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Encyclopedia > Blackadder
Blackadder

Left to right: (Back) Tim McInnerny, Stephen
Fry
and Hugh Laurie, (Front) Rowan Atkinson
and Tony Robinson in Blackadder Goes Forth
Genre Period, Situational comedy
Created by Richard Curtis
Rowan Atkinson
Ben Elton
Starring Rowan Atkinson
Tony Robinson
Tim McInnerny
Miranda Richardson
Stephen Fry
Hugh Laurie
Country of origin Flag of the United Kingdom United Kingdom
Language(s) English
No. of series 4
No. of episodes 24 (plus 3 specials) (List of episodes)
Production
Producer(s) John Lloyd
Camera setup Multi-camera
Running time 30 min. approx
Broadcast
Original channel BBC One
Picture format PAL (576i)
Audio format Monaural sound
Original run June 15, 1983November 2, 1989
External links
Official website
IMDb profile
TV.com summary

Blackadder is the generic name that encompasses four series of an acclaimed BBC One historical sitcom, along with several one-off installments. The first series was written by Richard Curtis and Rowan Atkinson, while subsequent episodes were written by Curtis and Ben Elton. The shows were produced by John Lloyd, and starred Rowan Atkinson as the eponymous anti-hero, Edmund Blackadder, and Tony Robinson as his sidekick/dogsbody, Baldrick. Blackadder may refer to: black adder is the only British venomous snake. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (500x781, 45 KB)[edit] Summary http://www. ... Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy in Blackadder II. Tim McInnerny (stress on the penultimate syllable of McInnerny) was born September 18, 1956 and is a British actor. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, novelist, filmmaker, journalist and television personality. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian and writer. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... In the performing arts, a period piece is a work set in a particular era. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis CBE, (born 8 November 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programmes Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley as well as movies such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy in Blackadder II. Tim McInnerny (stress on the penultimate syllable of McInnerny) was born September 18, 1956 and is a British actor. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, novelist, filmmaker, journalist and television personality. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian and writer. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A television special is a television program, typically a short film or television movie, which interrupts or temporarily replaces programming normally scheduled for a given time slot. ... This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... John Lloyd (born 1951 in Dover, England; birth name: John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd), British comedy writer and producer. ... A multi-camera setup is a film production technique wherein multiple cameras shoot the same action from different angles. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see PAL (disambiguation). ... 576i is the shorthand name for a video mode. ... Label for 1. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... A British sitcom is a situation comedy (sitcom) produced in the United Kingdom. ... This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... Richard Curtis in London, 1999 Richard Curtis CBE, (born 8 November 1956), is a New Zealand-born British screenwriter, best known for the TV programmes Blackadder and The Vicar of Dibley as well as movies such as Four Weddings and a Funeral, Notting Hill, and Love Actually. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ... John Lloyd (born 1951 in Dover, England; birth name: John Hardress Wilfred Lloyd), British comedy writer and producer. ... An eponym is the name of a person, whether real or fictitious, who has (or is thought to have) given rise to the name of a particular place, tribe, discovery, or other item. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ... Rowan Atkinson as Blackadder the Third. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... For other uses, see Sidekick (disambiguation). ... Look up dogsbody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Baldrick is a fictional character featured in the television series Blackadder. ...


In 2000, Blackadder Goes Forth ranked at 16 in the "100 Greatest British Television Programmes", a list created by the British Film Institute. Also in the 2004 TV poll to find "Britain's Best Sitcom", Blackadder was voted the second best British sitcom of all time, topped by Only Fools and Horses Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... 100 Greatest British Television Programmes was a list compiled in 2000 by the British Film Institute (BFI) chosen by a poll of industry professionals, to determine what were the greatest British television programmes of any genre ever to have been screened. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... Britains Best Sitcom was a poll conducted in 2003 and 2004 by the BBC to identify the United Kingdoms best situation comedy. ... Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were originally broadcast in the UK between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ...

Contents

Overview

Although each series is set in a different time era, all follow the fortunes (or rather, misfortunes) of Edmund Blackadder (played by Atkinson), who in each is a member of an English family dynasty present at many significant periods and places in British history. Although his intelligence levels rise over the course of the series (the character starts as being quite unintelligent in the first and gradually becomes smarter and more perceptive through each passing generation while decreasing in social status), each Blackadder is similar in that they are all cynical cowardly opportunists concerned with maintaining and increasing their own status and fortunes, regardless of their surroundings. In each series Blackadder is usually a cynical (almost modern) voice puncturing the pretensions and stupidity of those around him, and what might — through modern eyes — be seen as the more ludicrous and insane follies of history (from the cruel and unjust medieval religious witch-hunts and the petty whims and insanities of various British monarchs to the bloodshed of World War I). Rowan Atkinson as Blackadder the Third. ... This article is about the English as an ethnic group and nation. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the current understanding of the word cynicism. ... Cowardice is a vice that is conventionally viewed as the corruption of prudence, to thwart all courage or bravery. ... Opportunism is a term used in politics and political science. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A witch-hunt is a search for suspected witches; it is a type of moral panic. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


The lives of each of the four Blackadders is also entwined with his servant, each called Baldrick (played by Tony Robinson), who in each generation acts as Blackadder's dogsbody and who decreases in intelligence (and in personal hygiene standards) just as his master's intellect increases. Each Blackadder and Baldrick are also saddled with the company of a dim-witted aristocrat (who is arguably dimmer than even Baldrick) whose presence Blackadder must somehow tolerate. This role was taken in the first two series by Lord Percy Percy (Tim McInnerny), in the third series by Prince George, Prince Regent, and in the fourth by Lieutenant George, the latter two played by Hugh Laurie (see George (Blackadder character)). Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      The term aristocracy refers to a form of government where power is held by a small number of individuals from an elite or from noble families. ... Lord Percy Percy is the name given to a a pair of related fictional characters, played by Tim McInnerny, in the first two series of the popular British sitcom Blackadder, the Lord Percy of Blackadder II being the descendant of that seen in The Black Adder. ... Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy in Blackadder II. Tim McInnerny (stress on the penultimate syllable of McInnerny) was born September 18, 1956 and is a British actor. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian and writer. ... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ...


Each series was set in a different period of English history, beginning in 1485 and ending in 1917 (with one special set on New Year's Eve 1999) comprising six half-hour episodes. The first series, made in 1983, was called The Black Adder. This was followed by Blackadder II in 1985, Blackadder the Third in 1987, and finally Blackadder Goes Forth in 1989. In addition to these, three specials were also made: Blackadder: The Cavalier Years appeared as a 15-minute insert during the 1988 Comic Relief telethon; Blackadder's Christmas Carol was a 45-minute Christmas installment, broadcast the same year; and Blackadder: Back & Forth was a 30-minute film originally shown in a special cinema at the Millennium Dome throughout 2000, and later transmitted by Sky and the BBC. A pilot episode was recorded in 1982, but has never been shown on television. In it Baldrick was played by a different actor (Philip Fox), and its plot was re-used for the episode "Born to be King" in Series 1. Although DVD releases never include the pilot (Atkinson specifically prevents it from being distributed, because he fears the reputation of the pilot will overshadow his acting skills in it), copies are known to circulate online. England is the largest and most populous of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom (the United Kingdom is a nation which was created by the bonding of the four succsessor states). ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... Blackadder II was the second series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 9 January 1986 to 20 February 1986. ... Blackadder the Third was the third series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 17 September 1987 to 22 October 1987. ... Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ... Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... In American television, a Christmas television special is typically a one-time, half-hour program aired during the Christmas season. ... Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... The O2 redirects here. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Born to be King is the second episode of the first season of the BBC sitcom Blackadder (The Black Adder). ...


Developments over the series

It is implied in each series that the Blackadder character is a distant descendant of the previous one, although none of the Blackadders are mentioned during their series as having fathered any known children (it was even stated in "The Queen of Spain's Beard" (1.4) that Edmund was a virgin, although in a later episode he is alleged to have had relations with an old hag). Lord Blackadder had relationships with Kate and Lady Jane Pottle, and often engaged prostitutes, one of whom was even seen in the episode "Money", but whether he sired any offspring is never stated. The Queen of Spains Beard was the fourth episode of the first season of the BBC sitcom Blackadder (The Black Adder). ... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... In Roman times, Vestal Virgins were strictly celibate or they were punished by death. ... Edmund, Lord Blackadder (1531-1566) was the main character in the second series of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ... Bob is a pseudonym used by two characters in the sitcom Blackadder, both female and played by Gabrielle Glaister. ... Money is an episode of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. ...


