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Encyclopedia > Bladesmith

Bladesmithing is the art of blacksmithing that relates specifically to creating knives, swords, and other blades using a forge, hammer, anvil, and other smithing tools. Bladesmiths employ a variety of metalworking techniques used by blacksmiths, as well as woodworking for knife and sword handles, and often leatherworking for sheaths. A blacksmith is an artisan specializing in the hand-wrought manufacture of metal objects, such as wrought iron gates, grills and railings, light fixtures and furniture, sculpture, weapons, decorative and religous items, cooking utensils and tools. ... traditional Norse knife A knife is a sharp-edged hand tool used for cutting. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses of the word blade, see Blade (disambiguation) A blade is the part of a sword that is used to cut (as opposed to the hilt). ... {Unreferenced|date=March 2007}} The forge or smithy is the workplace of a smith or a blacksmith. ... A claw hammer For other uses, see Hammer (disambiguation). ... If you want the band called Anvil, please go to Anvil (band) A blacksmith working iron with a hammer and anvil An anvil is a manufacturing tool, made of a hard and massive block of stone or metal used as a support for chiseling and hammering other objects, such as... A modern hammer is directly descended from ancient hand tools A tool or device is a piece of equipment which typically provides a mechanical advantage in accomplishing a physical task, or provides an ability that is not naturally available to the user of a tool. ... Turned chess pieces Metalworking is the craft and practice of working with metals to create structures or machine parts. ... Artists can use woodworking to create delicate sculptures. ... Leatherworking is a profession in World of Warcraft. ...


Bladesmithing is a branch of blacksmithing, so most, if not all, blacksmiths will be familiar with bladesmithing as well as the other aspects of their craft, while bladesmiths will not necessarily be familiar with blacksmithing that do not relate to the making of blades.

Contents

Related trades

Many blade smiths were known by other titles according to the kind of blade that they produced:

  • A swordsmith is a smith, blacksmith, or bladesmith whose expertise is working on swords.
  • A cutler is a smith making knives and other cutlery.
  • A scythesmith is a smith making scythes.
  • Also awlbladesmiths, razorsmiths, sicklesmiths, and so on.

A smith, or metalsmith, is a person involved in the shaping of metal objects. ... A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ... Swiss longsword, 15th or 16th century Look up Sword in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Used cutlery: a plate, a fork and knife, and a drinking glass. ... A knife is a sharp-edged (single or double edged) instrument consisting of a thin blade used for cutting and fitted with a handle. ... A traditional wooden scythe A scythe (IPA: , most likely from Old English siðe, sigði) is an agricultural hand tool for mowing and reaping grass or crops. ...

Modern Bladesmithing

Modern bladesmiths use a variety of steels to produce their blades, most commonly high carbon steel such as 1075/1085 or 1095 (the '10' representing the 10 series carbon steels, while '75' '85' and '95' reflect the carbon content of the steel), tool steel such as O-1 or A-2, or other tool or high carbon steels. Stainless steel such as 440C is also used for knives that require high corrosion resistance; however, stainless steel is unsuitable for blades longer than knife length due to its hard and brittle structure in comparison to carbon steel. Despite this fact, it is often used commercially for mass-producing swords that are not battle-ready, advertised incorrectly as 'sword steel.' Steel framework Steel is a metal alloy whose major component is iron, with carbon being the primary alloying material. ... Carbon steel is a metal, a combination of two elements, iron & carbon, where other elements are present in quantities too small to affect the properties. ... Tool steel refers to a variety of carbon and alloy steels that are particularly well-suited to be made into tools. ... The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304L) Gateway Arch defines St. ...


Swords and longer blades, in modern times, are often crafted of 5160 carbon spring steel, which is not as hard or brittle as a high carbon steel such as 1095, but is more durable and less prone to breakage, and therefore more suitable for longer weapons. 5160 carbon spring steel is sometimes used for leaf springs in trucks, making it readily available from many junkyards.


For further clarification, 5160 spring steel is more durable than 1085 or 1095 high carbon steel, but does not hold as sharp an edge. 1095 high carbon steel is harder and more durable than 440C stainless steel, but will rust much more easily. Stainless steel is more brittle than both 5160 and 1095 carbon steel, but is still very useful due to its resistance to rust and corrosion.


Many advanced bladesmiths are able to forge a special type of steel using a technique called pattern welding, producing a metal commonly (and incorrectly) known as damascus steel. Pattern-welded steel is highly decorative as well as durable (if welded in certain ways with proper steels), and is often used in custom knife- and sword-crafting. Pattern welded pocket knife Pattern welding is the practice in sword and knife making of forming a blade of several metal pieces of differing composition that are forge-welded together and twisted and manipulated to form a pattern. ... Damascus steel is a steel used in Middle Eastern swordmaking from about 1100 to 1700 AD. Damascus swords were of legendary sharpness and strength, and were apocryphally claimed to be able to cut through more ordinary European swords and even rock. ...


