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Encyclopedia > Blessed Virgin Mary
A modern popular Roman Catholic image of the Blessed Virgin Mary, displaying her Immaculate Heart
A modern popular Roman Catholic image of the Blessed Virgin Mary, displaying her Immaculate Heart

The Blessed Virgin Mary, sometimes shortened to The Blessed Virgin or The Virgin Mary, is a traditional title specifically used by Roman Catholics, Anglicans, some Eastern Orthodox and Eastern Catholics, and others to describe Mary, the mother of Jesus Christ. Our Lady may refer to: Our Lady, the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mary, the mother of Jesus of Nazareth Our Lady of Guadalupe, a 16th century painting, a Roman Catholic icon and Mexicos most popular religious image Our Lady of Fatima, the title given to the Virgin Mary by Catholics... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The domes of an Ukrainian Catholic parish in Simpson, Pennsylvania This article refers to Eastern Churches in full communion with the See of Rome. ... According to the New Testament, Mary (Judeo-Aramaic מרים Maryām Bitter; Arabic مريم (Maryam); Septuagint Greek Μαριαμ, Mariam, Μαρια, Maria; Geez: ማሪያም, Māryām; Syriac: Mart, Maryam, Madonna), was the mother of Jesus of Nazareth, who at the time of his conception was the betrothed wife of Saint Joseph (cf. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The term carries not merely belief in the virginity of Mary but of her continuing role within the church and in the life of all Christians. In the Dogmatic Constitution of the Church (21 November 1964), passed during the Second Vatican Council, Mary was also given the title Advocate, Auxiliatrix, Adjutrix, and Mediatrix. Mary is often referred to colloquially as Our Lady. Virgin redirects here. ... Lumen Gentium, the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, is one of the principal documents of the Second Vatican Council. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... The Second Ecumenical Council of the Vatican, or Vatican II, was the twenty-first Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ...

Contents

The Blessed Virgin Mary in Catholicism

Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy focus on Mary as a living person who can intercede to her Son, Jesus, on behalf of humanity. From the beginning of the Church, Catholic theology has maintained that Christ is the sole Mediator between God and Man.[1] Yet as theologian Ludwig Ott observes, "there is nothing to prevent others in a certain way (secundum quid) from being called mediators between God and man, insofar as they, by preparing or serving, cooperate in uniting men to God" (emphasis added).[2] Mary's willed obedience[3] is contrasted with Eve's disobedience,[4] an idea with roots in the writings of the Church Fathers. Mary herself required redemption and is not equal to Jesus in Catholic theology. Nonetheless her role was pivotal, as emphasized by Jerome, Irenaeus 180–199 (see Jurgens §224), Tertullian c.212 (see Jurgens §358) and others including herself in Scripture: "behold the handmaid of the Lord."[5] Mary is also described by Ambrose as "the prototype of the Church."[6] Catholic Church redirects here. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Michelangelos Creation of Adam, from the Sistine Chapel. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Church Fathers, Early Church Fathers... For other uses of the word, see Redemption Redemption is a religious concept referring to forgiveness or absolution for past sins and protection from eternal damnation. ... Irenaeus (Greek: Εἰρηναῖος), (b. ... Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus, anglicised as Tertullian, (ca. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... For other uses, see Ambrose (disambiguation). ...


Marian devotions play a key part in the ritual and liturgy of Western and Eastern Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. While many of the traits attributed to her and devotions given her within Western Catholicism are not found among the Eastern Orthodox & Catholics, the opposite is also true. For instance, in the Paraklesis service of the Byzantine liturgy, Eastern Christians appeal to her: "O most holy Theotokos, save us!"[7] This appeal to her to save us is not used in Western Christianity, but it is explained by the Eastern Orthodox as "ask(ing) the Most Holy Theotokos to 'save us' not in the sense of the eternal salvation found only through Christ, but in the sense that those drowning call out to those on dry land for assistance in their plight."[8] For more on the place of Mary in Eastern Orthodox tradition and theology, see The Ever-Virgin Mother of God by Archpriest George Florovsky. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... A liturgy is the customary public worship of a religious group, according to their particular traditions. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      As a... ... The Byzantine Rite, sometimes called Constantinopolitan, is the liturgical rite used (in various languages) by all the Eastern Orthodox Churches and by several Eastern Rite particular Churches within the Catholic Church. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ...


Cult of the Virgin

Origins

Early image of the Virgin and child from the Roman catacombs, 4th century.
Early image of the Virgin and child from the Roman catacombs, 4th century.

The Council of Ephesus in 431 sanctioned the cult of the Virgin as Theotokos, Mother of God, allowing the creation of icons bearing the images of the Virgin and Child. Devotion to Mary was, however, already widespread by this point. The early Church Fathers saw Mary as the "new Eve" who said "yes" to God as Eve had said no. The non-canonical Gospel of James, written around 150, is an example of early devotion to Mary, advocating her perpetual virginity. Mary, as the first Christian Saint and Mother of Jesus, was deemed to be a compassionate mediator between suffering mankind and her son, Jesus, who was seen as King and Judge. Biblical support for this position was found in the story of the Marriage at Cana whereat Mary entreated Jesus to turn water into wine (Gospel of John, Chapter 2). Elizabeth's praise of Mary "blessed art thou among women" and "who am I that the mother of my Lord would visit me?" in Luke 2 are also cited, among other passages of Scripture. Image File history File links VirgenNino. ... Image File history File links VirgenNino. ... The word catacomb comes from Greek kata kumbas (L. ad catacumbas), near the low place and originally it meant a certain burial district in Rome. ... The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... The Gospel of James, also sometimes known as the Infancy Gospel of James or the Protevangelium of James, is an apocryphal Gospel probably written about AD 150. ... Virgin redirects here. ... In traditional Christian iconography, Saints are often depicted as having halos. ... In the Christian New Testament, the Gospel of John refers a number of times to a town called Cana of Galilee. ... For other uses, see Gospel of John (disambiguation). ...


Early representations show Mary as the "Throne of Heaven" with Mary and the Child Jesus both crowned as Royalty. She was further identified with the Bride in the Old Testament Song of Solomon, by such noted theologians as St. Bernard of Clairvaux. She became the prototype for the Church itself. During the Middle Ages, and especially in France, the great Cathedrals were thus named for Mary. The Marian Rosary was popularized by the followers of St. Dominic. Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh to refer to its canon, which corresponds to the Protestant Old Testament. ... For other uses, see Song of Solomon (disambiguation). ... Saint Bernard of Clairvaux (1090–August 21, 1153) was a French abbot and the primary builder of the reforming Cistercian monastic order. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A Cathedral is a Christian church building, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, which serves as the central church of a bishopric. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... St Dominic presiding over an auto de fe, Spanish, 1475 Saint Dominic (born at Calaruega, Spain, around 1170; died August 6, 1221, at Bologna, Italy) founded the Dominican Order. ...

Coronation of the virgin by Fra Angelico
Coronation of the virgin by Fra Angelico

The image of Mary as Queen was softened somewhat by Mary as Mother of the Child Jesus. St. Francis of Assisi popularized the image of the Nativity scene using live animals. This representation of the helpless Jesus suckled by his mother brought Christmas into the hearts and homes of the people. And, as journeys to the Holy Land became difficult, Mary's role in the Passion (Christianity) story became part of the popular Stations of the Cross as the Mother of the suffering Jesus. During the great plagues such as the Black Death, Mary became greatly popular as a compassionate intercessor and protector of mankind against the just judgment of God. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 587 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2024 × 2066 pixel, file size: 424 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Blessed Virgin Mary... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 587 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (2024 × 2066 pixel, file size: 424 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Blessed Virgin Mary... The Maestà (Madonna enthroned) with Saints Cosmas and Damian, Saint Mark and Saint John, Saint Lawrence and three Dominicans, Saint Dominic, Saint Thomas Aquinas and Saint Peter Martyr; San Marco, Florence. ... Saint Francis of Assisi (September 26, 1181 – October 3, 1226) was a Roman Catholic friar and the founder of the Order of Friars Minor, more commonly known as the Franciscans. ... A traditional nativity scene from Naples, Italy A nativity scene, also called a crib or crèche (meaning crib or manger in French) generally refers to any depiction of the birth or birthplace of Jesus. ... For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Holy Land (Biblical). ... The Passion is the theological term used for the suffering, both physical and mental, of Jesus in the hours prior to and including his trial and execution by crucifixion. ... The 12th Station of the Cross - Jesus dies on the Cross. ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ...


