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Encyclopedia > Black church
African American topics
African American history
Slavery in the United States
African American military history
Jim Crow laws · Redlining
Civil Rights: 1896–1954 1955–1968
Reparations
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The term black church or African American church refers to predominantly African American Christian churches that minister to black communities in the United States. While some groups of black churches, such as African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Churches, belong to predominantly black denominations, many black churches are part of predominantly white denominations.[1] Historically, after Emancipation blacks established separate churches to create their own communities, escape white control, and worship in in their own culturally distinct ways. Within the churches they built strong community organizations and held positions of leadership denied to them in mainstream America. In addition, African American churches have been the centers of communities, serving as schools in the early years after the Civil War, taking up social welfare functions, such as providing for the indigent, and going on to establish schools and orphanages.[2] Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... African American history is the portion of American history that specifically discusses the African American or Black American ethnic group in the United States. ... Slave sale in Easton, Maryland The history of slavery in the United States (1619-1865) began soon after the English colonists first settled in Virginia and lasted until the passage of the 13th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. ... Military history of African Americans is that of African Americans in the United States since the arrival of the first black slaves in 1619 to the present day. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... For the automotive term, see redline. ... Prominent figures of the African-American Civil Rights Movement. ... Reparations for slavery is a movement in the United States, which suggests that the government apologize to slave descendants for their hardships, and bestow on them reparations, whether it be in the form of money, land, or other goods. ... In the United States, African American culture or Black culture includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... Detail from cover of The Celebrated Negro Melodies, as Sung by the Virginia Minstrels, 1843 The minstrel show, or minstrelsy, was an American entertainment consisting of comic skits, variety acts, dancing, and music, performed by white people in blackface or, especially after the American Civil War, African Americans in blackface. ... This reproduction of a 1900 minstrel show poster, originally published by the Strobridge Litho Co. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... African American neighborhoods or black neighborhoods are types of ethnic enclaves found in many cities in the United States. ... In the United States, Historically black colleges and universities (HBCU) are colleges or universities that were established before 1964 with the intention of serving the African American community. ... Kwanzaa (or Kwaanza) is a week-long Pan-African festival primarily honoring African-American heritage. ... African American art is a broad term describing the visual arts of the American black community. ... This is a list of museums about, or otherwise focused on African Americans. ... African American dances in the vernacular tradition (academically known as African American vernacular dance) are those dances which have developed within African American communities in everyday spaces, rather than in dance studios, schools or companies. ... The Color Purple by Alice Walker African American literature is the body of literature produced in the United States by writers of African descent. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Nation of Islam (NOI) is a religious and social/political organization founded in the United States by Wallace Fard Muhammad in 1930 with the self-proclaimed goal of resurrecting the spiritual, mental, social, economic condition of the black man and woman of America and belief that God will bring... Black Hebrew Israelites (also Black Hebrews, African Hebrew Israelites, and Hebrew Israelites) are groups of people of African ancestry situated mostly in the United States who claim to be descendants of the ancient Israelites. ... This article is about the West African religion. ... Hoodoo is a form of predominantly African American, Christian, traditional folk magic. ... For other uses, see Santeria (disambiguation). ... Pan-African people are all people with African physical features. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Black Capitalism is a name for a movement among African Americans to build wealth through the ownership and development of businesses. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Black Panther Party (originally called the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense) was an African American organization founded to promote civil rights and self-defense. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP, generally pronounced as EN Double AY SEE PEE) is one of the oldest and most influential civil rights organizations in the United States. ... The Southern Christian Leadership Conference Logo. ... “CORE” redirects here. ... The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (or SNCC, pronounced snick) was one of the principal organizations of the American Civil Rights Movement in the 1960s. ... National Urban League Logo The National Urban League (NUL) is a nonpartisan civil rights organization based in New York City that advocates on behalf of African Americans and against racial discrimination in the United States. ... The Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH) is a non-profit organization founded in Chicago, Illinois, in 1915 as The Association for the Study of Negro Life and History by Carter G. Woodson and Jesse E. Moorland. ... United Negro College Fund logo The United Negro College Fund (UNCF) is a Fairfax, Virginia-based American philanthropic organization that fundraises college tuition money for African-American students and general scholarship funds for 39 historically black colleges and universities. ... National Black Chamber of Commerce The National Black Chamber of Commerce, (NBCC), was “incorporated in March of 1993, in Washington D.C.” The organizations mission is “To economically empower and sustain African American communities, through the process of entrepreneurship and capitalistic activity within the United States and via interaction with... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The Links, Incorporated is an exclusive non-profit organization based upon the ideals of combining friendship and community service and was was founded in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 9, 1946, from a group of ladies known as the Philadelphia Club to have focuses on civic, cultural, and educational endeavors[1... The National Council of Negro Women (NCNW) was founded in 1935 by Mary McLeod Bethune, child of slave parents, distinguished educator and government consultant. ... Bud Fowler, the first professional black baseball player with one of his teams, Western of Keokuk, Iowa The Negro Leagues were American professional baseball leagues comprising predominantly African-American teams. ... The Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association (CIAA) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... logo of Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (SIAC) is a College athletic conference consisting of historically black colleges located in the southern United States. ... The Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC) is a collegiate athletic conference which consists of historically black colleges in the southeastern United States. ... The Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) is a college athletic conference made up of historically black universities in the southern United States. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The Gullah language (Sea Island Creole English, Geechee) is a creole language spoken by the Gullah people (also called Geechees), an African American population living on the Sea Islands and the coastal region of the U.S. states of South Carolina and Georgia. ... Louisiana Creole (Créole Louisiane and Kourí-Viní, as it is known in and near St. ... Note: This page or section contains IPA phonetic symbols in Unicode. ... Notable African-American or Black people, other than Black Caribbeans. ... African-Americans are a demographic minority in the United States. ... This is a list of landmark legislation, court decisions, executive orders, and proclamations in the United States significantly affecting African Americans. ... This is an alphabetical list of African-American-related topics: Contents: Top - 0–9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z A African American African American contemporary issues African American culture... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A denomination... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ...

