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Encyclopedia > Blind Variation and Selective Retention

Blind Variation and Selective Retention, or BVSR for short, is a principle from cybernetics describing change in evolutionary systems. BVSR is better known as the core concept of the theory of evolution. Although it has its origin in Darwinian evolution, BVSR is a more general principle; for example, it can also be applied to memetic evolution or genetic programming. The term is little used outside of cybernetics.


BVSR describes a repeated process of two steps -- blind variation and selective retention on a population (of animals, religions, programs, etc.).


  Results from FactBites:
 
NationMaster - Encyclopedia: Blind Variation and Selective Retention (314 words)
Sexual selection occurs when organisms that are more attractive to the opposite sex because of their features reproduce more and increase the frequency of those features in the gene pool.
It is understood that an organism's DNA sequence, in the absence of selection, undergoes a steady accumulation of neutral mutations.
The relative importance of natural selection and genetic drift in determining the fate of new mutation also depends on the population size and the strength of selection: when N times s (population size times strength of selection) is small, genetic drift predominates.
evolution - Article and Reference from OnPedia.com (4128 words)
Sexual selection occurs when organisms that are more attractive to the opposite sex because of their features reproduce more and increase the frequency of those features in the gene pool.
It is understood that an organism's DNA sequence, in the absence of selection, undergoes a steady accumulation of neutral mutations.
The relative importance of natural selection and genetic drift in determining the fate of new mutation also depends on the population size and the strength of selection: when N times s (population size times strength of selection) is small, genetic drift predominates.
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