With each observed generation, his social standing is reduced, from prince, to lord, to royal butler to the Prince Regent, and finally a regular army captain in the trenches of World War I in Blackadder Goes Forth. However, he concurrently goes from being an incompetent fool (in the first series) to an ever more devious strategist in matters that affect him. The Macbeth-inspired witches, in "The Foretelling" (1.1) (thinking he is, in fact, Henry Tudor), promise that one day Blackadder will be king and, in "Bells" (2.1), the "wise woman" says "thou plottest Blackadder: thou wouldst be King!" In the first series, Edmund does become king for less than a minute, but then dies after succumbing to some poisoned wine: a fact alluded to in the closing credits song in "Head" (2.2): Social class refers to the hierarchical distinctions between individuals or groups in societies or cultures. ... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is shared between the Commonwealth Realms; this article focuses on the perspective of United Kingdom. ... The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. ... For other uses, see Butler (disambiguation). ... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Please see Captain for other versions of this rank Captain is a rank in the British armed forces that is used in the Army, Royal Navy, and the Royal Marines. ... A gas main being laid in a trench. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Macbeth and Banquo meeting the witches on the heath by Théodore Chassériau. ... The Weird Sisters, (sometimes Wyrd Sisters or Three Weird Sisters), is the Germanic mythological group name given to the Nordic fates, or Norns. ... The Foretelling was the first episode of the first season of the BBC sitcom Blackadder (The Black Adder). ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... List of Blackadder episodes Bells is the first episode of the BBC sitcom Blackadder II, the second series of Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England from 1558 to 1603. ... Head is the second episode of the BBC period comedy Blackadder II, the second series of Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England from 1558 to 1603. ...

His great-grandfather was a king
Although for only thirty seconds

In the second series, Blackadder comes very close to marrying Elizabeth I but fails. At the end of Blackadder the Third, the character assumes the role of Prince Regent after the real prince is killed in a duel with the Duke of Wellington and so presumably ascends the throne as George IV. After his general decline in status through the series, Blackadder, or at least the descendant of the original, finally becomes absolute monarch in Blackadder: Back & Forth through manipulation of the timeline. A Grand Admiral Blackadder of the far future is also seen in the Christmas special, and his status further rises when he manages to achieve control of the entire universe upon marrying Queen Asphyxia XIX. However, while Prince Edmund Plantagenet adopts the title "The Black Adder", Centurion Blacaddicus (presumably an ancestor) has it as a name. It may be a cognomen, a nickname at the end of a Roman man's name. Queenie was a caricature of the historical figure Queen Elizabeth I of England, played by Miranda Richardson in the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England. ... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... George IV (George Augustus Frederick) (12 August 1762 – 26 June 1830) was king of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and Hanover from 29 January 1820 until his death. ... Forms of government Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Absolute monarchy is a monarchical form of government where the monarch has the power to rule his or her land or country and its citizens freely, with no laws or legally-organized direct opposition in force. ... Poster for the 1960 adaptation of HG Wellss The Time Machine. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Universe (disambiguation). ... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... In the naming convention used in ancient Rome, derived from that of the Etruscan civilization, the names of male patricians normally consist of three parts (tria nomina): the praenomen (given name), nomen gentile or gentilicium (name of the gens or clan) and cognomen (belonging to a family within the gens). ... // A nickname is a name of a person or thing other than its proper name. ...


Comparison over the series

The first series, written by Curtis and Atkinson and without the involvement of Ben Elton, is the most different from the three others. It is noticeable that, as Blackadder is more cunning in series two, so Baldrick develops even further into a dimwit. It is clear that in the first series, the latter is smarter than his superior, saving the day on several occasions, whereas Edmund is despised by all and never accomplishes a thing. In the unaired pilot episode these relations were different, more like Series Two, where Blackadder is not completely successful, but not completely ridiculous either.


The subsequent three series had a smaller budget and the main characters more or less stay at the same level of intelligence. The Back & Forth special hardly changes anything about the cast of Series 4 at all, except of course their time and place. With regard to Blackadder-Baldrick, this means their roles are slightly reversed from series 2 onwards. While at first it was Baldrick who had a cunning plan, later it is Blackadder who is the more sophisticated of the two. This doesn't stop Baldrick from presenting his own 'cunning' plans, however (which are usually more stupidly optimistic than cunning, but sometimes still work).


Similarities over the series

Theme tune

Howard Goodall's theme tune has the same melody throughout all the series, but is played in roughly the style of the period in which it is set. It is performed mostly with trumpets in The Black Adder; with a combination of recorder, string quartet and electric guitar in Blackadder II; on oboe, cello and harpsichord (in Waltz time) for Blackadder the Third; by a military band in Blackadder Goes Forth; sung by carol singers in Blackadder's Christmas Carol; and by an orchestra in Blackadder: The Cavalier Years and Blackadder: Back & Forth.[1] Howard Goodall Howard Goodall (born 1958 in Bromley, South London) is a British composer of musicals, choral music and music for television. ... The theme music of a radio or television program is a piece that is written specifically for that show and usually played during the title sequence and/or end credits. ... Look up melody in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For the academic study of history of music, see Music history. ... The trumpet is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... Various recorders The recorder is a woodwind musical instrument of the family known as fipple flutes or internal duct flutes — whistle-like instruments which include the tin whistle and ocarina. ... The resident string quartet of the Library of Congress in 1963 A string quartet is a musical ensemble of four string instruments—usually two violins, a viola and cello—or a piece written to be performed by such a group. ... An electric guitar is a type of guitar that uses pickups to convert the vibration of its steel-cored strings into electrical current, which is then amplified. ... The oboe is a double reed musical instrument of the woodwind family. ... The violoncello, usually abbreviated to cello, or cello (the c is pronounced as in the ch of check), is a bowed stringed instrument, a member of the violin family. ... Harpsichord in the Flemish style A harpsichord is a musical instrument played by means of a keyboard. ... The time signature (also known as meter signature) is a notational device used in Western musical notation to specify how many beats are in each bar and what note value constitutes one beat. ... Military Band marching A military band is a group of soldiers assigned to musical duties. ... A carol is a festive song, generally religious but not necessarily connected with church worship, and often with a dance-like or popular character. ... For the song titled Orchestra, see The Servant (band). ...


Popularity and effects on popular culture

After the first series — which had enjoyed a considerable budget for a sitcom, and had been shot largely on location — the BBC decided not to take up the option of a follow-up. However, in 1984, Michael Grade took over as the controller of BBC One and, after talks with the Blackadder team, finally agreed that a second series could be made as long as the cost was dramatically cut. Blackadder II was therefore to be a studio-only production, with Ben Elton joining the writing team. Besides adding more jokes, Elton suggested a major change in character emphasis: Baldrick would become the stupid sidekick, while Edmund Blackadder evolved into a cunning sycophant. This led to the now familiar set-up that was maintained over all the following series. Only in the Back & Forth millennium special was the shooting once again on location, due to the fact that this was a production with a budget estimated at £3 million, and was a joint venture between Tiger Aspect, Sky Television, the New Millennium Experience Company and the BBC, rather than the BBC alone. Michael Ian Grade CBE (born March 8, 1943) is a British businessman and a distinguished figure in the field of broadcasting. ... BBC One is the primary television channel of the BBC, and the first in the United Kingdom. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Tiger Aspect Productions is a British television production company, particularly noted for its situation comedies. ... Sky Television corporate identity from 1989, maintained by British Sky Broadcasting until 1995 Sky Television plc was a four-channel satellite television service launched by Rupert Murdochs News International on February 5, 1989. ...


While each episode was plot-driven, they were still formulaic to a degree. For example, whenever Blackadder found himself in a difficult situation (as was the case most of the time), Baldrick would invariably suggest a solution, starting with the words, "I have a cunning plan". This became the character's catch phrase and, while his ideas were usually totally unhelpful, he would sometimes come up with a scheme that went towards saving the day. A catch phrase is a phrase or expression that is popularized, usually through repeated use, by a real person or fictional character. ...


Origin of Name

Dr. Eric Blackadder, Chief Medical Officer at the BBC at the time of the first programme, claims that the series is named after him.[1]


Series and specials

See also: List of Blackadder episodes

This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ...

