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Encyclopedia > Blade Runner
Blade Runner

Film poster
Directed by Ridley Scott
Produced by Michael Deeley
Written by Novel:
Philip K. Dick
Screenplay:
Hampton Fancher
David Peoples
Starring Harrison Ford
Rutger Hauer
Sean Young
Edward James Olmos
Daryl Hannah
Music by Vangelis
Cinematography Jordan Cronenweth
Editing by Marsha Nakashima
Les Healey (dir. cut)
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) June 25, 1982 (USA)
Running time 117 min. (intl. cut)
115 min. (dir. cut)
Country Flag of the United States United States
Language English
Budget $28,000,000
Official website
All Movie Guide profile
IMDb profile

Blade Runner is a 1982 neo-noir science fiction American film directed by Ridley Scott from a screenplay written by Hampton Fancher and David Peoples, based on the novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick. The film features Harrison Ford, Rutger Hauer, Sean Young, Edward James Olmos, Daryl Hannah and Joanna Cassidy. Blade Runner or Bladerunner may refer to: Blade Runner, a 1982 film by Ridley Scott Blade Runner (soundtracks) Blade Runner (video game) Blade Runner, an edition of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Philip K. Dick A series of sequels to the film and novel, written by K. W... A film poster for Blade Runner, contended as fair use. ... German Three sheet Movie poster for Metropolis. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Michael Deeley (born August 6, 1932) is a film producer who has helped create notable films such as The Italian Job, Blade Runner and The Deer Hunter. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Hampton Fancher (born July 18, 1938 in Los Angeles, California, USA) was an actor who transitioned into being a producer and screenwriter in the late 1970s. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ... Edward James Olmos (born February 24, 1947) is an Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated American actor, of Mexican descent. ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... Jordan Cronenweth (February 20, 1935 – November 29, 1996) was an American cinematographer based in Los Angeles. ... “WB” redirects here. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... Neo-noir (a portmanteau of the Greek neo, new; and the French noir, black) is a type of motion picture that prominently utilizes elements of film noir, but with updated themes, content, style or visual elements that were absent in films noir of the 1940s and 50s. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Hampton Fancher (born July 18, 1938 in Los Angeles, California, USA) was an actor who transitioned into being a producer and screenwriter in the late 1970s. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ... This article is about the literary concept. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ... Edward James Olmos (born February 24, 1947) is an Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated American actor, of Mexican descent. ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ... Joanna Cassidy (b. ...


The film depicts a dystopian Los Angeles in November 2019 in which genetically manufactured beings called replicants—visually indistinguishable from adult humans—are used for dangerous and degrading work in Earth's "off-world colonies". Following a small replicant uprising, replicants become illegal on Earth; and specialist police units called "blade runners" are trained to hunt down and "retire" (kill) escaped replicants on Earth. The plot focuses on a brutal and cunning group of replicants hiding in Los Angeles and a semi-retired blade runner, Rick Deckard (Ford), who reluctantly agrees to take on one more assignment. This article is about the philosophical concept and literary form. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Artists conception of a space habitat called the Stanford torus, by Don Davis Space colonization (also called space settlement, space humanization, space habitation, etc. ... Rick Deckard is the central protaganist and main character in Ridley Scotts 1982 science-fiction film, Blade Runner. ...


Blade Runner initially polarized critics; some were displeased with the pacing, while others enjoyed its thematic complexity.[1] The film performed poorly in North American theaters but achieved success overseas. Despite poor early ticket sales, it has since become a cult classic. Blade Runner has been hailed for its production design, one said to depict a "retrofitted future". The film is credited with prefiguring important concerns of the 21st century, such as globalization, global warming and genetic engineering. It remains a leading example of the neo-noir genre. Blade Runner brought author Philip K. Dick to the attention of Hollywood and several more films have since been based on his work. Ridley Scott regards Blade Runner as his "most complete and personal film." In 2007, the American Film Institute listed it as the 97th greatest film of all time[2] and the Internet Movie Database ranks the film as number 103 in the top 250 films.[3] Film criticism is the analysis and evaluation of films. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... A KFC franchise in Kuwait. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... Kenyans examining insect-resistant transgenic Bt corn. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...


Seven versions of the film have been created, for various markets, as well as a result of controversial changes made by film executives. A rushed Director's Cut was released in 1992 after a strong response to workprint screenings. This in conjunction with its popularity as a video rental made it one of the first films to see a DVD release. Warner Bros. announced in January 2006 the upcoming 25th anniversary theatrical and DVD release in late 2007 of the long-awaited remastered definitive Final Cut by Scott.[4] A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ... “WB” redirects here. ...

Contents

Production

Producer Michael Deeley became interested in Hampton Fancher's screenplay entitled Android (subsequently it was changed to Dangerous Days). Deeley convinced director Ridley Scott to create his first American film using Fancher's screenplay. Scott had previously declined the project, but after leaving the slow production of Dune, wanted a faster paced project to take his mind off his older brother's recent death.[5] He joined the project on February 21, 1980, and went on to push Filmways promised financing on April 9 of $13 million up to $15 million. A film producer creates the conditions for making movies. ... Michael Deeley (born August 6, 1932) is a film producer who has helped create notable films such as The Italian Job, Blade Runner and The Deer Hunter. ... Hampton Fancher (born July 18, 1938 in Los Angeles, California, USA) was an actor who transitioned into being a producer and screenwriter in the late 1970s. ... Sample from a screenplay, showing dialogue and action descriptions. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Dune is a 1984 science fiction film written and directed by David Lynch, based on the 1965 Frank Herbert novel of the same name. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


When Scott noted Deckard's line of work needed a new name, Fancher found a cinema treatment by William S. Burroughs for Alan E. Nourse's novel The Bladerunner (1974), entitled Blade Runner (a movie). Scott liked it and Deeley obtained the rights to the titles, but Scott soon considered Blade Runner a working title for the film and wanted to find something more "commercial". (Note: Some editions of Nourse's novel use the two-word spacing Blade Runner, as does the Burroughs book.) William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Alan E. Nourse (August 11, 1928 - July 19, 1992) was an American science fiction author and physician. ... The novel The Bladerunner (also published as The Blade Runner) is a 1974 science fiction novel by Alan E. Nourse. ... Blade Runner (a movie) is a science fiction novella by Beat Generation author William S. Burroughs, first published in 1979. ...


Over time, Scott became unhappy with the direction of the script and had David Peoples rewrite it. Fancher subsequently resigned on December 20, 1980 over the issue, although he later returned to contribute additional rewrites. David Webb Peoples (born c. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ...


Having invested over $2.5 million in pre-production, as the date of commencement of principal photography neared, Filmways withdrew financial backing. In ten days, Deeley secured $21.5 million in financing through a three way deal between The Ladd Company (through Warner Bros.), the Hong Kong-based producer Sir Run Run Shaw, and Tandem Productions. This would later prove problematic as the release of the film's Special Edition (Final Cut) was delayed due to legal wrangling over distribution rights. The Ladd Company is a film production and distribution company founded by Alan Ladd, Jr. ... “WB” redirects here. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Shaw Sir Run Run Shaw CBE, GBM (Chinese name: 邵逸夫, originally named 邵仁楞; born 1907) is a Hong Kong media mogul. ... Norman Lear (born July 27, 1922) is an American television writer and producer who produced shows such as All in the Family, Sanford and Son and Maude. ...


Philip K. Dick became concerned that no one had informed him about the film's production. After Dick criticized an early version of the script in an article in the Los Angeles Select TV Guide, the studio sent Dick the David Peoples rewrite. Although Dick died before the film's release, he was pleased with a forty-minute special effects test reel that he viewed and the motion picture is dedicated to him. Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ...


Blade Runner owes much to Fritz Lang's Metropolis.[6] Ridley Scott credits Edward Hopper's painting Nighthawks and the proto-cyberpunk short story comic The Long Tomorrow (by Dan O'Bannon, art by Moebius) as stylistic mood sources. In addition, he drew on the industrial night time landscape of his one-time home of Teesside.[7] Scott hired as his conceptual artist Syd Mead, who, like Scott, was influenced by the French science fiction comic magazine Métal Hurlant (Heavy Metal), to which Moebius contributed.[1] Moebius was offered the opportunity to assist in the pre-production of Blade Runner, but he declined so that he could work on René Laloux's animated film Les Maîtres du temps, a decision he later regretted.[8] Lawrence G. Paull (production designer) and David Snyder (art director) realized Scott's and Mead's sketches. Jim Burns briefly worked designing the Spinner hover cars; Douglas Trumbull and Richard Yuricich supervised the special effects for the film. Principal photography of Blade Runner began on March 9, 1981. Set design was partly inspired by cities such as Hong Kong and Tokyo, particularly the bright red light district of Kabukichō. Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... Metropolis is a very early science fiction film that was produced in Germany during the brief years of the Weimar Republic. ... Nighthawks. ... This article is about the painting by Edward Hopper. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... Cover for The Long Tomorrow by Moebius The Long Tomorrow is the title of a short story comic written by Dan OBannon around 1975 or 76, and illustrated by Moebius. ... Dan OBannon (born Daniel Thomas OBannon on September 30, 1946 in St. ... Jean Henri Gaston Giraud (born May 8, 1938) is a French comics artist. ... Arms of the County Borough of Teesside Teesside is the name given to the conurbation in northern England based on Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees and Redcar, along the banks of the River Tees with a resident population of over 388,000 in 2005. ... Syd Mead (born July 18, 1933 in St. ... Métal Hurlant is the name of a French magazine of science fiction comics, created in December 1974 by Jean Giraud (aka MÅ“bius), Jean-Pierre Dionnet and Philippe Druillet. ... Jean-Michel Nicollets cover for the first issue. ... René Laloux (July 13, 1929 - March 13, 2004 in Paris) was a French animator. ... Les Maîtres du temps is a French animated short film (78 minutes) from 1982. ... David C. Snyder (born January 10, 1974) better known as C-Doc, C-Doc (The WarHammer), Coolmaster D, The CMD, amongst others, is an American hip hop producer from the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. ... Jim Burns with a Hugo Award at Worldcon 2005 in Glasgow Jim Burns is an artist born in Cardiff, South Wales in 1948. ... Police spinner flying over industrial sprawl. ... Douglas Trumbull (born April 8, 1942) is a film director and special effects supervisor. ... Special effects (abbreviated SPFX or SFX) are used in the film, television, and entertainment industry to create effects that cannot be achieved by normal means, such as depicting travel to other star systems. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 2006 Ridley Scott was asked "Who's the biggest pain in the arse you've ever worked with?" He replied: "It's got to be Harrison...he'll forgive me because now I get on with him. Now he's become charming. But he knows a lot, that's the problem. When we worked together it was my first film up and I was the new kid on the block. But we made a good movie."[9] Ford has said of Scott in 2000: "I admire his work. We had a bad patch there, and I’m over it."[10] More recently in 2006, Ford reflected on the production of the film saying: "What I remember more than anything else when I see Blade Runner is not the 50 nights of shooting in the rain, but the voiceover...I was still obliged to work for these clowns that came in writing one bad voiceover after another."[11] Ridley Scott confirmed in the summer 2007 issue of Total Film that Harrison Ford has contributed to the Blade Runner Special Edition DVD, having already done his interviews. "Harrison's fully on board," said Scott.[12] Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Total Film, published by Future Publishing, is the United Kingdoms second best-selling film magazine, after the longer-established Empire from Emap. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... DVD (also known as Digital Versatile Disc or Digital Video Disc) is a popular optical disc storage media format. ...


Plot

Note: The following synopsis refers to the director's cut version of the film.
A Spinner flies over the 700-story Tyrell Complex in Downtown Los Angeles, 2019.
A Spinner flies over the 700-story Tyrell Complex in Downtown Los Angeles, 2019.