Typically the bladesmithing process begins with the forging of the blade itself, followed by the crafting of the handle out of wood, bone, antler, micarta, or any number of other possible materials. The handle is then affixed to the blade using various techniques that depend on the type of blade and the preference of the smith. Trunks A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is a solid material derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ... Grays Anatomy illustration of a human femur. ... For the Poet Laureate of Milwaukee, see Antler (Poet). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with novotext. ...


Historic Bladesmithing

Historically speaking, bladesmithing is an art that has survived and thrived over thousands of years. Many different parts of the world have different styles of bladesmithing, some more well-known than others.


Japanese

Japanese bladesmithing is often considered an extremely rigid, precise process, involving folding and forge-welding the steel many times over to create a laminated blade. In the past, it was typically assumed that more folds resulted in a higher quality blade. However, in modern times it is widely agreed that folding the steel past a certain point will actually decrease the effectiveness of the sword, resulting in a blade so thinly folded that it approaches the same effectiveness as a solid piece of metal with no folds at all. The number of folds that 'optimize' the blade toughness and edge-holding ability vary between smiths and between blade thickness and types of metal. A laminate is a material constructed by uniting two or more layers of material together. ...


Often Japanese bladesmiths would forge their blades out of multiple materials, rather than simply folding and forge-welding one type of steel to itself. Wrought iron, which is very durable and less brittle than steel, would sometimes be used for the spine of the blade, with extremely hard high-carbon steel forming the blade's edge. This process creates a highly impact-resistant blade with an extremely sharp edge. However, under heavy usage, the edge would be more prone to chipping than its European counterparts, which were typically designed to deal with heavier armor than Japanese blades. A wrought iron railing in Troy, New York. ...


Norse

The Norse also had extremely advanced bladesmithing techniques for their level of technology. Norse smiths would often forge-weld blades of multiple materials, similar in some ways to the Japanese method, though their blades were typically double-edged and straight rather than the slightly curved style of the katana. Norse blades were often forged with a durable, wrought-iron core, with an outer surface of harder steel. Norseman redirects here; for the town of the same name see Norseman, Western Australia. ...


Indian/Middle Eastern

Bladesmithing was common practice in Indian and the Middle East during the Middle Ages. A special type of steel known as Damascus steel was often used in these areas. This steel, created only in ancient times, has not truly been replicated in modern times. True Damascus steel should not be mistaken with modern pattern-welded steel (which is often referred to incorrectly as Damascus steel); true Damascus steel is a high carbon alloy with tremendous edge retention in addition to flexibility due to its composition of carbon nanotubes and carbide nanowires, with a wavy surface texture originating from the etched crystalline structure. This steel was known as Wootz steel, mined in India but was mostly forged in the middle east, and, according to many accounts, was the most advanced sword steel in all of Europe, Asia, the Middle East and parts of Africa for centuries; it was used for high quality blades and swords throughout three continents. Damascus steel is a steel used in Middle Eastern swordmaking from about 1100 to 1700 AD. Damascus swords were of legendary sharpness and strength, and were apocryphally claimed to be able to cut through more ordinary European swords and even rock. ... Wootz is a steel alloy making technique, discovered in India around 300 AD (although some say as early as 200 BC). ... World map showing the location of Europe. ... Small Text For other uses, see Asia (disambiguation). ... A map showing countries commonly considered to be part of the Middle East The Middle East is a region comprising the lands around the southern and eastern parts of the Mediterranean Sea, a territory that extends from the eastern Mediterranean Sea to the Persian Gulf. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Bladesmithing Myths and Misconceptions

A number of myths about bladesmithing have sprung up in the modern era due to incorrect depictions of bladesmithing in movies and other media, as well as a widespread lack of understanding of the art.


Bladesmithing in Movies

There are many incorrect depictions of bladesmithing in modern movies, which mislead their audiences into false understandings of the art.