Chronological order

To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... Blackadder II was the second series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 9 January 1986 to 20 February 1986. ... The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... Blackadder the Third was the third series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 17 September 1987 to 22 October 1987. ... Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ...

Series 1: The Black Adder

See also: List of Blackadder episodes#Series 1: The Black Adder (1983)

Set in the Middle Ages, this series is written as a secret history. It opens on 21 August 1485, the eve of the Battle of Bosworth Field, which in the series is won not by (as in actual fact) Henry Tudor (played by Peter Benson), but by Richard III (played by Peter Cook as a rather nice man who doted on his nephews, contrary to the traditional and highly debatable view of him as a hunchbacked, infanticidal monster). After his victory, Richard III is then killed by Lord Edmund Plantagenet (Richard takes Blackadder's horse, which he thinks is a stray; not recognizing the king, Edmund thinks Richard is stealing it, and cuts his head off). The late King's nephew, Richard, Duke of York (played by Brian Blessed) who is Lord Edmund Plantagenet's (The Black Adder) father, is then crowned as Richard IV. Lord Edmund never took part in the battle (he arrived late and went the wrong way, but claimed to have killed four hundred and fifty peasants and several nobles, one of whom had actually been killed by his brother in the battle). This logical but very silly historical premise, combined with interwoven bits of Shakespeare, lends real intellectual delight and challenge to the humour. This is an episode list of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... Medieval Britain is a term used to suggest that there is a unity to the history of Great Britain from the 5th century withdrawal of Roman forces from the province of Britannia and the Germanic invasions, until the 16th century Reformations in the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of... A secret history (or shadow history) is a revisionist interpretation of either fictional or real (or known) history which is claimed to have been deliberately suppressed or forgotten. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Combatants King Richard III of England, Yorkist Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, Lancastrian Commanders Richard III of England† Nominally, Richmond in practice, the Earl of Oxford Strength 6,000 (king had 15,500 but Lord Stanley with 4,000 and his brother, Sir William Stanley with 2,500 betrayed; Henry... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Peter Benson (actor), was born 13 June 1921, in England. ... Richard III (2 October 1452 – 22 August 1485) was King of England from 1483 until his death. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Two Princes Edward and Richard in the Tower, 1483 by Sir John Everett Millais, 1878, part of the Royal Holloway picture collection The Princes in the Tower, Edward V of England (November 4, 1470 – 1483?) and his brother, Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York (17 August 1473 – 1483... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... King Richard IV of England was a fictional character in the first series of the BBC comedy series The Black Adder, played by Brian Blessed. ... Brian Blessed (pronounced //, or in the tradition of English poetry, Blessèd, born near Doncaster,October 9, 1937) is an English actor, who came to fame as PC Fancy Smith in the BBC TV police drama series Z Cars. ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... Prince Henry Plantagenet of York (February/March 1460 - December 1498), known as Harry, was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder, played by Robert East His Royal titles included the Prince of Wales, Prince Regent, Captain of the Guard, Grand Warden of... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Richard, Duke of York (one of the 'Princes in the Tower') was in reality only twelve years old (and perhaps two years dead) when the Battle of Bosworth Field took place in 1485, and thus too young to have had two adult sons. This and other historical discrepancies don't detract from the comedy, though. Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York and 1st Duke of Norfolk (17 August 1473–1483?) was the second son of King Edward IV of England and Elizabeth Woodville and, thus, the younger brother of King Edward V. In January 1478, when he was about 4 years old, he married... The Two Princes Edward and Richard in the Tower, 1483 by Sir John Everett Millais, 1878, part of the Royal Holloway picture collection The Princes in the Tower, Edward V of England (November 4, 1470 – 1483?) and his brother, Richard of Shrewsbury, 1st Duke of York (17 August 1473 – 1483... Combatants King Richard III of England, Yorkist Henry Tudor, Earl of Richmond, Lancastrian Commanders Richard III of England† Nominally, Richmond in practice, the Earl of Oxford Strength 6,000 (king had 15,500 but Lord Stanley with 4,000 and his brother, Sir William Stanley with 2,500 betrayed; Henry...


The series follows the fictitious reign of Richard IV (1485–98). Richard and his Queen Gertrude of Flanders, the Witch Queen, have two sons: Gertrude of Flanders was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... Hans Baldung Griens Three Witches, circa 1514. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

It is later revealed in the episode "Born to be King" that after Harry's birth and before Edmund's, Queen Gertrude had an affair with Donald McAngus, Third Duke of Argyll. There is a possibility that Edmund was the result of this affair. If so, then Edmund is Harry's half-brother and also has another half-brother: Prince Henry Plantagenet of York (February/March 1460 - December 1498), known as Harry, was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder, played by Robert East His Royal titles included the Prince of Wales, Prince Regent, Captain of the Guard, Grand Warden of... The Lord Warden of the Marches was a position in the government of the medieval and Tudor Kingdom of England. ... A lunatic (colloquially: loony) is commonly used term for a person who is mentally ill, dangerous, foolish or unpredictable, a condition once called lunacy. ... King Richard III held the title of Duke of Gloucester from 1461 until his accession in 1483 The title Duke of Gloucester (pronounced gloss-ter) is a British royal title (after Gloucester), often conferred on one of the sons of the reigning monarch. ... A viceroy is a royal official who governs a country or province in the name of and as representative of the monarch. ... This article is about the country. ... The Sheriff of Nottingham was historically the office responsible for enforcing law and order in Nottingham and bringing criminals to justice. ... This article is about a title of nobility. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Lord (disambiguation). ... Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... This article is about the color. ... Adder is the name of several snakes, most belonging to the viper family, especially the Viperinae subfamily (pitless vipers). ... The Duke of Edinburgh is a dukedom associated with Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The Lord Warden of the Marches was a position in the government of the medieval and Tudor Kingdom of England. ... Outhouse near Crabapple Lake, United States, with wafer board walls, and a fiberglass ceiling An outhouse, (also known as a privy, kybo, jakes or earth-closet) usually refers to a type of toilet in a small structure separate from the main building which does not have a flush or sewer... Historically, the Royal Burgh of Roxburgh (Gaelic: Rosbrog), in the Scottish Borders, was an important trading burgh in the economy of Scotland. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the Scottish burgh. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Born to be King is the second episode of the first season of the BBC sitcom Blackadder (The Black Adder). ... Arms of the Duke of Argyll since 1406 The title Duke of Argyll was created in the peerage of Scotland in 1701 and in the peerage of the United Kingdom in 1892. ...

By the end of the series, events converge with our timeline, when King Richard IV and his entire family are poisoned, allowing Henry Tudor to take the throne as King Henry VII. He then rewrites history, presenting Richard III as a monster, and eliminating Richard IV's reign from the history books. Dougal McAngus, 4th Duke of Argyll is a fictional character in the first series of the British sitcom Blackadder. ... Arms of the Duke of Argyll since 1406 The title Duke of Argyll was created in the peerage of Scotland in 1701 and in the peerage of the United Kingdom in 1892. ... Commander-in-Chief (in NATO-lingo often C-in-C or CINC pronounced sink) is the commander of all the military forces within a particular region or of all the military forces of a state. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ...


In this series, the character of the Black Adder is somewhat different from later incarnations, being largely unintelligent and snivelling. The title of Laird of Roxburgh, Selkirk and Peebles may have been inspired by the then leader of the Liberal Party, David Steel, who was MP for that constituency when the series was written. This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... David Martin Scott Steel, Baron Steel of Aikwood, KT, KBE, PC (born 31 March 1938) is a British and Scottish politician and a Liberal Democrat member of the UK House of Lords. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Roxburghshire was a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1708 until 1918, when it was renamed Roxburgh and Selkirk. ...


The character does evolve through the series, however, and he begins showing signs of what his descendants will be like by the final episode, where he begins insulting everyone around him and making his own plans. This evolution follows naturally from the character's situation. "The Black Adder" is the title that Edmund adopts during the first episode (after first considering "The Black Vegetable"). Presumably one of his descendants adopted it as a surname prior to Blackadder II, where the title character becomes "Edmund Blackadder". Edmund's father the king can never remember his name at all (usually forgetting that he even has a second son), calling him "Edwin", "Osmond" or "Edna". As Edmund lies injured and near death in the final episode, his father finally addresses him by his actual name. "Father, you called me Edmund," says an astonished Edmund. "Sorry," replies the king, "Edgar". The king then toasts Edmund, shouting out to all those assembled, "My lords, I give you Edgar. . . " Edmund then motions the king close and whispers "The Black Adder" in his ear. The king then steps back and shouts, "The Black Dagger! May his name last as long as our dynasty". All assembled then drink poisoned wine and die. Rowan Atkinson as Blackadder the Third. ...


