FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
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Encyclopedia > Black conservatism
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Black Conservatism is a political and social movement within African American culture that aligns largely with the conservatives, emphasizing patriotism, independence and self-help, free markets and within some circles Christian Right values. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... African American history is the portion of American history that specifically discusses the African American or Black American ethnic group in the United States. ... Slave sale in Easton, Maryland The history of slavery in the United States (1619-1865) began soon after the English colonists first settled in Virginia and lasted until the passage of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. ... Military history of African Americans is that of African Americans in the United States since the arrival of the first black slaves in 1619 to the present day. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For the automotive term, see redline. ... American Civil Rights Movement redirects here. ... Reparations for slavery is a movement in the United States, which suggests that the government apologize to slave descendants for their hardships, and bestow on them reparations, whether it be in the form of money, land, or other goods. ... In the United States, African American culture or Black culture includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... African American neighborhoods or black neighborhoods are types of ethnic enclaves found in many cities in the United States. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Kwanzaa (or Kwaanza) is a week-long Pan-African festival primarily honoring African-American heritage. ... African American art is a broad term describing the visual arts of the American black community. ... This is a list of museums about, or otherwise focused on African Americans. ... African American dances in the vernacular tradition (academically known as African American vernacular dance) are those dances which have developed within African American communities in everyday spaces, rather than in dance studios, schools or companies. ... The Color Purple by Alice Walker African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The term black church or African American church refers to predominantly African American Christian churches that minister to black communities in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Nation of Islam (NOI) is a religious and social/political organization founded in the United States by Wallace Fard Muhammad in 1930 with the self-proclaimed goal of resurrecting the spiritual, mental, social, economic condition of the black man and woman of America and belief that God will bring... Black Hebrew Israelites (also Black Hebrews, African Hebrew Israelites, and Hebrew Israelites) are groups of people of African ancestry situated mostly in the United States who claim to be descendants of the ancient Israelites. ... This article is about the West African religion. ... Hoodoo is a form of predominantly African American, Christian, traditional folk magic. ... For other uses, see Santeria (disambiguation). ... Pan-African people are all people with African physical features. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Black Capitalism is a name for a movement among African Americans to build wealth through the ownership and development of businesses. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was an African American organization founded to promote civil rights and self-defense. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... “CORE” redirects here. ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... National Urban League Logo The National Urban League (NUL) is a nonpartisan civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States. ... The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is a non-profit organization founded in Chicago, Illinois, in 1915 as The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History by Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ... National Black Chamber of Commerce The National Black Chamber of Commerce, (NBCC), was “incorporated in March of 1993, in Washington D.C.” The organizations mission is “To economically empower and sustain African American communities, through the process of entrepreneurship and capitalistic activity within the United States and via interaction with... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The Links, Incorporated is an exclusive non-profit organization based upon the ideals of combining friendship and community service and was was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 9, 1946, from a group of ladies known as the Philadelphia Club to have focuses on civic, cultural, and educational endeavors[1... The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) was founded in 1935 by Mary McLeod Bethune, child of slave parents, distinguished educator and government consultant. ... Bud Fowler, the first professional black baseball player with one of his teams, Western of Keokuk, Iowa The Negro Leagues were American professional baseball leagues comprising predominantly African-American teams. ... The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... logo of Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) is a College athletic conference consisting of historically black colleges located in the southern United States. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Notable African-American or Black people, other than Black Caribbeans. ... African-Americans are a demographic minority in the United States. ... This is a list of landmark legislation, court decisions, executive orders, and proclamations in the United States significantly affecting African Americans. ... This is an alphabetical list of African-American-related topics: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A African American African American contemporary issues African American culture... For other uses, see Nas (disambiguation). ... Hip Hop Is Dead is a 2006 album by American hip-hop artist Nas that was released on December 19, 2006. ... American conservatism is a constellation of political ideologies within the United States under the blanket heading of conservative. ... Defence of the fatherland is a commonplace of patriotism: The statue in the courtyard of École polytechnique, Paris, commemorating the students involvement in defending France against the 1814 invasion of the Coalition. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      The Christian...

