FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Black mustard
?
Black mustard
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Division: Magnoliophyta
Class: Magnoliopsida
Order: Brassicales
Family: Brassicaceae
Genus: Brassica
Species: B. nigra
Binomial name
Brassica nigra
{{{author}}}

Black mustard, Brassica nigra, is a plant of the family Brassicaceae. Its distribution is probably now in temperate regions, world wide; it is widely cultivated for its seeds. Scientific classification or biological classification is how biologists group and categorize extinct and living species of organisms. ... Divisions Land plants (embryophytes) Non-vascular plants (bryophytes) Marchantiophyta - liverworts Anthocerotophyta - hornworts Bryophyta - mosses Vascular plants (tracheophytes) Lycopodiophyta - clubmosses Equisetophyta - horsetails Pteridophyta - true ferns Psilotophyta - whisk ferns Ophioglossophyta - adderstongues Seed plants (spermatophytes) †Pteridospermatophyta - seed ferns Pinophyta - conifers Cycadophyta - cycads Ginkgophyta - ginkgo Gnetophyta - gnetae Magnoliophyta - flowering plants Adiantum pedatum (a fern... Classes Magnoliopsida - Dicots Liliopsida - Monocots The flowering plants (also called angiosperms) are a major group of land plants. ... Orders see text Dicotyledons or dicots are flowering plants whose seed contains two embryonic leaves or cotyledons. ... Families See text The Brassicales are an order of flowering plants, belonging to the rosid group of dicotyledons. ... Genera See text The flowering plant family Brassicaceae, also called Cruciferae, is known as the mustard family or cabbage family. ... Species See text Brassica is a genus of plants in the mustard family (Brassicaceae). ... In biology, binomial nomenclature is the formal method of naming species. ... Genera See text The flowering plant family Brassicaceae, also called Cruciferae, is known as the mustard family or cabbage family. ...


Black mustard has small hard seeds that are about 1 mm in diameter and are very flavorful, although they have almost no aroma. The seeds have a significant amount of fatty oil. This oil is used often for cooking in India.


The plant itself can grow from 2 to 8 feet tall with small yellow flowers. These flowers are usually up to 1/3" across, with 4 petals each. Its leaves are covered in small hairs. The leaves can wilt on hot days, but recover at night.


Source: [1] [2]


  Results from FactBites:
 
Mustard - LoveToKnow 1911 (1500 words)
One drachm to half an ounce of mustard in a tumblerful of warm water is an efficient emetic, acting directly upon the gastric sensory nerves, long before any of the drug could be absorbed so as to reach the emetic centre in the medulla oblongata.
A mustard sitz bath will often hasten and alleviate the initial stage of menstruation, and is sometimes used to expedite the appearance of the eruption in measles and scarlatina.
The domestic remedy of hot water and mustard for children's feet in cases of cold or threatened cold may be of some use in drawing the blood to the surface and thus tending to prevent an excessive vascular dilatation in the nose or bronchi.
Museum homepage (737 words)
Mustard is used in the form of poultices for external application near the seat of inward inflammation, chiefly in pneumonia, bronchitis and other diseases of the respiratory organs.
Black mustard is in general similar to white mustard in growth and appearance.
Black Mustard is little cultivated in the U.S., but is a common weed and young leaves are sometimes gathered and used as pot herbs.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m