It is interesting to note that the unaired pilot episode, covering the basic plot of "Born to be King", has some differences to the first series. Baldrick was played by Philip Fox, who was replaced by Tony Robinson. The King is played by John Savident (famous for playing Fred Elliott in the TV soap Coronation Street), while Percy was still played by Tim McInnerny. Rowan Atkinson speaks, dresses and generally looks and acts like the later Blackadder descendants of the second series onwards, but no reason is given as to why he was changed to a snivelling wretch for the first series. One assumes that the change was driven by the writing, which would not have worked with a swaggering character in the lead. John Savident (born 1938) is a well-known British actor. ... Frederick Fred Handel Elliott was a fictional character on the soap opera Coronation Street. ... The first TIME cover devoted to soap operas: Dated January 12, 1976, Bill Hayes and Susan Seaforth Hayes of Days of our Lives are featured with the headline Soap Operas: Sex and suffering in the afternoon. A soap opera is an ongoing, episodic work of fiction, usually broadcast on television... Coronation Street is an award-winning British soap opera. ... Lord Percy Percy is the name given to a a pair of related fictional characters, played by Tim McInnerny, in the first two series of the popular British sitcom Blackadder, the Lord Percy of Blackadder II being the descendant of that seen in The Black Adder. ...


Richard Curtis admitted in a 2004 documentary on the show that just before recording began, producer John Lloyd came up to him with Atkinson and asked what Edmund's character was. Curtis then realised that, despite writing some funny lines, he had no idea how Rowan Atkinson was supposed to play his part. This is typical of the slighting and dismissive remarks Curtis makes about this first series. One supposes that Atkinson, who co-wrote this series but not the later ones, came up with his characterisation himself. Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ...


All the credits of this first series included "with additional dialogue by William Shakespeare" as famous quotes were worked in wherever possible. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The opening titles consisted of several stock shots of Edmund riding his horse on location, interspersed with different shots of him doing various silly things (and, usually, a shot of King Richard IV to go with Brian Blessed's credit). The closing titles were the same sequence of Edmund riding around, eventually falling off his horse, and then chasing after it. The theme tune also gained lyrics.


Series 2: Blackadder II

Main article: Blackadder II

Blackadder II is set in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603), played by Miranda Richardson. The principal character is Edmund, Lord Blackadder, the great-grandson of the original Black Adder. During the series, he often comes into contact with the Queen, her pretentious Lord Chamberlain Lord Melchett (Stephen Fry) and her demented former nanny Nursie (Patsy Byrne). Blackadder II was the second series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 9 January 1986 to 20 February 1986. ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... Queenie was a caricature of the historical figure Queen Elizabeth I of England, played by Miranda Richardson in the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Edmund, Lord Blackadder (1531-1566) was the main character in the second series of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ... This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The Lord Chamberlain or Lord Chamberlain of the Household is one of the chief officers of the Royal Household in the United Kingdom, and is to be distinguished from the Lord Great Chamberlain, one of the Great Officers of State. ... Melchett is a fictional character in the British television sitcom series Blackadder, played by Stephen Fry. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, novelist, filmmaker, journalist and television personality. ... Patsy Byrne as the character Nursie on Blackadder. ... Patsy Byrne is a British actress, born 13 July 1933. ...


Following the BBC's request for improvements to be made to the show, several changes were made. The second series was the first to establish the familiar character of Blackadder: cunning, shrewd and witty, in sharp contrast with Prince Edmund of the first series. To make the show more cost effective, it was also shot with far fewer outdoor scenes than the first series and several, frequently used, indoor scenes, such as the Queen's throne room and Blackadder's front room. Prince Edmund, The Black Adder Spoiler warning: Prince Edmund Plantagenet of York (August/ September, 1461 - December, 1498) (Later King Edmund of England - for about 30 seconds) was a fictional character in the first series of the popular BBC sitcom The Black Adder. ... Throne Room redirects here, for the album by CeCe Winans see Throne Room (album) A throne room is the room, often rather a hall, in the official residence of the crown, either a palace or a fortified castle, where the throne of a senior figure (usually a monarch) is set...


Series 3: Blackadder the Third

Main article: Blackadder the Third

Blackadder the Third is set in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, a period known as the Regency. In the series, E. Blackadder Esquire is the butler to the Prince of Wales (the prince is played by Hugh Laurie as a complete fop and idiot). Despite Edmund's respected intelligence and abilities, he has no personal fortune to speak of. Blackadder the Third was the third series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 17 September 1987 to 22 October 1987. ... The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ... Edmund Blackadder esq. ... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian and writer. ... FOP (Formatting Objects Processor) is an XSL-FO processor written in Java, which provides the feature to convert XSL-FO files to PDF or direct-printable-files. ...


As well as Rowan Atkinson and Tony Robinson in their usual roles, this series starred Hugh Laurie as the Prince Regent, and Helen Atkinson-Wood as Mrs. Miggins. The series features rotten boroughs (or "robber buttons"), Dr. Samuel Johnson (played by Robbie Coltrane), a child-prime minister, the French Revolution (featuring Chris Barrie) and the Scarlet Pimpernel, over-the-top theatrical actors, squirrel-hating highwaymen, and a duel with the Duke of Wellington (played by Stephen Fry). Prince Regent (or Prince Regnant, as a direct borrowing from French language) is a prince who rules a country instead of a sovereign, e. ... Helen Atkinson-Wood (born 14 March 1955 in Cheadle Hulme) is an English actress and comedian. ... Mrs. ... The term rotten borough referred to a parliamentary borough or constituency in Great Britain and Ireland which, due to size and population, was controlled and used by a patron to exercise undue and unrepresentative influence within parliament. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... For the jazz saxophonist, see Ravi Coltrane. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Chris Barrie (born March 28, 1960) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Arnold Rimmer in the cult BBC2 comedy Red Dwarf, and as Gordon Brittas in popular BBC1 sitcom The Brittas Empire. ... For the eponymous flower, see Scarlet pimpernel. ... English Renaissance theatre is English drama written between the Reformation and the closure of the theatres in 1642. ... Folk image of a mounted highwayman Highwayman was a term used particularly in Britain during the 17th and 18th centuries to describe robbers who targeted people traveling by stagecoach and other modes of transport along public highways. ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...


Series 4: Blackadder Goes Forth

Main article: Blackadder Goes Forth

This series is set in 1917, on the Western Front in the trenches of the First World War. Another "big push" is planned, and Captain Blackadder's one goal is to avoid getting shot, so he plots ways to get out of it. Blackadder is joined by the idealistic Edwardian twit Lieutenant George (Hugh Laurie), and the world's worst cook, Private S. Baldrick. Loony General Melchett (Stephen Fry) rallies his troops from a French mansion thirty-five miles from the front, where he is aided and abetted by his assistant, Captain Darling (Tim McInnerny), pencil-pusher supreme and Blackadder's nemesis, whose name is played on for maximum comedy value. Blackadder Goes Forth was the fourth and final series of the BBC situation comedy Blackadder, written by Richard Curtis and Ben Elton, which aired from 28 September to 2 November 1989. ... Western Front was a term used during the First and Second World Wars to describe the contested armed frontier between lands controlled by Germany to the East and the Allies to the West. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... For the village, see Passendale. ... Captain Edmund Blackadder (1871—1917 assumed, MIA) was the main character in the fourth and final series of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It succeeded the Victorian period and is sometimes extended to include the period up to the sinking of the RMS Titanic in 1912, the start of World War... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ... Baldrick is a fictional character featured in the television series Blackadder. ... Melchett is a fictional character in the British television sitcom series Blackadder, played by Stephen Fry. ... Captain Kevin Darling Captain Kevin Darling was a fictional character played by Tim McInnerny in series four of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ...


Except for the final episode, the episode titles are all plays on words involving military titles, e.g. "Captain Cook" (about food), "Private Plane" (involving Rik Mayall as a pilot).