Contents

Overview

For many black conservatives, their key political mission is to bring repair and success to the Black community by applying the following fundamental principles: the pursuit of educational and professional excellence as a means of advancement within the society; policies that promote safety and security in the community beyond the typical casting of a criminal as a "victim" of societal racism; local economic development through free enterprise rather than looking to the federal government for assistance; empowerment of the individual via self-improvement (virtue), conscience, and supernatural grace.[1]. However, the policy advocated by by many Black conservatives is typically in conflict with some of the key points in the common social, economic, and political positions that a high percentage of African-Americans favor. These include role of welfare state, affirmative action, reparation of slavery, black solidarity/nationalism, merit of globalisation and free market, desirability of some aspect of popular black entertainment such as hip hop. More controversially, black conservative are sometimes being accused of being Uncle Tom. For example, Ebony, in their May 2001 “100+ Most Influential Black Americans” issue, did not include a number of influential African Americans such as Thomas Sowell, Shelby Steele, Armstrong Williams, Walter Williams and, most notably, Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. The Economist, a British libertarian magazine, describe the exclusion of Thomas from the list as spiteful.[4] This article is about the racial term. ... Thomas Sowell (born June 30, 1930), is an American economist, political writer, and commentator. ... Shelby Steele (born 1946, Chicago) is an American author, columnist, documentary film maker, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, specialising in the study of race relations, multiculturalism and affirmative action. ... Armstrong Williams (born February 5, 1959) is an African American political commentator. ... This article is about the economist, Walter Williams. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ...


A fundamental breaking point between the black liberal and the black conservative is focused around the balance between a perception of the impact that historical slavery and oppression has on Black people living today versus the power and consequences of personal choices that a person makes in determining his ultimate fate. The Black conservative is more inclined to advance the notion that individual choices toward success and a commitment toward changing one's individual behavior will allow the individual to advance in society with respect to the rights that blacks have been afforded due to the Civil Rights Movement. The Black liberal counters that collective success in which the least among them are focused upon and brought up to standard is worthy of consideration. Somewhat ironically, Black conservatives find common ground with Black Nationalists to the extent that they both believe that the black masses have been duped by the politics of condescending white liberals vis a vis the maintenance of the Welfare state. There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ...


Typically, black conservatives oppose affirmative action which is overwhelmingly supported by the majority of African American communities. They tend to argue that efforts to obtain reparations for slavery are either misguided or counter-productive. They also favour integration of African Americans into mainstream America and, consequently, are openly hostile to notions of Black nationalism. Black conservative politicians are more inclined to support Republican Party economic policies (i.e., globalization, free-trade agreements, tax cuts). GOP redirects here. ... Puxi side of Shanghai, China. ... A South Korean container ship approaching the Bay Bridge in San Francisco Bay. ...


Black conservatives also tend to be culturally conservative and put a priority on maintaining strong ties to black cultural and family traditions. This would include preferences to Jazz and Gospel music over Hip-hop and so-called Urban Contemporary music. Thomas Sowell, self proclaimed black libertarian, asserted that what some portray as "authentic black culture" is actually a relic of a highly disfunctional white southern redneck culture. Black conservatives favor traditional nuclear family arrangements and oppose gay marriage. They are particularly strong critics of out of wedlock births. In the tradition of African American politics and intellectual life, black conservatives tend to side with Booker T. Washington as contrasted with W.E.B. DuBois. For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... Thomas Sowell (born June 30, 1930), is an American economist, political writer, and commentator. ... Same-sex marriage is marriage between individuals who are of the same legal or biological sex. ... Booker Taliaferro Washington (April 5, 1856 – November 14, 1915) was an American educator, author and leader of the African American community. ... W. E. B. Du Bois William Edward Burghardt Du Bois (pronounced ) (February 23, 1868 – August 27, 1963) was a civil rights activist, sociologist, educator, historian, writer, editor, poet, and scholar, and socialist. ...


Although black conservatives are predominantly protestant, black conservative thought has much in common with Catholic intellectual thought regarding the dignity of the human person- especially the thought of the former Pope John Paul II. Martin Luther King, Jr., himself, found inspiration in the theological work of Saint Thomas Aquinas as well as the Catholic writer, Jacques Maritain- who contributed to the development of human rights policy at the United Nations.


Black conservatives and Black Republicans

According to a 2004 study 13.7% of blacks identified as "Conservative" or "Extremely Conservative" [2] with another 14.4 identifying as slightly conservative. However the same study indicated less than ten percent identified as Republican or Republican leaning in any fashion. Likewise, a recent Pew Research Center survey showed that 19% of blacks identify as Religious Right [3]. In 2004 the Pew Research Center indicated only 7% of blacks identify as Republican.[4] Hence a certain percentage of noted Black conservatives (such as Harold Ford Jr.) are likely connected to the Blue Dog Democrats or Democrats for Life of America movements. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Harold Ford Jr. ... Blue Dog Democrats are a group of 44 non-centrist, right wing house members who often defy the progressives and centrists within their own party. ... This article is about the political organization. ...


