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Encyclopedia > Blister
For the packaging type, see Blister pack. For the cancelled television series, see Blister (TV series).
Blister
Classification & external resources
ICD-10 T14.0
ICD-9 910-914, 940.0-949.5
A blister caused by 2nd degree burns
A blister caused by 2nd degree burns

A blister or bulla is a defense mechanism of the human body. When the outer (epidermis) layer of the skin separates from the fibre layer (dermis), a pool of lymph and other bodily fluids collect between these layers while the skin re-grows from underneath. Blisters can be caused by chemical or physical injury. An example of chemical injury would be an allergic reaction. Physical injury can be caused by heat, frostbite, or friction. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Tablets in a blister pack Blister pack is a term for two distinct types of non-reclosable clear plastic packaging used for consumer goods. ... Blister (TV series) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). ... The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (most commonly known by the abbreviation ICD) provides codes to classify diseases and a wide variety of signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or disease. ... The following is a list of codes for International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1716, 1208 KB)This is a blister that formed on my foot a couple of days after getting a second-degree burn. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1716, 1208 KB)This is a blister that formed on my foot a couple of days after getting a second-degree burn. ... With regard to living things, a body is the integral physical material of an individual. ... In mammals including humans, the lymphatic vessels (or lymphatics) are a network of thin tubes that branch, like blood vessels, into tissues throughout the body. ... Bodily fluids listed below are found in the bodies of men and/or women. ...

Contents

Cause

Blisters typically develop when there is friction and irritation to the surface layer of the skin and cause it to separate from the second layer. Fluid fills in the space between these two layers. Blisters most often appear on the soles of the feet and palms of the hands. The hands and feet often rub against shoes, socks, or sports equipment and create friction under moist, warm conditions perfect for blisters.


Prevention

Large blister caused by a sunburn
Large blister caused by a sunburn

Minimizing friction is the primary method of preventing blisters. Appropriate footwear, socks, and gloves for work involving frequent hand use will help reduce blisters. Making sure that shoes are the right size and shape, and that socks are made from a synthetic blend is an effective way of reducing the occurrence of blisters. Other effective ways to reduce blisters is to apply petroleum jelly or talcum powder before exercising to reduce friction. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Generally, synthetic means pertaining to synthesis, i. ...


Treatment

Unless infection occurs, blisters usually heal quickly without much additional treatment. If a blister is punctured, it forms an open wound, which should be disinfected and bandaged. Loose bandaging should be used since a bandage that is too tight can result in rupture or rubbing against the blister, causing discomfort. If the blister is broken, the excess skin should be removed, especially if it is dirty or torn. Removing the excess skin often makes the wound heal any infection quickly - if immediately disinfected. Signs of infection include pus draining from the blister, very red or warm skin around the blister, and red streaks leading away from the blister. A wound is a physical trauma where the skin is torn, cut or punctured. ... An antiseptic solution of iodine applied to a cut Antiseptics (Greek αντί, against, and σηπτικός, putrefactive) are antimicrobial substances that are applied to living tissue/skin to reduce the possibility of infection, sepsis, or putrefaction. ... Bandages are also used in martial arts to prevent dislocated joints. ... An infection is the detrimental colonization of a host organism by a foreign species. ... Pus is a whitish-yellow or yellow substance produced during inflammatory responses of the body that can be found in regions of pyogenic bacterial infections. ...


Small unbroken blisters that do not cause discomfort can be left alone to heal, because the best protection against infection is a blister's own skin.[1]


Variations

If a blister is associated with sub-dermal bleeding it will partially fill with blood, forming a blood blister. Certain autoimmune diseases feature extensive blistering as one of their symptoms. These include pemphigus and pemphigoid. Blistering also occurs as part of foodborne illness with Vibrio vulnificus (seafood). The class of chemical weapons known as vesicants acts by causing blisters (often within the respiratory tract). Mustard gas and lewisite are examples of such agents. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Human blood smear: a - erythrocytes; b - neutrophil; c - eosinophil; d - lymphocyte. ... A blood blister on the first finger of the left hand. ... Autoimmune diseases arise from an overactive immune response of the body against substances and tissues normally present in the body. ... Pemphigus is an autoimmune disorder that causes blistering and raw sores on skin and mucous membranes. ... A foodborne illness (also foodborne disease) is any illness resulting from the consumption of food. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Spaghetti with seafood (Spaghetti allo scoglio). ... Early detection of chemical agents Sociopolitical climate of chemical warfare While the study of chemicals and their military uses was widespread in China, the use of toxic materials has historically been viewed with mixed emotions and some disdain in the West (especially when the enemy were doing it). ... A vesicant (also known as a blister agent) is a chemical agent that causes blistering of the skin. ... Airborne exposure limit 0. ... Lewisite is a chemical compound from a chemical family called arsines. ...


See also

Bubonic plague is an infectious disease that is believed to have caused several epidemics or pandemics throughout history. ... Dracunciliasis, more commonly known as Guinea Worm Disease (GWD), is an infection caused by the parasite Dracunculus medinensis (also known as Guinea worm). The word Dracunculus comes from the Latin little dragon. // An adult female Dracunculus worm emerges through the skin of its human host one to two years after... Herpangina (also called mouth blisters) is the name of a painful mouth infection caused by coxsackieviruses. ... Herpes zoster, colloquially known as shingles, is the reactivation (from the general area of the spinal cord) of varicella zoster virus (VZV, primary infection of which leads to chickenpox), one of the Herpesviridae group, leading to a crop of painful blisters over the area of a dermatome. ... Endoscopic images of a duodenal ulcer. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ http://sportsmedicine.about.com/cs/foot_facts/a/aa031400a.htm

Insane blisters from rowing: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XyhpetcjohU


  Results from FactBites:
 
Blister - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (189 words)
If a blister is punctured, it forms an open wound and should be bandaged to prevent bacteria and dust from entering the wound which could result in inflammation.
If a blister is associated with sub-dermal bleeding, it may partially fill with blood, forming an unpleasant blood blister.
Blistering is a distinguishing characteristic of second degree burns.
Blister Beetles (996 words)
Blister beetles are infrequent pests of several crops including alfalfa, sweet clover, potatoes, beans, and sugarbeets.
Since blister beetles are readily attracted to flowering plants, controlling the number of flowering weeds in the field and cutting alfalfa prior to bloom stage will reduce the potential for infestation.
Blister beetles are gregarious and are often found in high numbers in localized areas of the field.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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