The final episode of this series, "Goodbyeee...", is known for being extraordinarily poignant for a comedy — especially the final scene, which sees the main characters (Blackadder, Baldrick, George, and Darling) finally venturing forward and charging off to die in the fog and smoke of no man's land. Melchett remains at his office but blithely orders a reluctant Darling to fight with the others. "Goodbyeee..." had no closing titles, simply fading from the protagonists charging across no man's land under fire, to a field of poppies in the sunlight: like the poem "In Flanders Fields". This particular poignant moment illustrates how the series had the capacity to be more than just a sitcom. In a list of the 100 Greatest British Television Programmes drawn up by the British Film Institute in 2000, voted for by industry professionals, Blackadder Goes Forth was placed 16th. 29th Infantry Battalion, 2nd Division, Canadian Corps. ... This article is about the plant. ... A small portion of In Flanders Fields appeared alongside McCraes portrait on a Canadian stamp of 1968, issued to commemorate a half-century since his death. ... 100 Greatest British Television Programmes was a list compiled in 2000 by the British Film Institute (BFI) chosen by a poll of industry professionals, to determine what were the greatest British television programmes of any genre ever to have been screened. ... The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and...


Specials

The Pilot Episode

The Blackadder pilot was shot but never aired in the UK. One notable difference in the pilot, as in many pilots, is the casting. Baldrick is played not by Tony Robinson, but by Philip Fox. The script of the pilot is roughly the same as the episode Born to be King, albeit with some different jokes, with some jokes appearing in other episodes of the series.[2] To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article may require cleanup. ... Born to be King is the second episode of the first season of the BBC sitcom Blackadder (The Black Adder). ...


Blackadder: The Cavalier Years

This takes place at the time of the English Civil War. It is a short episode, shown as part of Comic Relief's Red Nose Day in 1988. The second series of Blackadder was set in Elizabethan England, starring (left to right) Tony Robinson as Baldrick, Rowan Atkinson as Edmund, Lord Blackadder, and Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy. ... For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ...


The 15-minute episode was set in November 1648, during the last days of the Civil War. Sir Edmund Blackadder and his servant, Baldrick, are the last two men loyal to the defeated King Charles I of England (played by Stephen Fry, portrayed as a soft-spoken, ineffective, slightly dim character, with the voice and manners of Charles I's namesake, the current Prince of Wales). They have given refuge to the King in Blackadder Hall. Edmund remains loyal because as a known royalist he sees the King as his only hope of survival and also because of his fear of a hideous age of Puritanism, full of moral prohibitions (as he describes it). However, due to a misunderstanding between Oliver Cromwell (guest-star Warren Clarke) and Baldrick, the King is arrested and sent to the Tower of London. The rest of the episode revolves around Blackadder's attempts to save the king, as well as improve his standing. Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Blackadder Hall has been the official residence of the fictional Blackadder family since before 1648. ... The Puritans were members of a group of radical Protestants which developed in England after the Reformation. ... For other uses, see Oliver Cromwell (disambiguation). ... Warren Clarke (b. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress The Tower of London, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically simply as The Tower), is an historic monument in central London, England on the north bank of the River Thames. ...

BBC One, Friday 5 February 1988, 9.45–10pm

Blackadder's Christmas Carol is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ...

The second special was broadcast in 1988. In a twist on Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol, Ebenezer Blackadder is the "kindest and loveliest" man in England, and could be considered to be the 'white sheep' of the Blackadder Family. One of the ghosts that so effectively convinced Ebenezer Scrooge to change his miserly ways displays for this Blackadder the contrary antics of his ancestors and descendants, and reluctantly informs him that if he turns evil his descendents will enjoy power and fortune, while if he remains the same a future Blackadder will live shamefully subjugated to a future incompetent Baldrick. This remarkable encounter causes him to proclaim, "Bad guys have all the fun", and adopt the personality with which viewers are more familiar. Blackadder in Blackadders Christmas Carol Blackadders Christmas Carol (1988) is a one-off episode of Blackadder, a parody of Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol. ... “Dickens” redirects here. ... A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (commonly known as A Christmas Carol ) is what Charles Dickens described as his little Christmas Book and was first published on December 19, 1843 with illustrations by John Leech. ... Ebenezer Blackadder is one of the many Blackadder ancestors from the BBC sitcom of the name. ... Black sheep is a derogatory colloquialism in the English language meaning an outsider or one who is different in a way which others disapprove of. ...

BBC One, Friday 23 December 1988, 9.30–10.15pm

The Shakespeare Sketch
A short sketch made in 1989 with Hugh Laurie as William Shakespeare and Rowan Atkinson as Blackadder (currently Shakespeare's agent). Blackadder complains that at five hours Hamlet is too long and that they need to cut out "some of the dead wood". is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Agency is an area of law dealing with a contractual or quasi-contractual relationship between at least two parties in which one, the principal, authorizes the other, the agent, to represent her or his legal interests and to perform legal acts that bind the principal. ... The American actor Edwin Booth as Hamlet, seated in a curule chair, c. ...


1775 (US series pilot)
This was the pilot for a prospective US Blackadder series. It was shot in 1992 and aired once, but failed to be picked up. Its cast was completely different and it was set in colonial Philadelphia.[2]


Blackadder and the King's Birthday
A short sketch with Rowan Atkinson as Lord Blackadder and Stephen Fry as King Charles II was performed at the Prince of Wales' 50th Birthday Gala. It was televised on ITV (in the UK) on 14 November 1998. Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, Scotland, and Ireland. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...


Woman's Hour Invasion
Woman's Hour is a show on BBC Radio 4 consisting of reports, interviews and debates aimed at women, and also includes short serials during the last quarter of the show. On one instance of the show, Blackadder and Baldrick show up, travel back in time and talk to Shakespeare and others. Womans Hour is a magazine programme broadcast on BBC Radio 4 in the United Kingdom. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ...


The purpose of the "invasion" was to raise money for Children In Need. [3] New BBC Children in Need Pudsey and logo from 2007 BBC Children in Need is an annual British charity appeal organised by the BBC. // Each year since 1980, the BBC has set aside one evening of programming on its flagship television channel, BBC One, to show events aimed at raising...


Blackadder: The Army Years
The Royal Variety Performance 2000. A short sketch with Rowan Atkinson as the modern-day Lord Edmund Blackadder of Her Royal Highness's regiment of shirkers. The sketch was written and introduced by Ben Elton. The Royal Variety Performance is a gala evening held in the United Kingdom once each year, and often in a theatre in Londons West End although it is increasingly being held outside of London. ...


Blackadder: Back & Forth

Blackadder: Back & Forth was originally shown in the Millennium Dome in 2000, followed by a screening on Sky One in the same year (and later on BBC1). It is set on the turn of the millennium, and features Lord Blackadder placing a bet with his friends — modern versions of Queenie (Miranda Richardson), Melchett (Stephen Fry), George (Hugh Laurie) and Darling (Tim McInnerny) — that he has built a working time machine. While this is intended as a clever con trick, the machine, surprisingly, does work, sending Blackadder and Baldrick back to the time of the dinosaurs, where they manage to cause the extinction of the dinosaurs, through the use of Baldrick's best, worst and only pair of underpants as a weapon against a hungry T.Rex. Blackadder: Back & Forth (1999) was created for showing during 2000 in a cinema built near the Millennium Dome, by Sky Television and the BBC, with sponsorship from—among others—Tesco PLC. Spoiler warning: Blackadder is entertaining guests on New Years Eve, 1999. ... The O2 redirects here. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... A millennium (pl. ... Poster for the 1960 adaptation of HG Wellss The Time Machine. ... Confidence Man redirects here. ... Orders & Suborders Saurischia Sauropodomorpha Theropoda Ornithischia Thyreophora Ornithopoda Marginocephalia Dinosaurs were vertebrate animals that dominated the terrestrial ecosystem for over 160 million years, first appearing approximately 230 million years ago. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Attempting to find their way home, they find themselves unable to (as Baldrick did not complete the machine's controls) and instead land at the court of Elizabeth I, where they are mistaken for the contemporary versions, and Blackadder takes the opportunity to assault William Shakespeare (Colin Firth) "on behalf of every schoolboy and schoolgirl for the next 400 years". They next arrive in Sherwood Forest where Blackadder, held hostage by Robin Hood (Rik Mayall, portrayed here as a generation of another Blackadder character, Lord Flashheart), talks the Merry Men into revolt. They eventually kill Robin and, after spending some time in the forest — in Edmund's case, with Maid Marian (Kate Moss) and in Baldrick's, with Will Scarlet — they return to the machine. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Colin Andrew Firth (born 10 September 1960) is an English film, television and stage actor. ... visitor centre Birch trees in the Sherwood Forest The legendary Major Oak Major Oak in December 2006 View of the Forest looking Northeast Sherwood Forest is a 4. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Robin Hood and Maid Marian (poster, ca. ... Not to be confused with Kate Mosse. ... Will Scarlet (also Scarlett, Scarlock, Scadlock, Scatheloke and Scathelocke) was a prominent member of Robin Hoods Merry Men. ...