Devotion to the Virgin Mary as the "new Eve" lent much to the status of women during the Middle Ages. Women who had been looked down upon as daughters of Eve (first woman), came to be looked upon as objects of veneration and inspiration. The veneration of Mary both as woman and prototype of the Church was greatly responsible for transforming the Germanic Warrior code into the Code of Chivalry. This reinterpretation of women flowered in the Courtly Love poetry of Medieval and Renaissance France. Mary, as the original "vessel of Christ" may have also influenced the legends of the Holy Grail. Her selflessness, obedience and virginal humility were reinterpreted in the literary figure of Sir Galahad, finder of the Grail. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Adam and Eve. ... Warrior code is an ethical code followed by warriors, often those that were privileged by birth, belonging to nobility or another privileged caste to preserve their honour. ... Bors Dilemma - he chooses to save a maiden rather than his brother Lionel Chivalry[1] is a term related to the medieval institution of knighthood. ... Court of Love in Provence in the 14th Century (after a manuscript in the Bibliothèque Nationale, Paris). ... For other uses, see Holy Grail (disambiguation). ... A portrait of Sir Galahad by George Frederick Watts. ...


Accusations of idolatry

Our Lady of Lourdes
Modern popular image of the Lourdes Apparition.

Some Protestants have accused Catholics and Eastern Orthodox of "Mariolatry," suggesting that Catholics adore the Virgin Mary in breach of the Ten Commandments, which condemn keeping "false gods." This point was offered especially by John Calvin. In Catholic theology there is a clear distinction drawn between the worship or latria (adoration, which may be offered only to God), and veneration and praise, or dulia. Catholicism has traditionally accorded to the Virgin Mary the veneration of hyperdulia, which rests in part upon the angelic salutation, "Hail, full of grace" (Luke 1:28), a phrase with momentous theological impact. Over the centuries, according to the Catholics, the nature of Mary within theology became clearer. By 403 we find Epiphanius refuting a sect called the Collyridians who adored Mary, telling them: "Mary should be honoured, but the Father and the Son and the Holy Ghost should be adored. Nobody should adore Mary" (in Ott, Bk III, Pt 3 Ch. 3, §8). Thus we find, from the third century Church, veneration of Mary. Later, the belief that Mary intercedes for us with her Divine Son, and a clear distinction between latria and dulia together with a rejection of the notion of giving latria to Mary. The saints, for their part, receive dulia. This distinction between latria, hyperdulia, and dulia, is key to understanding Roman Catholic Tradition (Eastern Catholics and Orthodox do not distinguish hyperdulia from dulia). generally available marian image - no copyright issues File links The following pages link to this file: Rosary Blessed Virgin Mary Categories: Images with unknown source ... generally available marian image - no copyright issues File links The following pages link to this file: Rosary Blessed Virgin Mary Categories: Images with unknown source ... This article is about the French pilgrimage location. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article is about a list of ten religious commandments. ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... Latria is a Greek term used in Catholic theology to mean adoration, which is the highest form of worship or reverence and is directed only to God. ... The Collyridians were an obscure minor early Christian heretical group. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The domes of an Ukrainian Catholic parish in Simpson, Pennsylvania This article refers to Eastern Churches in full communion with the See of Rome. ... Separate articles treat Eastern Orthodox Christianity and Orthodox Judaism. ...


These proclamations by the Catholic Church, in addition to calling Mary the Mother of God, which echoes the term Theotokos, instituted by an Ecumenical Council (instead of the mother of the human body of Jesus, which may echo the term Christotokos, specifically condemned as Nestorian by an Ecumenical Council), the Queen of Heaven, and the Queen of the World has led to such accusations. However, Catholics and Orthodox Christians believe that Mary is the Mother of Jesus, and that He is both God and man. Catholics counter the Protestant attack by stating that some Protestants have fallen into the Nestorian heresy which claimed that the "man Jesus" is not both fully divine and fully human, two natures (ousia) united inextricably in one person (hypostasis). Instead, Nestorianism claims that the "man Jesus" had Divine nature bestowed upon him at some time later than His conception and, therefore, Mary could not have been the Mother of God. Instead, the Nestorian doctrine was that she was merely the "mother of his humanity". Catholics do not believe Mary is the source of Jesus' Divine nature, but the source of his human nature. Yet as a person he is truly God and truly man, thus making her His mother. This has led to disagreement between Catholics and Protestants. The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ... Mary may refer to: // Mary (mother of Jesus), the mother of Jesus of Nazareth Blessed Virgin Mary, the Catholic and Orthodox conception of the mother of Christ See also Islamic view of Virgin Mary Mary Magdalene, devoted disciple of Jesus Mary Salome (disciple), mother of apostles James and John Mary... Russian Orthodox Icon of the Theotokos Theotokos is a Greek word that means God-bearer or Mother of God. It is a title assigned by the early Christian Church to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Third Ecumenical Council held at Ephesus in 431. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      An Ecumenical Council (also sometimes Oecumenical... Nestorianism is the doctrine that Jesus exists as two persons, the man Jesus and the divine Son of God, or Logos, rather than as a unified person. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      An Ecumenical Council (also sometimes Oecumenical... The term Nestorianism is eponymous, even though the person who lent his name to it always denied the associated belief. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... See: Hypostasis (linguistics) Hypostasis (religion) Hypostasis (organization) This is a disambiguation page — a list of articles associated with the same title. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ...


"Marianism" describes the excessive veneration of Mary, as opposed to Jesus. The term was first used in the 19th century to condemn the "perversion of Christianity into Marianism".


Marian theology

Marian theology or Mariology is the area of Christian theology concerned with Mary, the Mother of Jesus. It not only deals with her life but her veneration through Roman Catholicism, and her aspect in modern and ancient Christianity.


St. Irenaeus of Lyon called Mary the second Eve because through Mary and her willing acceptance of God's choice, God undid the harm that was done through Eve's choice to eat the forbidden fruit.

See full article Mariology

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Divine motherhood

Main article: Theotokos
Our Lady of GuadalupeHighly venerated image in Mexico.
Our Lady of Guadalupe
Highly venerated image in Mexico.

The Divine Motherhood of Mary is the teaching that Mary was predestined from all of time to be the Theotokos, which translates from Greek as "God-bearer" or more commonly, Mother of God. The title of Theotokos is documented throughout the history of the early church, and was officially given to the Blessed Virgin at the Council of Ephesus in 431. The title does not emphasize Mary, but puts focus on the inseparable dual nature of Jesus Christ, both man and God. Scripturally, this is supported by St. Elizabeth's inspired salutation to Mary from Luke 1:43: "And how [have I deserved that this honor should] be granted to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?" The designation of Mary as The Mother of God stands in stark contrast to the pagan notion of God and emphasizes the miracle of the incarnation: the uncontainable God of creation containing himself within the womb of the Virgin. Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (788x1233, 253 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (788x1233, 253 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... An image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... This article does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...


