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Encyclopedia > Bleach
Commercial chlorine bleach
Commercial chlorine bleach

A bleach is a chemical that removes colour or whitens, often via oxidation. Common chemical bleaches include household "chlorine bleach", a solution of approximately 6% sodium hypochlorite (NaClO), and "oxygen bleach", which contains hydrogen peroxide or a peroxide-releasing compound such as sodium perborate or sodium percarbonate. To bleach something is to apply bleach, sometimes as a preliminary step in the process of dyeing. Bleaching powder is calcium hypochlorite. BLEACH redirects here. ... Look up bleach in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (313x625, 21 KB) Summary Description: A bottle of White King-brand commercial bleach, resting atop my mothers Fisher & Paykel washing machine. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (313x625, 21 KB) Summary Description: A bottle of White King-brand commercial bleach, resting atop my mothers Fisher & Paykel washing machine. ... A chemical substance is any material substance used in or obtained by a process in chemistry: A chemical compound is a substance consisting of two or more chemical elements that are chemically combined in fixed proportions. ... The most fundamental reactions in chemistry are the redox processes. ... Sodium hypochlorite is a chemical compound with the formula NaClO. A solution of sodium hypochlorite is frequently used as a disinfectant and as a bleaching agent; indeed, often it is simply called bleach, though other chemicals are sometimes given that name as well. ... R-phrases , , , , S-phrases , , , ,, , , , Flash point Non-flammable Related Compounds Related compounds Water Ozone Hydrazine Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a very pale blue liquid which appears colourless in... Sodium perborate (PBS), also called perboric acid or metaborate peroxyhydrate, is a white, odorless, water-soluble chemical compound with chemical formula NaBO3. ... Sodium percarbonate (or sodium carbonate peroxyhydrate) is an addition compound of sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide. ... Look up step in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Illustration of a physical process: a geyser in action. Process (lat. ... Dyeing is the process of changing the colour of a yarn or cloth by treatment with a dye. ... Calcium hypochlorite is a chemical compound with formula Ca(ClO)2. ...

Contents

Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[2] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [3]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[4] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[5] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [6]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[7] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[8] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [9]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[10] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[11] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [12]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[13] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[14] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [15]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[16] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[17] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [18]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[19] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[20] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [21]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[22] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[23] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [24]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[25] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[26] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [27]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[28] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[29] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [30]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[31] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[32] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [33]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[34] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[35] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [36]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[37] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[38] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [39]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[40] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[41] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [42]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[43] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[44] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [45]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[46] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[47] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [48]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[49] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[50] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [51]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[52] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[53] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [54]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[55] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[56] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [57]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[58] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[59] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [60]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[61] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[62] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [63]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[64] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[65] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [66]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[67] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[68] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [69]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[70] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[71] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [72]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[73] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[74] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [75]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[76] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[77] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [78]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[79] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[80] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [81]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[82] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[83] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [84]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[85] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[86] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [87]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[88] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[89] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [90]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[91] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[92] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [93]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[94] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[95] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [96]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[97] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[98] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [99]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[100] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[101] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [102]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[103] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[104] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [105]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[106] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[107] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [108]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[109] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[110] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [111]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[112] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[113] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [114]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[115] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[116] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [117]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[118] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[119] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [120]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[121] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[122] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [123]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[124] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[125] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [126]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[127] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[128] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [129]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[130] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[131] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [132]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[133] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[134] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [135]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[136] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[137] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [138]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[139] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[140] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [141]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[142] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[143] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [144]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[145] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


Hazards and concerns

Since bleaches are strong oxidizing agents, they can be quite hazardous, especially when reacted with other common household chemicals. European Union Chemical hazard symbol for oxidizing agents Dangerous goods label for oxidizing agents Oxidizing agent placard An oxidizing agent (also called an oxidant or oxidizer) is A chemical compound that readily transfers oxygen atoms or A substance that gains electrons in a redox chemical reaction. ...


Mixing sodium hypochlorite with acids like vinegar or drain cleaners containing sodium hydrogen sulfate (sodium bisulfate), or even lemon juice can release chlorine. Hypochlorite and chlorine are in equilibrium in water, the position of the equilibrium is pH dependant and low pH (acidic) favors chlorine,[1] Vinegar is sometimes infused with spices or herbs—as here, with oregano. ... Sodium bisulfate, also sodium hydrogen sulfate, has formula NaHSO4. ... General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ...


Cl2 + H2O rightleftharpoons H+ + Cl- + HClO


Chlorine is a respiratory irritant that attacks mucous membranes and burns the skin. As little as 3.5 ppm can be detected as an odour, and 1000 ppm is likely to be fatal after a few deep breaths. Exposure to chlorine has been limited to 0.5 ppm (8-hour time-weighted average - 40 hour week) by OSHA in the US.[146] General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... The mucous membranes (or mucosae; singular: mucosa) are linings of mostly endodermal origin, covered in epithelium, and are involved in absorption and secretion. ... For other uses, see Burn. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... Parts per million (ppm) is a measure of concentration that is used where low levels of concentration are significant. ... If you are searching for the organization, click OSHA. Osha (Ligusticum porteri) is a perennial herb used for its medicinal properties. ...


Sodium hypochlorite and ammonia react to form a number of products, depending on the temperature, concentration, and how they are mixed. [147]. The main reaction is chlorination of ammonia, first giving chloramine (NH2Cl), then NHCl2 and finally nitrogen trichloride (NCl3). These materials are very irritating to eyes and lungs and are toxic above certain concentrations. For other uses, see Ammonia (disambiguation). ... Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... Nitrogen trichloride, also known as trichloramine, is the chemical compound with the formula NCl3. ...