Contents

History

To make them easier to control, white slave owners systematically stripped African slaves of their cultural heritage including religion, sometimes passing laws prohibiting African religious practices. Despite these efforts, slaves managed to retain elements of their culture. In the context of religion, these elements included call and response interactions, shouting, and dance.[2]bnp The term Call and response may refer to Call and response -- a type of musical phrasing Call-and-response -- a type of communication Call and Response is a Californian pop band. ...


Slavery

See also: History of slavery in the United States

Slaves often learned about Christianity by attending services led by a white preacher or supervised by a white person. In such settings, whites used Bible stories such as the Curse of Ham to justify slavery. They promoted the idea that loyal and hard-working slaves would be rewarded in the after-life. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This Gutenberg Bible is displayed by the United States Library. ... The Drunkenness of Noah by Giovanni Bellini, depicting Ham (center) laughing at his father, while Shem and Japheth cover him. ...


Slave revolts in the early 1800s, often inspired by other passages in the Bible or by black preachers, led to laws barring black churches and black preachers. Slaves organized underground churches and hidden religious meetings, where slaves were free to mix evangelical Christianity with African beliefs and African rhythms and turn traditional hymns into spirituals. The underground churches provided psychological refuge from the white world, and the spirituals gave the church members a secret way to communicate and, in some cases, to plan rebellion. In 1831, Nat Turner, a slave and a Baptist preacher, killed about 50 white men, women, and children in an armed rebellion in Virginia.[3] A slave revolt, like a rebellion is an armed uprising by slaves. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The word evangelicalism often refers to... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Christianity is... == Historical background on spiritual music Spirituals were often expressions of religious faith, although they may also have served as socio-political protests veiled as assimilation to white, American culture. ... Nat, commonly called Nat Turner, (October 2, 1800 – November 11, 1831) was an American slave whose slave rebellion in Southampton County, Virginia, was the most remarkable instance of black resistance to enslavement in the antebellum southern United States. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Where it was possible, free blacks organized independent black churches[2] in response to racial discrimination.[4] Along with white churches opposed to slavery, they provided aid and comfort to escaping slaves.[5]