The duo have brief stopovers at the Battle of Waterloo, where they accidentally kill Wellington (Stephen Fry), and in Roman Britain, where Centurion Blacaddicus and Legionary Baldricus face the Scots, before they finally find their way home, thanks to Baldrick's cunning plan of sticking his head into the toilet and seeing where the switches were when his life flashes before his eyes. Combatants First French Empire Seventh Coalition: United Kingdom Kingdom of Prussia Kingdom of the United Netherlands Kingdom of Hanover Duchy of Nassau Duchy of Brunswick Commanders Napoleon Bonaparte, Michel Ney Duke of Wellington, Gebhard von Blücher Prince William of Orange Strength 73,000 67,000 Coalition 60,000 Prussian... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... Roman Britain refers to those parts of the island of Great Britain controlled by the Roman Empire between 43 and 410. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Roman Legion (from Latin , from lego, legere, legi, lectus — to collect) is a term that can apply both as a transliteration of legio (conscription or army) to the entire Roman army and also, more narrowly (and more commonly), to the heavy infantry that was the basic military unit of... “Gael” redirects here. ...


After returning home to a French-ruled Britain where no-one's heard of Shakespeare or Robin Hood, Blackadder quickly returns to the machine and restores history. Upon his second return, the others comment that a machine like that could be dangerous in the wrong hands. This gives Blackadder a very cunning plan indeed, and he excuses himself while the others watch the Millennium celebrations on television.


The television shows King Edmund III and Queen Marian of Sherwood arriving at the Millennium Dome to be greeted by Prime Minister Baldrick. The Blackadders have finally achieved their destiny. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is, in practice, the political leader of the United Kingdom. ...


The Jubilee Girl
The Jubilee Girl was a 29 December 2002 BBC special about Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee Concert. The concert was hosted by Sir Osmond Darling-Blackadder (Keeper of Her Majesty's Lawn Sprinklers) and Dame Edna Everage. Earlier, a BBC "advertisement" for the celebrations also featured this incarnation of Blackadder, in which Sir Osmond is told to announce the event, even though he thinks it is a terrible idea: is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Queen Elizabeth II makes an official appearance at the CBC Headquarters as part of her Jubilee goodwill tour, October 2002. ... Dame Edna Everage featuring on a billboard at the Myer department store in Melbourne. ...

We don't want thousands of people wandering around here willy-nilly, leaving orange peel on the petunias and frightening the corgies.
I said to her, I said, you're the Queen, not Fatboy Slim.

FatBoy Slim (born Quentin Leo Cook on July 31, 1963,[1] also known as Norman Cook) is a British big beat musician. ...

Series 5/Film version

In January 2005, Tony Robinson told ITV's This Morning that Rowan Atkinson is more keen than he has been in the past to do a fifth series, set in the 1960s (centred around a rock band called the "Black Adder Five", with Baldrick — aka 'Bald Rick' — as the drummer) [4]. However, aside from a brief mention in June 2005 [5] there have been no further announcements from the BBC that a new series is being planned. Furthermore, in November 2005, Rowan Atkinson told BBC Breakfast that although he would very much like to do a new series set in Colditz or another prisoner-of-war camp during World War II, the chances of it happening are extremely low [4]. There were a couple of ideas that had previously floated for the fifth series. Batadder was intended to be a parody of Batman with Baldrick as the counterpart of Robin (suggested by John Lloyd). This idea eventually came to surface as part of the Comic Relief sketch "Spider-Plant Man" in 2005, with Atkinson as the title hero, Robinson as Robin, Jim Broadbent as Batman and Rachel Stevens as Jane Mary. Star Adder was to be set in space in the future (suggested by Atkinson)[6] though this too was touched upon in Blackadder's Christmas Carol. On April 10, 2007, Hello! reported that Atkinson was moving forward with his ideas for a fifth series. He said, "I like the idea of him being a prisoner of war in Colditz.......That would have the right level of authority and hierarchy which is apparent in all the Blackadders." [7] Independent Television (generally known as ITV, but also as ITV Network) is a public service network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up under the Independent Television Authority (ITA) to provide competition to the BBC. ITV is the oldest commercial television network in the UK. Since 1990 and the Broadcasting... This Morning logo (ITV1) This Morning is a British, ITV1 daytime television programme that started on 3 October 1988 and includes celebrity guests, entertainment, advice, competitions and features. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Baldrick is a fictional character featured in the television series Blackadder. ... BBC Breakfast is the morning television news programme simulcast on BBC One and BBC News 24. ... Colditz is a city in Saxony, Germany, located at the banks of the river Mulde. ... A Prisoner-of-war camp is a site for the containment of persons captured by the enemy in time of war. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Robin is a fictional character, a superhero in the DC Comics universe. ... There have been several notable individuals with the name John Lloyd. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ... Spider-Plant Man is a parody of Spider-Man that was made for the Comic Relief 2005 appeal and which aired on BBC One on March 11, 2005. ... Spider-Man swinging around his hometown, New York City. ... James Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning English theatre, film and television actor. ... Rachel Lauren Stevens (born April 9, 1978) is an English singer and actress and an occasional model who lives in Hampstead, London. ... Mary Jane Watson or Mary Jane Watson-Parker, depending on the adaptation, is (in the fictional world of Spider-Man) the wife of Peter Parker (Spider Man) and a supporting character in the Marvel Comics Spider-Man series. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... Speculative fiction - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Hello! is a weekly magazine specialising in celebrity news and gossip, published in Britain. ...


In June 2006, Rowan Atkinson (while filming Mr. Bean's Holiday in France) mentioned the possibility of a feature length version set during the Russian Revolution. Stephen Fry has expressed the view that, since the series went out on such a good "high", a film might not be a good idea.[8] Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... Mr. ... The Russian Revolution of 1917 was a series of political and social upheavals in Russia, involving first the overthrow of the tsarist autocracy, and then the overthrow of the liberal and moderate-socialist Provisional Government, resulting in the establishment of Soviet power under the control of the Bolshevik party. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, novelist, filmmaker, journalist and television personality. ...


Anachronism

The Blackadder series contain many instances of anachronism or anachronistic references. For example: The British sitcom, Blackadder, takes place in several historical eras. ...

  • In The Black Adder, the Duke of Edinburgh is one of Edmund's titles. However, Scotland had a separate monarchy at this point, and this title had not yet been created.
  • In several episodes of Blackadder II, Blackadder and others use the term dago to refer to the Spanish, even though this term did not come into being until the 1800s.
  • Blackadder the Third encompasses many historical persons and events from throughout the reign of George III (1760–1820) and even beyond, despite the appearance of taking place over a relatively short period of time. For example, Samuel Johnson completed his dictionary in 1755, which is the premise for the second episode. In the same installment, Dr Johnson is seen with Lord Byron, despite the fact that in real life, the latter was born four years after the former died. The most common setting appears to be during the English Regency (1811–20) despite the fact that Prince George is portrayed as thin and young, when actually he was in his early fifties and very, very fat. (Despite this disparity, jokes are made about Prince George's great weight.) There are also a number of references to Napoleon Bonaparte throughout the series, yet the French Revolution only takes place in the third episode.

Blackadder also refers to the Duke of Wellington as the Iron Duke even though the Duke of Wellington had not been given that nickname at that time. The Duke of Edinburgh is a dukedom associated with Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Motto Latin: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) (Scots: Wha daur meddle wi me) Capital Edinburgh¹ Language(s) Gaelic, Scots Government Monarchy King/Queen  - 843-860 Kenneth I  - 1587–1625 James VI  - 1702-1714 Anne Legislature Parliament of Scotland History  - United 843  - Union of the... Look up dago in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... “George III” redirects here. ... For other persons named Samuel Johnson, see Samuel Johnson (disambiguation). ... A Dictionary of the English Language, one of the most influential dictionaries in the history of the English language, was prepared by Samuel Johnson and published on April 15, 1755. ... Lord Byron redirects here. ... The English Regency, or simply the Regency, is a name given to the period from 1811 to 1820 in the history of England. ... Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... The French Revolution (1789–1815) was a period of political and social upheaval in the political history of France and Europe as a whole, during which the French governmental structure, previously an absolute monarchy with feudal privileges for the aristocracy and Catholic clergy, underwent radical change to forms based on... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ...