From Reconstruction up until the New Deal the black population tended to vote Republican as the Republican Party, particularly in the Southern United States, was seen as less racist than the Democratic Party. (See Dixiecrats for more on this) For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... This article is about Franklin D. Roosevelts 1930s political reforms in the United States. ... Historic Southern United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Another case study of differences between Black conservatives and Black Republicans is an emphasis on personal empowerment versus theological perspectives. Black Republicans like Colin Powell hold to the social ideas articulated by the early Radical Republicans like Frederick Douglass while at the same time supporting the self-empowerment message of Booker T. Washington. Many social conservatives who are black and Republican hold to a biblically based empowerment although they also appreciate Booker's emphasis on personal accomplishment. Conservatives like the Texas minister T. D. Jakes are evangelical African Americans who support policies more in common but not totally in line with many white Evangelicals. General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Thomas Dexter T. D. Jakes Sr. ...


Black conservatives and black churches

The African American church has traditionally been an important element to social and political movements in the community. In general these have been identified by figures of the Left or liberalism, like Jesse Jackson, but this is not consistently true. On issues concerning homosexuality Black Protestants are more socially conservative than other groups exempting White Evangelicals. [5] Their view on the issue of homosexual teachers changed less than any other segment based on religion or race. Jesse Louis Jackson, Sr. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Relation to other religions Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Christianity Portal This box:      In contemporary usage, the word evangelicalism refers to a collection of religious beliefs, practices, and traditions typified by an emphasis on the Bible and on evangelism [1]. Evangelical...

  • 1954 - President Dwight Eisenhower appoints J. Ernest Wilkins as Assistant Secretary of Labor.
  • 1960 - Jackie Robinson, the first black Major League Baseball player, engaged in political campaigning for a number of politicians, including the Democrat Hubert Humphrey and Richard Nixon.
  • 1966 - Edward W. Brooke (R-MA) is the first African-American elected to U.S. Senate by popular vote.
  • 1968 - Arthur A. Fletcher is appointed Assistant Secretary of Labor; he will be a candidate for Chairman of the Republican National Committee in '76 and appointed Chairman of the US Commission on Civil Rights in '90.
  • 1975 - President Gerald Ford appoints William T. Coleman Secretary of Transportation. James B. Parsons is named Chief Judge of the US District Court in Chicago, the first African-American to hold such a position.
  • 1980 - NAACP President Benjamin Hooks is invited to address the Republican National Convention
  • 1981 - President Ronald Reagan appoints Clarence Pendleton, Jr. as Chairman of the US Civil Rights Commission
  • 1982 - President Reagan appoints Clarence Thomas as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
  • 1989 - President George H.W. Bush appoints Louis Sullivan as Secretary of Health and Human Services, General Colin L. Powell as Chair of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Condoleezza Rice as Director of the National Security Council.
  • 1990 - Gary Franks is elected to US Congress (CT)
  • 1991 - President Bush appoints Clarence Thomas to U.S. Supreme Court
  • 1998 - U.S. House of Representatives elects J. C. Watts (R-OK) to be Chairman of the House Republican Conference.
  • 2001 - President George W. Bush appoints General Colin L. Powell as the Secretary of State; Roderick R. Paige as the Secretary of Education; Condoleezza Rice as Advisor of the National Security Council and, subsequently, Secretary of State; Alphonso Jackson as the Deputy Secretary to Housing and Urban Development; Claude Allen as the Deputy Secretary of Health and Human Services; Leo S. Mackay, Jr. as the Deputy Secretary of Veterans Affairs; Larry D. Thompson as the Deputy Attorney General; and Stephen A. Perry as Administrator of General Services Administration

Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Edward William Brooke III (born October 26, 1919) is an American politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent, Endicott Peabody 58%-42%. Born in... Born in Kentucky, Coleman arrived in California in 1849. ... Dr. Benjamin Lawson Hooks (born January 31, 1925), is an American civil rights leader. ... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... Louis Henri Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. ... Colin Luther Powell (pronounced Coe-lin, born April 5, 1937) was the 65th United States Secretary of State, serving from January 20, 2001 to January 26, 2005 under President George W. Bush. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Gary A. Franks (b. ... Julius Caesar Watts, Jr. ... Alphonso Roy Jackson (born September 9, 1945 in Marshall, Texas) is the current and 13th United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). ... Claude Alexander Allen, Former Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy Claude Alexander Allen (born October 11, 1960) was the Assistant to the President for Domestic Policy in George W. Bushs White House and a former nominee for a judgeship on the United States Court of Appeals for the... Larry Thompson was briefly regarded as the leading candidate for Attorney General after John Ashcroft left the post. ...

