbuster in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
  • Box Office Mojo list of all-time U.S. blockbuster motion pictures
  • IMDb - All-Time Worldwide Boxoffice Grossing over $200,000,000
  • IMDb - All-Time USA Boxoffice Grossing over $100,000,000

  Results from FactBites:
 
Blockbuster Entertainment Limited - Blockbuster and Starlight Children’s Foundation - Business in the Community (521 words)
Blockbuster Entertainment Ltd, a leading provider of in-home movie and game entertainment in the UK first announced its partnership with Starlight Children’s Foundation at the end of 2001.
Blockbuster has formed an integrated Cause Related Marketing partnership with Starlight, which aims to grant the wishes of seriously and terminally ill children and entertain them while in hospital.
Blockbuster’s partnership with Starlight aims to build the company’s image and reputation in its local communities whilst reflecting the brand’s “magical” positioning.
Blockbuster (entertainment) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (349 words)
Blockbuster, as applied to film or theater, is a very popular and monetarily-successful production.
Spielberg and director/producer George Lucas (whose 1977 film Star Wars was the biggest blockbuster of the decade) are the filmmakers most closely associated with the blockbuster era.
The focus on creating blockbusters grew so intense that a backlash occurred, with critics decrying the prevalence of a "blockbuster mentality" and lamenting dearth of personal, small-scale films.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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