An opening crawl following the main titles informs the viewer that advances in genetic technology have allowed scientists to create sophisticated biologically-engineered humanoid beings called "replicants". Following a violent revolt that takes place "off world," replicants are declared illegal on Earth. A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Police spinner flying over industrial sprawl. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... The term humanoid refers to any being whose body structure resembles that of a human. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


In Los Angeles, November 2019, Deckard (Harrison Ford) is called out of retirement when a fellow Blade Runner, Holden (Morgan Paull) is shot during a Voight-Kampff test by Leon (Brion James), an escaped replicant. A reluctant Deckard is brought to his old boss Bryant (M. Emmet Walsh), who informs him that the recent escape of Nexus-6 replicants is the worst yet. He orders Deckard to eliminate the four replicants, a process referred to as "retirement". Deckard agrees to help after Bryant threatens him. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... Rick Deckard is the central protaganist and main character in Ridley Scotts 1982 science-fiction film, Blade Runner. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Voight-Kampff Originating as a fictional tool in Philip K Dicks novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the Voight-Kampff machine or device (spelled Voigt-Kampff in the book) also appeared in the books screen adaptation, the 1982 science fiction film Blade Runner. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Brion James (February 20, 1945 – August 7, 1999), was an American character actor. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Michael Emmet Walsh (born March 22, 1935 in Ogdensburg, New York) is an American character actor who has appeared in over 100 film and television productions. ...


Bryant briefs Deckard on the replicants: Roy Batty (Rutger Hauer) is a commando, Leon Kowalski (Brion James) a manual laborer, Zhora (Joanna Cassidy) an assassin built for martial arts, and Pris (Daryl Hannah) a "basic pleasure model". Bryant also explains that the Nexus-6 model has a four-year lifespan as a failsafe against their developing unstable emotions. Deckard is teamed up with Gaff (Edward James Olmos) and sent to the Tyrell Corporation to ensure that the Voight-Kampff test works on Nexus-6 models. While there, Deckard discovers that Tyrell's (Joe Turkel) young assistant Rachael (Sean Young) is an experimental replicant who believes she is a human; Rachael's consciousness has been enhanced with implanted memories from Tyrell's niece, an accomplishment that is satisfying to Tyrell. This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Brion James (February 20, 1945 – August 7, 1999), was an American character actor. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Joanna Cassidy (b. ... Hawaiian State Grappling Championships. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ... The term Fail-safe is used to describe: A device which, if (or when) it fails, fails in a way that will cause no harm or at least a minimum of harm to other devices or danger to personnel. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Edward James Olmos (born February 24, 1947) is an Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated American actor, of Mexican descent. ... The Tyrell Corporation is a fictional corporation from the 1982 Ridley Scott film Blade Runner. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Joe Turkel as Lloyd the Bartender in Stanley Kubricks The Shining (1980) Joe Turkel (15 July 1927, in Brooklyn, New York) is a prolific American character actor. ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ...


Deckard and Gaff search Leon's apartment as Roy and Leon force Chew (James Hong), an eye designer, to direct them to J.F. Sebastian (William Sanderson) who can lead them to Tyrell. Later, Rachael visits Deckard at his apartment to prove her humanity to him, but leaves in tears after Deckard tells her that her memories are in fact implants. Clues lead Deckard to a sleazy strip club owned by Taffy Lewis (Hy Pyke), who employs Zhora. A chase through the crowded streets ensues and Deckard shoots and "retires" Zhora. Deckard meets with Bryant shortly after and is told to add Rachael to his list of retirements after she has disappeared from the Tyrell Corporation Headquarters. However, after Rachael saves Deckard's life when he is attacked by Leon, they become close and begin to fall in love. In another part of the city, we see Pris and Sebastian for the first time while she's on the street in search of Roy and company. After she freshens up, Roy arrives: then he and Pris employ Sebastian's help by explaining their plight in a very subtle, yet threatening manner. We then turn to Tyrell's penthouse apartment and see Sebastian and Roy arrive on the elevator. Once inside Roy proceeds to demand an extension to his lifespan and absolution for his sins; upon receiving neither, he kills Tyrell and then Sebastian. This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... James Hong (吳漢章, pinyin: Wu Hanzhang, born 22 February 1929) is an American actor and former president of the Association of Asian/Pacific American Artists (AAPAA). ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... William Sanderson is an American character actor (born January 10, 1948 in Memphis, Tennessee, USA). ... This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ... // Hy Pyke (actor) Hy Pyke is an United States character actor born in Los Angeles, California on the 2nd of December, 1935, the son of vaudevillian David Pyke and his wife Pauline. ... A penthouse apartment or penthouse is a special apartment on the top floor of a building. ...


Deckard is sent to Sebastian's apartment and is ambushed by Pris. Deckard manages to get the upper hand and retires Pris, just as Roy returns. Roy then traps Deckard in the apartment, hunting him throughout the dilapidated Bradbury Building and forcing him to the roof. As Deckard attempts to escape from the roof, he ends up hanging from a beam. Just as Deckard is about to fall, Roy saves his life. Roy is quickly deteriorating, as his 4-year lifespan is up early, and he "dies" on the rooftop. Deckard then considers whether or not to kill Rachel. His thoughts are echoed by Gaff who calls from a distance, "It's too bad she won't live; but then again, who does?" Deckard returns to his open apartment and finds Rachael alive. As they leave, Deckard finds an origami unicorn calling card left by Gaff and they depart towards an uncertain future together. Front entrance of Bradbury The Bradbury Building is an architectural landmark in Los Angeles, California, in the United States. ... This article is about paper folding. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ...


Cast

Main article: Characters in Blade Runner

With the exception of Harrison Ford, Blade Runner had a significant number of then-unknown actors in its cast. The cast included: This article details the characters in the film Blade Runner. ...

Deckard and Rachael share a tender moment.
  • Harrison Ford as Rick Deckard. Coming off some success with Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope and Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back, but still a year before the release of Raiders of the Lost Ark, Ford was looking for a role with dramatic depth. After Steven Spielberg praised Ford and showed some Raiders rushes to Deeley and Scott they hired Ford. Due to the initially poor reception of Blade Runner and friction with Scott, Ford has usually avoided discussing the film, but in the July 2007 issue of Empire magazine, he revealed, "When we started shooting it had been tacitly agreed that the version of the film that we had agreed upon was the version without voiceover narration. It was a fucking nightmare. I thought that the film had worked without the narration. But now I was stuck re-creating that narration. And I was obliged to do the voiceovers for people that did not represent the director's interests."[13]
  • Rutger Hauer as Roy Batty, the violent yet thoughtful leader of replicants;[14] and was regarded by Philip K. Dick as "the perfect Batty — cold, Aryan, flawless."[15] Of the many films Hauer has done, Blade Runner is his favorite. As he explains:
Blade Runner needs no explanation. It just is. All of the best. There is nothing like it. To be part of a real masterpiece which changed the world's thinking. It's awesome.[16]
  • Sean Young as Rachael.
  • Edward James Olmos as Gaff. Olmos used his diverse ethnic background, and some in-depth personal research,[17] to help create the fictional "Cityspeak" language his character uses in the film. It later turned out that what he addresses to the sitting and eating Rick Deckard is partly in Hungarian and means "Horse dick! No way. You are the Blade... Blade Runner."[17]
  • Daryl Hannah as Pris.

Supporting roles: This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... Movie poster Star Wars Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back is the sequel to the first released Star Wars movie, and the second film released in the original trilogy. ... Raiders of the Lost Ark, also known as Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark, is a 1981 adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg, produced by George Lucas and starring Harrison Ford. ... Steven Spielberg (born December 18, 1946)[1] is an American film director and producer. ... Michael Deeley (born August 6, 1932) is a film producer who has helped create notable films such as The Italian Job, Blade Runner and The Deer Hunter. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Empire is a British film magazine published monthly by Emap Consumer Media since July 1989. ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ... Edward James Olmos (born February 24, 1947) is an Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated American actor, of Mexican descent. ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ...

  • M. Emmet Walsh as Captain Bryant. Walsh lived up to his reputation as a great character actor with the role of a hard drinking police veteran. Walsh's sleazy and underhand character resembles in many ways Orson Welles' Hank Quinlan in A Touch of Evil, and represents a further homage to the Film Noir genre.
  • Joe Turkel as Dr. Eldon Tyrell. With a confident penetrating voice and a penchant for self-aggrandizement, this corporate mogul has built an empire on slavery.
  • William Sanderson as J.F. Sebastian, a quiet and lonely genius who provides a compassionate yet compliant portrait of humanity. This led to more varied work for Sanderson.
  • Brion James as Leon. Although at first glance a dumb replicant used for muscle, Leon did have an undertone of intuitive intelligence.
  • Joanna Cassidy as Zhora. Cassidy portrays a strong woman who has seen the worst humanity has to offer.
  • Morgan Paull as Holden. The Blade Runner initially assigned to the case, he is severely wounded by Leon while screening new Tyrell employees in an attempt to find the replicants, prompting his replacement with Deckard.
  • James Hong as Hannibal Chew. An elder geneticist who loves his work, especially synthesizing eyes.
  • Hy Pyke as Taffey Lewis. Pyke conveys Lewis' sleaziness with ease and apparently with one take; something almost unheard of with Scott's drive for perfection resulting at times in double digit takes.

Michael Emmet Walsh (born March 22, 1935 in Ogdensburg, New York) is an American character actor who has appeared in over 100 film and television productions. ... Joe Turkel as Lloyd the Bartender in Stanley Kubricks The Shining (1980) Joe Turkel (15 July 1927, in Brooklyn, New York) is a prolific American character actor. ... Slave redirects here. ... William Sanderson is an American character actor (born January 10, 1948 in Memphis, Tennessee, USA). ... Brion James (February 20, 1945 – August 7, 1999), was an American character actor. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Joanna Cassidy (b. ... James Hong (吳漢章, pinyin: Wu Hanzhang, born 22 February 1929) is an American actor and former president of the Association of Asian/Pacific American Artists (AAPAA). ... For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... // Hy Pyke (actor) Hy Pyke is an United States character actor born in Los Angeles, California on the 2nd of December, 1935, the son of vaudevillian David Pyke and his wife Pauline. ...

Themes

Despite the initial appearance of an action film, Blade Runner operates on an unusually rich number of dramatic levels.[18] It owes a large debt to film noir, containing and exploring such conventions as the femme fatale, first-person narration (removed in later versions), and the questionable moral outlook of the Hero, extended here to include even the humanity of the hero, as well as the usual dark and shadowy cinematography. Despite the initial appearance of an action film, Blade Runner operates on an unusually rich number of dramatic levels. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... Convicted spy Mata Hari made her name synonymous with femme fatale during WWI. A femme fatale (plural: femmes fatales) is an alluring and seductive woman whose charms ensnare her lovers in bonds of irresistible desire, often leading them into compromising, dangerous, and deadly situations. ... For other uses, see Hero (disambiguation). ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...


It is one of the most literate science fiction films, both thematically enfolding the philosophy of religion and moral implications of the increasing human mastery of genetic engineering, within the context of classical Greek drama and its notions of hubris[19] — and linguistically, drawing on the poetry of William Blake and the Bible. A theme subtly reiterated by the chess game between Roy and Tyrell based on the famous Immortal Game of 1851 symbolizing the struggle against mortality imposed by God.[20][21] However, Scott himself has stated in Paul M. Sammon's Future Noir that this resemblance was purely coincidential. Philosophy of religion is the rational study of the meaning and justification ( or rebuttal) of fundamental religious claims, particularly about the nature and existence of God (or gods, or the divine). ... Morality (from the Latin manner, character, proper behaviour) has three principal meanings. ... Kenyans examining insect-resistant transgenic Bt corn. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Hubris or hybris (Greek ), according to its modern usage, is exaggerated self pride or self-confidence (overbearing pride), often resulting in fatal retribution. ... William Blake (November 28, 1757 – August 12, 1827) was an English poet, visionary, painter, and printmaker. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... For other uses, see Immortal game (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the term God in the context of monotheism and henotheism. ...