Notable black conservatives

United States politicians

African American Portal

Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... John Kenneth Blackwell (born February 28, 1948), is a former secretary of state for the U.S. state of Ohio who made an unsuccessful bid as the Republican nominee for Governor of Ohio in the 2006 election. ... For the football player of the same name, see Keith Butler (football player). ... Dr. Alveda C. King-Tookes is the niece of civil rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... The Alexis de Tocqueville Institution (not institute; abbreviated AdTI) is a Washington, D.C.-based commercial think-tank and consultancy that produces reports at the behest of its sponsors. ... Roderick Raynor Rod Paige (born June 17, 1933), served as the 7th United States Secretary of Education from 2001 to 2005. ... General Colin Luther Powell, United States Army (Ret. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Michael Powell Michael Kevin Powell (born March 23, 1963) is an American Republican politician. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... The Assistant to the President for National Security Affairs, commonly referred to as the National Security Advisor, serves as the chief advisor to the President of the United States on national security issues. ... Former state delegate Winsome Earle Sears is one of leading Black Republicans in the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Michael S. Steele (born October 19, 1958) is the chairman of GOPAC and a former Lieutenant Governor of Maryland, having been elected on the same ticket as Governor Robert L. Ehrlich in 2002. ... Categories: People stubs | Members of the Durham City Council ... Julius Caesar J.C. Watts (born November 18, 1957) is an American conservative Republican politician and former Representative from Oklahoma in the U.S. Congress. ...

United States judges

Wallace B. Jefferson made Texas history as the first African American Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Texas. ... The U.S. state of Texas has two courts of last resort: the Texas Supreme Court, which is the highest state appellate court for civil matters (including juvenile delinquency, which the law considers to be a civil matter and not criminal) and the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals, the highest... The Honorable Janice Rogers Brown Janice Rogers Brown (born May 11, 1949 in Greenville, Alabama) is a federal judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, or called simply the DC Circuit Court, is the federal appellate court for the U.S. district court in Washington, DC. Appeals from the DC Circuit, as with all the US Courts of Appeals, are heard by the... Clarence Thomas (born June 23, 1948) is an American jurist and has been an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States since 1991. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ...

Talk show hosts

  • Larry Elder, author of 10 Things You Can't Say in America, radio show host
  • Alan Keyes, radio host, U.N. Ambassador, presidential candidate, author
  • Angela McGlowan, Republican political analyst for Fox News Network who has been nicknamed the "Black Ann Coulter"
  • Jesse Lee Peterson, president of The Brotherhood Organization, television and radio host
  • Armstrong Williams, author of Beyond Blame, TV host of On Point

Larry Elder Laurence Allen Larry Elder (born April 27, 1952 in Los Angeles, California) aka the Sage from South Central is an American libertarian-minded Republican (he has sometimes referred to his views as conservatarian) radio and former TV talk show host and author whose program The Larry Elder Show... Alan Keyes (born August 7, 1950) is an American political activist, author and former diplomat. ... Angela McGlowan, is a political analyst and former beauty queen from Oxford, Mississippi best known as a Republican Political Analyst for the Fox News Network and as a frequent guest on political talk shows. ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Jesse Lee Peterson (born May 24, 1949 in Midway, Alabama) is the president and founder of The Brotherhood Organization of A New Destiny (BOND), a group dedicated to promoting responsible fatherhood amongst African Americans. ... Armstrong Williams (born February 5, 1959) is an African American political commentator. ...

Columnists

Erik Rush is a conservative American columnist, freelance writer and author. ... La Shawn Barber is a black conservative columnist and blogger who lives in the Washington D.C. area. ... Stephen L. Carter born October 26, 1954 is an American law professor, legal- and social-policy writer, columnist, and novelist. ... The introduction of this article does not provide enough context for readers unfamiliar with the subject. ... Ken Hamblin, the self-titled Black Avenger, was host of the Ken Hamblin Show which was syndicated nationally on Entertainment Radio Networks. ... Deroy Murdock is a conservative syndicated columnist, a contributing editor with National Review Online, and a political commentator for the Washington Times. ... Star Parker (b. ... The Coalition on Urban Renewal and Education or CURE is an organization founded by Star Parker in 1995 to jump start national dialogue on issues of race and poverty, according to their web site. ... Thomas Sowell (born June 30, 1930), is an American economist, political writer, and commentator. ... Hoover Tower The Hoover Institution on War, Revolution, and Peace is a conservative public policy think tank and library founded by Herbert Hoover at Stanford University, his alma mater. ... Walter E. Williams (born 1936) is an American economist. ...