NH3 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NH2Cl


NH2Cl + NaOCl --> NaOH + NHCl2


NHCl2 + NaOCl --> NaOH + NCl3


Additional reactions produce hydrazine, in a variation of the Olin Raschig process. Hydrazine is the chemical compound with formula N2H4. ... The Olin Raschig process is an industrial process used to produce hydrazine. ...


NH3 + NH2Cl + NaOH --> N2H4 + NaCl + H2O


The hydrazine generated can further react with the monochloramine in an exothermic reaction:[1] Chloramine (monochloramine) is chemical compound with the formula NH2Cl. ... In thermodynamics, the word exothermic describes a process or reaction that releases energy in the form of heat. ...


2 NH2Cl + N2H4 --> 2 NH4Cl + N2


Industrial bleaching agents can also be sources of concern. For example, the use of elemental chlorine in the bleaching of wood pulp produces organochlorines, persistent organic pollutants, including dioxins. However, the use of chlorine dioxide in these processes has reduced the dioxin generation to under detectable levels.[148] Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ... An organochlorine compound is an organic compound of chlorine. ... Dioxins form a family of toxic chlorinated organic compounds that bioaccumulate in humans and wildlife due to their fat solubility. ... Chlorine dioxide is a chemical compound with the formula ClO2. ...


History

Chlorine was first characterized by the Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1774 (as an adherent of the Phlogiston theory, he called it "dephlogisticated marine acid"). French chemist Claude Louis Berthollet, noting the bleaching properties of chlorine, invented hypochlorite bleach in 1789. In French, bleach is known as Eau de Javel, after the village where it was manufactured. General Name, symbol, number chlorine, Cl, 17 Chemical series halogens Group, period, block 17, 3, p Appearance yellowish green Standard atomic weight 35. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Carl Wilhelm Scheele Scheeles house with his pharmacy in Köping. ... Chesma Column in Tsarskoe Selo, commemorating the end of the Russo-Turkish War. ... Phlogiston theory was a 17th century attempt to explain oxidation processes, such as fire and rust. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Claude Louis Berthollet. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


Several alternatives to bleach have recently appeared in industrialized countries. These substances are touted as being less toxic, and the use of bleach as a stain remover has become less popular in the United States. However, due to the recent upsurge of illness due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (known as MRSA) and other bacterial pathogens susceptible to bleach, the bleach industry has recovered somewhat, and the use of bleach as a disinfectant is increasing in a variety of industrial and commercial, as well as household settings. Methicillin (USAN) or meticillin (INN, BAN) is a narrow spectrum beta-lactam antibiotic. ... Binomial name Rosenbach 1884 Staphylococcus aureus , literally Golden Cluster Seed and also known as golden staph, is the most common cause of staph infections. ...


Chemistry

The process of bleaching can be summarised in the following set of chemical reactions:


Cl2(aq) + H2O(l) rightleftharpoons H+(aq) + Cl-(aq) + HClO(aq)


The H+ ion of the hypochlorous acid then dissolves into solution, and so the final result is effectively:


Cl2(aq) + H2O(l) rightleftharpoons 2H+(aq) + Cl-(aq) + ClO-(aq)


How bleaches work

Color in most dyes and pigments is produced by molecules, such as beta carotene, which contain chromophores. Chemical bleaches work in one of two ways: Look up dye in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Natural Ultramarine pigment in powdered form. ... Beta-carotene is a form of carotene with β-rings at both ends. ... A chromophore is part (or moiety) of a molecule responsible for its color. ...

  • An oxidizing bleach works by breaking the chemical bonds that make up the chromophore. This changes the molecule into a different substance that either does not contain a chromophore, or contains a chromophore that does not absorb visible light.
  • A reducing bleach works by converting double bonds in the chromophore into single bonds. This eliminates the ability of the chromophore to absorb visible light.[149]

Sunlight acts as a bleach through a process leading to similar results: high energy photons of light, often in the violet or ultraviolet range, can disrupt the bonds in the chromophore, rendering the resulting substance colorless. Extended exposure often leads to massive discoloration usually reducing the colors to white and typically very faded blue spectrums.[150] A chemical bond is the physical process responsible for the attractive interactions between atoms and molecules, and that which confers stability to diatomic and polyatomic chemical compounds. ... The optical spectrum (light or visible spectrum) is the portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that is visible to the human eye. ... Covalent bonding is a form of chemical bonding characterized by the sharing of one or more pairs of electrons between atoms, in order to produce a mutual attraction, which holds the resultant molecule together. ... Covalently bonded hydrogen and carbon in a molecule of methane. ... In modern physics the photon is the elementary particle responsible for electromagnetic phenomena. ... Violet (named after the flower violet) is used in two senses: first, referring to the color of light at the short-wavelength end of the visible spectrum, approximately 380–420 nanometres (this is a spectral color). ... For other uses, see Ultraviolet (disambiguation). ...


See also

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Tooth Whitener for Home Use (Brush for Application) Tooth bleaching, also known as tooth whitening, is a common procedure in general dentistry but most especially in the field of cosmetic dentistry. ... Bleaching of wood pulp is the chemical processing carried out on various types of wood pulp to decrease the color of the pulp, so that it becomes whiter. ...

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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 61st day of the year (62nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

External links

Look up bleach in
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  • American Chemistry Council, Chlorine Chemistry Division

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