Tyrell polarizing his office window.

Blade Runner delves into the future implications of technology on the environment and society by reaching into the past using literature, religious symbolism, classical dramatic themes and film noir. This tension between past, present and future is apparent in the retrofitted future of Blade Runner, which is high-tech and gleaming in places but elsewhere decayed and old. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... Religious symbolism is the use of symbols, including archetypes, acts, artwork, events, or natural phenomena, by a religion. ... This still from The Big Combo (1955) demonstrates the visual style of film noir at its most extreme. ... High tech refers to high technology, technology that is at the cutting-edge and the most advanced currently available. ...


A high level of paranoia is present throughout the film with the visual manifestation of corporate power, omnipresent police, probing lights, and in the power over the individual represented particularly by genetic programming of the replicants. Control over the environment is seen on a large scale, hand in hand with the seeming absence of any natural life, with artificial animals being created as a substitute for the extinct originals. This oppressive backdrop underscores the reason many people are going to the off-world colonies. The film also makes extensive use of eyes and manipulated images to call into question reality and our ability to perceive it. For other senses of this word, see paranoia (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ...


These thematic elements provide an atmosphere of uncertainty for Blade Runner's central theme of examining humanity. In order to discover replicants, an empathy test is used with a number of questions focused on the treatment of animals, thus making it the essential indicator of someone's "humanity". The replicants are juxtaposed with human characters who lack empathy, while the replicants appear to show compassion and concern for one another at the same time as the mass of humanity on the streets is cold and impersonal. The film goes so far as to put in doubt whether Deckard is a replicant and forces the audience to reevaluate what it means to be human.[22] The question of whether Deckard is intended to be a human or a replicant has been an ongoing controversy since the film's release. Ridley Scott, after remaining coy for twenty years, stated in 2000 that Deckard is a replicant,[23] and has reinserted a unicorn sequence into the Director's Cut indicating Deckard has false memories like Rachael.[24] Both Hampton Fancher and Harrison Ford have stated that Deckard is human. The rough consensus of the debate is that in the original theatrical release of the film Deckard is probably human, whereas the Director's Cut hints that he may be a replicant. This article is about modern humans. ... The gentle and pensive maiden has the power to tame the unicorn, in this fresco in Palazzo Farnese, Rome, probably by Domenichino, ca 1602 For other uses, see Unicorn (disambiguation). ...


In an interview with Ridley Scott in 2002, Journalist Lynn Barber of The Observer described the film as being "extremely dark, both literally and metaphorically, with an oddly masochistic feel." Ridley Scott explained that he "liked the idea of exploring pain" in the wake of his brother's death from skin cancer. "When he was ill, I used to go and visit him in London, and that was really traumatic for me."[2] Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Lynn Barber is a British journalist, currently writing for The Observer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Soundtrack

The Blade Runner soundtrack by Vangelis is a dark melodic combination of classic composition and futuristic synthesizers which mirrors the film-noir retro-future envisioned by Ridley Scott. Vangelis, fresh from his Academy Award winning score for Chariots of Fire, composed and performed the music on his synthesizers. The sound scape of 2019 was created in Vangelis' "space" mode of new age music, as heard on such albums of his as Heaven and Hell. He also made use of various chimes and the vocals of collaborator Demis Roussos. Another memorable sound is the haunting tenor sax solo "Love Theme" by UK saxophonist Dick Morrissey, who appeared on many of Vangelis' albums. Ridley Scott also used "Memories of Green" from Vangelis' album See You Later (an orchestral version of which Scott would later use in his film Someone To Watch Over Me). The Blade Runner soundtrack by Vangelis is a dark melodic combination of classic composition and futuristic synthesizers which mirrors the film-noir future envisioned by Ridley Scott. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... For other uses, see Synthesizer (disambiguation). ... New Age music is a style of music originally associated with some New Age beliefs. ... Heaven and Hell is a 1975 is the second solo album of the Greek artist Vangelis. ... // Artemios (Demis) Ventouris Roussos (born June 15, 1946) is a Greek singer. ... Richard Edwin Dick Morrissey (May 9, 1940, Horley, Surrey - November 8, 2000, Deal, Kent) was a British jazz musician and composer. ... See You Later is a 1980 album by the Greek artist Vangelis. ... Someone to Watch Over Me is an episode from the fifth season of Star Trek: Voyager. ...


Along with Vangelis' compositions and ambient textures, the film's sound scape also prominently features a track by the Japanese Ensemble Nipponia ('Ogi No Mato' or 'The Folding Fan as a Target' from the Nonesuch Records release "Traditional Vocal And Instrumental Music") and a track by harpist Gail Laughton ('Pompeii 76 A.D.' from Laurel Records recently reissued "Harps of the Ancient Temples").

Both emotional and unsettling, the Blade Runner score plays off conflict (discord versus harmony, light against dark) for a rich, textured tapestry of sound. — musicoutfitter.com[25]

Despite being well received by fans and critically acclaimed and nominated in 1983 for a BAFTA and Golden Globe as best original score, and the promise of a soundtrack album from Polydor Records in the end titles of the film, the release of the original soundtrack recording was delayed for over a decade. There are two official releases of the music from Blade Runner. In light of the lack of a release of an album, The New American Orchestra recorded an orchestral adaptation in 1982 which bore little resemblance to the original. Some of the film tracks would in 1989 surface on the compilation Themes, but not until the 1992 release of the Director's Cut version would a substantial amount of the film's score see commercial release. BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ...


These delays and poor reproductions led to the production of many bootleg recordings over the years. A bootleg tape surfaced in 1982 at science fiction conventions and became popular given the delay of an official release of the original recordings, and in 1993 "Off World Music, Ltd." created a bootleg CD that would prove more comprehensive than Vangelis' official CD in 1994. A disc from "Gongo Records" features most of the same material, but with slightly better sound quality. In 2003, two other bootlegs surfaced, the "Esper Edition," closely preceded by "Los Angeles — November 2019." The double disc "Esper Edition" combined tracks from the official release, the Gongo boot and the film itself. Finally "2019" provided a single disc compilation almost wholly consisting of ambient sound from the film, padded out with some sounds from the Westwood game Blade Runner. For other uses, see Bootleg. ... CD redirects here. ...


Reception

Ratings
Australia:  M
Canada (Ontario):  AA
Canada (Manitoba):  PA
Canada (Maritime):  A
Canada (Quebec):  13+
Canada (Home Video)):  14A (director's cut)
Iceland:  16
Ireland:  15
Sweden:  15 (Barnförbjuden)
United Kingdom:  AA (original rating);
15 (1986 video rating)
United States:  R

Blade Runner was released in 1,290 theaters on June 25, 1982. That date was chosen by producer Alan Ladd, Jr. because his previous highest-grossing films (Star Wars and Alien) had a similar opening date (May 25) in 1977 and 1979, making the date his "lucky day."[1] However, the gross for the opening weekend was a disappointing $6.15 million. A significant factor in the film's rather poor box office performance was that its release coincided with two other science fiction films, The Thing which opened the same day and E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, which was released in the U.S. on June 11, 1982, and dominated box office revenues at the time. A motion picture rating system categorizes films with regard to suitability for children and/or adults in terms of issues such as sex, violence and profanity. ... The Ontario Film Review Board uses the following motion picture rating system for theatrical releases in the Canadian province of Ontario under the Theatres Act: General. ... The Manitoba Film Classification Board is part of the Ministry of Culture, Heritage and Tourism of the government of the Canadian province of Manitoba. ... The Maritime Film Classification Board is a government organization responsible for reviewing films and granting film ratings in New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. ... The Régie du cinéma is a government agency responsible for the motion picture rating system within the Canadian province of Quebec. ... The Canadian Home Video Rating System (CHVRS) is a voluntary rating classification system applied to home video products such as VHS and DVDs. ... British Board of Film Classification logo The British Board of Film Classification (BBFC), originally British Board of Film Censors, is the organisation responsible for film and some video game classification and censorship within the United Kingdom. ... The MPAA film rating system is a system used in the United States and territories and instituted by the Motion Picture Association of America to rate a movie based on its content. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Alan Ladd Jr. ... This movie poster for Star Wars depicts many of the films important elements, such as Luke Skywalker, Princess Leia, Han Solo, X-Wing and Y-Wing fighters Star Wars, retitled Star Wars Episode IV: A New Hope in 1981 (see note at Title,) is the original (and in chronological... This article is about the first film in a series. ... is the 145th day of the year (146th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Thing is a 1982 science fiction film, directed by John Carpenter. ... For the Atari 2600 video game based on the movie, see E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (Atari 2600). ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ...


Film critics were polarized as some felt the story had taken a back seat to special effects and that it was not the action/adventure the studio had advertised. Others acclaimed its complexity and predicted it would stand the test of time.[1]


In the United States, a general criticism was its slow pacing that detracts from other strengths;[26] one film critic went so far as to call it "Blade Crawler."[27] Roger Ebert praised Blade Runner's visuals and recommended it for that reason; however, he found the human story clichéd and a little thin.[28] Ebert thought Tyrell's character unconvincing and the apparent lack of security measures allowing Roy to murder him problematic. Also he believed the relationship between Deckard and Rachael seemed "to exist more for the plot than for them."[29] In 1992, with the release of the director's cut version, Ebert held to his original opinion of the film, and said that the new version added little.[30] Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ...


Blade Runner has been nominated for and won many awards.

Year Award Category — Recipient(s)
1982 Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award Best Cinematography — Jordan Cronenweth
1983 BAFTA Film Award Best Cinematography — Jordan Cronenweth
Best Costume Design — Charles Knode, Michael Kaplan
Best Production Design/Art Direction — Lawrence G. Paull
1983 Hugo Award Best Dramatic Presentation
1983 London Critics Circle Film Awards — Special Achievement Award Lawrence G. Paull, Douglas Trumbull, Syd Mead — For their visual concept (technical prize).

It was nominated for the following awards: Jordan Cronenweth (February 20, 1935 – November 29, 1996) was an American cinematographer based in Los Angeles. ... BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Michael Kaplan is a movie costume designer. ... The 2005 Hugo Award with base designed by Deb Kosiba. ...

  • BAFTA (1983)
    • Best Film Editing — Terry Rawlings
    • Best Make Up Artist — Marvin G. Westmore
    • Best Score — Vangelis
    • Best Sound — Peter Pennell, Bud Alper, Graham V. Hartstone, Gerry Humphreys
    • Best Special Visual Effects — Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich, David Dryer
  • British Society of Cinematographers: Best Cinematography Award (1982) — Jordan Cronenweth
  • Fantasporto
    • International Fantasy Film Award (1983) — Best Film — Ridley Scott
    • International Fantasy Film Award (1993) — Best Film — Ridley Scott (Director's cut)
  • Golden Globe: Best Original Score (1983) — Motion Picture — Vangelis
  • Academy Award (1983)
    • Best Art Direction-Set Decoration — Lawrence G. Paull, David L. Snyder, Linda DeScenna
    • Best Effects, Visual Effects — Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich, David Dryer
  • Saturn Award (1983)
    • Best Science Fiction Film
    • Best Director — Ridley Scott
    • Best Special Effects — Douglas Trumbull, Richard Yuricich
    • Best Supporting Actor — Rutger Hauer
    • Best Genre Video Release (1994) — Director's cut

BAFTA Award The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organisation that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... Terry Rawlings is BAFTA and Academy Award-winning film editor and sound editor. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... Douglas Trumbull (born April 8, 1942) is a film director and special effects supervisor. ... Jordan Cronenweth (February 20, 1935 – November 29, 1996) was an American cinematographer based in Los Angeles. ... Fantasporto, also known as Fantas, is an international film festival, annually organized in Porto, Portugal. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... The Golden Globe Award The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The Saturn Award is an award presented annually by the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy & Horror Films to honor the top works in science fiction, fantasy, and horror in film, television, and home video. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ...