"Wade in the water." Postcard of a river baptism in New Bern, North Carolina, near the turn of the 20th century. Such postcards were popular souvenirs of visits to the South until well into the 1940s.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1104x576, 91 KB)Wade in the Water. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1104x576, 91 KB)Wade in the Water. ...

Reconstruction

See also: Reconstruction

After emancipation, Northern churches founded by free blacks, as well as predominantly white denominations, sent missions to the South to minister to newly freed slaves. The AME and AME Zion churches gained hundreds of thousands of members. In 1870, the Southern based Colored Methodist Episcopal (CME) Church was founded. The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., now the largest black religious organization in the United States, was founded in 1894.[3] These churches blended elements from the underground churches with elements from freely established black churches.[2] Despite early efforts to integrate freed slaves into American society, racial segregation quickly became the norm in many states. The black communities, with the black churches as focal points, developed along lines partly independent of white communities. Black preachers provided leadership, encouraged education and economic growth, and were often the primary link between the black and white communities. The black church established and/or maintained the first black schools and encouraged community members to fund these schools and other public services.[2] For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Emancipation Proclamation Reproduction of the Emancipation Proclamation at the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio The Emancipation Proclamation consists of two documents issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln during the American Civil War. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1821, but operated for a number years before then. ... The Christian Methodist Epsicopal Church is a historically black denomination within the broader context of Methodism. ... The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. ...


Since the male hierarchy denied them opportunities for ordination, middle-class women in the black church organized missionary societies to address social issues. These societies provided job training and reading education, worked for better living conditions, raised money for African missions, wrote religious periodicals, and promoted Victorian ideals of womanhood, respectability, and racial uplift.[3] Ordination is the process in which clergy become authorized by their religious denomination and/or seminary to perform religious rituals and ceremonies. ... For other uses, see Missionary (disambiguation). ... The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


Civil Rights Movement

See also: American Civil Rights Movement

Black churches held a leadership role in the American Civil Rights Movement. Their history as a centers of strength for the black community made them natural leaders in this moral struggle. In addition they had often served as links between the black and white worlds. Notable minister-activists included Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr., Ralph David Abernathy, Bernard Lee, Fred Shuttlesworth, and C.T. Vivian.[6] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (414x640, 32 KB) Summary From http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (414x640, 32 KB) Summary From http://www. ... Ralph David Abernathy (March 21, 1926 - April 17, 1990) was an American civil rights leader. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... The civil rights movement in the United States has been a long, primarily nonviolent struggle to bring full civil rights and equality under the law to all citizens of United States. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Ralph David Abernathy (March 21, 1926 - April 17, 1990) was an American civil rights leader. ... Bernard Lee as M in The Man with the Golden Gun Bernard Lee (January 10, 1908 – January 16, 1981) was a British actor, best known for his role as M in the first eleven James Bond films. ... Fred Shuttlesworth (b. ... Reverend C. T. Vivian (born July 28, 1925 in Howard, Missouri) is a minister and was a close friend and lieutenant of Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. ...


Politics and social issues

The black church continues to be a source of support for members of the African American community. When compared to American churches as a whole, black churches tend to focus more on social issues such as poverty, gang violence, drug use, and racism. A study found that black Christians were more likely to have heard about health care reform from their pastors than were white Christians.[7] Black churches are typically very conservative on sexuality issues, such as homosexuality.[8] A boy from an East Cipinang trash dump slum in Jakarta, Indonesia shows what he found. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with gang. ... Recreational drug use is the use of psychoactive drugs for recreational rather than medical or spiritual purposes, although the distinction is not always clear. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... (This article is about political movements affecting the delivery of health care and health care systems. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual interaction and / or romantic attraction between individuals of the same sex. ...