Athletes and entertainers

T.D. Jakes
This image is a candidate for speedy deletion. It may be deleted after seven days from the date of nomination.

Image File history File links Jakes_wapost_himself. ... Image File history File links Jakes_wapost_himself. ... Lionel Hampton with George W. Bush Lionel Leo Hampton (April 20, 1908, Louisville, Kentucky – August 31, 2002 New York City), was a jazz bandleader and percussionist. ... Prince Yaphet Frederick Kotto (born November 15, 1937) is an American actor. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Connor Phillips (born January 17, 1962 in Denver, Colorado) is an African American actor and a conservative, Christian commentator and writer. ... Lynn Curtis Swann (b. ... For other persons named James Walker, see James Walker (disambiguation). ...

Other

Herman Cain (Born December 13, 1945) is a conservative newspaper columnist, African-American businessman, politician and radio talk-show host from Georgia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Ezola Broussard Foster (born August 9, 1938) was the Reform Party candidate for Vice President in the U.S. presidential election of 2000. ... Samuel B. Fuller (S.B. Fuller) (June 4, 1905 —- October 24, 1988) was an African American entrepreneur. ... Robert A George is an editorial writer for the New York Post and a conservative blogger and pundit. ... Niger Innis of the Congress of Racial Equality. ... “CORE” redirects here. ... Roy Innis, National Chairman Congress of Racial Equality. ... The Hudson Institute is a right-leaning U.S. think tank, founded in 1961 in Croton-on-Hudson, New York, by the futurist Herman Kahn and other colleagues from the RAND Corporation. ... Bishop T.D. (Thomas Dexter) Jakes (born June 9, 1957 in South Charleston, West Virginia) is an American televangelist. ... Don King Wax Sculpture Donald Don King (born December 6, 1931), is a successful American boxing promoter particularly known for his hairstyle and flamboyant personality. ... Michael King (born December 18, 1962 in Gary, Indiana) is a black conservative commentator, columnist and television producer. ... John H. McWhorter (1965- ), African American, was associate professor of linguistics at University of California, Berkeley until 2003, and is now a Senior Fellow at the Manhattan Institute think tank. ... The Manhattan Institute for Policy Research is an influential New York City-based free market think tank established in 1978. ... Meredith walking to class accompanied by U.S. marshals James Howard Meredith (born June 25, 1933) is an American civil rights movement figure, although he vocally prefers not to be regarded as such. ... The Aspen Institute is a U.S. nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1950 dedicated to fostering enlightened leadership and open-minded dialogue. ... Deroy Murdock is a conservative syndicated columnist, a contributing editor with National Review Online, and a political commentator for the Washington Times. ... Gerald A. Reynolds (1964-) is an American politician and lawyer, and the current chair of the U.S. Civil Rights Commission, a position to which he was appointed by President George W. Bush on December 6, 2004. ... Project 21 is a media public relations group that provides broadcasters with prominent African-American conservative commentators as guests. ... Vernon Robinson is a politician in the Winston-Salem, NC area, who, in two high-profile Congressional races, has been attacked for running controversial campaigns. ... George S. Schuyler photo taken by Carl Van Vechten, 1941 George S. Schuyler (1895-1977), an African American writer known for his conservative views, was born in 1895 in Providence, Rhode Island, U.S.. In 1912, Schuyler dropped out of school to join the US Army and soon rose to... Shelby Steele (born 1946, Chicago) is an American author, columnist, documentary film maker, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, specialising in the study of race relations, multiculturalism and affirmative action. ... Stanley Crouch (born December 14, 1945, Los Angeles) is an American music critic, syndicated columnist, and novelist perhaps best known for his jazz criticism and his novel Dont the Moon Look Lonesome? // During the early 1970s, Crouch moved from California to New York City, where he lived along with... Lee Walker (born February 11, 1976) is a Welsh professional snooker player. ...