Current rankings

Current recognitions for Blade Runner include:

  • In 2007, the American Film Institute listed it as the 97th greatest film of all time, making it new to the list.[2]
  • The Internet Movie Database ranks the film as number 100 in the top 250 films. (November 2007)[3]
  • Blade Runner is currently ranked the third best film of all time by The Screen Directory.[31]
  • One of Time's 100 All-Time best movies.[32]
  • In 2007, upon release of The Final Cut, Roger Ebert somewhat revised his original opinion of the film and added it to his list of Great Movies.[33]

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with AFIs 100 Years. ... “TIME” redirects here. ...

Influence in film

A police spinner flies alongside a huge advertising-laden skyscraper in Los Angeles at night.

Although it initially gained a small North American audience, the film was popular internationally and became a cult classic and has been often referenced. Blade Runner's dark style and futuristic design have served as a benchmark and its influence can be seen in many subsequent science fiction films and television programs. Batman Begins director Christopher Nolan used Blade Runner as a case study on how to create a "credible universe that doesn't appear to have any boundaries."[34] This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Police spinner flying over industrial sprawl. ... For other uses, see Skyscraper (disambiguation). ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... For the novel based on the film, see Batman Begins (novelization). ... Christopher Nolan (born July 30, 1970) is an Academy Award nominated film director, writer and producer. ...


Blade Runner continues to reflect modern trends and concerns, and an increasing number consider it one of the greatest science fiction films of all time.[35] The film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry in 1993 and is frequently used in university courses.[36] The National Film Registry is the registry of films selected by the United States National Film Preservation Board for preservation in the Library of Congress. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...


Cultural references

Blade Runner is one of the most musically sampled films of the 20th century.[37] The character Roy Batty served as the apparent inspiration of several songs, such as electronic "The Fires of Ork" by Pete Namlook and Geir Jenssen (a.k.a. Biosphere), Unkle's "Main Title Theme" (both using Batty's line: "Fiery the angels fell... burning with the fires of Orc"), and in rock: Audioslave's "Show Me How To Live," White Zombie's "Electric Head Pt. 2 (The Ecstasy)" and "More Human Than Human" (a Tyrell Corporation slogan), Covenant's "Like Tears In Rain," Front Line Assembly's "Replicant," Diesel Christ's "Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?," Sigue Sigue Sputnik's "Love Missile F1-11," Hoodlum Priest's "Tyrell" and Kent's "OWC," Fightstar's "Lost Like tears in rain." Alain Jourgensen's Ministry-offshoot Revolting Cocks also reference Batty in their song "Attack Ships On Fire" from their debut album Big Sexy Land. Further, the band Haujobb derives its name from the misspelling of the German translation for "skinjob" as used by Captain Bryant when referring to replicants. DJ Trace samples Deckard's dialogue in his drum and bass track "Replicants." This article is about reusing existing sound recordings in creating new works. ... For other uses, see Electronic music (disambiguation). ... Pete Namlook (born Peter Kuhlmann /ˈpʰei. ... Biosphere is the main recording name of Geir Jenssen (born 1962 in Tromsø, Norway), a musician who has released a notable catalogue of ambient electronic music. ... For other uses, see Uncle. ... For other uses, see Rock music (disambiguation). ... For the bands self-titled album, see Audioslave (album). ... White Zombie was an American band named after the 1932 film White Zombie, which starred Bela Lugosi. ... Electric Head Pt. ... This was the first official single off the Astro Creep: 2000 - Songs of Love, Destruction and Other Synthetic Delusions of the Electric Head album by White Zombie. ... The Tyrell Corporation is a fictional corporation from the 1982 Ridley Scott film Blade Runner. ... Covenant is a band from Sweden that has created electronic body music (EBM)[1][2] and futurepop[1][2] since 1986. ... Front Line Assembly (also known by the acronym FLA) is a Canadian electro-industrial band formed in 1986 by Bill Leeb and Michael Balch after Leeb left Skinny Puppy. ... Sigue Sigue Sputnik is a British pop-cyberpunk band led by former Generation X bassist Tony James. ... // Biography named after a 60s movie, Hoodlum Priest was led by Derek Thompson, born of a Irish background but born and raised in London, his self-chosen moniker for his work as a producer and engineer, using hip-hop, industrial, and techno influences as the source of material for... Kent is a Swedish rock band founded in Eskilstuna/Torshälla in 1990, with the name Coca-Cola Kids, later Jones & Giftet (Jones & the Poison), and Havsänglar (Angel sharks, literally Sea angels). ... Fightstar is a four-piece Post-Hardcore band from London, England. ... Al Jourgensen (born October 8, 1958 in Havana, Cuba), is an American musician best known as the founder and frontman of the industrial rock band Ministry. ... Revolting Cocks (often abbreviated Revco) were a musical side-project for Alain Jourgensen (Ministry) and Luc Van Acker. ... Big Sexy Land is an studio album by Revolting Cocks released in 1985. ... Haujobb Haujobb is a German musical project whose output has ranged drastically within the electronic music spectrum, from industrial dance, to electronic body music and cold techno. ...


Extracts from the musical score and dialogue have been used in several trance music mixes, the earliest being Paul Oakenfold's 1994 Goa Mix, which samples Roy Batty's "Tears In Rain" speech, and Vangelis' "Tears In Rain", "Main Titles" and "Rachel's Song". Trance is a style of electronic music that developed in the 1990s. ... This section may require cleanup to meet Wikipedias quality standards. ... This article is about DJ Paul Oakenfolds Goa Mix, an Essential Mix broadcast on the BBC in 1994. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots...


Gary Numan is a Philip K. Dick fan and has cited Blade Runner as one of his favourite films; the title of his 1979 single "Are 'Friends' Electric?" (from the album Replicas) was influenced by Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. Numan used vocal samples from Blade Runner for his songs "Call Out The Dogs," "My World Storm" and "From Russia Infected," and his song "Time To Die" was derived from Roy Batty's death scene (the lyrics paraphrase Batty's final speech). Numan admired Dick Morrissey's work on the Blade Runner score and invited the saxophonist to play on his 1983 album Warriors; Morrissey played on five of Numan's albums between 1983 and 1991. For the video game programmer Garry Newman, see Garrys Mod. ... Are Friends Electric? is a 1979 song by Gary Numan, released under the name Tubeway Army as a single and on the album Replicas. ... Replicas is an LP by Gary Numan and the Tubeway Army, released in 1979. ... Richard Edwin Dick Morrissey (May 9, 1940, Horley, Surrey - November 8, 2000, Deal, Kent) was a British jazz musician and composer. ...


1987 Academy Award Winner (best score) and electronic/avant-garde musician/composer, Ryuichi Sakamoto has written two pieces of music inspired by the film, "Replica" and "Broadway Boogie-Woogie" (the latter of which used voice samples taken directly from the film). In 1999 an orchestral arrangement of "Replica" (initially an electronic piece) was performed on the "f" tour and can be heard on the album Cinemage. Ryuichi Sakamoto (坂本 龍一 Sakamoto Ryūichi, born January 17, 1952, Nakano, Tokyo, Japan) is an Academy Awards-winning, Grammy-winning, Golden Globe-winning Japanese musician, composer, producer and actor, based in New York and Tokyo. ...


Other songs influenced by the film (and the book it is based upon) include Joe Satriani's "Tears in the Rain", Altered State's "Where's Harrison Ford?," Blind Guardian's "Time What Is Time," Fear Factory's "Replica," Incubus' "Talk Shows On Mute," Kim Wilde's "Bladerunner," Circle of Dust's "Pale Reflection," Revolting Cocks's "Attack Ships on Fire," and Tan-Hauser Gate's "Little Piece of You." Joseph Satch Satriani (born on July 15, 1956, in Westbury, New York, U.S.) is an American guitarist and former guitar instructor. ... Altered States is the only novel (ISBN 0060107278) and last film written by Paddy Chayefsky. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Fear Factory is a Los Angeles, California based metal band. ... Incubus is a five-piece American alternative rock band based out of Calabasas, California. ... Kim Wilde (born Kim Smith, November 18, 1960 in Chiswick, West London) is an English pop singer, professional gardener, and pop cultural figure. ... Circle of Dust was a mid-1990s coldwave industrial band created and run by Klayton (then known as Scott Albert) who is now famous for his solo band Celldweller. ... Revolting Cocks (often abbreviated Revco) were a musical side-project for Alain Jourgensen (Ministry) and Luc Van Acker. ...


Blade Runner has also influenced the adventure games Rise of the Dragon, Snatcher, Beneath a Steel Sky, and Flashback: The Quest for Identity, the anime series Bubblegum Crisis, the role-playing game Shadowrun, the computer game System Shock and the Syndicate games. The fictional language Cityspeak has been used in many cyberpunk genre role-playing games. The memorable Scrap Brain Zone level from the original Sonic the Hedgehog features an almost identical score to the Blade Runner 'End Title' theme, and is clearly a direct tribute. The J-E-N-O-V-A track from Final Fantasy VII also bears a close resemblance to the ending credit's theme. [citation needed] A level in the acclaimed TimeSplitters 2, "Neo Tokyo", is an obvious homage to Blade Runner, as it is set in the same year (2019), similar landscapes, and has an overall cyber-punk theme. The 1996 Battle Arena Toshinden URA fighting video game features an android character named "Replicant" like the humanoids in Blade Runner. Bryan Fury of the Tekken series is based heavily on Roy Batty. This is an article about the computer and video game genre. ... Rise of the Dragon is a graphic adventure game that was released in 1990 for the DOS computer and later remade for the Sega CD (1994). ... Snatcher ) is a cyberpunk-themed adventure game written and directed by Hideo Kojima. ... Beneath a Steel Sky is a 1994 science fiction, more specifically cyberpunk, point and click adventure game. ... Screenshot Flashback (Sega Genesis) Flashback: The Quest for Identity, often just called Flashback, is a computer platform game produced by Delphine Software, which has since went bankrupt and no longer exists. ... Bubblegum Crisis ) is a cyberpunk-style anime set in a future, post-disaster Tokyo, called Megatokyo. The series has a manga adaptation. ... This article is about games in which one plays the role of a character. ... Shadowrun is a cyberpunk-urban fantasy cross-genre role-playing game, set 63 years in the future,[1]following a great cataclysm that has brought use of magic back to the world, just as it begins to embrace the marvels (and dangers) of technologies such as cyberspace, omnipresent computer networks... For the Doctor Who novel, see System Shock (Doctor Who). ... The Syndicate series was a series of violent isometric science fiction computer games created by Bullfrog Productions. ... Sonic the Hedgehog is the platform game that launched the career of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Team. ... Sonic the Hedgehog is the platform game that launched the career of Sonic the Hedgehog and Sonic Team. ... Final Fantasy VII ) is a console role-playing game developed and published by Square (now Square Enix), and the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy video game series. ... TimeSplitters 2 is a first-person shooter video game that is available for the PlayStation 2, Xbox, and Nintendo GameCube game consoles. ... Battle Arena Toshinden 2 for the PlayStation is the sequel to Battle Arena Toshinden. ... Bryan Fury is a video game character from the Tekken fighting game series. ... Tekken lit. ...