In Roman Catholicism , there are currently four dogmas about the Blessed Virgin Mary: Mother of God (Theotokos), Perpetual Virginity, Immaculate Conception, and Assumption into Heaven. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... For other senses of this word, see dogma (disambiguation). ... Russian Orthodox Icon of the Theotokos Theotokos is a Greek word that means God-bearer or Mother of God. It is a title assigned by the early Christian Church to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Third Ecumenical Council held at Ephesus in 431. ... The Perpetual Virginity of Mary is a Catholic and Orthodox doctrine of faith which states that Mary, the mother of Jesus, remained an actual virgin, implying both virginal disposition and physical integrity, before, during, and after the birth of Jesus. ... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ...


Three of these dogmas are accepted by the Eastern Orthodox Churches and Oriental Orthodox Churches not in union with Rome. None are accepted within Protestant communities except perhaps in some Anglo-Catholic traditions. A debate with them concerning the truth of these dogmas goes on. ...


Four Marian dogmas

The Mother of God

The dogma that declared Mary as the Mother of God or Theotokos is the central dogma within Mariology. This dogma was declared by the Ecumenical Council Ephesus in A.D. 431. The first of twelve anathemas proposed by Cyril of Alexandra and accepted by the Council of Ephesus declares: The 10th-century Fedorovskaya icon from Kostroma. ... Russian Orthodox Icon of the Theotokos Theotokos is a Greek word that means God-bearer or Mother of God. It is a title assigned by the early Christian Church to Mary, the mother of Jesus, at the Third Ecumenical Council held at Ephesus in 431. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      An Ecumenical Council (also sometimes Oecumenical... Map of Lydia in ancient times showing location of Ephesus and other ancient cities in western Anatolia Ephesus (Greek: , Turkish: ) was an Ionian Greek city in ancient Anatolia, founded by colonists from Athens in the 10th century BC[1]. The city was located in Ionia, where the Cayster River (K... Anathema (in Greek Ανάθεμα) meaning originally something lifted up as an offering to the gods; later, with evolving meanings, it came to mean: to be formally set apart, banished, exiled, excommunicated or denounced, sometimes accursed. ... The Council of Ephesus was held in Ephesus, Asia Minor in 431 under Emperor Theodosius II, grandson of Theodosius the Great. ...

1.If anyone does not confess that Emmanuel is God in truth, and therefore that the holy virgin is the mother of God (for she bore in a fleshly way the Word of God become flesh, let him be anathema.

The Council of Ephesus also declared:

Therefore we confess one Christ, one Son, one Lord. According to this understanding of the unconfused union, we confess the holy virgin to be the mother of God because God the Word took flesh and became man and from his very conception united to himself the temple he took from her.

This is the oldest of all dogmas concerning the Blessed Virgin. It is not only essential in Marian Theology but also in the Theology of Christ. For if Mary was not Mother of God, then Jesus was in fact not God.


This dogma is based in part on the scripture in which Elizabeth greets Mary stating:

"And how does this happen to me, that the mother of my Lord should come to me?" (Luke 1:43)

The Perpetual Virginity

The dogma of the Perpetual Virginity of Mary defines that Mary was always a virgin, even after giving birth to Christ-in fact, Christ's birth sanctified his mother's virginity. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 436 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (728 × 1000 pixel, file size: 130 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Caravaggio - The Annunciation (1608-09, Oil on canvas, 285 x 205 cm) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S... For other senses of this word, see dogma (disambiguation). ... The Perpetual Virginity of Mary is a Catholic and Orthodox doctrine of faith which states that Mary, the mother of Jesus, remained an actual virgin, implying both virginal disposition and physical integrity, before, during, and after the birth of Jesus. ... This page is about the title, office or what is known in Christian theology as the Divine Person. ...


The Second Council of Constantinople stated in the Fourteen anathemas: The Fifth Ecumenical Council (the Second Council of Constantinople) was a Christian Ecumenical Council that was held in 553. ...

2. If anyone will not confess that the Word of God has two nativities, that which is before all ages from the Father, outside time and without a body, and secondly that nativity of these latter days when the Word of God came down from the heavens and was made flesh of holy and glorious Mary, mother of God and ever-virgin, and was born from her: let him be anathema.

While many Protestant Christians have declared that Mary did in fact have other children, in accordance with verses such as Matthew 13:55-56 which state that Jesus had brothers and sisters. The Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox Churches have held that the word for brother, male cousin, male friend, etc. were the same word adelphos which is Greek for brethren/brother. Within the New Testament the word appears over 346 times. This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


The scripture verse commonly cited for her perpetual virginity is

"Then said the LORD unto me; This gate shall be shut, it shall not be opened, and no man shall enter in by it; because the LORD, the God of Israel, hath entered in by it, therefore it shall be shut." (Ezekiel 44:2)

The Immaculate Conception

The dogma concerning the Immaculate Conception of Mary was promulgated by Pope Pius IX on December 8, 1854. The official language of the Papal Bull entitled Ineffabilis Deus states: Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2940, 498 KB) Description:  Title: de: Maria Immaculata Technique: de: Öl auf Leinwand Dimensions: de: 206 × 144 cm Country of origin: de: Spanien Current location (city): de: Madrid Current location (gallery): de: Museo del Prado Other notes: Source: The Yorck Project... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Ineffabilis Deus (Latin for Ineffable God) is the name of an Apostolic constitution written by Pope Pius IX. It defines ex cathedra the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ...

We declare, pronounce, and define that the doctrine which holds that the most Blessed Virgin Mary, in the first instance of her conception, by a singular grace and privilege granted by Almighty God, in view of the merits of Jesus Christ, the Savior of the human race, was preserved free from all stain of original sin, is a doctrine revealed by God and therefore to be believed firmly and constantly by all the faithful."

Hence, if anyone shall dare--which God forbid!--to think otherwise than as has been defined by us, let him know and understand that he is condemned by his own judgment; that he has suffered shipwreck in the faith; that he has separated from the unity of the Church; and that, furthermore, by his own action he incurs the penalties established by law if he should are to express in words or writing or by any other outward means the errors he think in his heart.

Protestant and Orthodox Christians a like denounce the dogma for different reasons. However both view this as an example of Papal hubris. Protestants hold that this dogma mean that Mary has no need for a savior. Orthodox Christians however view this as unnecessary as Original Sin, or First Sin is not a stain on one's soul. Their understanding is that we do not hold the guilt of Adam's sin, which is held by the West, but we do share in the consequences of that sin, which is chiefly death. “Original Sin” redirects here. ...


Catholic teaching holds that Mary was granted grace, which is necessary for salvation, from the first moment of her conception. Mary still needed a savior as without Christ she would not have been preserved from original sin. Mary shared in the gifts of Christ's crucifixion prior to his death by way of God. Actual grace is, in Catholic theology, a supernatural help of God -- Divine grace -- for salutary acts. ...


Our Lady of Lourdes pronounced herself as the Immaculate Conception in February of 1858 to St. Bernadette Soubiroux. She and her parish Priest were unfamilar with the phrase and took it to their local Bishop who explained that only 4 years prior the Pope had declared Mary was Immaculately Conceived. The apparitions of Our Lady of Lourdes began when Bernadette Soubirous, a 14-year old peasant girl from Lourdes, when questioned by her mother, admitted that she had seen a lady in the cave of Massabielle, about a mile from the town, on 11 February 1858, while she was gathering...


Scripture verse sometimes used to show her Immaculate Conception include Luke 1:28 and

"So I made an ark of boards of incorruptible wood, and I hewed tables of stone like the first, and I went up to the mountain, and the two tables were in my hand." (Deuteronomy 10:3 Breton LXX)

Other translations use the words "setim," "acacia," "indestructible," and "hard" to describe the wood used. In any case, Moses used this wood because it was regarded as very durable and "incorruptible." Mary is regarded by Catholic and Orthodox Christians as being the Ark of the Covenant in the New Testament and therefore it would seem fitting that the New Ark likewise be made "incorruptible" or "immaculate."