Cast

Ben Elton's arrival after the first series heralded the more frequent recruitment of comic actors from the famed "alternative" era for guest appearances, including Robbie Coltrane, Rik Mayall (who had actually appeared in the final episode of the first series as Mad Gerald), Adrian Edmondson, Nigel Planer, Mark Arden, Stephen Frost, Chris Barrie and Jeremy Hardy. Elton himself played an anarchist in Blackadder the Third. Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For the jazz saxophonist, see Ravi Coltrane. ... Richard Michael Rik Mayall (born 7 March 1958) is an English comedian and actor. ... Adrian Charles Edmondson (born 24 January 1957) is an English actor, comedian, director, and writer. ... Nigel George Planer (born February 22, 1953 in London) is an English actor, novelist and playwright. ... Mark Arden (born July 31, 1956) is a British comedian and actor, best known for being one half of comic double act The Oblivion Boys with Stephen Frost. ... Stephen Frost (born December 28, 1955) is a British comedian perhaps most famous for his work in the 1980s with Mark Arden as part of the double act The Oblivion Boys on Saturday Live. ... Chris Barrie (born March 28, 1960) is an English actor, best known for his roles as Arnold Rimmer in the cult BBC2 comedy Red Dwarf, and as Gordon Brittas in popular BBC1 sitcom The Brittas Empire. ... Jeremy Hardy (born 17 July 1961) is a British alternative comedian. ...


However, aside from the regular cast listed above, only one actor — Lee Cornes — appeared in an episode of all three Curtis-Elton series. He appeared as a guard in the episode Chains of Blackadder II; as the poet Shelley in the episode Ink and Incapability of Blackadder the Third; and as firing squad soldier Private Fraser in the episode Corporal Punishment of Blackadder Goes Forth. Lee Cornes is a British actor. ... Percy Bysshe Shelley (August 4, 1792 – July 8, 1822; pronounced ) was one of the major English Romantic poets and is widely considered to be among the finest lyric poets of the English language. ... A Private is a soldier of the lowest military rank (equivalent to Nato Rank Grades OR-1 to OR-3 depending on the force served in). ...


More 'establishment'-style actors, some at the veteran stage of their careers, were also recruited for roles. These included Brian Blessed, John Grillo, Tom Baker, Jim Broadbent, Hugh Paddick, Frank Finlay, Miriam Margolyes, Kenneth Connor, Bill Wallis, Ronald Lacey, Roger Blake, Denis Lill, Warren Clarke, Miriam Margolyes and Geoffrey Palmer who played Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig in Goodbyeee..., the final, fatal episode of Blackadder Goes Forth. Brian Blessed (pronounced //, or in the tradition of English poetry, Blessèd, born near Doncaster,October 9, 1937) is an English actor, who came to fame as PC Fancy Smith in the BBC TV police drama series Z Cars. ... For other persons named Tom Baker, see Tom Baker (disambiguation). ... James Broadbent (born May 24, 1949) is an Academy Award-winning English theatre, film and television actor. ... Hugh Paddick (Hoddesdon, Hertfordshire August 22, 1915 – November 11, 2000 in London), was a British actor, who appeared in the 1960s BBC radio show Round the Horne in sketches such as Charles and Fiona (as Charles) and Julian and Sandy (as Julian). ... Frank Finlay, CBE (born 6 August 1926 in Farnworth, in Bolton, Lancashire, England) is a British stage, film and television actor of English, Irish and Scottish descent. ... Miriam Margolyes OBE (born May 18, 1941) is a British character actress. ... Kenneth Connor (1916-1993) Kenneth Connor, MBE (6 June 1916 – 28 November 1993) was a British comedy stage, radio, film and TV actor, best known for the Carry On films. ... Bill Wallis (born 1937) is a British actor and comedian who has appeared in numerous radio and television roles, as well as the theatre. ... Ronald Lacey (June 18, 1935 - May 15, 1991) was born in the suburbs of London. ... Denis Lill (born 22 April 1942 in Hamilton, New Zealand) is a British actor. ... Warren Clarke (b. ... Miriam Margolyes OBE (born May 18, 1941) is a British character actress. ... Geoffrey Dyson Palmer OBE (born 4 June 1927) is an English actor, noted mostly for his extensive career in British sitcoms. ... Field Marshal Lord Haig Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE, ADC (June 19, 1861 – January 28, 1928) was a British soldier and senior commander (Field Marshal) during World War I. He was commander of the British Expeditionary Force during the Battle of the Somme... Goodbyeee. ...


Unusually for a sitcom based loosely on factual events and in the historical past, a man was recruited for one episode essentially to play himself. Political commentator Vincent Hanna played a character billed as "his own great-great-great grandfather" in the episode Dish and Dishonesty of Blackadder the Third. Hanna was asked to take part because the scene was of a by-election in which Baldrick was a candidate and, in the style of modern television, Hanna gave a long-running "live" commentary of events at the count (and interviewed candidates and election agents) to a crowd through the town hall window. Vincent Leo Martin Hanna (August 9, 1939 – July 22, 1997) was a Northern Irish television journalist famed for his coverage of United Kingdom byelections. ... Dish and Dishonesty is an episode of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... City Hall is a 1996 film directed by Harold Becker. ...


List

Each series tended to feature the same set of regular actors in different period settings. This article lists the characters (and the actors who played them) in the four series and three special episodes of the British sitcom Blackadder. ...


The only character types to retain the same name throughout were:

Some characters recurred as their own presumed descendants: Rowan Atkinson as Blackadder the Third. ... Rowan Sebastian Atkinson (born 6 January 1955) is an English comedian, actor and writer, famous for his title roles in the British television comedies Blackadder and Mr. ... The House of Plantagenet (IPA: ), also called the House of Anjou, or Angevin dynasty was originally a noble family from France, which ruled the County of Anjou. ... Baldrick is a fictional character featured in the television series Blackadder. ... Tony Robinson (born 15 August 1946) is an English actor, broadcaster and political campaigner, known for playing the part of Baldrick in the BBC TV series Blackadder and for hosting a number of shows on Channel 4, the most noteworthy being Time Team. ...

  • Melchett - Stephen Fry
    • Sycophantic Lord Melchett (a sort of William Cecil character), an advisor to Queen Elizabeth I, series 2
    • General Sir Anthony Cecil Hogmanay Melchett, a blustering buffoon and presumed descendant of Lord Melchett, series 4
    • Bishop Flavius Melchett - Blackadder Back and Forth
    • General Melchecus - Blackadder Back & Forth
    • The Duke Of Wellington, not a Melchett, but definitely a precursor to the series 4 Melchett character (e.g. his use of Melchett's eventual catchphrase "Behh!"), series 3
  • Lord Percy Percy - Tim McInnerny, Series 1 and 2
  • Kevin Darling - Tim McInnerny
    • Captain Kevin Darling, Series 4
    • Archdeacon Darling and Duke of Darling / Duc de Darling - Blackadder Back and Forth
  • George - Hugh Laurie
    • HRH The Prince George Augustus Frederick Hanover, Series 3
    • Lieutenant The Honourable George Colthurst St. Bartleigh, Series 4
  • Elizabeth - Miranda Richardson
    • Queen Elizabeth I in Series 2, Christmas Carol, and Back & Forth
    • Lady Elizabeth in Back & Forth.
  • Bob - Gabrielle Glaister - an attractive girl who poses as a man called Bob, before revealing her true gender and becoming romantically involved with Flashheart (2 and 4)
  • Lord Flashheart - Rik Mayall, a vulgar yet successful rival of Blackadder (2 and 4)
    • a decidedly Flashheart-like Robin Hood in Back and Forth.

