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Encyclopedia > Blazing Saddles
Blazing Saddles

Blazing Saddles promotional poster
Directed by Mel Brooks
Produced by Michael Hertzberg
Written by Andrew Bergman (story)
Mel Brooks
Norman Steinberg
Andrew Bergman
Richard Pryor
Alan Uger (screenplay)
Starring Cleavon Little
Gene Wilder
Harvey Korman
Music by Mel Brooks
John Morris
Cinematography Joseph F. Biroc
Editing by Danford B. Greene
John C. Howard
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) February 7, 1974
Language English (with restricted use of Yiddish and German)
Budget $2.6 million USD
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile
Alex Karras as Mongo in Blazing Saddles
Alex Karras as Mongo in Blazing Saddles

Blazing Saddles (1974) is a comedy directed by Mel Brooks and starring Cleavon Little and Gene Wilder, and released by Warner Brothers. The film was written by Brooks, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor, Norman Steinberg, and Alan Uger, and was based on Bergman's story and draft. Brooks appears in multiple supporting roles, including Governor Le Petomane and a Yiddish-speaking Indian Chief. Slim Pickens, Alex Karras, David Huddleston, and Brooks regulars Dom DeLuise, Madeline Kahn and Harvey Korman are also featured. Musician Count Basie has a cameo as himself. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (981x1500, 236 KB) Summary movie poster for the American theatrical release of the film Blazing Saddles (1974) Source URL: http://www. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on May 9, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Andrew Bergman is an American screenwriter, director, and novelist born in 1945. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on May 9, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Cleavon Little (June 1, 1939 - October 22, 1992) was an American actor, best known for his lead role in the 1974 Mel Brooks comedy Blazing Saddles and as the irreverent Dr. Jerry Noland in the early seventies series Temperatures Rising. He was born in Chickasha, Oklahoma, grew up in California... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an Academy Award-nominated American comedic actor who is perhaps best known for his collaborations with Mel Brooks, most notably Blazing Saddles and The Producers. ... Actor Harvey Korman in the 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on May 9, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... John Morris (born October 18, 1926) is a film and television composer, best known for his work with filmmaker Mel Brooks. ... Joseph F. Biroc (February 12, 1903-September 7, 1996) was a highly successful film and television cinematographer. ... Warner Bros. ... February 7 is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Yiddish (Yid. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Image File history File links Mongo_only_pawn_in_game_of_life. ... Image File history File links Mongo_only_pawn_in_game_of_life. ... Alexander George Karras, born July 15, 1935 in Gary, Indiana, is a former football player and actor who is best known for playing with the National Football Leagues Detroit Lions from 1958-1962 and 1964-1971. ... Mongo may refer to subjects within the following categories: A city in Chad; see Mongo, Chad. ... See also: 1973 in film 1974 1975 in film 1970s in film years in film film // Events February 7 - Blazing Saddles is released in USA May 1 - George Lucas creates the first draft of what would eventually become Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope. ... Airplane! is considered by some critics to be one of the funniest movies of all time. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on May 9, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Cleavon Little (June 1, 1939 - October 22, 1992) was an American actor, best known for his lead role in the 1974 Mel Brooks comedy Blazing Saddles and as the irreverent Dr. Jerry Noland in the early seventies series Temperatures Rising. He was born in Chickasha, Oklahoma, grew up in California... Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an Academy Award-nominated American comedic actor who is perhaps best known for his collaborations with Mel Brooks, most notably Blazing Saddles and The Producers. ... Warner Bros. ... Andrew Bergman is an American screenwriter, director, and novelist born in 1945. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Yiddish (Yid. ... Slim Pickens riding the bomb in the movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Louis Bert Lindley, Jr. ... Alexander George Karras, born July 15, 1935 in Gary, Indiana, is a former football player and actor who is best known for playing with the National Football Leagues Detroit Lions from 1958-1962 and 1964-1971. ... Born in Vinton, Virginia, on September 17, 1930, David Huddleston was briefly an officer in the United States Air Force before beginning his formal education in acting at the prestigious American Academy of Dramatic Arts. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Actor Harvey Korman in the 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles. ... William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. ...