For instance, in the beginning of Conan the Barbarian, Conan's father, upon forging his sword, quenches the orange-hot blade in snow. In truth, this action would probably crack the blade. Sub-zero quenches (that is, quenching a blade at forging temperature in a medium that is extremely cold, such as snow or liquid nitrogen) are useful for some metals such as stainless steel, which is a fairly recent invention, but most other high carbon steels must be quenched in some sort of oil or a brine solution to avoid cracking or warpage. Hither came Conan, the Cimmerian, black-haired, sullen-eyed, sword in hand, a thief, a reaver, a slayer, with gigantic melancholies and gigantic mirth, to tread the jeweled thrones of the Earth under his sandalled feet. ... Synthetic motor oil An oil is any substance that is in a viscous liquid state (oily) at ambient temperatures or slightly warmer, and is both hydrophobic (immiscible with water, literally water fearing) and lipophilic (miscible with other oils, literally fat loving). This general definition includes compound classes with otherwise unrelated... Brine is water saturated or nearly saturated with salt. ...


Another incorrect example of bladesmithing is presented in the movie Highlander 3: The Final Dimension. Connor Macleod breaks his Masamune and must re-forge it using a block of steel left by the sword's original maker. Some feel that it is implied that he 'fills in the cracks' of his sword blade due to the short amount of time in which he repairs his sword and the difficult shape of the steel block he uses as his material. However, realistically, in order for his blade to be full strength, he would need to completely remake the blade from scratch, and reset it into the handle. There is no way to 'fill in the cracks' of a broken blade with new steel short of forge-welding, and a forge-weld in the middle of a blade like the Masamune would arguably decrease its strength considerably. It is possible, however, that the movie intended for Connor to have re-forged his sword blade from scratch, as his actual smithing is vague in the movie context. Highlander may refer to the following: Persons: A person from the Scottish Highlands A person from the Highlands in Southern Poland: Gorals A person from the central plateaux of Madagascar Film and TV: Highlander (film): Highlander I, II, III & IV: fantasy movies. ... Masamune Portrait This article is about the swordsmith. ...


The sames goes to the sword Narsil in The Lord Of The Rings - The Return of the King. As Elrond ordered the Narsil to be reforged, the sword smiths of Rivendell were seen joining the red hot shards of Narsil together and hammered to "seal" them. This is absolutely wrong and Aragorn would have died the first instance he uses this sword as the sowrd would have broken easily.


Arrowhead Myths

A common myth surrounds the making of arrowheads, claiming that arrowheads in the Middle Ages were made by casting liquid steel or iron into molds. This is generally not true, as arrowheads in the Middle Ages were typically made by casting pewter, not steel. Pewter, possessing a much lower melting point than iron, is much easier, not to mention less dangerous, to melt and cast into shape; therefore pewter was often used for items like arrowheads in which edge retention and durability were not as important as would be in a sword or knife. American Indian arrowheads of several shapes and functions Japanese arrowheads of several shapes and functions Arrowhead can refer to: the point of an arrow; some plants in the genus Sagittaria; the Arrowhead region of northeastern Minnesota; a place name in southern California, derived from an arrowhead-shaped geologic formation in... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Pewter plate Pewter is a metal alloy, traditionally between 85 and 99 percent tin, with the remainder consisting of 1-15 percent copper, acting as a hardener, with the addition of lead for the lower grades of pewter, which have a bluish tint. ...


Drop Forging Misconception

Drop forging, a form of forging using mechanical equipment to push heated steel into shape, should not be confused with metal casting. Casting involves pouring a liquid metal into a mold to form an object, and as pouring involves "dropping" metal, is sometimes confused with drop forging. Drop forging does not involve liquid metal at all. See blacksmithing for more details. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Casting may be used to create artistic sculptures Casting is a manufacturing process by which a molten material such as metal or plastic is introduced into a mold, allowed to solidify within the mold, and then ejected or broken out to make a fabricated part. ... A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ...


See also


A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ... Pattern welded pocket knife Pattern welding is the practice in sword and knife making of forming a blade of several metal pieces of differing composition that are forge-welded together and twisted and manipulated to form a pattern. ... The American Bladesmith Society is dedicated to preserving the ancient art and history of crafting hand forged knives. ... Companies manufacturing sword replicas Albion Swords (USA) Angus Trim (USA) Arma Bohemia (Czech Republic) Armour Class (Scotland) Arms & Armor (USA) Cold Steel (USA) Darkwood Armory (USA) Del Tin (Italy) Hanwei/CAS Iberia (Taiwan) Lutel (Czech Republic) Pavel Moc (Czech Republic) TEMPL (Czech Republic) Vince Evans (USA) Windlass Steelcrafts (India) American...

Metalworking:

Metalworking smiths: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Turned chess pieces Metalworking is the craft and practice of working with metals to create structures or machine parts. ...