The film and music inspired a Subaru commercial.[38] For other uses, see Subaru (disambiguation). ...


The line "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe" occurs several times in the Torchwood episode Ghost Machine shown on BBC3 in 2007. For plants known as torchwood, see Burseraceae. ... Ghost Machine is an episode of the British science fiction television series Torchwood. ... BBC Three, the replacement for BBC Choice, is a British television channel from the BBC broadcasting only on digital cable, terrestrial and satellite. ...


Yoko Kanno's "Velveteen" from the Ghost in the Shell Stand Alone Complex soundtrack album contains samples from the scene of Deckard driving through a tunnel while voices and sirens from police vehicles are heard. Yoko Kanno , born March 19, 1964 in Miyagi Prefecture, Japan) is a composer, arranger and musician best known for her work on the soundtracks for many games, seminal anime films, TV series, live-action movies, and advertisements. ... Batou and a Tachikoma Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex is also titled Kōkaku Kidōtai: Stand Alone Complex (ManMachine Interface: STAND ALONE COMPLEX) in Japan, and is often refered to by its acronym GitS:SAC. GitS:SAC is a Japanese anime TV series set in...


In the new Battlestar Galactica series, the humanoid Cylons are sometimes referred to as "Skin-jobs". Battlestar Galactica. ...


The "prototype issue" of Steve Gallacci's anthropomorphic comic book Albedo Anthropomorphics included a parody of the film entitled Bad Rubber. The Rick Deckard character was presented as a duck named "Rick Duckard". Steven A. Gallacci (born 1955) is best known for creating and publishing Albedo Anthropomorphics, a black and white alternative comic containing anthropomorphic (funny animal) characters, which has been considered a major factor in the origins of furry fandom. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Albedo Anthropomorphics or its short name, Albedo, is the name of a furry comic book anthology which is credited with starting the furry comic book subgenre that featured sophisticated stories with funny animals primarily intended for an adult audience. ...


Versions

Seven different versions of the film exist, but the most well known are the International Cut (1982) and the Director's Cut (1992):

  • The U.S. theatrical version (1982), known as the original version, also called Domestic Cut, released on VHS in 1983, and re-released in 1992 as a "10th Anniversary Edition."
  • Original workprint version (1982) shown to audience test previews, and occasionally at film festivals.
  • The International Cut (1982) also known as "Criterion Edition" or uncut version, included more violent action scenes, than the U.S. theatrical version. Although initially censored in the U.S., and available in European and Asian theatrical and local Warner Home Video LD releases, it was later released on VHS and Criterion Collection Laserdisc in North America.
  • The U.S. broadcast version (1986), the original version edited for profanity and nudity to suit a broad TV audience.
  • Another workprint (1990) was distributed in 1991, as a Director's Cut at film festivals without Scott's approval. Its positive reviews pushed the studio to approve work on an official director's cut.
  • The Ridley Scott-approved (1992) Director's Cut (1'51''48); prompted by the unauthorized 1991 workprint theatrical release, and made available on VHS in 1994 (1993 in Japan), and on Laserdisc in 1995.
  • Ridley Scott's Final Cut (2007), or the "25th Anniversary Edition," was released by Warner Bros. theatrically on October 5, and scheduled for release on DVD, HD-DVD, and Blu-Ray on December 18.[39][40] This is the only version Ridley Scott had complete artistic control over, while the Director's Cut was rushed and he was not directly involved.

Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ... The Criterion Collection is a joint venture between Janus Films and The Voyager Company that was begun in the mid 1980s for the purpose of releasing authoritative consumer versions of classic and important contemporary films on the laserdisc and DVD formats. ... Not to be confused with disk laser, a type of solid-state laser in a flat configuration. ... Look up Profanity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nude redirects here. ...

Original versions (1982)

The 1982 American and European theatrical versions released by the studio included a "happy ending" (using stock footage from Stanley Kubrick's The Shining) and voiceovers added. Although several different versions of the script had included a narration of some sort, Harrison Ford and Ridley Scott decided to add scenes to provide the information; but studio executives rewrote and reinserted narration during post-production after test audience members indicated difficulty understanding the film. It has been suggested that Ford intentionally performed the voice-over poorly, in the hope it would not be used,[41] but recent interviews contradict this:[42] In an interview with Playboy magazine in 2002, Ford clarified: "I delivered it to the best of my ability, given that I had no input. I never thought they'd use it. But I didn't try and sandbag it. It was simply bad narration."[43] Ford also stated in 1999: "I contested it mightily at the time. It was not an organic part of the film."[44] Kubrick redirects here. ... For other uses of this term, see Shining. ... VoiceOver is a feature built into Apple Computers Mac OS X v10. ... Post production is the general term for the last stage of film production in which photographed scenes (also called footage) are put together into a complete film. ... For other uses, see Playboy (disambiguation). ...


The International Cut, or "Criterion Edition," is the U.S. theatrical release with uncut violent contents in three particular scenes:

  • When Batty confronts Tyrell in his bedroom, in addition to crushing Tyrell's face with his hands, Batty pokes out Tyrell's eyes with his thumbs, releasing a huge amount of blood.
  • When Pris has somersaulted onto Deckard's back, rather than hitting him three times and then dropping him (as she does in all other versions), she hits him twice, then inserts her fingers into his nostrils and releases her legs, holding him up by his nostrils for a few seconds before he falls to the floor. The shot of him falling to the floor is identical in all versions. Deckard also shoots Pris an extra time, and the scenes of her thrashing spasmodically on the floor after having been shot are slightly extended.
  • When Batty is being hunted by Deckard at the end of the film, he pushes a nail through his own hand, which again bleeds profusely.

Director's Cut (1992)

Deckard's dream in the 1992 Director's Cut

In 1990, Warner Bros. briefly allowed theatrical screenings of a 70 mm copy of the workprint version of the film, advertising it as a "Director's Cut." These sell-out screenings ran for two weeks at the NuArt Theater in Los Angeles, and the Castro Theatre in San Francisco. Ridley Scott publicly disowned this workprint version of the film as his definitive Director's Cut, citing that it was roughly edited, and lacked the score composed for the film by Vangelis. In response to Scott's dissatisfaction (and in part because of the film's resurgent cult popularity in the early '90s), Warner Bros. decided to assemble a definitive Director's Cut of the film, with direction from Scott, to be released in 1992. This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process. ... Castro Theatre in San Francisco, California. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots...


They hired film-restorationist Michael Arick, who had rediscovered the workprint of Blade Runner, and who was already doing consultation work for them, to head the project with Scott. He started by spending several months in London with Les Healey, who had been the assistant editor on Blade Runner, attempting to compile a list of the changes that Scott wanted made to the film. He also received a number of suggestions/directions directly from the director himself. Three major changes were made to the film, which most would agree significantly changed the feel of the picture: This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

  • The removal of Deckard's explanatory voice-over
  • The re-insertion of a dream sequence of a unicorn running through a forest
  • The removal of the studio-imposed "happy ending," including some associated visuals which had originally run under the film's end-credits.

The original sequence of Deckard's unicorn dream was not found in a print of sufficient quality; the original scene shows Deckard intercut with the running unicorn. Arick was thus forced to use a different print that shows only the unicorn running, without any intercutting to Deckard. This footage was inserted into what had previously been a continuous tracking shot. As mentioned above, the restoration of the unicorn scene suggest a completely different ending to the film: Gaff's origami unicorn means that Deckard's dreams are known to him, implying that Deckard's memories are artificial, and therefore he would be a replicant of the same generation as Rachael.


The cut did not include much of the "extra violence" included in the "International" version of the film.


Scott has since complained that time and money constraints, along with his obligation to Thelma & Louise, kept him from retooling the film in a completely satisfactory manner. While he is happier with the 1992 release of the film than with the original theatrical version, he has never felt entirely comfortable with it as his definitive Director's Cut. Thelma & Louise is a 1991 film, written by Callie Khouri and directed by Ridley Scott. ...


In 2000, Harrison Ford gave his view on the Director’s Cut of the film saying, although he thought it "spectacular," it didn’t "move him at all." He gave a brief reason: "They haven't put anything in, so it's still an exercise in design."[10] For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ...


Originally released as a single-disc DVD in March 1997, the Director's Cut was one of the first DVDs on the market. However, it is of low quality compared to DVDs of later standards, due to it being produced in the early days of the format. Warner Home Video re-released it with a new transfer in 2006 as a "Digitally Remastered Version." The 1997 2.0 Dolby Surround audio track remained unchanged, however. Sign for Dolby Surround Dolby Surround was the earliest consumer version of Dolbys multichannel analog film sound format Dolby Analog SR (Spectral Recording). ...


The Final Cut (2007)

Movie poster of Blade Runner: The Final Cut

Partly as the result of previous complaints, Scott was invited in mid-2000 to help put together a final and definitive version of the film, which was completed in mid-2001. During the process, a new digital print of the film was created from the original negatives, special effects were updated and cleaned, and the sound was remastered in 5.1 Dolby Digital surround sound. Unlike the rushed 1992 Director's Cut, Scott personally oversaw the new cut as it was being made. The Special Edition DVD was slated for a Christmas 2001 release, and was originally rumored to be a three-disc set, including the full international theatrical cut, an early workprint with additional scenes, and the newly-enhanced version, in addition to deleted scenes, extensive cast and crew interviews, and the documentary On the Edge of Blade Runner. But Warner Bros. delayed the "Special Edition" release after legal disputes began with the film's original completion bond guarantors (specifically Jerry Perenchio), who were ceded the copyright to the film when the shooting ran over budget from $21.5 to $28 million. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dolby Digital is the marketing name for a series of lossy audio compression technologies by Dolby Laboratories. ... “WB” redirects here. ... A performance bond is a surety bond issued by an insurance company to guarantee satisfactory completion of a project by a contractor. ... Jerry Perenchio (born 1931) is a former talent agent who runs the nations largest Spanish-language TV network. ...


After years of legal disputes, Warner Bros. announced in 2006 that it had finally secured full distribution rights to the film, and that there would be a three-stage release of the film. First, a digitally remastered single-disc re-release of the 1992 Director's Cut was released on September 5, 2006 in the United States, on October 9, 2006 in Ireland and the UK, and in the following months in continental Europe. Second, Ridley Scott's "Final Cut" of the film began a limited theatrical release in New York and Los Angeles on October 5, 2007 [4], as well as in Chicago on November 2, 2007 and Toronto on November 9, 2007. The third and final phase — a multi-disc box set — will be released on the DVD, HD-DVD and Blu-ray disc formats.[45][46] The set will include the workprint, the two 1982 original theatrical versions (U.S. domestic and uncensored International cuts), the 2006-remastered Director's Cut, the 2007 Final Cut, and bonus features; all are scheduled for release December 18, 2007. Four-disc and two-disc sets will also be released, containing some of the features of the five-disc set.[47][48] is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... HD DVD or High-Definition DVD is a high-density optical disc format designed for the storage of data and high-definition video. ... Blu-ray discs Blu-ray Disc is a next-generation optical disc format jointly developed by a group of leading consumer electronics and PC companies called the Blu_ray Disc Association (BDA), which succeeds the Blu_ray Disc Founders (BDF). ... A workprint is a rough version of a motion picture, used by the film editor(s) during the editing process. ...