As neighborhood institutions

Although black neighborhoods may suffer from civic disinvestment[9], with lower quality schools, less effective policing[10] and fire protection. There are institutions that help to improve the physical and social capital of black neighborhoods. In black neighborhoods the churches may be important sources of social cohesion.[11]For some African Americans the kind spirituality learned through these churches works as a protective factor against the corrosive forces of racism.[12] Churches my also do work to improve the physical infrastructure of the neighborhood. Churches in Harlem have undertaken real estate ventures and renovated burnt out and abandon brownstones to create new housing for residents.[13] Churches have fought for the right to operate their own schools in place of the often inadequate public schools found in many black neighborhoods.[14] For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... This article is about the building material and the dwelling. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ...


Traditions

Like many Christians, African American Christians sometimes participate in or attend a Christmas play. Black Nativity by Langston Hughes, is a re-telling of the classic Nativity story with gospel music. Productions can be found at black theaters and churches all over the country.[15][16] The Three Wise Men are typically played by prominent members of the black community in the neighboring area. Christmas pageant may refer to: A play about the Nativity of Jesus A Santa Claus Parade such as the Adelaide Christmas Pageant. ... Black Nativity is a re-telling of the classic Nativity story with an entirely black cast. ... Langston Hughes (February 1, 1902 – May 22, 1967) was an American poet, novelist, playwright, short story writer, and columnist. ... Gospel music is a musical genre characterized by dominant vocals (often with strong use of harmony) referencing lyrics of a religious nature, particularly Christian. ... Adoration of the Magi by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo In Christian tradition the Magi, also known as the Three Wise Men, The Three Kings, or Kings from the east, are sometimes considered to be Median, perhaps Zoroastrian priests, who were also proficient in astrology from Ancient Persia. ...


Historically black denominations

Throughout U.S. history, religious preferences and racial segregation have fostered development of separate black church denominations, as well as black churches within white denominations.


African Methodist Episcopal Church

The first of these churches was the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church. Richard Allen, a former slave, was an influential deacon and elder at the integrated and affluent St. George's Methodist Church in Philadelphia. In 1787, Allen founded the all-black Mother Bethel AME Church after white members of St. George's started to treat his people as second-class citizens. The charismatic Allen had attracted numerous new black members to St. George's and white members became so uncomfortable they relegated black worshippers to the balcony. The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... Richard Allen (February 14, 1760 - March 26, 1831) an African American pastor and the founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. ... For other uses, see Deacon (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philadelphia (disambiguation) and Philly. ...


Over time, growing numbers of African-American congregations withdrew from the Methodist Episcopal (ME) Church. In 1816, representatives of these congregations convened to establish the AME Church and consecrated Allen as their bishop.[4] The Methodist Episcopal Church, sometimes referred to as the M.E. Church, officially began at the Baltimore Christmas Conference in 1784. ...


African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church

The African Methodist Episcopal Zion or AME Zion Church, like the AME Church, is an offshoot of the ME Church. Black members of the John Street Methodist Church of New York City left to form their own church after several acts of overt discrimination. In 1796, black Methodists asked the permission of the bishop of the ME Church to meet independently, though still to be part of the ME Church and still be led by white preachers. This AME Church group built Zion chapel in 1800 and became incorporated, subordinate to the ME Church, in 1801. In 1820, AME Zion Church members began further separation from the ME Church. By seeking to install black preachers and elders, they created a debate over whether blacks could be ministers. This debate ended in 1822 with the ordination of Abraham Thompson, Leven Smith, and James Varick, the first superintendent (bishop) of the AME Zion church.[17] The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1821, but operated for a number years before then. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... James Varick was the first Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. ...