Smiths | Blacksmith | Coppersmith | Goldsmith | Gunsmith | Locksmith | Pewtersmith | Silversmith | Bladesmith | Tinsmith | Whitesmith A smith, or metalsmith, is a person involved in the shaping of metal objects. ... A blacksmith A blacksmith at work A blacksmith at work A blacksmiths fire Hot metal work from a blacksmith A blacksmith is a person who creates objects from iron or steel by forging the metal; i. ... A coppersmith is a person who works with copper and brass. ... A goldsmith creating a new ring A goldsmith is a metalworker who specializes in working with precious metals, usually to make jewelry. ... A gunsmith is a person who designs, builds, repairs or modifies firearms to blueprint and customer specifications, using hand tools and machine tools such as grinders and lathes. ... Locksmithing is the science and art of making and defeating locks. ... Pewter plate Pewter is a metal alloy, traditionally between 85 and 99 % tin, with the remainder consisting of 1-4 % copper, acting as a hardener, with the addition of lead for the lower grades of pewter and a bluish tint. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A whitesmith is a person who works with galvanized or tinned iron, or white iron. ... A whitesmith is a person who works with galvanized or tinned iron, or white iron. ...

Metalworking tools:

Anvil | Forge | Forging | Fuller | Hardy hole | Hardy tools | Pritchel | Slack tub | Steam hammer | Swage block | Trip hammer If you want the band called Anvil, please go to Anvil (band) A blacksmith working iron with a hammer and anvil An anvil is a manufacturing tool, made of a hard and massive block of stone or metal used as a support for chiseling and hammering other objects, such as... {Unreferenced|date=March 2007}} The forge or smithy is the workplace of a smith or a blacksmith. ... This article is about smithing. ... A fuller is a hand held form tool usually with a wooden handle, but often an air cooled wire handle. ... A Hardy hole is a square hole in an anvil, suitable for holding hardy tools in place. ... Hardy tools are metalworking tools, used in forging. ... A pritchel is a type of punch used in forging, particularly in making nail holes in horseshoes. ... A slack tub is usually a large container full of water used by a blacksmith to quench hot metal. ... The steam hammer is a power-driven hammer used in forgings. ... Top view of a swage block showing various sized holes and sections Right side view of the above swage block A swage block is a large, heavy block of steel used in smithing, with various sized holes in its face and usually with forms on the sides. ... A triphammer is a massive power hammer, usually raised by a cam and then released to fall under the force of gravity. ...


Metalworking topics:   Turned chess pieces Metalworking is the craft and practice of working with metals to create structures or machine parts. ...

Casting | CNC | Cutting tools | Drilling and threading | Fabrication | Finishing | Grinding | Jewellery | Lathe (tool) | Machining | Machine tooling | Measuring | Metalworking | Hand tools | Metallurgy | Milling | Occupations | Press tools | Smithing | Terminology | Welding Casting may be used to create artistic sculptures Casting is a manufacturing process by which a molten material such as metal or plastic is introduced into a mold, allowed to solidify within the mold, and then ejected or broken out to make a fabricated part. ... A CNC Turning Center A CNC Milling Machine The abbreviation CNC stands for computer numerical control, and refers specifically to a computer controller that reads G-code instructions and drives the machine tool, a powered mechanical device typically used to fabricate metal components by the selective removal of metal. ... a Cutting Tool, in the context of Metalworking is any tool that is used to remove metal from the workpiece by means of shear deformation. ... Drilling is the process of using a drill bit in a drill to produce holes. ... A typical steel fabrication shop Fabrication, when used chas an industrial term, applies to the building of machines and structures by cutting, shaping and assembling components made from raw materials. ... Metalworking finishing is the activity of making things out of metal in a skillful manner. ... Rotating abrasive wheel on a bench grinder. ... Amber jewellery in the form of pendants Jewellery (also spelled jewelry, see spelling differences) is a personal ornament, such as a necklace, ring, or bracelet, made from jewels, precious metals or other substance. ... Conventional metalworking lathe In woodturning, metalworking, metal spinning, and glassworking, a lathe is a machine tool which spins a block of material so that when abrasive, cutting, or deformation tools are applied to the block, it can be shaped to produce an object which has rotational symmetry about an axis... A lathe is a common tool used in machining. ... A machine tool is a powered mechanical device, typically used to fabricate metal components of machines by the selective removal of metal. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... Turned chess pieces Metalworking is the craft and practice of working with metals to create structures or machine parts. ... Metalworking hand tools are hand tools that are used in the metalworking field. ... Metallurgy is a domain of materials science and of materials engineering that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ... Endmills for a milling machine. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Smith (metalwork). ... Power press with a fixed barrier guard A press, or a machine press is a tool used to work metal (typically steel) by changing its shape and internal structure. ... A smith, or metalsmith, is a person involved in the shaping of metal objects. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Welding is a fabrication process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. ...


 
 

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