The film is a parody of the Western film genre as well as a satire about racism. In contemporary usage, a parody is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... i like western films The Western is an American genre in literature and film. ... 1867 edition of the satirical magazine Punch, a British satirical magazine, ground-breaking on popular literature satire. ... Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · The Holocaust · Armenian Genocide · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Blood libel · Black Legend Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Ku Klux Klan National Party (South Africa) American Nazi Party Kahanism · Supremacism Anti...

Contents

Cast

Gene Wilder (born Jerome Silberman on June 11, 1933) is an Academy Award-nominated American comedic actor who is perhaps best known for his collaborations with Mel Brooks, most notably Blazing Saddles and The Producers. ... Cleavon Little (June 1, 1939 - October 22, 1992) was an American actor, best known for his lead role in the 1974 Mel Brooks comedy Blazing Saddles and as the irreverent Dr. Jerry Noland in the early seventies series Temperatures Rising. He was born in Chickasha, Oklahoma, grew up in California... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on May 9, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an Academy Award-nominated Jewish American actress of movie, television, and theater distinguished by an unusual gift for comedy. ... Actor Harvey Korman in the 1974 comedy Blazing Saddles. ... Slim Pickens riding the bomb in the movie Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb Louis Bert Lindley, Jr. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Liam Dunn (1916-1976) was an American actor. ... George Furth (b. ... Burton Gilliam (born August 9, 1930) is an American actor. ... John Hillerman (born December 20, 1932 in Denison, Texas) is an American actor. ... Born in Vinton, Virginia, on September 17, 1930, David Huddleston was briefly an officer in the United States Air Force before beginning his formal education in acting at the prestigious American Academy of Dramatic Arts. ... Alexander George Karras, born July 15, 1935 in Gary, Indiana, is a former football player and actor who is best known for playing with the National Football Leagues Detroit Lions from 1958-1962 and 1964-1971. ... Jack Starrett (November 2, 1936 – March 27, 1989) was an American actor and director from Refugio, Texas. ...

Plot summary

The story is set in the American Old West of 1874 (though it is filled with anachronistic references). Construction on a new railroad runs into quicksand; the route has to be changed, which will require it to go through Rock Ridge, a frontier town where everyone has the last name of "Johnson" (including a "Howard Johnson" and a "Van Johnson"). The conniving State Attorney General Hedley Lamarr — not to be confused, as he often is in the film, with actress Hedy Lamarr — wants to buy the land along the new railroad route cheaply by driving the townspeople out. He sends a gang of thugs, led by his flunky Taggart, to scare them away, prompting the townsfolk to demand that the Governor appoint a new sheriff. The Attorney General convinces his dim-witted boss to select Bart, an African American railroad worker, as the new sheriff. Because Bart is black, Lamarr believes that this will so offend the townspeople they will either abandon the town or lynch the new sheriff. The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1888. ... Look up Anachronism in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A frontier is a political and geographical term referring to areas near or beyond a boundary, or of a different nature. ... The current logo for Howard Johnsons motor lodges. ... Van Johnson in Battleground (1949) Van Johnson (born Charles Van Johnson on August 25, 1916, in Newport, Rhode Island) is an American film and television actor and dancer. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... Look up Sheriff in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Lynching is a form of violence, usually murder, conceived of by its perpetrators as extrajudicial punishment for offenders or as a terrorist method of enforcing social domination. ...


With his quick wits and the assistance of an alcoholic gunslinger Jim, also known as "The Waco Kid" ("I must have killed more men than Cecil B. DeMille!"), Bart works to overcome the townsfolk's hostile reception. He defeats Mongo, an immensely strong (but only marginally sentient) henchman sent by Taggart, and bests German seductress-for-hire Lili von Shtupp at her own game, before inspiring the town to lure Lamarr's newly-recruited army of thugs into an ambush. Gunslinger from The Great Train Robbery Gunslinger, also gunfighter, is a name given to men in the American Old West who had gained a reputation as being dangerous with a gun. ... Cecil B. DeMille on August 27, 1934 cover of Time Magazine Cecil Blount DeMille (August 12, 1881 – January 21, 1959) was one of the most successful filmmakers during the first half of the 20th century. ...