The Assumption of Mary

The Assumption of Mary is held infallibly by both the Roman Catholic and Orthodox Churches. However, it was not until 1950 that it was officially pronounced a dogma by Pope Pius XII in his Papal Bull Munificentissimus Deus. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 285 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (858 × 1804 pixel, file size: 379 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Assumption of Mary Painting by Giovanni Battista Piazzetta, 1735 Paris, Musee du Louvre +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Munificentissimus Deus (Latin for The most bountiful God) is the name of an Apostolic constitution written by Pope Pius XII. It defines ex cathedra the dogma of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ...


The official language states:

"We pronounce, declare, and define it to be a divinely revealed dogma: that the Immaculate Mother of God, the ever Virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory. Hence if anyone, which God forbid, should dare willfully to deny or to call into doubt that which we have defined, let him know that he has fallen away completely from the divine and Catholic Faith"

The Orthodox reject this dogma on the grounds that it is another sign of Papal hubris. However, they do share in the belief of the Assumption though believe it was unnecessary to officially pronounce it.


As the Virgin Mary remained an ever-virgin and sinless, it is viewed that the Virgin Mary could not thus suffer the consequences of Original Sin, which is chiefly Death. The Virgin Mary was defined as declared not only perpetual virgin but sinless by the Second Ecumenical Council of Nicea: “Original Sin” redirects here. ...

"..we also confess the two natures of the one who became incarnate for our sake from the God-bearer without blemish (immaculate), Mary the ever-virgin.."[9][10]

Jesus and Mary are both considered sinless by Catholic and Orthodox. Sinlessness is not unique to Christian, in Judaism there is traditionally four men that are regarded as never having committed sin of their own, and only died due to the Sin of Adam. They are exceptions to the norm that all men have sinned, they are as follows: Benjamin, the son of Jacob; Amram, the father of Moses; Jesse, the father of David; and Kileab, the son of David.[11][12]


Other Held Beliefs

Co-Redemptrix

The fifth Marian dogma is not dogmatically defined (unlike the other four Marian dogmas). It has been proposed, and is subject to discussion. Download high resolution version (803x1066, 200 KB)The Annunciation by El Greco 1570-1575 Museo del Prado, Madrid Source: http://www. ... The Fifth Marian Dogma in the Roman Catholic faith refers to a proposed dogmatic recognition of the Blessed Virgin Mary as Co-Redemptrix (Co-operator in the Redemption). ...


It would dogmatically define that Mary co-operated in the Redemption, because of her free participation in the birth of Christ. Should she have refused participation, there would have been no birth of Christ, and consequently no redemption. Thus she was an alternative Eve, who of her own free will carried out the will of God, and so doing contributed as a necessary, but not in itself sufficient, instrument in the redemption process of Christ. For other uses of the word, see Redemption Redemption is a religious concept referring to forgiveness or absolution for past sins and protection from eternal damnation. ...


However, it is quite important to remember that the Catholic Church does not view Mary as a member of the Holy Trinity or as a goddess. The term Co-Redemptrix would not imply that Mary is equal to Christ the Redeemer, but instead she is Co-Redemptrix "with" Christ. She chose to allow herself to be Mother of Our Lord, it was not forced upon her.


Queen of Heaven

While this has never been declared officially a dogma of the Catholic Church, there is a feast day devoted to Mary the Queen of Heaven, which is celebrated on August 22. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2024x2707, 541 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: Roman Catholic Church ... Queen of Heaven is a title of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Roman Catholicism. ...


Mediatrix of all Graces and Advocate for the People of God

In the first of his so called Rosary encyclicals, Supremi Apostolatus (1883), Pope Leo XIII calls Our Lady the guardian of our peace and the dispensatrix of heavenly graces. Pope Leo XIII (March 2, 1810—July 20, 1903), born Vincenzo Gioacchino Raffaele Luigi Pecci, was the 256th Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, reigning from 1878 to 1903, succeeding Pope Pius IX. Reigning until the age of 93, he was the oldest pope, and had the third longest pontificate...


The following year, 1884, his encyclical Superiore Anno speaks of the prayers presented to God through her whom He has chosen to be the dispenser of all heavenly graces.


But it was in Octobri Mense (1891) that Leo XIII gave the most forceful exposition of this doctrine:

"With equal truth can it be affirmed that, by the will of God, nothing of the immense treasure of every grace which the Lord has accumulated, comes to us except through Mary.... How great are the wisdom and mercy revealed in this design of God.... Mary is our glorious intermediary; she is the powerful Mother of the omnipotent God.... This design of such dear mercy realized by God in Mary and confirmed by the testament of Christ (Jn. 19:26‑27), was understood from the beginning and accepted with the utmost joy by the holy Apostles and the earliest believers. It was also the belief and teaching of the venerable Fathers of the Church. All the Christian peoples of every age accepted it unanimously.... There is no other reason for this than a divine faith."

Professor Mark Miravalle of the Franciscan University in Steubenville in the United States launched a petition to urge Pope John Paul to make such a move, by defining the teaching of the Church that Mary is Co-Redemptrix, Mediatrix of All Graces, and Advocate for the People of God.


More than six million signatures were gathered from 148 countries. Signatories included Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Cardinal John O'Connor of New York, 41 other cardinals and 550 bishops. Mother Teresa was born Agnes Gonxhe Bojaxhiu Mother Teresa of Calcutta (August 27, 1910–September 5, 1997) was an internationally renowned Catholic nun and founder of the Missionaries of Charity whose work among the poor of Calcutta was widely reported. ... John Cardinal OConnor His Eminence John Cardinal OConnor, (January 15, 1920 – May 3, 2000) was the eleventh bishop (eighth archbishop) of the Roman Catholic archdiocese of New York, serving from 1984 until his death in 2000. ... This article is about the state. ...


However, such a proposal was also heavily criticized by many Catholics who suggested that such an act would drive a wedge in relationships with other Christian faiths, notably the Orthodox Church and Anglicanism, neither of whom would accept such a designation. ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ...


See also

Our Lady redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... From May to October, 1917, three young Portuguese shepherds, Lucia, Jacinta and Francisco, claimed to have witnessed an apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ...

Perpetual virginity

It is a fundamental Catholic and Orthodox teaching that Mary remained a virgin her entire life. Several explanations are offered regarding verses such as Matthew 13:55 and Mark 6:3, which list "adelphoi" of Jesus. Jerome translated the ambiguous Greek term "adelphoi" to possibly mean certain types of close relatives such as "cousins".[13] Several early writers (the Clementine literature, Hegesippus-Eusebius) suggest that they were stepbrothers of Jesus, sons of a previous wife of Joseph.[14][15][16] It is important to note that the perpetual virginity of Mary is linked to the belief in her Immaculate Conception, or sinlessness: her physical virginity is reflective of her spiritual virginity. Mary's perpetual virginity also stresses her exclusive love and dedication to her offspring, Jesus Christ. Catholics and Orthodox Christians, as well as some Early Church Fathers such as St Jerome, cite Ezekiel 44:2 as evidence for Mary's perpetual virginity: The perpetual virginity of Mary is a doctrine of faith of Roman and Eastern Orthodox Catholic Christianity, as well of Islam, stating that Mary, the mother of Jesus, remained an actual virgin, implying both virginal disposition and physical integrity, before, during, and after the birth of Jesus, and thus is... The perpetual virginity of Mary is a doctrine of faith of Roman and Eastern Orthodox Catholic Christianity, as well of Islam, stating that Mary, the mother of Jesus, remained an actual virgin, implying both virginal disposition and physical integrity, before, during, and after the birth of Jesus, and thus is... The Gospel of Matthew (literally, according to Matthew; Greek, Κατά Μαθθαίον or Κατά Ματθαίον, Kata Maththaion or Kata Matthaion) is a synoptic gospel in the New Testament, one of four canonical gospels. ... The Gospel of Mark, anonymous[1] but traditionally ascribed to Mark the Evangelist, is a synoptic gospel of the New Testament. ... For other uses, see Jerome (disambiguation). ... Clementine literature (also called Clementia, Pseudo-Clementine Writings, The Preaching of Peter etc. ... Hegesippus (ca 110 A.D. - ca 180), was a Christian chronicler of the early Christian church and writer countering heresies. ... Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius of Caesarea (c. ... Ezekiel (Hebrew: יחזקאל, ) is a prophet in the Hebrew Bible of the Book of Ezekiel. ...

