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Encyclopedia > Blessed Sacrament
The Blessed Sacrament is displayed in a procession at the 2005 Southeastern Eucharistic Congress.
The Blessed Sacrament is displayed in a procession at the 2005 Southeastern Eucharistic Congress.

The Blessed Sacrament, or the Body and Blood of Christ, is a devotional name used in the Roman Catholic Church, Old Catholic and Anglican Churches, to refer to the Host and wine after they have been consecrated in the sacrament of the Eucharist. Christians in these traditions believe in the Real Presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharistic elements of the bread and wine, and hence carry out Eucharistic adoration. This belief is based on interpretations of biblical scripture and tradition. In the Roman Catholic tradition, Christ's presence is believed to be corporeal, while in the Old Catholic and Anglican traditions, his presence is more usually seen as spiritual. The Roman Catholic understanding is defined by numerous church councils including the Fourth Lateran Council and the Council of Trent and is quoted in paragraph 1376 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church (which explains the meaning of Transubstantiation). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1324x1013, 290 KB) Summary First Annual (2005) Southeastern Eucharistic Congress, Charlotte, NC. Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Blessed Sacrament Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1324x1013, 290 KB) Summary First Annual (2005) Southeastern Eucharistic Congress, Charlotte, NC. Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Blessed Sacrament Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create... A Devotion in Christianity has come to mean time spent alone or in a small group of people reading and studying the Bible in a way as it relates to ones spiritual health and wellbeing. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... The Old Catholic Church is not so much a religious denomination, as a community, part of whose member churches split from the Roman Catholic church in 1870. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... Christs Precious Blood is the Eucharist under the species of wine. ... In Catholic belief and practice, a sacrament is a rite that mediates divine grace, constituting a sacred mystery. ... For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ... Christians believe that Jesus is the mediator of the New Covenant (see Hebrews 8:6). ... The Real Presence is the term various Christian traditions use to express their belief that, in the Eucharist, Jesus the Christ is really (and not merely symbolically, figuratively or by his power) present in what was previously just bread and wine. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Eucharistic adoration is a practice in the Roman Catholic and in Anglican Churches, in which the Blessed Sacrament is exposed to and adored by the faithful. ... The Fourth Council of the Lateran was summoned by Pope Innocent III with his Bull of April 19, 1213. ... The Council of Trent is the Nineteenth Ecumenical Council of the Roman Catholic Church. ... The Catechism of the Catholic Church, or CCC, is an official exposition of the teachings of the Catholic Church, first published in French in 1992 by the authority of Pope John Paul II.[1] Subsequently, in 1997, a Latin text was issued which is now the official text of reference... Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ that, according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church, occurs in the Eucharist and that is called in Greek (see Metousiosis). ...

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Roman Catholic Church

The Blessed Sacrament may be received by Catholics who have undergone the First Holy Communion (ie., given by a priest or other Minister of the Eucharist to a Catholic and consumed by the communicant) as part of the Liturgy of the Eucharist during Mass. The person receiving the Eucharist should be in a "state of grace," i.e., have no mortal sin on their conscience at the time of communion (Matt 5:23-24). Eucharist in the Catholic Church refers to both the celebration of the Mass, that is the Eucharistic Liturgy, and the consecrated bread and wine which acording to the faith become the body and blood of Christ. ... In the Catholic Church the term minister refers to the person whether lay or ordained who is commissioned to perform some work on behalf of the Church. ... Mortal Sin Logo Mortal Sin is an Australian thrash metal band that formed in 1985. ...


The Blessed Sacrament can also be exposed (displayed) on an altar in a Monstrance. Rites involving the exposure of the Blessed Sacrament include Benediction and Eucharistic adoration. According to Catholic theology, adoration of the host is not the adoration of bread, but of the Body and Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ, who is transubstantiated in it. Catholics believe Jesus is the sacrificial lamb of God prefigured in the Old Testament passover. Unless the flesh of that passover sacrificial lamb was consumed, the members of the household would not be saved from death. As the Passover was the Old Covenant, so the Eucharist became the New Covenant. (Matt 26:26-28), (Mark 14:22-24), (Luke 22: 19-20), and (John 6:48-58) Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Categories: Stub | Roman Catholic Sacraments and Other Practices ... A benediction is a short invocation for divine help, blessing and guidance, usually at the end of church worship service. ... Eucharistic adoration is a practice in the Roman Catholic and in Anglican Churches, in which the Blessed Sacrament is exposed to and adored by the faithful. ... Theology (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογια, logia, words, sayings, or discourse) is reasoned discourse concerning religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Transubstantiation (in Latin, transsubstantiatio) is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ that, according to the belief of the Roman Catholic Church, occurs in the Eucharist and that is called in Greek (see Metousiosis). ...