The resulting fight between the townsfolk and the gunfighters is such that it literally breaks the fourth wall; the fight spills out from the film lot in the Warner Bros. Studios into a neighboring musical set, makes its way to the studio commissary where a pie fight ensues, and finally spills out into the streets. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A commissary is someone delegated by a superior to execute a duty or an office. ...


The film ends with the sheriff and the Waco Kid defeating the bad guy, saving the town, catching the end of the movie, persuading people of all colors and creeds to live in harmony and, finally, riding (in a limousine) off into the sunset.


Themes and motifs

In addition to spoofing the western genre, Blazing Saddles works to satirize the way that Hollywood has portrayed the history of the American West. The film presents a western story but reverses several clichés to suggest an inherent falsehood in the western genre. For example, the seemingly innocent townsfolk in this case are far from innocent when a black man attempts to join them. Though they appeared helpless to resist the white outlaws, when confronted by a black man the entire town is suddenly armed. The villainous railroad tycoons in this movie are actually corrupt members of the American government who exploit ethnic minorities and victimize their own citizens for the sake of profit. By injecting the "real story" of the west into a clichéd western, the movie suggests a falsehood in the mythic Wild West, a portrayal most widely propagated through cinema. The cowboy, the quintessential symbol of the American Old West, circa 1888. ...


The movie makes use of many anachronisms and breaks the fourth wall repeatedly to remind viewers that they are watching a movie. For example, when newly-appointed Sheriff Bart is seen beginning his journey to Rock Ridge, he is shown wearing Gucci cowboy gear. He is also accompanied by a jazz soundtrack which is assumed to be non-diegetic scoring for the benefit of the viewing audience. However, the camera pans left to show Bart riding by Count Basie's well-known Big Band jazz group, which is playing their hit "April in Paris" in the middle of the desert. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The House of Gucci, better known as simply Gucci, is an Italian iconic fashion and leather goods label. ... According to Gerald Prince in A Dictionary of Narratology, diegesis is (1) The (fictional) world in which the situations and events narrated occur; (2) Telling, recounting, as opposed to showing, enacting. ... William Count Basie (August 21, 1904 – April 26, 1984) was an American jazz pianist, organist, bandleader, and composer. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans, Louisiana, United States around the start of the 20th century. ... April in Paris is a song composed by Vernon Duke and written by E. Y. Harburg in 1932. ...


The movie also portrays a shared heritage of American immigrants and minorities. Chinese as well as black railroad workers are portrayed as equally oppressed. In the scene in which the Indian Chief speaks with Bart's family in Yiddish, three cultures are meshed together in harmony despite their obvious differences. Even as the townspeople are obliged to unite in order to fight their oppressors, Olson Johnson announces, "All right! We'll give some land to the niggers, and the chinks. But we don't want the Irish!" Yiddish (ייִדיש, Jiddisch) is a Germanic language spoken by about four million Jews throughout the world. ... // Nigger is a racial slur used to refer to dark-skinned people, especially those of African ancestry. ... Look up chink in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The film is known for pushing the boundaries of good taste and decency in cinema. The movie features racial epithets, vulgarity, and frank portrayals of sexuality and bodily functions. One of the film's most famous scenes involves a group of cowboys sitting around a campfire while eating plates of beans and farting loudly. Certain versions of the film obscure the farting sounds with amplified sounds of horses neighing; other versions remove the scene entirely and substitute blackout scenes of Bart using various tricks to defeat Mongo. Wikibooks Transwiki has more about this subject: Campfire A campfire in a fire pit A campfire is a fire lit at a campsite, usually in a fire ring. ... Flatulence (expelled through the anus in a process commonly known as farting or emitting gas) is the presence of a mixture of gases known as flatus in the digestive tract of mammals. ... The term blackout in peacetime refers to a cessation of electrical energy through electric power transmission systems. ...