He said to me: This gate is to remain closed; it is not to be opened for anyone to enter by it; since the LORD, the God of Israel, has entered by it, it shall remain closed.

This teaching is rejected by the majority of Protestant theologians and some academic New Testament scholars, who interpret "adelphoi" in the usual sense of "brother," although most Reformers regarded Mary as ever virgin. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ...


Immaculate Conception

Main article: Immaculate Conception

Since the Middle Ages, Roman Catholic theologians had argued the question of whether or not Mary had been subject to original sin. In general, the Franciscans argued in favor of her "immaculate conception", the doctrine that she, from the moment of her conception, had been preserved by God from all sin and all tendency to sin; the Dominicans, on the other hand, including most notably Thomas Aquinas, argued that Mary's sinlessness is a grace granted to her at some time after her conception. In 1854, Pope Pius IX effectively ended the debate for Roman Catholics by proclaiming the dogma of the "Immaculate Conception", stating that "the Blessed Virgin Mary in the first instant of her conception was preserved exempt from all stain of original sin by a singular privilege and grace granted by God (cf. Luke 1:28), in view of the merits of Jesus Christ, the Saviour of the human race." ("Ineffabilis Deus", issued on 8 December 1854). It was subsequently claimed that the Blessed Virgin Mary during her sixteenth appearance in Lourdes on March 25, 1858 announced to Bernadette Soubirous "I am the Immaculate Conception". The term Immaculate Conception is also widely used within Roman Catholicism to refer to the Virgin Mary. Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... “Original Sin” redirects here. ... Franciscans is the common name used to designate a variety of mendicant religious orders of men or women tracing their origin to Francis of Assisi and following the Rule of St. ... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... Saint Thomas Aquinas, O.P.(also Thomas of Aquin, or Aquino; c. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Pope Pius IX (May 13, 1792 – February 7, 1878), born Giovanni Maria Mastai-Ferretti, reigned as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church from his election in June 16, 1846, until his death more than 31 years later in 1878. ... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... Ineffabilis Deus (Latin for Ineffable God) is the name of an Apostolic constitution written by Pope Pius IX. It defines ex cathedra the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1854 (MDCCCLIV) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the French pilgrimage location. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1858 (MDCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Bernadette Soubirous Statue of Our Lady of Lourdes in Lourdes, France. ...


Assumption

Main article: Assumption of Mary
The Assumption of Mary into Heaven by GB Piazzetta
The Assumption of Mary into Heaven by GB Piazzetta

In 1950, speaking ex cathedra, in his encyclical Munificentissimus Deus Pope Pius XII proclaimed the Dogma of the Assumption, in which he stated that "at the end of her earthly course, Mary was assumed into heavenly glory, body and soul". This was a long held belief by Christians since the time of the early Church, despite its recent definition as dogma. Pope Pius XII also stated that he was relying both on scripture and on "apostolic tradition". As an infallible pronouncement, the Dogma of the Assumption is thus a mandatory belief for Roman Catholics. No pope since has issued an infallible dogma. This doctrine is based on the vison of John in Revelation 12:1: A great sign appeared in the sky a Woman clothed with the sun with the moon under her feet and on her head a crown of twelve stars. The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 285 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (858 × 1804 pixel, file size: 379 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Assumption of Mary Painting by Giovanni Battista Piazzetta, 1735 Paris, Musee du Louvre +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 285 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (858 × 1804 pixel, file size: 379 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Assumption of Mary Painting by Giovanni Battista Piazzetta, 1735 Paris, Musee du Louvre +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Papal infallibility. ... Munificentissimus Deus (Latin for The most bountiful God) is the name of an Apostolic constitution written by Pope Pius XII. It defines ex cathedra the dogma of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... Pope Pius XII (Latin: ), born Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli (March 2, 1876 – October 9, 1958), reigned as the 260th pope, the head of the Roman Catholic Church and sovereign of Vatican City, from March 2, 1939 until his death. ... For other senses of this word, see dogma (disambiguation). ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ...

  • The Marian appartions support this as well.

Co-Redemptrix

Main article: Co-Redemptrix

Some Catholics in the late twentieth century urged Pope John Paul II to infallibly declare Mary Co-Redemptrix, not meaning by this title that Mary herself redeems mankind, but that she cooperates with Jesus in His redemption of the world; as a co-pilot is not equal to the pilot of an airplane, so is the case with Jesus and His Mother as well as with any other Christian faithful who, by the Baptism, becomes member of the Mystical Body of Jesus and, as such, "co-redemptor". The term Co-Redemptrix has been employed by some 20th century Roman Catholic authors when writing about the Blessed Virgin Mary. ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... In Catholic theology, papal infallibility is the dogma that, by action of the Holy Spirit, the Pope is preserved from even the possibility of error[1] when he solemnly declares or promulgates to the Church a dogmatic teaching on faith or morals as being contained in divine revelation, or at...


Professor Mark Miravalle of the Franciscan University in Steubenville in the United States launched a petition to urge Pope John Paul to make such a move, by defining the teaching of the Church that Mary is Co-Redemptrix, Mediatrix of All Graces, and Advocate for the People of God. More than six million signatures were gathered from 148 countries. Signatories included Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Cardinal John O'Connor of New York, 41 other cardinals and 550 bishops. However, such a proposal was also heavily criticized by many Catholics who suggested that only Jesus could be a Redeemer and that such an act would drive a wedge in relationships with other apostolic tradition Christian faiths, notably the Orthodox Church and Anglicanism, neither of whom would accept such a designation. Though both Pope Pius XI in 1935 and Pope John Paul II himself in 1985 did use the word co-redemptrix to refer to Mary, no formal infallible dogma supporting such a designation has been issued, notwithstanding the petition. Mother Teresa was born Agnes Gonxhe Bojaxhiu Mother Teresa of Calcutta (August 27, 1910–September 5, 1997) was an internationally renowned Catholic nun and founder of the Missionaries of Charity whose work among the poor of Calcutta was widely reported. ... This article is about the state. ... ... Anglicanism commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, the churches that are in full communion with the see of Canterbury. ... Pope Pius XI (Latin: ; Italian: Pio XI; May 31, 1857 – February 10, 1939), born Ambrogio Damiano Achille Ratti, reigned as Pope from February 6, 1922 and as sovereign of Vatican City from 1929 until his death on February 10, 1939. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... Coat of Arms of Pope John Paul II. The Letter M is for Mary, the mother of Jesus, to whom he held strong devotion Pope John Paul II (Latin: , Italian: Giovanni Paolo II, Polish: Jan PaweÅ‚ II) born   []; 18 May 1920 – 2 April 2005) reigned as the 264th Pope of... This article is about the year. ...


