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Encyclopedia > Blanket primary

In United States politics, the blanket primary was a system used for selecting party candidates in a primary election. In a blanket primary, voters may pick one candidate for each office without regard to party lines; for instance, a voter might select a Democratic candidate for governor and a Republican candidate for senator. It differs from the open primary – in open primaries voters may pick candidates regardless of their own party registration, but must stick to one party's candidates. The Federal Government of the United States was established by the United States Constitution. ... The examples and perspective in this article do not represent a worldwide view. ... Democracy is a form of government under which the power to alter the laws and structures of government lies, ultimately, with the citizenry. ... Republican; a belief in a constitutional system without an hereditary element. ...


Compared to other primary systems, the blanket primary is less restrictive for voters because it does not limit them to selecting from only one party's candidates. Mainstream political parties, however, saw this as a disadvantage because it discouraged party loyalty, especially among moderate voters who did not identify strongly with either party. The system also has potential for tactical voting: Voters opposed to one party might dishonestly choose a weaker candidate from that party, setting the candidate up to lose in the general election. In voting systems, tactical voting (or strategic voting) occurs when a voter misrepresents his or her sincere preferences in order to gain a more favorable outcome. ... A general election is an election in which all members of a given political body are up for election. ...


In 2001, the Supreme Court struck down California's blanket primary in California Democratic Party v. Jones. Similar systems used by Washington and Alaska were also changed. The blanket primary surives in modified form in Lousiana, where the top two vote-getters from each office advance to the general election, regardless of party affiliation. 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The Supreme Court of the United States is the supreme court in the United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... Holding --- Court membership Case opinions Laws applied --- California Democratic Party v. ... Official language(s) None Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 18th 184,824 km² 385 km 580 km 6. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 1st 663,267 mi² / 1 717 854 km² 808 mi / 1300 km 1,479 mi / 2380 km 13. ... Louisiana is a southern state of the United States of America. ...


External links

  • "Court nixes 'blanket' primaries" by Laurie Asseo, Salon, June 26, 2000, retrieved January 12, 2006.
  • "History of the Blanket Primary in Washington", Washington Secretary of State, retrieved January 12, 2006.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Blanket primary - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (326 words)
In United States politics, the blanket primary (also known as a jungle primary) is a system used for selecting party candidates in a primary election.
In a blanket primary, voters may pick one candidate for each office without regard to party lines; for instance, a voter might select a Democratic candidate for governor and a Republican candidate for senator.
The blanket primary survives in modified form in Louisiana, where the top two vote-getters from each office advance to the general election, regardless of party affiliation.
Washington Policy Center • Publications (6968 words)
Blanket Primary: Voters do not declare a party affiliation and receive a ballot listing the names of candidates of all parties for each office, and may vote for candidates seeking to be nominated by different parties.
Since the purpose of a closed primary is to limit participation in a party’s selection process to declared members of that party (plus independents if party rules permit), parties generally adopt rules to prevent “party-raiding,” the process by which members of the opposition party change registration solely for the purpose of a specific primary race.
Supporters of the blanket primary have argued that it is fundamental that voters in a “safe” district should be able to participate in the nomination of the person who will represent their district, even if of the other party.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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