Nominations, awards and honors

The film was nominated for three Academy Awards and two BAFTA awards. Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ...


The film won the Writers Guild of America Award for "Best Comedy Written Directly for the Screen" — writers Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor, Alan Uger.[1] Annual awards given out by the Writers Guild of America for outstanding achievements in film, TV, or radio writing. ...


In 2006, Blazing Saddles was among 25 films named to the National Film Registry by the Librarian of Congress.[2] The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ...


Critical reaction

While the film is widely considered a classic comedy today, critical reaction was mixed when the film was first released. Vincent Canby wrote[3]: Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ...

Throughout Blazing Saddles I kept being reminded of Sleeper, both films being the work of men who had their first real successes as gag writers. Both worked for Sid Caesar, and both still appreciate the need for getting a joke to the audience fast and then moving on. However, Sleeper builds momentum through the continuing character played by Mr. Allen himself, and gives the impression of having been pared down to comic essentials.
Blazing Saddles has no dominant personality, and it looks as if it includes every gag thought up in every story conference. Whether good, bad, or mild, nothing was thrown out.
Mr. Allen's comedy, though very much a product of our Age of Analysis, recalls the wonder and discipline of people like Keaton and Laurel and Hardy. Mr. Brooks's sights are lower. His brashness is rare, but his use of anachronism and anarchy recalls not the great film comedies of the past, but the middling ones like the Hope-Crosby "Road" pictures. With his talent he should do much better than that.

Roger Ebert called the film a "crazed grabbag of a movie that does everything to keep us laughing except hit us over the head with a rubber chicken. Mostly, it succeeds. It's an audience picture; it doesn't have a lot of classy polish and its structure is a total mess. But of course! What does that matter while Alex Karras is knocking a horse cold with a right cross to the jaw?"[4] Sleeper (1973) is a futuristic science fiction comedy film, written by, directed by, and starring Woody Allen. ... Sid Caesar (born Isaac Sidney Caesar on September 8, 1922) is an Emmy-winning comic actor and writer, best known as the leading man on the 1950s television sketch comedy series Your Show of Shows. ... Road to. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... A prop comic holding a rubber chicken in sweatpants (as in the simile looser than a rubber chicken in sweatpants). Please see this page: www. ...


Reaction to inclusion in the National Film Registry

Blazing Saddles was among 25 films named to the National Film Registry by the Librarian of Congress in 2006. Films chosen for inclusion in this registry are rated on several criteria, including historical significance. The American film critic Dave Kehr queried if the historical importance of Blazing Saddles lay in the fact that it was the first film from a major studio to have a fart joke.[5] The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films. ... Dave Kehr is an American film critic currently writing for The New York Times. ... The major film studios, often simply known as the majors, are film studios (mostly United States-based) that produce many films per year. ... The acronym FART may refer to: Regional Bus and Rail Company of Canton Ticino (Ferrovie Autolinee Regionali Ticinesi) Fatal Accident Reconstruction Team Fathers Against Rude Television (F.A.R.T.), a fictional TV-censorship group from the Futurama episode, Bender Should Not Be Allowed on TV Flatulent Airborne Reaction Team...


TV Pilot

A television pilot was produced for CBS based on the film, titled Black Bart.[1] It featured Louis Gossett Jr. as Bart and Steve Landesberg as the drunk sidekick. Mel Brooks had little if nothing to do with the pilot, as writer Andrew Bergman is listed as the sole creator. The pilot did not sell but CBS aired it once on April 4, 1975. It was later inclued as a bonus feature on the Blazing Saddles 30th Anniversary DVD. Louis Gossett Jr. ... Steve Landesberg (born 23 November 1945) is an United States actor, comedian and voice actor. ... Andrew Bergman is an American screenwriter, director, and novelist born in 1945. ...