National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.

The National Baptist Convention was first organized in 1880 as the Foreign Mission Baptist Convention in Montgomery, Alabama. Its founders, including Elias Camp Morris, stressed the preaching of the gospel as an answer to the shortcomings of a segregated church. In 1895, Morris moved to Atlanta, Georgia, and founded the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., as a merger of the Foreign Mission Convention, the American National Baptist Convention, and the Baptist National Education Convention.[18] The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc., is the largest African American religious organization.[19] The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. ... Coordinates: , Country State County Montgomery Incorporated December 3, 1819 Government  - Mayor Bobby Bright Area  - City  156. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Gospel, from the Old English good tidings is a calque of Greek () used in the New Testament (see Etymology below). ... This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ...


Church of God in Christ

In 1907, Charles Harrison Mason formed the Church of God in Christ (COGIC) after his Baptist church expelled him. Mason was a member of the Holiness Movement of the late 19th century. In 1906, he attended the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles. Upon his return to Tennessee, he began teaching the Pentecostal Holiness message. However, Charles Price Jones and J. A. Jeter of the Holiness movement disagreed with Mason's teachings on the Baptism of the Holy Spirit. For other uses, see Church of God. ... Young C.H. Mason Elder Mason was converted in November, 1878, and baptized by his brother, I. S. Nelson, a Baptist Preacher, who was pastoring the Mount Olive Missionary Baptist Church near Plumerville, Arkansas. ... The Holiness movement is composed of people who believe and propagate the belief that the carnal nature of man can be cleansed through faith and by the power of the Holy Spirit if one has had his sins forgiven through faith in Jesus. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... The Pentecostal movement within Protestant Christianity places special emphasis on the gifts of the Holy Spirit. ... Charles Price Jones, Sr. ... According to the New Testament, the Baptism in the Holy Spirit is an experience sent by Jesus Christ. ...


Jones changed the name of his COGIC church to Church of Christ, Holiness (USA) in 1915.


At a conference in Memphis, Tennessee, Mason reorganized the Church of God in Christ as a Holiness Pentecostal body.[20] The headquarters of COGIC is Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee. It is the site of Martin Luther King's final sermon, "I've been to the Mountain Top," delivered the day before he was assassinated.[21] For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... Mason Temple is the central house of worship of the Church of God in Christ, this denomination is the largest Pentecostal group in the United States. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... “Martin Luther King” redirects here. ...


Other denominations

The African Union First Colored Methodist Protestant Church and Connection, usually called the A.U.M.P. Church, is a Methodist Christian denomination and the oldest independent black denomination in the U.S. It was chartered by Peter Spencer (1782-1843) in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1813 as the Union Church... The Apostolic Faith Mission of Portland, Oregon, United States was founded in 1906 by Florence L. Crawford, after she received the Baptism of the Holy Ghost at the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California. ... The Christian Methodist Epsicopal Church is a historically black denomination within the broader context of Methodism. ... National Baptist Convention of America, Inc. ... National Missionary Baptist Convention of America - an association serving as a medium of cooperation and fellowship for African-American missionary Baptist churches. ... The Pentecostal Assemblies of The World, Inc. ... The Progressive National Baptist Convention (PNBC) is a convention of African-American Baptists emphasizing civil rights and social justice. ... The Spiritual Israel Church and Its Army (SICIA) is a Christian spiritual church that emerged from the Church of God in David, a denomination that was founded in the mid-1920s in Alabama (and later moved to Michigan) by Bishop Derks Field. ... The United House of Prayer for All People is a Pentecostal church founded by Charles Manuel (Sweet Daddy) Grace (1881?-1960), who proclaimed himself Bishop, in 1919. ...

See also

African American Portal

Image File history File links AmericaAfrica. ... In the United States, African American culture or Black culture includes the various cultural traditions of African American communities. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... The Black Madonna of Częstochowa, Poland A Black Madonna or Black Virgin is a statue or painting of Mary in which she is depicted with dark or black skin. ...