Fictional black conservatives

Character Film
TV series
Novel
Network
Production company
Publisher
Actor
Author
Occupation
Carlton Banks The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air NBC Alfonso Ribeiro Student
Ervin Burrell The Wire HBO Frankie Faison Police Commissioner
Ray Campbell Sister, Sister ABC/The WB Tim Reid
Thurgood Marshall "Goodie" Cumberbatch 704 Hauser CBS T.E. Russell
Gordon Davis Protect and Defend Berkley Books Eric L. Harry
William Dent Girlfriends UPN/The CW Reggie Hayes Lawyer
Augustus Freeman IV ("Icon") Icon (Comic book) Milestone Media Dwayne McDuffie Superhero
Jim Gardner Commander in Chief ABC Harry Lennix White House Chief of Staff
Oliver Garland The Emperor of Ocean Park Knopf Stephen L. Carter
John Garnett ATL Warner Brothers Keith David CEO
Warden Leo Glynn Oz HBO Ernie Hudson Prison Warden
Jimmy James Barbershop
Barbershop 2: Back in Business
Barbershop: The Series
MGM (film)
Showtime (TV)
Sean Patrick Thomas (film)
Leslie Elliard (TV)
Barber/Aspiring politician
Bruford Jamison, Jr. Drop Squad Gramercy Pictures Eriq La Salle
Ronald "Ron" Johnson, Jr. A Different World NBC Darryl M. Bell Undergraduate student
Kyle Get on the Bus Columbia Pictures Isaiah Washington Military Veteran
Russell A. "Linc" Lincoln Linc's Showtime Steven Williams
Matty Roc Fox Joan Pringle Registered nurse
Wendell Perry Get on the Bus Columbia Pictures Wendell Pierce Lexus Dealership Owner
Courtney Rae Whoopi Carsey-Werner Wren T. Brown Former Enron employee
Dondi Reece Black Panther (Comic book) Marvel Comics Reginald Hudlin U.S. Secretary of State
Dr. Maxwell Stanton In the House NBC/UPN Alfonso Ribeiro Doctor
Detective Odafin "Fin" Tutuola Law & Order: Special Victims Unit NBC Ice T Police Detective
P.K. Winsome The Colbert Report Comedy Central Tim Meadows Political Commentator/ Entrepreneur