The Final Cut contains the following changes to the Director's Cut:

  • The shot of Deckard waiting to eat at the White Dragon has been shortened, its editing reminiscent of the workprint version of the shot. This was done due to the removal of the voiceover.
  • All the violent scenes in the International Cut that were deleted in the U.S. theatrical release and Director's Cut are restored to the Final Cut.
  • When Bryant and Deckard are looking at the Nexus-6 profiles, Bryant gives a description of Leon's job. This was from the workprint.
  • When Gaff and Deckard first appear at Leon's apartment, the landlord now says "Kowalski". Another small bit originally from the workprint.
  • Deckard's conversation with the snake merchant Abdul Ben Hassan has been altered so that the dialogue is no longer out of sync; Ben Ford's mouth (lip-syncing the spoken dialog) was digitally placed over his father's.
  • A shot of the busy crowds in the streets was restored. Immediately after that, a shot of two strippers wearing hockey masks (similar to the one worn by Jason Voorhees in the Friday the 13th films) was restored. Finally, there's a shot of Deckard talking to another police officer. This sequence takes place just prior to Deckard entering the Snake Pit. These three shots had previously appeared in slightly different form in the workprint version.
  • The original full-length version of the unicorn dream has been restored. This is a much different version than the one that appeared in the Director's Cut, and has never been in any version seen by the public prior to this one.
  • During Deckard's pursuit of Zhora, Joanna Cassidy now performs the stunt when being shot, rather than the obvious stunt double seen in previous versions. This scene was re-filmed specifically for the Final Cut.
  • When Batty confronts Tyrell, he says, "I want more life, father." (from the workprint version and used in television broadcasts of the film), as opposed to the original line "I want more life, fucker."
  • After killing Tyrell, Batty says "I'm sorry Sebastian. Come. Come." when before he merely approached the desperate Sebastian. This is also from the workprint.
  • When Batty releases the dove, it now flies up into a background that matches 2019 L.A.

Jason Voorhees is a fictional character from the Friday the 13th series of slasher films. ... This article is about the Friday the 13th series of movies. ... Joanna Cassidy (b. ...

Inspiring the Future Contest

To coincide with the release of Blade Runner:The Final Cut, the "Inspiring the Future" contest is being held at http://www.bladerunnercontest.com. People are encouraged to upload their Blade Runner inspired works. The categories for submission are art, literature, fashion, music, and short films. Submissions are taken until November 4th. The voting period begins on November 5th and runs until December 14th. The contest is only open to legal residents of the United States; within that limitation persons aged 18 or above are welcome to submit their work.


Future Noir

Prior to principal photography, Paul M. Sammon was commissioned by Cinefantastique magazine to do a special article on the making of Blade Runner. His detailed observations and research later became the book Future Noir: The Making of Blade Runner, which is commonly referred to as the "Blade Runner Bible" by many of the film's fans. It will have a second edition published in 2007. Principal Photography refers to the phase of film production during which the movie is actually shot, as distinct from pre-production and post-production. ... Cinefantastique is a horror, fantasy, and science fiction film magazine started in 1970 by publisher/editor Frederick S. Clarke. ...


The book outlines not only the evolution of Blade Runner but also the politics and difficulties on set. It focuses particularly on the British director's experiences with his first American crew. About these difficulties, producer Alan Ladd, Jr. has said: Alan Ladd Jr. ...

Harrison wouldn't speak to Ridley and Ridley wouldn't speak to Harrison. By the end of the shoot Ford was 'ready to kill Ridley', said one colleague. He really would have taken him on if he hadn't been talked out of it.[49]

In addition, there are short biographies and quotes of some of the cast concerning their experiences with Blade Runner. Many photos of behind-the-scenes elements of the movie making process are printed, and preliminary sketches are provided as well.


Documentaries

On the Edge of Blade Runner (55 minutes)[50] was produced in 2000 by Nobles Gate Ltd. (for Channel 4), was directed by Andrew Abbott and hosted/written by Mark Kermode. Interviews with production staff, including Scott, give details of the creative process and the turmoil during preproduction. Stories from Paul M. Sammon and Hampton Fancher provide insight into Philip K. Dick and the origins of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. This article is about the British television station. ... Mark Kermode (born Mark Fairey [1] on 2 July 1963) is an English film critic who regularly writes for Sight and Sound magazine and The Observer newspaper. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Interwoven are cast interviews (with the notable exceptions of Harrison Ford and Sean Young), which convey some of the difficulties of making the film (including an exacting director and humid, smoggy weather). There is also a tour of some locations, most notably the Bradbury Building and the Warner Bros. backlot that became the LA 2019 streets, which look very different from Scott's dark vision. For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ... Front entrance of Bradbury The Bradbury Building is an architectural landmark in Los Angeles, California, in the United States. ... “WB” redirects here. ...


The documentary then details the test screenings and the resulting changes (the voice over, the happy ending, and the deleted Holden hospital scene), the special effects, the soundtrack by Vangelis, and the unhappy relationship between the filmmakers and the investors which culminated in Deeley and Scott being fired but still working on the film. The question of whether or not Deckard is a replicant surfaces. Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... Despite the initial appearance of an action film, Blade Runner operates on an unusually rich number of dramatic levels. ...


Future Shocks (27 minutes) is a more recent documentary from 2003 by TVOntario (part of their Film 101 series using footage compiled over the years for Saturday Night at the Movies). It includes interviews with executive producer Bud Yorkin, Syd Mead, and the cast, this time with Sean Young, but still without Harrison Ford. There is extensive commentary by science fiction author Robert J. Sawyer and from film critics, as the documentary focuses on the themes, visual impact and influence of the film. Edward James Olmos describes Ford's participation and personal experiences during filming are related by Young, Walsh, Cassidy and Sanderson. They also relate a story about crew members creating T-shirts that took pot shots at Scott. The different versions of the film are critiqued and the accuracy of its predictions of the future are discussed. TVOntario, officially the Ontario Educational Communications Authority, is an educational public television broadcaster in the Canadian province of Ontario. ... Saturday Night at the Movies is a weekly television series on TVOntario, the public educational television network in Ontario, Canada. ... Bud Yorkin (born in Washington, Pennsylvania on February 22, 1926) is an American producer/director/writer/actor. ... Syd Mead (born July 18, 1933 in St. ... Robert J. Sawyer is a Canadian science fiction writer, dubbed the dean of Canadian science fiction by the Ottawa Citizen in 1999. ...


Although neither documentary appears on the special edition DVD, a new 3 1/2 hour documentary, "Dangerous Days: The Making of Blade Runner," directed and produced by Charles de Lauzirika, will appear. It was culled from over 80 interviews, including Harrison Ford, and will also contain several alternate and deleted shots within the context of the documentary itself.[51][52] Charles de Lauzirika is one of the top producers of Special Edition DVDs in the industry, having created award-winning documentaries and supplemental content for such releases as the 9-disc Alien Quadrilogy, the 4-disc Kingdom of Heaven (film) Directors Cut and the 3-disc editions of...


Novel

See also: Differences between the novel and film

The original screenplay by Hampton Fancher was based on Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, which he optioned in 1980 after an unsuccessful previous attempt. However, Fancher's script focused more on environmental issues and less on issues of humanity and faith, which weighed heavily in the novel. When Ridley Scott became involved with the film, he wanted changes to the script made, and eventually hired David Peoples to perform the re-writes after Fancher refused. The film's title also changed several times during the writing process; it was to be called Dangerous Days in Fancher's last draft before eventually taking the title Blade Runner, borrowed (with permission) from a William S. Burroughs treatment of Alan E. Nourse's science fiction novel The Bladerunner (1974). Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Hampton Fancher (born July 18, 1938 in Los Angeles, California, USA) was an actor who transitioned into being a producer and screenwriter in the late 1970s. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ... William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) - August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Alan E. Nourse (August 11, 1928 - July 19, 1992) was an American science fiction author and physician. ... The novel The Bladerunner (also published as The Blade Runner) is a 1974 science fiction novel by Alan E. Nourse. ...


As a result of Fancher's divergence from the novel, numerous re-writes before and throughout shooting the film, and the fact that Ridley Scott never entirely read the novel on which the film was based, the film diverged significantly from its original inspiration. Some of the themes in the novel that were minimized or entirely removed include: fertility/sterility of the population, religion, mass media, Deckard's uncertainty that he is human, and real versus synthetic pets and emotions. Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ...


Philip K. Dick refused an offer of $400,000 to write a novelization of the Blade Runner screenplay, saying "[I was] told the cheapo novelization would have to appeal to the twelve-year-old audience" and "[it] would have probably been disastrous to me artistically." He added, "That insistence on my part of bringing out the original novel and not doing the novelization — they were just furious. They finally recognized that there was a legitimate reason for reissuing the novel, even though it cost them money. It was a victory not just of contractual obligations but of theoretical principles."[53] In the end, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? was reprinted for a time as a movie tie-in with the film poster as a cover and the original title in parenthesis below the Blade Runner title. A novelization (or novelisation in British English) is a work of fiction that is written based on some other media story form rather than as an original work. ... A tie-in is an authorized product that is based on an existing or upcoming media property, such as a movie or video/DVD, computer game, video game, television program/television series, board game, web site, role-playing game or literary property. ...


The producers of the film arranged for a screening of some special effects rough cuts for Philip K. Dick shortly before he died in early 1982. Despite his well known skepticism of Hollywood in principle, he became quite enthusiastic about the film. He said, "I saw a segment of Douglas Trumbull's special effects for Blade Runner on the KNBC-TV news. I recognized it immediately. It was my own interior world. They caught it perfectly." He also approved of the film's script, saying, "After I finished reading the screenplay, I got the novel out and looked through it. The two reinforce each other, so that someone who started with the novel would enjoy the movie and someone who started with the movie would enjoy the novel."[53] ...


The film also draws upon We Can Build You, another of Dick's novels. In chapter 3 of We Can Build You, another character named Pris is described as wearing "odd make-up, eyes outlined in black, a harlequin effect, and almost purple lipstick; the whole color scheme made her appear unreal and doll-like." This description inspired the make-up worn by Pris in Blade Runner. We Can Build You is a 1972 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...


Folklore

Among the folklore that has grown up around the film over the years has been the belief that the film was a curse[54] to the companies whose logos were displayed prominently in some scenes. While they were market leaders at the time, many of them experienced disastrous setbacks over the next decade and hardly exist today: Look up Curse in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Logo (disambiguation). ...

  • Atari, which dominated the home video game market when the film came out, never recovered from the next year's downturn in the industry, and by the 1990s had ceased to exist as anything more than a brand, a back catalog of games and some legacy computers. The Atari of today is an entirely different firm, using the former company's name.
  • The Bell System monopoly was broken up that same year, and all of the resulting Regional Bell operating companies have since changed their names and merged with each other or other companies.
  • Pan Am suffered the terrorist bombing/destruction of Pan Am Flight 103 and went bankrupt in 1991, after a decade of mounting losses.
  • Cuisinart similarly went bankrupt in 1989, though it lives on under new ownership.
  • The Coca-Cola Company suffered losses during its failed introduction of New Coke in 1985, but soon afterwards regained its marketshare and has continued to thrive as a leading soft drink manufacturer. Its continued success has made Coca-Cola a notable exception to the Blade Runner curse.

This article is about a corporate game company. ... Game console redirects here. ... ET for the Atari 2600 is considered by many to be emblematic of the crash along with the Atari 2600 version of Pac-Man. ... The Bell System was a trademark and service mark used by the United States telecommunications company American Telephone & Telegraph Company (AT&T) and its affiliated companies to co-brand their extensive circuit-switched telephone network and their affiliations with each other. ... This article is about the economic term. ... The Regional Bell operating companies (RBOC) are the result of the United States antitrust action against AT&T in 1983. ... The phrase mergers and acquisitions or M&A refers to the aspect of corporate finance strategy and management dealing with the merging and acquiring of different companies as well as assets. ... Pan Ams seaplane terminal at Dinner Key in Miami, Florida, was a hub of inter-American travel during the 1930s and 1940s. ... PA 103 redirects here. ... Notice of closure stuck on the door of a computer store the day after its parent company, Granville Technology Group Ltd, declared bankruptcy (strictly, put into administration—see text) in the United Kingdom. ... Cuisinart is a brand of small kitchen appliances. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturers, distributors and marketers of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... New Coke was the unofficial name of the sweeter formulation introduced in 1985 by The Coca-Cola Company to replace its flagship soft drink, Coca-Cola or Coke. ...