Mistakes

  • In the beginning when Bart and Charlie are using a handcart to check for quicksand, the cable pulling the handcart towards the camera is clearly visible.
  • Don Megowan is listed in the credits as "Gum Chewer," but the gum chewer was actually played by John Alderson. Megowan plays the man who is kneed in the groin by Lily.
  • In the scene in which Mel Brooks as the Indian Chief speaks Yiddish, he makes a grammatical mistake when he chants "Loz im geyn" (Let him go) instead of "Loz zey geyn" (Let them go), or better yet, since he is talking to two others, the plural imperative "Lozt zey geyn".

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Trivia

  • This was Mel Brooks's first movie shot in anamorphic. To date, this film and History of the World, Part I are the only films Brooks has shot in this format.
  • Brooks wanted Richard Pryor to play the sheriff's role, but the studio objected. Warner executives expressed concern about Pryor's reliability because of his heavy drug use at the time and the belief that he was crazy.[6] Pryor was eventually hired as one of the film's screenwriters.
  • Gene Wilder was the second choice to play the character of the Waco Kid. He was quickly brought in to replace Gig Young after the first day of filming because Young was suffering from delirium tremens on the set due to his alcoholism.[7][8]
  • After screening the movie, the head of Warner Brothers Pictures complained about the use of the word "nigger", the campfire scene and the punching of a horse, and told Brooks to remove all these elements from the film. As Brooks' contract gave him control of the final cut, the complaints were disregarded and all three elements were retained in the film.[6]
  • Mel Brooks wanted the movie's title song to reflect the western genre, and advertised in the trade papers that he wanted a "Frankie Laine-type" sound. Several days later, singer Frankie Laine himself visited Brooks' office offering his services. Brooks had not told Laine that the movie was planned as a comedy, and was embarrassed by how much heart Laine put into singing the song.
  • In an interview included in the DVD release of Blazing Saddles, Mel Brooks claims that Hedy Lamarr threatened to sue, saying the film's running "Hedley Lamarr" joke infringed her right to publicity. In one scene, one character even warns another that Hedy would sue. Brooks says they settled out of court for a small sum.
  • In the same interview, Brooks relates how he managed to convince John Wayne to read the script after meeting him in the Warner Brothers studio commissary. Wayne was impressed with the script, but politely declined a cameo appearance, fearing it was "too dirty" for his family image.
  • Brooks used his own voice for one of the singers backing Madeline Kahn's performance of "I'm Tired", speaking lines such as "Give her a break!", "Let her alone!" and, "Don't you know she's pooped?!"
  • The bead work on Brooks' Indian headdress in the movie poster says "Kosher for Passover" in Hebrew (kosher l'pesach) (although misspelled; it actually reads "Posher for Kassover" (posher l'kesach) . When Brooks is speaking 'Indian', he's actually speaking Yiddish. 'Shtup' is close to German 'stopfen' for 'to stuff' and is a Yiddish vulgarism for sexual intercourse.
  • The Indians speaking Yiddish is a nod to the rumour that various ethnic groups cast as Indians---Jews, southern Italians, Greeks, or Indians (often not of the nation being portrayed)---have used the opportunity for non-English dialogue to insult their employers in Yiddish, Italian, Greek, Crow/Mandan/... and so on.
  • Right before the "I'm Tired" scene, after Jim tells Bart about Lili Von Shtupp, a short guitar tune of Springtime For Hitler plays.
  • When Mel Brooks's character exclaims "Hello Boys!", it is a reference to The Producers when Max Bialystock says the same thing after opening the safe.
  • When asked in a television interview if anything was so offensive it had to be cut from the movie, Mel Brooks confided that one bit between Madeline Kahn and Cleavon Little had to be edited. In the darkened dressing room when Lili asks Bart if it's "twue" what they say about black men and then she says "it's twue, it's twue!", he cut Bart's punchline of "You're sucking my arm..."