Old Catholic and Anglican Churches

Reception of the Blessed Sacrament in the Anglican Communion varies by province. Formerly, Confirmation was universally required as a precondition to reception, but many provinces now allow all the baptised to partake. The Anglican Communion uses the compass rose as its symbol, signifying its worldwide reach and decentralized nature. ... Confirmation can refer to: Confirmation (sacrament) Confirmation (epistemology) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Devotions to the Blessed Sacrament vary. In most churches, individuals will genuflect or bow in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament, which is generally reserved in a tabernacle or aumbry on, behind, or near the altar. Its presence is indicated by a light suspended over or placed on top of the tabernacle or aumbry. The use of a monstrance is rare, perhaps in keeping with Article XXV of the Thirty-Nine Articles that "the Sacraments were not ordained of Christ to be gazed upon, or to be carried about, but that we should duly use them." Nonetheless, many parishes do have services of devotions to the Blessed Sacrament, in which the ciborium is removed from the tabernacle or aumbry and hymns, prayers, psalms, and sentences of devotion are sung and/or read. In some parishes, when the Blessed Sacrament is moved between tabernacles (say, from the High Altar to a chapel altar), sanctus bells are rung, and all who are present kneel. Genuflection is an act of reverence consisting of falling onto (usually) one knee. ... The Tabernacle is known in Hebrew as the Mishkan ( משכן Place of [Divine] dwelling). It was to be a portable central place of worship for the Hebrews from the time they left ancient Egypt following the Exodus, through the time of the Book of Judges when they were engaged in conquering... In mediaeval times, an aumbry was a cupboard in the wall of a Christian church or in the sacristy which was used to store chalices and other vessels and which was used also for the reserved sacrament, the consecrated elements from the communion service. ... The Thirty-Nine Articles are the defining statements of Anglican doctrine. ... A Ciborium is a container, used in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and related Churches rituals to store Holy Communion. ... It has been suggested that altar bell be merged into this article or section. ...


The Old Catholic tradition varies between Roman Catholic and Anglican practice. The Old Catholic Church is not so much a religious denomination, as a community, part of whose member churches split from the Roman Catholic church in 1870. ...


See also

For the death metal band from Sweden, see Eucharist (band) The Eucharist (or Communion or The Lords Supper etc. ... Corpus Christi celebrations in Antigua Guatemala, 14 June, 1979 Corpus Christi (Latin: Body of Christ) in Catholicism is a religious feast celebrated by Roman Catholics on the eighth Thursday after Easter, i. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Blessed Sacrament - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (353 words)
The Blessed Sacrament is displayed in a procession at the 2005 Southeastern Eucharistic Congress.
The Blessed Sacrament is a devotional name used in the Catholic Church, and also in Old Catholic and high church Anglican churches, to refer to the Eucharist gifts in the forms of Host and wine after they have been consecrated.
The Blessed Sacrament may be received by Catholics who have undergone their First Holy Communion (ie., given by a priest or other Minister of the Eucharist to a Catholic and swallowed by the communicant) as part of the Liturgy of the Eucharist during Mass.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Visits To the Blessed Sacrament (606 words)
In this latter case the visits paid to the Blessed Sacrament assumed the special character of a work of mercy intended to console the Sacred Heart of Jesus for the indifference and ingratitude shown Him by the majority of Christians, for whose sake He remains in the sacramental species.
To this day in the Greek Church no practice of genuflecting to the Blessed Sacrament is known and in fact it may be said that, though it is treated respectfully, as the Book of the Gospels or the sacred vessels would be treated respectfully, still no cultus is shown it outside of the Liturgy.
But in the course of the same century the practice of visiting the Blessed Sacrament became fairly common, as we see particularly in the case of Blessed Henry Suso and Blessed Mary de Malliaco (A.D. 1331-1414), who, we are told, "on solemn feasts kept vigil before the most holy Sacrament".
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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