Mary as Co-Redemptrix is entirely tied to her role in the Incarnation of Jesus. Because Jesus was miraculously incarnated in the womb of the Virgin Mary, the physical, human nature of Jesus was thus derived from Mary. In a very real sense, the blood Jesus shed on the Cross was the blood he received from Mary. And since Jesus saved mankind by his incarnation, and this was made possible by the obedience of Mary, this becomes a source of understanding Mary as Co-Redemptrix. Mary's role, however, is totally dependent upon her relationship to the redeemer, Jesus, and her total obedience to the Will of the Spirit.


In support, Mary herself said in Luke 1:48, "...for behold, henceforth ALL GENERATIONS 'SHALL' CALL ME BLESSED".


Controversy

Some Biblical scholars, as well as some Jewish[17] and even Christian commentators, claim that the tradition that the Messiah would be born of a virgin arose from a mistranslation of a prophetic text in Isaiah 7:14. The original Hebrew stated that an almah ("young girl" or "virgin") would give birth to a figure called Emmanuel (whom Christians traditionally identify with Jesus), but the Septuagint translated almah into Greek as parthenos ("virgin"). The Peshitta text (Aramaic)of Isaiah also states a "virgin."[18] The Septuagint: A column of uncial text from 1 Esdras in the Codex Vaticanus, the basis of Sir Lancelot Charles Lee Brentons Greek edition and English translation. ...


The tradition of the Eastern Orthodox Church is thus: one of the translators of the Septuagint hesitated over the translation of Isaiah 7:14 "Behold a virgin (almah) shall conceive", doubting the possibility of a virginal conception. Instead of translating 'almah' with 'parthenos' (virgin), he translated it with 'gyne' (young woman) - also admissible from the Hebrew . According to this same tradition, an angel appeared to him and advised him that 'virgin' was the correct translation, and that he would not die until he had seen the Christ born of a virgin. Thus the scholar-translator remained in the Temple of Jerusalem for over three hundred years, awaiting the sign. This was the Simeon the Righteous, the "just and devout" man of Jerusalem who, according to Luke 2:25-35, met the Virgin Mary and Jesus as they entered the Temple to fulfill the requirements of the Law of Moses on the fortieth day from Jesus' birth. On taking Jesus into his arms he uttered the prayer Nunc dimittis, about having finally seen the promised salvation. The Jerusalem Temple (Hebrew: beit ha-mikdash) was the center of Israelite and Jewish worship, primarily for the offering of sacrifices known as the korbanot. ... Simeon the Righteous by Alexey Yegorov. ... Torah, (תורה) is a Hebrew word meaning teaching, instruction, or especially law. It primarily refers to the first section of the Tanakh–the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, or the Five Books of Moses, but can also be used in the general sense to also include both the Written... The start of the Nunc dimittis in the Très Riches Heures du Duc de Berry The Nunc dimittis (also Song of Simeon or Canticle of Simeon) is a canticle from a text in the second chapter of Luke (Luke 2:29–32) named after its first words in Latin. ...


Marian prayers

See main category: Marian prayers
Rosary beads
Rosary beads

The earliest known Marian prayer is the Sub tuum praesidium, or Beneath Thy Protection, dating from late 2nd century. A papyrus dated to c. 250 containing the prayer in Greek was discovered in Egypt in 1917, and is the earliest known reference to the title Theotokos. This title was authorized at the Council of Ephesus in 431 commemorating the Virgin's role in the incarnation of Jesus as the Word of God, and her place in the History of Salvation Picture of a Rosary from http://ct. ... Picture of a Rosary from http://ct. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... Sub tuum praesidium or, in English, Under your protection is the oldest anthem to the Blessed Virgin Mary from the see of Alexandria in the third century. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ...


Beneath your compassion, We take refuge, O Mother of God: do not despise our petitions in time of trouble: but rescue us from dangers, only pure, only blessed one.


A popular Marian devotional is the Rosary of St. Dominic, a form of prayer in which an Our Father, ten Hail Marys and a Glory Be to the Father (together forming a "decade of the Rosary") are recited five times while meditating on the mysteries of the life of Jesus and Mary (Joyful, Luminous, Sorrowful and Glorious) to be followed by a prayer called the "Hail Holy Queen" and perhaps the "Litany of Loreto". Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... Dominic is usually a male name. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Hail... Glory Be to the Father, also known as Gloria Patri, is a doxology, a short hymn of praise to God in various Christian liturgies. ... The Salve Regina or Hail Holy Queen is a Christian hymn and prayer to the Virgin Mary. ... The Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary is a Christian prayer originally approved in 1587 by Pope Sixtus V. It is also known as the Litany of Loreto, for its first-known place of origin, the Shrine of Our Lady of Loreto, where its usage was recorded as early as...


Other famous Marian prayers include the "Magnificat," the Angelus and the Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary. Marian hymns include O Mary, we Crown Thee With Blossoms Today, O Purest of Creatures, the Regina Coeli, and the Ave Maria. May and October are traditionally seen within Roman Catholicism as Marian months. The Visitation in the Book of Hours of the Duc of Berry For the David and the Giants album, see Magnificat (album) The Magnificat (also known as the Song of Mary) is a canticle frequently sung (or said) liturgically in Christian church services. ... The Angelus is a devotion in memory of the Incarnation. ... The Litany of the Blessed Virgin Mary is a Christian prayer originally approved in 1587 by Pope Sixtus V. It is also known as the Litany of Loreto, for its first-known place of origin, the Shrine of Our Lady of Loreto, where its usage was recorded as early as... Hymns to Mary are Christian hymns focused on Mary, the Mother of Jesus. ... Queen of Heaven is a title of the Blessed Virgin Mary in Roman Catholicism. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Hail...


The Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary is a weekly cycle of prayers said throughout the day, based on the Liturgy of the Hours, and consists of hymns, psalms, scripture, and patristic readings. The Little Office of Our Lady or Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary is a liturgical devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, in imitation of, and in addition to, the Divine Office in the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Liturgy of the Hours is usually recited in full in monastic communities. ... A hymn is a type of song, usually religious, specifically written for the purpose of praise, adoration or prayer, and typically addressed to a god or other religiously significant figure. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... Patristics is the study of early Christian writers, known as the Church Fathers. ...


Marian apparitions

Main article: Marian apparitions

The central role of Mary in the belief and practice of Catholicism is reflected in the fact that many Roman Catholic churches contain side altars dedicated to the Virgin Mary. She is also celebrated through major religious sites where it is claimed apparitions or appearances of the Virgin have occurred, often with claims by witnesses that messages to humanity were delivered. Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence Marian apparitions are events in which the Virgin Mary is purported to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, in various settings. ... Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence Marian apparitions are events in which the Virgin Mary is purported to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, in various settings. ...


Marian titles

See main category: Marian titles
Byzantine icon adopted into Roman Catholicism as Our Lady of Perpetual Help

Among the most prominent Marian titles in the Roman Catholic Calendar are: widely used religious icon - no copyright File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... widely used religious icon - no copyright File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Look up icon in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ...