Anamorphic widescreen is a cinematography and photography technique for capturing a widescreen picture on standard 35mm film. ... This article is about the film. ... Richard Franklin Lennox Thomas Pryor III (December 1, 1940 – December 10, 2005) was an American comedian, actor, and writer. ... Actor Gig Young in City That Never Sleeps Gig Young (November 4, 1913–October 19, 1978) was an American film actor. ... For the beer, see Delirium Tremens (beer). ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... // Nigger is a racial slur used to refer to dark-skinned people, especially those of African ancestry. ... Frankie Laine, born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio (March 30, 1913 – February 6, 2007), was one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century. ... Frankie Laine, born Francesco Paolo LoVecchio (March 30, 1913 – February 6, 2007), was one of the most successful American singers of the twentieth century. ... Mel Brooks (born Melvin Kaminsky on May 9, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American actor, writer, director and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... Hedy Lamarr (November 9, 1913 – January 19, 2000) was an Austrian/Jewish-American actress and communications technology innovator. ... John Wayne (May 26, 1907 – June 11, 1979), born Marion Robert Morrison[1] and later changed to Marion Michael Morrison, popularly known as the Duke, was an iconic, Academy Award-winning, American film actor. ... Warner Bros. ... Marlene Dietrich IPA: ; (December 27, 1901 – May 6, 1992) was a German-born actress, singer, and entertainer. ... Falling in Love Again (Cant Help It) is the English language name for a 1930 song composed by Frederick Hollander as Ich bin von Kopf bis Fuß auf Liebe eingestellt. ... Frederick Holländer (October 18, 1896 - January 18, 1976) was an English-born composer of German descent. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A row of dancing stormtroopers in the infamous opening musical number from Springtime for Hitler. ... The Producers may refer to one of the following: American actor and writer director Mel Brooks comedy about two con-men who attempt to cheat theatre investors out of their investment money. ... Max Bialystock is a fictional character and main protagonist who first appeared in Mel Brooks 1969 movie, The Producers, played by Zero Mostel. ...

Footnotes and references

  1. ^ Awards for Blazing Saddles (1974)
  2. ^ Boliek, Brooks (12-28-2006). 'Rocky,' 'Fargo,' 'Saddles' join Nat'l Film Registry. The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved on 2007-02-02.
  3. ^ Review of Blazing Saddles by Vincent Canby
  4. ^ Blazing Saddles review by Roger Ebert
  5. ^ National Film Registry Announces New Titles
  6. ^ a b 2001 Review, mostly of Brooks's DVD commentary, from Salon.com
  7. ^ IMDb Biography for Gig Young
  8. ^ Gig Young

2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Vincent Canby (July 27, 1924 – September 15, 2000) was an American film critic. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... A major selling point of DVD video is that its storage capacity allows for a wide variety of extra features in addition to the feature film itself. ... Screenshot of Salon. ... Actor Gig Young in City That Never Sleeps Gig Young (November 4, 1913–October 19, 1978) was an American film actor. ...

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Blazing Saddles (1985 words)
Blazing Saddles includes Nightscape Familiar to mitigate these situations even further (not to mention blocking Blastoderms while he's at it!), and while the Familiar only reduces the cost of red and blue spells, this isn't a particularly limiting factor, as the majority of creatures you want to play are red to begin with.
The reason Blazing Saddles is effective where Machine Head is not is because the former seizes tempo with mana acceleration, as outlined above, and refuses to relinquish it, maintaining pressure with haste creatures and removal.
The deck's namesake, Blazing Specter, is an extremely powerful creature, providing a source of both damage and disruption, forcing an opponent to remove it quickly or find their hand stripped of valuable resources and their life total dropping at an unhealthy clip.
NodeWorks - Encyclopedia: Blazing Saddles (584 words)
The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, including one for Kahn for a Dietrich-like portrayal of the "Teutonic Titwillow" and one for the film's title song, co-written by Brooks and performed with complete sincerity by Frankie Laine.
When the original title (Tex X) was turned down by the studio because it sounded like the title of a blaxploitation film, Brooks next choice was Black Bart; although that name wasn't used either, it was the name of a television pilot based on the film but produced without Brooks' participation.
That pilot is included on the 30th anniversary DVD release of Blazing Saddles.
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