Spin-offs

Video games

There are two video games based on the film, one for Commodore 64, ZX Spectrum and Amstrad CPC 6128 by CRL Group PLC (1985) based on the music by Vangelis (due to licensing issues), and another action adventure PC game by Westwood Studios (1997). A prototype board game was also created in California (1982) that had game play similar to Scotland Yard. The cult computer game Snatcher was heavily influenced by Blade Runner, so much so that websites exist detailing the numerous similarities between the two.[55] The Westwood PC game featured new characters and branching storylines based on the Blade Runner world, coupled with voice work from some of the original cast from the film and some recurring locations from the film. Blade Runner is a Westwood Studios PC game loosely based on the 1982 movie of the same name. ... Computer and video games redirects here. ... C-64 redirects here. ... The ZX Spectrum is an 8-bit personal home computer released in the United Kingdom in 1982 by Sinclair Research Ltd. ... Amstrad is a manufacturer of electronics based in Brentwood in Essex, England and founded in 1968 by Sir Alan Michael Sugar in the UK. The name is a contraction of Alan Michael Sugar Trading. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... Front cover Blade Runner was a Westwood Studios PC game loosely based on the 1982 movie of the same name. ... Westwood Studios (1985-2003) was a computer and video game developer, founded in 1985 as Westwood Associates by Brett Sperry and Louis Castle and based in Las Vegas, Nevada. ... London (plan of the Scotland Yard board game) Scotland Yard is a board game in which a team of players, as police, cooperate to track down a player controlling a criminal around a board representing the streets of London. ... Snatcher ) is a cyberpunk-themed adventure game written and directed by Hideo Kojima. ... Front cover Blade Runner was a Westwood Studios PC game loosely based on the 1982 movie of the same name. ...


It is noteworthy that the events portrayed in the 1997 game occur not after, but in parallel to those in the film — the player assumes the role of another replicant-hunter working at the same time as Deckard, though of course they never meet, so as to remain consistent with the film. The game was highly advanced for its time, featuring a non linear plot, and advanced non player characters that each ran in their own independent AI. Unfortunately, the game was hobbled by an unusual pseudo-3D engine (which eschewed true 3-D imagery in favor of actively scaled, pre-rendered raster graphics) that did not require the use of a 3-D accelerator card (then a very optional piece of hardware) to play the game. This system was credible when the game went into production, but seriously outclassed by the time the game was finally released. Westwood's production also presented some of the most technically advanced and visually stunning pre-rendered cutscenes seen in any game of its time. Imagine the smiley face in the top left corner as an RGB bitmap image. ...


Comics

Archie Goodwin scripted the comic book adaptation, A Marvel Comics Super Special: Blade Runner, published September, 1982. The Jim Steranko cover leads into a 45-page adaptation illustrated by the team of Al Williamson, Carlos Garzon, Dan Green and Ralph Reese. This adaptation was poorly received and widely ridiculed because of poor writing and misquoted dialogue taken from the film. (This adaptation includes one possible explanation of the title's significance in story context: the narrative line, "Blade runner. You're always movin' on the edge.") Two Blade Runner parody comics have been written: Blade Bummer by Crazy comics,[56] and an anthropomorphic parody of the film known as Bad Rubber, which was written and illustrated by Steve Gallacci, and published in the prototype issue (Number 0) of his comic book title Albedo Anthropomorphics. In Bad Rubber, the character based on Rick Deckard is a duck named "Rick Duckard". Archie Goodwin (September 8, 1937 – March 1, 1998) was an American comic book writer, editor, and artist. ... Captain America #111 (March 1969): Sterankos signature surrealism. ... Al Williamson Al Williamson (March 21, 1931 - ) is an American cartoonist of partly Colombian descent. ... Ralph Reese is an American artist who attended the High School of Art and Design before beginning his art career as an assistant to Wally Wood during the mid-1960s. ... In contemporary usage, a parody (or lampoon) is a work that imitates another work in order to ridicule, ironically comment on, or poke some affectionate fun at the work itself, the subject of the work, the author or fictional voice of the parody, or another subject. ... Crazy is a humor magazine, an imitator of the popular MAD Magazine. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Steven A. Gallacci (born 1955) is best known for creating and publishing Albedo Anthropomorphics, a black and white alternative comic containing anthropomorphic (funny animal) characters, which has been considered a major factor in the origins of furry fandom. ... Albedo Anthropomorphics or its short name, Albedo, is the name of a furry comic book anthology which is credited with starting the furry comic book subgenre that featured sophisticated stories with funny animals primarily intended for an adult audience. ...


Sequels

Three official and authorized Blade Runner novels have been written by Philip K. Dick's friend K. W. Jeter that continue the story of Rick Deckard and attempt to resolve many of the differences between Blade Runner and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Kevin Wayne Jeter (born 1950) is an American science fiction and horror author known for his literary writing style, dark themes, and paranoid, unsympathetic characters. ... Rick Deckard is the central protaganist and main character in Ridley Scotts 1982 science-fiction film, Blade Runner. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ...

David Peoples, who co-wrote Blade Runner and wrote the 1998 film Soldier, has said that Soldier is intended to be what he calls a "sidequel" to Blade Runner. Soldier takes place in the same fictional universe, and the spinners used in Blade Runner are also used in Soldier. However, Soldier is an informal sequel as it was never formally approved by the Blade Runner partnership, which owns the rights to the Blade Runner universe. Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human (1995) is a novel by K. W. Jeter, and a continuation of both the film Blade Runner and the novel upon which it was based, Philip K. Dicks Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? The book continues the story of Rick Deckard. ... Blade Runner 3: Replicant Night (1996) by K. W. Jeter, continues the story of Rick Deckard. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ... Soldier is a 1998 science fiction film directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. ... A spin-off (or spinoff) is a new organization or entity formed by a split from a larger one such as a new company formed from a university research group. ... A fictional universe is an imaginary world that serves as the setting or backdrop for one or (more commonly) multiple works of fiction or translatable non-fiction. ... Police spinner flying over industrial sprawl. ... An informal sequel, also called an unauthorized sequel or unofficial sequel, is a sequel to a film, movie, novel, television show, or video game that is produced without the consent of the creators of the original material. ...


Though not an official sequel to Blade Runner there are many similarities between the 1999 television series Total Recall 2070 and the Blade Runner universe.[57] Total Recall 2070 was based on two works by Phillip K. Dick: "We Can Remember It for You Wholesale" (the basis for the film Total Recall), and Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (the basis for Blade Runner), so many consider the series a sequel to (or at least a spin-off of) Blade Runner. The artist Shu Lea Chang has suggested that her art-porn movie I.K.U. is meant as a sequel to Blade Runner. A television program is the content of television broadcasting. ... Total Recall 2070 was a science fiction TV series first broadcast in 1999 in Canada and later the same year on Showtime. ... We Can Remember It for You Wholesale is a novelette by Philip K. Dick first published in The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction in April 1966. ... Total Recall is an American science fiction film released on June 1, 1990 starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, directed by Paul Verhoeven and written by Ronald Shusett, Dan OBannon, Jon Povill and Gary Goldman. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Directed by Shu Lea Cheang, I.K.U is independent Japanese erotic cyberpunk movie. ...


Ridley Scott apparently toyed with the idea of a sequel film, which would have been titled Metropolis. However, the project was ultimately shelved due to rights issues. A script was also written for a proposed sequel entitled Blade Runner Down, which would have been based on K. W. Jeter's first Blade Runner sequel novel.[58] At the 2007 Comic-Con Scott again announced that he is considering a sequel to the film.[59][60]


Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c d Sammon, Paul M. (1996). Future Noir: the Making of Blade Runner. London: Orion Media. ISBN 0-06-105314-7. 
  2. ^ a b c Barber, Lynn (2002-01-02). "Scott's Corner". The Observer. Retrieved on 2007-02-22. 
  3. ^ a b http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0083658/ Retrieved on 1 September 2007
  4. ^ a b Foster, Dave. "Warner confirms Blade Runner DVD plans", 31-05-2006. Retrieved on 2007-03-04. 
  5. ^ Sammon, Paul M. (1996). "4", Future Noir: the Making of Blade Runner. London: Orion Media, 48. ISBN 0-06-105314-7. 
  6. ^ Bukatman, Scott (1997-08-01). Blade Runner: BFI Modern Classics. London: BFI (British Film Institute). ISBN 0-85170-623-1. 
  7. ^ Scott, Ridley. (2003) Daily Telegraph — Interview with Ridley Scott
  8. ^ Giraud, Jean. (1988) The Long Tomorrow & Other SF Stories. ISBN 0-87135-281-8
  9. ^ Carnevale, Rob. "Getting Direct With Directors...Ridley Scott", BBC Movies, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-02-21. 
  10. ^ a b Kennedy, Colin (2000-11). "And beneath lies, the truth". Empire (137): 76. Retrieved on 2007-02-24. 
  11. ^ (2006-04) "In Conversation with Harrison Ford". Empire (202): 140. Retrieved on 2007-02-24. 
  12. ^ Smith, Neil (Summer 2007/Issue 130), "The Total Film Interview", Total Film
  13. ^ Ford: Blade Runner Was a Fucking Nightmare (2007-07-05). Retrieved on 2007-07-05.
  14. ^ Ebert, Roger (1992-09-11). Blade Runner: Director's Cut. Retrieved on 2006-08-28.
  15. ^ Sammon, Paul M. (1996). "12", Future Noir: the Making of Blade Runner. London: Orion Media, 284. ISBN 0-06-105314-7. 
  16. ^ BRMovie.com – Rutger Hauer. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  17. ^ a b Sammon, Paul M. (1996). "8", Future Noir: the Making of Blade Runner. London: Orion Media, 115 – 116. ISBN 0-06-105314-7. 
  18. ^ 2019: Off-World Archives [1]
  19. ^ Jenkins, Mary. (1997) The Dystopian World of Blade Runner: An Ecofeminist Perspective
  20. ^ http://www.faqs.org/faqs/movies/bladerunner-faq/ Blade Runner – FAQ
  21. ^ Unnecessary Destruction: The Lost Films of Ridley Scott. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  22. ^ Kerman, Judith. (1991) Retrofitting Blade Runner: Issues in Ridley Scott's "Blade Runner" and Philip K. Dick's "Do Android's Dream of Electric Sheep?" ISBN 0-87972-510-9
  23. ^ Scott, Ridley (2000) video clip of Ridley Scott confirming that Deckard is a replicant
  24. ^ news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/825641.stm. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  25. ^ www.musicoutfitter.com/blade-runner/p393363.html. Retrieved on 2007-08-28.
  26. ^ Hicks, Chris. (1992) DeseretNews.com — Review of Blade Runner
  27. ^ Flynn, John. (2003) Towson.edu — Blade Runner Retrospective
  28. ^ "Sneak Previews", week of June 25, 1982.
  29. ^ [2] - 1982 review by Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.
  30. ^ [3] - 1992 review by Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times.
  31. ^ The Screen Directory. Retrieved on 2007-09-26.
  32. ^ Blade Runner - ALL-TIME 100 movies - TIME. Retrieved on 2007-10-07.
  33. ^ Roger Ebert. Blade Runner: The Final Cut (1982). Retrieved on 2007-11-7.
  34. ^ Jankiewicz, Pat. "Dark Knight Resurrected", Starlog, August 2005. Retrieved on 2006-11-06. 
  35. ^ Jha, Alok; Rogers, Simon; Rutherford, Adam (2004-08-26). Our expert panel votes for the top 10 sci-fi films. Guardian.co.uk. Guardian Newspapers. Retrieved on 2006-11-14.
  36. ^ Aren't We All Just Replicants on the Inside? - October 2, 2007 - The New York Sun. Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  37. ^ Cigéhn, Peter (2004-09-01). The Top 1319 Sample Sources (version 60). Sloth.org.
  38. ^ youtube.com
  39. ^ Scotsman.com. (2006) Scotsman.com — 'Blade Runner' replicated on DVD again
  40. ^ thedigitalbits.com
  41. ^ Sammon, Paul M. (1996). "13", Future Noir: the Making of Blade Runner. London: Orion Media, 298. ISBN 0-06-105314-7. 
  42. ^ IMDB. (2005) Trivia for Blade Runner
  43. ^ Fleming, Michael. "The Playboy Interview", Playboy Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-02-22. 
  44. ^ "Harrison Ford's Blade Runner Gripe", Empire, 1999-09-07. Retrieved on 2007-02-22. 
  45. ^ "Blade Runner Special Edition News and Views," brmovie.com, Feb. 2, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  46. ^ "Blade Runner Final Cut Due," SciFi Wire, May 26, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  47. ^ BLADE RUNNER: THE FINAL CUT. Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  48. ^ My Two Cents - Archived Posts (7/25/07 - 6/28/07). Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  49. ^ Shone, Tom (2004). Blockbuster. Simon 7 Schuster. ISBN 0743239903. 
  50. ^ On the Edge of Blade Runner at Google Video
  51. ^ Charles de Lauzirika interview
  52. ^ Another Charles de Lauzirika interview
  53. ^ a b Boonstra, John. "A final interview with science fiction's boldest visionary, who talks candidly about Blade Runner, inner voices and the temptations of Hollywood", Rod Serling's The Twilight Zone magazine, Vol 2 #3 (available from Phillipkdick.com, June 1982. Retrieved on 2007-01-09. 
  54. ^ Curse at the Blade Runner FAQ.
  55. ^ KoKee. (2001) Blade Runner & Snatcher
  56. ^ Kupperberg, Paul & Camp, Bob. (1982) BladeZone.com — Crazy: Blade Runner Parody
  57. ^ scifi.com – "A Total Recall spin-off that's an awful lot like Blade Runner"
  58. ^ BRmovie.com FAQ: "Are there any sequels? I heard rumours ...". Retrieved on 2007-07-27.
  59. ^ Blade Runner: The Final Cut – and a Sequel? - at the official StarWars.com blog
  60. ^ http://www.thedigitalbits.com/#mytwocents