Among the most prominent Marian titles in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic liturgical calendars are: Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... Queen of Heaven is a Roman title used in antiquity for the Ancient Egyptian goddess, Isis. ... The Sedes Sapientiae is a medieval statue of Our Lady, Seat of Wisdom. ... Mary Untier of Knots and Mary Undoer of Knots, ca 1700 St. ... Our Lady of Aparecida (also written as Our Lady Aparecida) is the patron saint of Brazil, represented by a statue of the Virgin Mary located in the Basilica of Aparecida, in the city of Aparecida in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. ... The statue of Our Lady of Combermere Our Lady of Combermere is a religious title given within Roman Catholicism to the Blessed Virgin, Mary, the mother of Jesus. ... Tarxien is a small village found in the southern part of Malta. ... “Our Lady” redirects here. ... Our Lady of Fatima Our Lady of Fatima (pron. ... Our Lady of Good Counsel (Mater boni consilii) is a title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary, after a miraculous painting now found in Genazzano, Italy. ... Vailankanni(Tamil:வேளாங்கன்னி,Meaning:Virgin of Velai,the town), also known as Velankanni or Velanganni, is a panchayat town in Nagapattinam district in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu. ... Vailankanni, also known as Velankanni, is a small town located on the shores of the Bay of Bengal 350 km south of Chennai (Madras) and 12 km south of Nagapattinam on the Coromandel Coast, in Tamil Nadu, India. ... Our Lady of Good Success Our Lady of Good Success (Nuestra Señora del Buen Suceso) is the title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary who appeared to Mother Mariana in Quito, Ecuador and separate statues in Madrid, Spain, found by two Minim brothers and Parañaque, Philippines, found by... Our Lady of Grace may refer to: A Roman Catholic Church in Edina, Minnesota A Roman Catholic Church in Howard Beach, New York A Roman Catholic Church in Chiswick, London, in the Archdiocese of Westminster. ... An image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. ... Our Lady of Lebanon, also known as Notre Dame du Liban, is the patron saint of the Mediterranean country of Lebanon. ... In Christian culture and practice, a shrine to the Virgin Mary or Marian shrine is a shrine marking an apparition or other miracle ascribed to the Blessed Virgin Mary, or a site on which is centered a historically strong Marian devotion. ... Our Lady of Mount Carmel is a title given to Mary, the mother of Jesus, in honor of her having given the Scapular of Our Lady of Mount Carmel to Saint Simon Stock. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The Philippine islands is a commonly mistaken description for the Philippines. ... Our Lady of Prompt Succor is the religious title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, by the Roman Catholic Church. ... Our Lady of Salambao is the patron saint of Obando, Bulacan, near Manila in the Philippines. ... The City of Cavite is a third class city in the province of Cavite, Philippines. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Seven Dolours of the Virgin. ... FYI: The page is a Google translation. ... Nuestra Señora del Pilar (Spanish for Our Lady of the Pillar) is an apparition of Mary, mother of Jesus, whose shrine (Nuestra Señora del Pilar Basilica) is in Zaragoza, Spain, by the river Ebro. ... Our Lady of Walsingham refers to the 11th century English Marian apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary to a Saxon noblewoman in the village of Walsingham, Norfolk. ... Languages Croatian Religions Predominantly Roman Catholic Related ethnic groups Slavs South Slavs Croats (Croatian: Hrvati) are a South Slavic people mostly living in Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina and nearby countries. ... Our Lady, Queen of Ireland, is used as the term for the Marian apparition in Knock, Ireland, in 1879. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... The title of Queen of Genoa was given to the Blessed Virgin Mary on March 25, 1637. ... A statue of Our Lady of Peace stands in the courtyard of the Cathedral of Our Lady of Peace in Honolulu. ... Virgin and Child Surrounded by Angels (c. ... Madonna del Ghisallo is a hill close to Lake Como in Italy. ... Title of the Blessed Virgin Mary, mother of Jesus. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ...

  • Panagia Myrtidiotissa
  • Panagia Evangelistria (Our Lady of the good Tidings)
  • Aeiparthenos Maria (forever virgin Mary)
  • Hyperagia Theotokos (most Holy Mother of God)
  • Axion Esti (it is worthy to bless Thee, the Virgin)
  • Panagia Despoina (Our Lady and Queen)
  • Rodon to Amaranton (the Unfading Rose)
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Marian Feast days

San Albino Church, Mesilla Village, Las Cruces, New Mexico (January, 1985).
San Albino Church, Mesilla Village, Las Cruces, New Mexico (January, 1985).

Among the most prominent Marian feast days in the Roman Catholic Calendar are[21]: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (685 × 1024 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) San Albino Church, Mesilla Village, Las Cruces, New Mexico (January, 1985). ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 401 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (685 × 1024 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) San Albino Church, Mesilla Village, Las Cruces, New Mexico (January, 1985). ... Las Cruces is a city located in Doña Ana County, New Mexico, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 74,267, making the city the second largest in the state. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...

Among the most prominent Marian feast days in the Eastern Orthodox and Greek-Catholic liturgical calendars are: is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Our Lady of Prompt Succor is the religious title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus, by the Roman Catholic Church. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Presentation of Jesus at the Temple. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The apparitions of Our Lady of Lourdes began when Bernadette Soubirous, a 14-year old peasant girl from Lourdes, when questioned by her mother, admitted that she had seen a lady in the cave of Massabielle, about a mile from the town, on 11 February 1858, while she was gathering... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ... Palm Sunday is a moveable feast in the Christian calendar which falls on the Sunday before Easter. ... Holy Week (Latin: ) in Christianity is the last week of Lent. ... This article is about the Christian festival. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Our Lady of Good Counsel (Mater boni consilii) is a title given to the Blessed Virgin Mary, after a miraculous painting now found in Genazzano, Italy. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... May crowning is a traditional Roman Catholic ritual that occurs on or about 1 May every year. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Our Lady of Fatima Our Lady of Fatima (pron. ... is the 144th day of the year (145th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Seven Dolours of the Virgin. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... FYI: The page is a Google translation. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... An image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. ... Eastern Orthodoxy (also called Greek Orthodoxy and Russian Orthodoxy) is a Christian tradition which represents the majority of Eastern Christianity. ... The term Eastern Rites may refer to the liturgical rites used by many ancient Christian Churches of Eastern Europe and the Middle East that, while being part of the Roman Catholic Church, are distinct from the Latin Rite or Western Church. ...

is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Annunciation (disambiguation). ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... According to Catholic theology and the traditions of the Roman Catholic Church and Eastern and Oriental Orthodox churches, the body of Mary, the mother of Jesus, venerated by these denominations as the Blessed Virgin Mary or Theotokos, respectively, was taken into Heaven along with her soul after her death. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... A Synaxis is a group of churchmen - especially in the Orthodox church - who would otherwise compose a Synod but lack an officiating Patriarch. ... Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ...

Marian shrines

Side altar to the Blessed Virgin Mary in St Mary's Pro-Cathedral in Dublin

In the culture and practice the Roman Catholic Church - a shrine to the Virgin Mary or Marian shrine is a shrine marking an apparition or other miracle ascribed to the Blessed Virgin Mary, or a site on which is centered a historically strong Marian devotion. Such locales are often the destination of pilgrimages. In the culture and practice of some Christian Churches - mainly, but not solely, the Roman Catholic Church - a shrine to the Virgin Mary or Marian shrine is a shrine marking an apparition or other miracle ascribed to the Blessed Virgin Mary, or a site on which is centered a historically... marian altar from Pro-Cathedral, Dublin - no c/r my image File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... marian altar from Pro-Cathedral, Dublin - no c/r my image File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Malborough Street frontage of the Pro-Cathedral St Marys Church, known also as St Marys Pro-Cathedral or simply the Pro-Cathedral, is the episcopal seat of the Roman Catholic Archbishop of Dublin and Primate of Ireland. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Eastern Orthodox shrine Buddhist shrine just outside Wat Phnom. ... Apparition of The Virgin to St Bernard by Filippino Lippi (1486) Oil on panel, 210 x 195 cm Church of Badia, Florence Marian apparitions are events in which the Virgin Mary is purported to have supernaturally appeared to one or more persons, typically Catholics, in various settings. ... A miracle, derived from the old Latin word miraculum meaning something wonderful, is a striking interposition of divine intervention by God in the universe by which the ordinary course and operation of Nature is overruled, suspended, or modified. ... A pilgrimage is a journey by a religious person to a place that is sacred according to his or her religion. ...