Character types played by the same actor: Melchett is a fictional character in the British television sitcom series Blackadder, played by Stephen Fry. ... Stephen John Fry (born 24 August 1957) is an English comedian, writer, actor, novelist, filmmaker, journalist and television personality. ... William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley (13 September 1521–4 August 1598), was an English politician, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign. ... Queenie was a caricature of the historical figure Queen Elizabeth I of England, played by Miranda Richardson in the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England. ... Lord Percy Percy is the name given to a a pair of related fictional characters, played by Tim McInnerny, in the first two series of the popular British sitcom Blackadder, the Lord Percy of Blackadder II being the descendant of that seen in The Black Adder. ... Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy in Blackadder II. Tim McInnerny (stress on the penultimate syllable of McInnerny) was born September 18, 1956 and is a British actor. ... Captain Kevin Darling Captain Kevin Darling was a fictional character played by Tim McInnerny in series four of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ... Tim McInnerny as Lord Percy Percy in Blackadder II. Tim McInnerny (stress on the penultimate syllable of McInnerny) was born September 18, 1956 and is a British actor. ... Captain Kevin Darling Captain Kevin Darling was a fictional character played by Tim McInnerny in series four of the popular BBC sit-com Blackadder. ... George is the name of two characters appearing in the historical BBC sitcom Blackadder played by Hugh Laurie. ... James Hugh Calum Laurie, OBE (born June 11, 1959) is an English actor, comedian and writer. ... Queenie was a caricature of the historical figure Queen Elizabeth I of England, played by Miranda Richardson in the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England. ... Miranda Jane Richardson (born 3 March 1958) is an Academy Award nominated English actress. ... Queenie was a caricature of the historical figure Queen Elizabeth I of England, played by Miranda Richardson in the second series of the BBC sitcom Blackadder, which was set in Elizabethan England. ... Bob is a pseudonym used by two characters in the sitcom Blackadder, both female and played by Gabrielle Glaister. ... Gabrielle Glaister (born 27 July in 1961, England) is a British actress. ... Lord Flashheart is the name of two characters (the first presumably an ancestor of the second) who appeared in two episodes of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... Richard Michael Rik Mayall (born 7 March 1958) is an English comedian and actor. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ...

  • Stephen Fry played Lord Frondo; King Charles I; Bishop Flavius Melchett; and the Duke of Wellington.
  • Tim McInnerny played The Scarlet Pimpernel (alias Lord Topper and Le Comte De Frou Frou) for one episode in the third.
  • Hugh Laurie also played Simon "Farters Parters" Partridge (also known as Mr Ostrich) in episode five, and Prince Ludwig the Indestructible in the final installment of Blackadder II, and Lord Pigmot.
  • Miranda Richardson played Miss Amy Hardwood (aka The Shadow) in "Amy and Amiability" in the third series, the dutiful Nurse Mary Fletcher-Brown in "General Hospital" from the fourth, and Queen Asphyxia in the Christmas Carol.
  • Rik Mayall plays 'Mad Gerald' in the first series and the dashing Lord Flashheart, a vulgar yet successful rival of Blackadder in both the second and fourth series; he also plays Robin Hood in Back & Forth.
  • Gabrielle Glaister plays an attractive girl who poses as a man and calls herself Bob in both the second and fourth series.

Non-recurring: Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Field Marshal Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, KG, GCB, GCH, PC, FRS (c. ... For the eponymous flower, see Scarlet pimpernel. ... // Binomial name Carolus Linnaeus, 1758 The present-day distribution of Ostriches. ... Amy Hardwood is a fictional character in the British sitcom Blackadder. ... Amy and Amiability is an episode of the BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... General Hospital is the penultimate episode of the fourth series of the BBC One sitcom Blackadder Goes Forth. ... Richard Michael Rik Mayall (born 7 March 1958) is an English comedian and actor. ... Lord Flashheart is the name of two characters (the first presumably an ancestor of the second) who appeared in two episodes of the popular BBC sitcom Blackadder. ... For other uses, see Robin Hood (disambiguation). ... Gabrielle Glaister (born 27 July in 1961, England) is a British actress. ... Bob is a pseudonym used by two characters in the sitcom Blackadder, both female and played by Gabrielle Glaister. ...

  • Patsy Byrne received plaudits for her crucial role as Nursie in all six episodes of Blackadder II but never featured in either of the subsequent series, either as a regular character or one-off. Her only future roles in Blackadder were in Blackadder Back & Forth and Blackadder's Christmas Carol, when she briefly reprised Nursie during scenes set in the Blackadder II era and then in Carol's Christmas future scenes, also playing a member of the "triple husbandoid" to Queen Asphyxia, credited as 'Bernard' (though not named in the special this was the name Nursie clamed to have been born under in Series II).
  • Similarly, Helen Atkinson-Wood played the role of Mrs. Miggins in all six episodes of Blackadder the Third, but did not appear again in the programme, although she was mentioned in "Goodbyeee", the final episode of Blackadder Goes Forth and a Mrs. Miggins had been mentioned several times in Blackadder II

Patsy Byrne is a British actress, born 13 July 1933. ... Helen Atkinson-Wood (born 14 March 1955 in Cheadle Hulme) is an English actress and comedian. ... Mrs. ...

Precursors

The plot device of a 'modern' man in ancient times is not new, and has a venerable history in fiction.


In TV comedies, perhaps the most obvious 'ancestor' of the Blackadder series is Up Pompeii!. The series, starring Frankie Howerd as Lurcio, was set in ancient Rome and made similar play with historical characters. Even the apparent 'reincarnation' device found in Blackadder [9] is also used. The TV series inspired three feature films, the first of which, Up Pompeii!, was also set in Imperial Rome with Howerd as Lurcio. The film ended with the eruption of Vesuvius and had a final scene set in the present day, in which the actors all played tourists closely resembling their ancient roles, with Howerd being a tour guide, showing them around the ruins of Pompeii. The second was set in medieval times and called Up the Chastity Belt, with Howerd's character as 'Lurkalot' (cf The Black Adder). In this, Howerd's character is discovered to be a double of Richard Lionheart, and later assumes the throne under his identity while the real king leads a bawdy life as Lurkalot (cf Blackadder the Third). Most strikingly, the third and final Up ... film, Up the Front, sees Howerd's character reborn as 'Private Lurk' and fighting in the First World War (cf Blackadder Goes Forth). Up Pompeii! was a British television comedy series of the 1970s, starring Frankie Howerd. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the theological concept. ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... This article is about the mountain in Italy. ... A Tour Guide is an occupation or vocation of someone who conducts tours usually within the tourism industry. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... A political decoy is a person employed to impersonate a politician, in order to draw attention away from the real person or to take risks on their behalf. ... Richard I (8 September 1157 – 6 April 1199) was King of England from 6 July 1189 to 6 April 1199. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


Notes

References

  • All series and many of the specials are available on DVD and video, as well as many available on BBC Audio Cassette.
  • Curtis, Richard, Elton, and Atkinson. Blackadder: The Whole Damn Dynasty 1485–1917. Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN 0-14-029608-5. Being the—almost—complete scripts of the four regular series.
  • Howarth, Chris, and Steve Lyons. Cunning: The Blackadder Programme Guide. Virgin Publishing, 2002. ISBN 0-7535-0447-2. An unofficial guide to the series, with asides, anecdotes and observations.
  • Curtis, Richard, Ben Elton. Blackadder: Back & Forth. Penguin Books, 2000. ISBN 0-14-029135-0. A script book with copious photographs from the most recent outing.

Size comparison: A 12 cm Sony DVD+RW and a 19 cm Dixon Ticonderoga pencil. ... Bottom view of VHS cassette with magnetic tape exposed Top view of VHS cassette with front casing removed The Video Home System, better known by its abbreviation VHS, is a recording and playing standard. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:


Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... The domain name bbc. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... The Open Directory Project (ODP), also known as dmoz (from , its original domain name), is a multilingual open content directory of World Wide Web links owned by Netscape that is constructed and maintained by a community of volunteer editors. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Blackadder - definition of Blackadder in Encyclopedia (5310 words)
At the end of the third series, Blackadder assumes the role of Prince Regent after the real prince is killed in a duel with the Duke of Wellington, and (presumably, though not definitely) goes on to assume the identity of George IV.
Blackadder II is set in England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (reigned 1558–1603).
Blackadder The Third is set in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, a period known as the Regency.
Edmund Blackadder - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (446 words)
In Blackadder II the central character is Edmund, Lord Blackadder, a nobleman in the court of Elizabeth I of England.
In Blackadder: The Cavalier Years the central character is Sir Edmund Blackadder, a loyal royalist and friend of Charles I of England.
In Blackadder Goes Forth the central character is Captain Blackadder, an officer in the British Army during World War I.
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