This is a list of characters on the television series The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air. ... The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air is an Emmy, BAFTA, and RTS-award winning popular American television sitcom that aired on NBC from September 10, 1990, to May 20, 1996. ... This article is about the television network. ... Alfonso Lincoln Ribeiro (born September 21, 1971 in New York City) is an American actor, singer, and dancer of Dominican descent. ... Ervin Burrell is a fictional officer in the Baltimore Police Department played by Frankie Faison on the HBO drama The Wire. ... For others uses of the term, see The Wire (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Frankie Faison, often credited as Frankie R. Faison is one of those actors which many people may recognise, but not know his name. ... Sister, Sister is an American television sitcom about twin girls (Tia and Tamera Mowry), separated and adopted at birth, who one day come face-to-face after 14 years apart. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... The Warner Bros. ... Tim Reid (born December 19, 1944 in Norfolk, Virginia) is an American actor and film director best known for his roles in prime time television programs. ... 704 Hauser was a short-lived CBS television series in 1994. ... This article is about the broadcast network. ... Berkley Books is a paperback imprint of Penguin Group (USA). ... Eric L. Harry (b. ... For other uses, see Girlfriend (disambiguation). ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ... “The CW” redirects here. ... Reggie Hayes Reggie Hayes(born July 15, 1969 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American actor. ... Icon is a fictional superhero created by Milestone Comics and published by DC Comics. ... Icon is a fictional superhero created by Milestone Comics and published by DC Comics. ... Milestone Medias character Static Animated version of Static Milestone Media is a company best known for creating the Milestone comics imprint (that was published through DC Comics) and the Static Shock cartoon series. ... Dwayne McDuffie is a comic book animation writer and a creator of the Emmy Award winning show Static Shock. ... Jim Gardner, played by Harry J. Lennix, is the fictional White House Chief of Staff on the political television drama Commander in Chief. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) is an American television network. ... Harry J. Lennix (b. ... Colophon of the publisher Alfred A. Knopf. ... Stephen L. Carter born October 26, 1954 is an American law professor, legal- and social-policy writer, columnist, and novelist. ... ATL is an American film that was released on March 31, 2006. ... Warner Bros. ... Keith David (born June 4, 1956) is an Emmy Award winning, African-American film, television, and voice actor most known for his roles as Childs in John Carpenters The Thing, Goliath in the cartoon Gargoyles, playing the Arbiter in Halo 2 and Halo 3, as well as voice overs... Warden Leo Glynn Leo Glynn (played by Ernie Hudson) is the warden of the Oswald state correctional facility on the HBO drama Oz. ... Oz is an American television drama series created by Tom Fontana, who also wrote or co-wrote every episode of the series. ... For other uses, see HBO (disambiguation). ... Ernie Hudson (born December 17, 1945) is an American actor. ... Barbershop is a motion picture directed by Tim Story, produced by State Street Pictures, and released by MGM on September 13, 2002. ... Barbershop 2: Back in Business is a 2004 comedy film sequel to 2002s Barbershop, from the writing/producing team Robert Teitel and George Tillman Jr. ... For alternate meanings of MGM, see MGM (disambiguation). ... This article is about the pay TV channel. ... Sean Patrick Thomas (born December 17, 1970) is an American actor. ... Gramercy Pictures was a major film distributor, a joint venture of Polygram Filmed Entertainment and Universal Pictures. ... Eriq La Salle (born July 23, 1962 in Hartford, Connecticut) is an American actor and director, best known for his portrayals of Darryl in the 1988 comedy film Coming to America and Dr. Peter Benton during the first eight seasons of the NBC drama series ER. Eriq La Salle directed... A Different World is an American television sitcom which aired for six seasons on NBC (from September 24, 1987 until July 9, 1993). ... This article is about the television network. ... Darryl M. Bell (sometimes credited as Daryl Bell) was born in 1961, in Chicago, Illinois. ... Get on the Bus is a 1996 film about a group of African-American men who are taking a cross-country bus trip in order to participate in the Million Man March. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Isaiah Washington IV (born August 3, 1963) is an American film and television actor. ... Lincs was an American sitcom based in a bar in Washington D.C.. It starred Pam Grier, Steven Williams and Golden Brooks and was aired for two seasons from 1998 to 2000 before being cancelled. ... This article is about the pay TV channel. ... See also Stephen Williams Steven Williams (born January 7, 1949, in Memphis, Tennessee, USA) is an award winning actor who has starred in many films and countless television shows. ... Roc was a Fox network sitcom which ran from 1991 to 1994. ... FOX redirects here. ... Joan Pringle is an American actress best known for playing vice principal Sybil Buchanan in the TV series The White Shadow. ... Get on the Bus is a 1996 film about a group of African-American men who are taking a cross-country bus trip in order to participate in the Million Man March. ... The Columbia Pictures logo from 1993 to the present Columbia Pictures Industries, Inc. ... Wendell Pierce (born December 8, 1962) is an American actor. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carsey-Werner Productions (in some incarnations, Carsey-Werner-Mandabach Productions) is an independent production company founded in 1981 by former ABC writer/producer duo Marcey Carsey and Tom Werner (co-owner of the Boston Red Sox baseball franchise). ... Enron Creditors Recovery Corporation (formerly Enron Corporation) (former NYSE ticker symbol: ENE) was an American energy company based in Houston, Texas. ... The Black Panther (TChalla) is a fictional character in the Marvel Comics universe who is the first modern Black superhero. ... This article is about the comic book company. ... Reginald Alan Hudlin (born December 15, 1961) is an American writer and film director. ... In the House was a television sitcom that premiered April 10, 1995 originally on NBC (seasons 1 and 2 aired on NBC, and seasons 3, 4, and 5 aired on UPN). ... This article is about the television network. ... UPN (which originally stood for the United Paramount Network) was a television network in over 200 markets in the United States. ... Alfonso Lincoln Ribeiro (born September 21, 1971 in New York City) is an American actor, singer, and dancer of Dominican descent. ... Gumshoe redirects here. ... Det. ... Law & Order: Special Victims Unit - Season 5 DVD Law & Order: Special Victims Unit (also known as Law & Order: SVU) is the first of three spin-offs of Law & Order (the other two being Law & Order: Criminal Intent and Law & Order: Trial by Jury; all series are presented on the NBC... This article is about the television network. ... Tracy Marrow (born February 16, 1958), better known as Ice T or Ice-T, is an American rapper, singer and actor. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ... The Colbert Report (IPA ) is an American satirical television program that airs from 11:30 p. ... Comedy Central is an American cable television and satellite television channel in the United States. ... Tim Meadows (born February 5, 1961) is an American actor and comedian. ...

Black conservative organizations

Notable black conservative blogs

La Shawn Barber is a black conservative columnist and blogger who lives in the Washington D.C. area. ...

See also

The following is an alphabetically ordered list of famous African American Republicans, past and present . ...