Many of the shrines have acquired a symbolic value for patriotism and nationalism in their area.


Among the shrines considered most significant for their apparitions:

For the Greek Orthodox the major Marian Shrine is the Church of Our Lady of Tinos, at Tinos island in Greece which constitutes the most important christian pilgrimage in the Aegean. The Basilica of the Holy House, or Chiesa della Casa Santa, is a Catholic place of pilgrimage in Loreto (AN), Italy. ... Our Lady of Fatima Our Lady of Fatima (pron. ... Fatima basilica Fatima esplanade, 13/05/2003 Religious articles, 13/05/2003 Fátima is a town in Portugal famous for the religious visions that are said to have taken place there in 1917. ... Our Lady of Lebanon, also known as Notre Dame du Liban, is the patron saint of the Mediterranean country of Lebanon. ... Statue of Notre Dame du Liban Basilica of St. ... La Salette is a mountaintop village near Grenoble, France. ... An image of Our Lady of Guadalupe. ... Nickname: Motto: Capital en movimiento Location of Mexico City in south central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nuestra Señora del Pilar Basilica The basilica at night The Basilica-Cathedral of Our Lady of the Pillar or Nuestra Señora del Pilar is a Roman Catholic church in the city of Zaragoza, Aragon, of great importance in Spain. ... For other uses, see Zaragoza (disambiguation). ... Capital Zaragoza Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % of Spain Ranked 4th  47 719 km²  9,4% Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ % of Spain  â€“ Density Ranked 11th  1 217 514  2,9%  25,51/km² Demonym  â€“ English  â€“ Spanish  Aragonese  aragonés Statute of Autonomy August 16, 1982 ISO 3166-2 AR Parliamentary representation  â€“ Congress seats  â€“ Senate... Black Madonna, Fleur de lys of CzÄ™stochowa, Poland The Black Madonna of CzÄ™stochowa, (Czarna Madonna or Matka Boska CzÄ™stochowska in Polish) icon was, according to legend, painted by St. ... Motto: CzÄ™stochowa to dobre miasto (CzÄ™stochowa is a good city) Coordinates: , Country Voivodeship Powiat city county Gmina CzÄ™stochowa Established 11th century City Rights 1356 Government  - Mayor Tadeusz Wrona Area  - City 162. ... There is another Lourdes with a different pronunciation, see Lourdes, Brazil Our Lady of Lourdes Basilica Lourdes (Lorda in Occitan) is a town in the Hautes-Pyrénées département in France. ... This article is about the French pilgrimage location. ... This is the standard image for Miraculous Medal prayer cards. ... The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Manila is an ecclesiastical territory or diocese of the Roman Catholic Church in the Philippines. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Batangas Region: CALABARZON (Region IV-A) Capital: Batangas City Founded: March 10, 1917 Population: 2000 census—1,905,348 (9th largest) Density—602 per km² (7th highest) Area: 3,165. ... REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES Province of Batangas Region: CALABARZON (Region IV-A) Capital: Batangas City Founded: March 10, 1917 Population: 2000 census—1,905,348 (9th largest) Density—602 per km² (7th highest) Area: 3,165. ... Basilica of Our Lady of Good Health The Basilica of Our Lady of Health is located at the small town of Velankanni in the state of Tamil Nadu in southern India. ... Greek Orthodox Church (Greek: HellÄ“northódoxÄ“ EkklÄ“sía) can refer to any of several hierarchical churches within the larger group of mutually recognizing Eastern Orthodox churches. ... Our Lady of Tinos (also in Greek Megalochari tis Tinou or Panagia Evangelistria tis Tinou) is the major Marian shrine in Greece. ... Tinos (Greek: Τήνος; Italian: Tine) is a Greek island situated in the Aegean Sea. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Anglican Recognition of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Mary's special position within God's purpose of salvation as "God bearer" (theotokos) is recognised in a number of ways in the Anglican Church. The Church affirms in the historic creeds that Jesus was born of the Virgin Mary, and celebrates the feast days of the Presentation of Christ in the Temple; the Annunciation of our Lord to the Blessed Virgin; the Visitation of the Blessed Virgin; and the Birth of the Blessed Virgin.


The Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary is kept in the 1662 Book of Common Prayer. In certain Anglo-Catholic parishes this feast is called the Immaculate Conception. Again, the Assumption of Mary is believed in by most Anglo-Catholics, but is in considered a pious opinion by moderate Anglicans. Protestant minded Anglicans reject the celebration of these feasts. ... Mary, mother of Jesus as the Immaculate Conception. ... The Assumption has been a subject of Christian art for centuries. ...


Prayer to and with the Blessed Virgin Mary varies according to churchmanship. Low Church Anglicans rarely invoke the Blessed Virgin except in certain hymns, such as the second stanza of Ye Watchers and Ye Holy Ones. Anglo-Catholics, however, frequently pray the rosary, the Angelus, Regina Caeli, and other litanies and anthems of Our Lady. The Anglican Society of Mary maintains chapters in many countries. The purpose of the society is to foster devotion to Mary among Anglicans. In Anglican parlance, churchmanship is the general emphasis on doctrine, discipline, political outlook, and liturgical practice by adherents of the Church of England, particularly in certain historical periods. ... Low church is a term of distinction in the Church of England or other Anglican churches, initially designed to be pejorative. ... Ye watchers and ye holy ones is a popular Anglican hymn written by John Riley. ... ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ... The Angelus is a devotion in memory of the Incarnation. ... Queen of Heaven is a Roman title of the Ancient Egyptian Goddess Isis in antiquity and Blessed Virgin Mary in Roman Catholicism. ... Blessed Virgin Mary A traditional catholic image of Mary, entitled the Immaculate Heart of Mary The Society of Mary is an Anglican devotional society dedicated to and under the patronage of the Blessed Virgin Mary. ...


See also

Theotokos of Kazan Theotokos (Greek: , translit. ... Anthropotokos is a name given to Mary by the Nestorianist Church. ... Virgin Mary redirects here. ... The Immaculate Conception is a Roman Catholic doctrine which asserts that Mary, the mother of Jesus, was preserved by God from the stain of original sin at the time of her own conception. ... The terms Anglo-Catholic and Anglo-Catholicism describe people, groups, ideas, customs and practices within Anglicanism that emphasise continuity with Catholic tradition. ... This article discusses the ancient goddess Isis. ... Ballinspittle lies about 8 kilometres south-west of Kinsale Ballinspittle (Irish: Béal Átha an Spidéil) is a village in County Cork, Ireland. ... This article is about the Islamic perspective on Mary. ... The Marian Cross The Marian Cross is an informal name applied to a Roman Catholic cross design. ... The Perpetual Virginity of Blessed Mary is an apologetic work of St. ... The Angelus is a devotion in memory of the Incarnation. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Coptic Orthodox Pope · Roman Catholic Pope Archbishop of Canterbury · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Hail... The Hail, Holy Queen, or the Salve Regina is a prayer commonly said at the end of the Rosary. ... Our Lady of Lourdes - Mary appearing at Lourdes with Rosary beads. ...

References

For other uses, see Ambrose (disambiguation). ... Libellus de Nativitate Sanctae Mariae is a text concerning the events surrounding the birth of Mary, mother of Jesus. ... The Gospel of James, also sometimes known as the Infancy Gospel of James or the Protevangelium of James, is an apocryphal Gospel probably written about AD 150. ... // Overview The Liturgy of Saint James is based on the traditions of the ancient rite of the Early Christian Church at Jerusalem, as the Mystagogic Catecheses of St Cyril of Jerusalem imply. ...

External links

8 Mary Defended This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ...


 
 

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