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Sneak Previews was a film review show that first aired aired on WTTW, a PBS television station in Chicago, Illinois, and found national airing as other PBS affiliates added the program to their schedules. ... The Chicago Sun-Times is an American daily newspaper published in Chicago. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Starlog is a science-fiction film magazine published by Starlog Group Inc. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Google Video logo Google Video is a free video sharing and video search engine service from Google that allows anyone to upload video clips to Googles web servers as well as make their own media available free of charge; some videos are also offered for sale through the Google... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Ennis House The Ennis House is a building located in the Los Feliz neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. ... While it is impossible to objectively determine the greatest film of all time, it is possible to discuss the films that have been regarded as the greatest ever. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Tokyo (disambiguation). ... For the 2004 album by American rapper Ludacris, see The Red Light District. ... Kipple is a term coined by science fiction author Philip K. Dick in the book Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?. It refers to unwanted or useless junk that tends to reproduce itself. ... According to the Auteur Theory, the prevalent framework of modern film criticism, a film director is most responsible for the creative aspects of a film. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This is a list of fictional universes, organized by genre and by sub-genre. ... The Million Dollar Theater on Broadway in downtown Los Angeles, opened in February 1918, is one of the first movie palaces built in the United States. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... Postmodernity (also called post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is a term used to describe the social and cultural implications of postmodernism. ... Synthetic biology has long been used to describe an approach to biology that attempts to integrate different areas of research in order to create a more holistic understanding of life. ... A view of Union Station familiar to many of downtown Los Angeles visitors. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:

Reviews: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... Wikia (no official pronunciation[2]; originally Wikicities) is a selective wiki hosting service (or wiki farm) operated by Wikia, Inc. ... Look up Wiki in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...

Media: This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...

Notable fan sites:

  • 2019: Off-World – One of the first Blade Runner fan sites
  • BRMovie.com – alt.fan.blade-runner site
  • BladeZone – The Online Blade Runner Fan Club & Museum
  • BR-Insight – Analysis of the film

Soldier is a 1998 science fiction film directed by Paul W.S. Anderson. ... Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? is a 1968 science fiction novel by Philip K. Dick. ... Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human (1995) is a novel by K. W. Jeter, and a continuation of both the film Blade Runner and the novel upon which it was based, Philip K. Dicks Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? The book continues the story of Rick Deckard. ... Blade Runner 3: Replicant Night (1996) by K. W. Jeter, continues the story of Rick Deckard. ... Blade Runner is a Westwood Studios PC game loosely based on the 1982 movie of the same name. ... Rick Deckard is the central protaganist and main character in Ridley Scotts 1982 science-fiction film, Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... This article details the minor characters in the film Blade Runner. ... The Tyrell Corporation is a fictional corporation from the 1982 Ridley Scott film Blade Runner. ... Front entrance of Bradbury The Bradbury Building is an architectural landmark in Los Angeles, California, in the United States. ... The Tannhauser Gate is a location originally referred to in dialogue in the 1982 film Blade Runner, and again in the 1998 film Soldier. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... Rutger Oelsen Hauer (IPA: [rʏtxɛr ulsɛn hʌuɛr]) (born in Breukelen, January 23, 1944) is a Dutch film actor. ... Mary Sean Young (born in Louisville, Kentucky on November 20, 1959) is an American actress. ... Edward James Olmos (born February 24, 1947) is an Emmy-winning and Oscar-nominated American actor, of Mexican descent. ... Daryl Christine Hannah (born December 3, 1960) is an American film actress. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Hampton Fancher (born July 18, 1938 in Los Angeles, California, USA) was an actor who transitioned into being a producer and screenwriter in the late 1970s. ... Michael Deeley (born August 6, 1932) is a film producer who has helped create notable films such as The Italian Job, Blade Runner and The Deer Hunter. ... David Webb Peoples (born c. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... Evangelos Odysseas Papathanassiou (Greek: Ευάγγελος Οδυσσέας Παπαθανασίου IPA: ) is a world-renowned Greek composer of electronic, new age and classical music and musical performer, under the artist name Vangelis Papathanassiou (Βαγγέλης Παπαθανασίου) or just Vangelis (a diminutive of Evangelos) [IPA: or ]. He is best known for his Academy Award winning score for the film Chariots... The Blade Runner soundtrack by Vangelis is a dark melodic combination of classic composition and futuristic synthesizers which mirrors the film-noir future envisioned by Ridley Scott. ... Despite the initial appearance of an action film, Blade Runner operates on an unusually rich number of dramatic levels. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Voight-Kampff Originating as a fictional tool in Philip K Dicks novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the Voight-Kampff machine or device (spelled Voigt-Kampff in the book) also appeared in the books screen adaptation, the 1982 science fiction film Blade Runner. ... Police spinner flying over industrial sprawl. ... Postmodernism is a term applied to a wide-ranging set of developments in critical theory, philosophy, architecture, art, literature, and culture, which are generally characterized as either emerging from, in reaction to, or superseding, modernism. ... Berlins Sony Center reflects the global reach of a Japanese corporation. ... A cult film is a film that has acquired a highly devoted but relatively small group of fans. ... Sir Ridley Scott (born November 30, 1937 in South Shields, South Tyneside) is a British film director and producer. ... Boy and Bicycle is the first film made by Ridley Scott. ... The Duellists (1977) was Ridley Scotts first feature film, based on the Joseph Conrad short story The Duel. Set during the Napoleonic Wars, it features two French Hussar officers, DHubert and Feraud (played by Keith Carradine and Harvey Keitel). ... This article is about the first film in a series. ... A screenshot from the commercial. ... Legend is a 1985 fantasy film released by 20th Century Fox (in Europe) and Universal Pictures (in the U.S. and Canada), directed by Ridley Scott and starring Tom Cruise, Mia Sara, Tim Curry, Alice Playten, and Billy Barty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the Shohei Imamura film of the same name, see Black Rain (Japanese film). ... Thelma & Louise is a 1991 film, written by Callie Khouri and directed by Ridley Scott. ... 1492: Conquest of Paradise is a 1992 American/Spanish adventure/drama film. ... White Squall is a 1996 movie directed by Ridley Scott, starring Jeff Bridges and John Savage. ... G.I. Jane is an 1997 action movie that tells the story of the first woman to undergo S.E.R.E. training. ... Gladiator is a 2000 historical action drama film. ... Hannibal is a 2001 film directed by Ridley Scott, adapted from the Thomas Harris novel of the same name. ... Black Hawk Down is a 2001 film by Ridley Scott, based on the book Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden. ... Matchstick Men is a 2003 film starring Nicolas Cage, Sam Rockwell and Alison Lohman. ... Kingdom of Heaven is a 2005 epic film, directed and produced by Ridley Scott, and written by William Monahan. ... All the Invisible Children is a collection of short films which premiered at the 2005 Venice Film Festival. ... A Good Year is a 2006 romantic comedy film set in Provence, in southeastern France. ... American Gangster is a 2007 crime film written by Steve Zaillian and directed by Ridley Scott. ... Body of Lies, formerly titled Penetration, is an upcoming feature film adaptation of the novel Body of Lies by David Ignatius about a CIA operative who goes to Jordan to track a high-ranking terrorist. ... Philip Kindred Dick (December 16, 1928 – March 2, 1982) was an American writer, mostly known for his works of science fiction. ... For other uses, see Total recall (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Crap artist be merged into this article or section. ... Screamers is a 1995 film directed by Christian Duguay based on the short story Second Variety by Philip K. Dick. ... Impostor is based upon a short story written by Philip K. Dick in 1953. ... Minority Report is a 2002 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg, loosely based on the Philip K. Dick short story of the same name. ... Paycheck is a 2003 film adaptation of the short story Paycheck by science fiction writer Philip K. Dick. ... A Scanner Darkly is a 2006 film by Richard Linklater based on the Philip K. Dick novel of the same name. ... Next is a 2007 film the producers claim is based on the science fiction short story The Golden Man by Philip K. Dick though it bears no resemblance to it other than having a precog in. ...


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'Blade Runner' (892 words)
Deckard, the best blade runner ever, is pressed into duty by his former boss (M. Emmet Walsh) when four replicants take over a space shuttle and return to Earth.
The filmmaker also has expanded on the unicorn references, which he says "provoke Deckard's doubts in his own essence." The blade runner has just confronted Rachel with the fact that her memories are not really hers, but implants borrowed from Tyrell's niece.
Every viewing of "Blade Runner" brings new discoveries -- a half-midget, half-mechanical toy's decidedly sexual response to Priss's appearance in Sebastian's living-doll-filled apartment -- and revitalizes treasured visual memories -- the way Rachel's copper irises give away her kinship to Tyrell's synthetic owl.
Blade Runner (video game) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1755 words)
Blade Runner is a Westwood Studios PC game loosely based on the 1982 movie of the same name.
Blade Runner is strongly based on the 1982 movie of the same name, as such it could be considered an adaptation of sorts.
The Blade Runner videogame is notable for its accurate, even lovingly imitated environments, and for remaining quite true to Philip K Dick's novel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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