References

  1. ^ For an overview of these themes, see Stan Faryna, Brad Stetson, and Joseph G. Conti, Eds., Black and Right: The Bold New Voice of Black Conservatives in America, (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1997)
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]

External links

  • [6]
  • [7]
  • [8]
  • [9]
  • [10]
  • [11]
An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... African American history is the portion of American history that specifically discusses the African American or Black American ethnic group in the United States. ... The Atlantic slave trade, also known as the Transatlantic slave trade, was the trade of African persons supplied to the colonies of the New World that occurred in and around the Atlantic Ocean. ... The word Maafa (also known as the African Holocaust or Holocaust of Enslavement) is derived from a Kiswahili word meaning disaster, terrible occurrence or great tragedy. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Military history of African Americans is that of African Americans in the United States since the arrival of the first black slaves in 1619 to the present day. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For the automotive term, see redline. ... American Civil Rights Movement redirects here. ... Reparations for slavery is a movement in the United States, which suggests that the government apologize to slave descendants for their hardships, and bestow on them reparations, whether it be in the form of money, land, or other goods. ... Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... In the United States, African American culture or Black culture includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Kwanzaa (or Kwaanza) is a week-long Pan-African festival primarily honoring African-American heritage. ... African American art is a broad term describing the visual arts of the American black community. ... African American dances in the vernacular tradition (academically known as African American vernacular dance) are those dances which have developed within African American communities in everyday spaces, rather than in dance studios, schools or companies. ... The Color Purple by Alice Walker African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ... This is a list of museums about, or otherwise focused on African Americans. ... African American neighborhoods or black neighborhoods are types of ethnic enclaves found in many cities in the United States. ... The term black church or African American church refers to predominantly African American Christian churches that minister to black communities in the United States. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Nation of Islam (NOI) is a religious and social/political organization founded in the United States by Wallace Fard Muhammad in 1930 with the self-proclaimed goal of resurrecting the spiritual, mental, social, economic condition of the black man and woman of America and belief that God will bring... Black Hebrew Israelites (also Black Hebrews, African Hebrew Israelites, and Hebrew Israelites) are groups of people of African ancestry situated mostly in the United States who claim to be descendants of the ancient Israelites. ... This article is about the West African religion. ... Hoodoo is a form of predominantly African American, Christian, traditional folk magic. ... For other uses, see Santeria (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Black Capitalism is a name for a movement among African Americans to build wealth through the ownership and development of businesses. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was an African American organization founded to promote civil rights and self-defense. ... Pan-African people are all people with African physical features. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... “CORE” redirects here. ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... National Urban League Logo The National Urban League (NUL) is a nonpartisan civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States. ... The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is a non-profit organization founded in Chicago, Illinois, in 1915 as The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History by Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ... National Black Chamber of Commerce The National Black Chamber of Commerce, (NBCC), was “incorporated in March of 1993, in Washington D.C.” The organizations mission is “To economically empower and sustain African American communities, through the process of entrepreneurship and capitalistic activity within the United States and via interaction with... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The Links, Incorporated is an exclusive non-profit organization based upon the ideals of combining friendship and community service and was was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 9, 1946, from a group of ladies known as the Philadelphia Club to have focuses on civic, cultural, and educational endeavors[1... The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) was founded in 1935 by Mary McLeod Bethune, child of slave parents, distinguished educator and government consultant. ... Bud Fowler, the first professional black baseball player with one of his teams, Western of Keokuk, Iowa The Negro Leagues were American professional baseball leagues comprising predominantly African-American teams. ... The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... logo of Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) is a College athletic conference consisting of historically black colleges located in the southern United States. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Notable African-American or Black people, other than Black Caribbeans. ... African-Americans are a demographic minority in the United States. ... This is a list of landmark legislation, court decisions, executive orders, and proclamations in the United States significantly affecting African Americans. ... This is an alphabetical list of African-American-related topics: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A African American African American contemporary issues African American culture...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Black conservatism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2784 words)
Black Conservatism is a political and social movement within African American culture which emphasizes American patriotism (and in extreme cases, jingoism), and right to far-right Christian values.
Black Conservatives find common ground with Black Nationalists to the extent that they both believe that the fl masses have been duped by the politics of condescending white liberals vis a vis the maintenance of the Welfare state.
Black conservatives tend to be labeled by a segment of African Americans as "house negroes", "Uncle Toms" or other slurs as a informal social control mechanism.
African American - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3488 words)
Blacks from non-African countries such as Haiti, Cuba, or the Dominican Republic are theoretically referred to by their nation of origin and not African American, but in general the cultural assumption in the U.S. is that if a person is fl, native English-speaking and living in the United States, he or she is "African American."
Beginning in the 1980s, many fls began to abandon the term "Afro-American", which had become popular in the 1960s and '70s, for "African-American," because they desired an unabbreviated expression of their African heritage that could not be mistaken or derided as an allusion to the afro hairstyle.
Because of the historical circumstances surrounding the capture, enslavement and systematic attempts to de-Africanize fls in the U.S. under chattel slavery, most African Americans are unable to trace their ancestry to a specific African nation; hence, the entire continent serves as a geographic marker.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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