References

  1. ^ Sutton, Charyn D. (1992). Pass It On: Outreach to Minority Communities, Big Brothers/Big Sisters of America. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Abdul Alkalimat and Associates. Religion and the Black Church, 6th, Introduction to Afro-American Studies, Chicago: Twenty-first Century Books and Publications. 
  3. ^ a b c Maffly-Kipp, Laurie F. (May 2001). The Church in the Southern Black Community. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  4. ^ a b Africans in America: The Black Church. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  5. ^ Rimsa, Kelly. The Underground Railroad in Indiana. Retrieved on 2007-05-21.
  6. ^ We Shall Overcome: The Players. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.
  7. ^ The Diminishing Divide ... American Churches, American Politics (June 25, 1996). Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  8. ^ Fears, Darryl (2004-11-02). Gay Blacks Feeling Strained Church Ties. Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-05-16.
  9. ^ Root shock: The consequences of African American dispossession Journal of Urban Health. Springer New York. Volume 78, Number 1 / March, 2001
  10. ^ The Neighborhood Context of Police Behavior Douglas A. Smith Crime and Justice, Vol. 8, Communities and Crime (1986), pp. 313-341
  11. ^ Church Culture as a Strategy of Action in the Black Community Mary Pattillo-McCoy American Sociological Review, Vol. 63, No. 6 (Dec., 1998), pp. 767-784
  12. ^ "Gathering the Spirit" at First Baptist Church: Spirituality as a Protective Factor in the Lives of African American Children by Wendy L. Haight; Social Work, Vol. 43, 1998
  13. ^ Abyssinian Baptist Church Development Corp.
  14. ^ A Harlem Church Sues to Operate Charter School by Azi Paybarah Published: October 25, 2007
  15. ^ Black Nativity
  16. ^ Black Nativity
  17. ^ Moore, John Jamison, D.D (1884). History of the A.M.E. Zion Church in America. Founded 1796, In the City of New York. York, Pa: Teachers' Journal Office. 
  18. ^ History of the National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.
  19. ^ African American Religion, Pt. II: From the Civil War to the Great Migration, 1865-1920. Retrieved on 2007-05-29.
  20. ^ The Story of Our Church. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
  21. ^ Chronology of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Retrieved on 2007-05-22.
Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 306th day of the year (307th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Church, usually called the AME Church, is a Christian denomination founded by Bishop Richard Allen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1816. ... The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, or AME Zion Church, was officially formed in 1821, but operated for a number years before then. ... For other uses, see Church of God. ... The National Baptist Convention, USA, Inc. ... The Pentecostal Assemblies of The World, Inc. ... National Baptist Convention of America, Inc. ... The Progressive National Baptist Convention (PNBC) is a convention of African-American Baptists emphasizing civil rights and social justice. ... National Missionary Baptist Convention of America - an association serving as a medium of cooperation and fellowship for African-American missionary Baptist churches. ... The Christian Methodist Epsicopal Church is a historically black denomination within the broader context of Methodism. ... The African Union First Colored Methodist Protestant Church and Connection, usually called the A.U.M.P. Church, is a Methodist Christian denomination and the oldest independent black denomination in the U.S. It was chartered by Peter Spencer (1782-1843) in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1813 as the Union Church... The Apostolic Faith Mission of Portland, Oregon, United States was founded in 1906 by Florence L. Crawford, after she received the Baptism of the Holy Ghost at the Azusa Street Revival in Los Angeles, California. ... The African Orthodox Church owes its Episcopate and Apostolic Authority to the Syrian Church of Antioch where there disciples were first called Christians, and of which the Chair (See) of St. ... Richard Allen (February 14, 1760 - March 26, 1831) an African American pastor and the founder of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. ... Martin Luther King Jr. ... Joseph Lowery, (born October 6, 1921, in Huntsville, Alabama) is a leader in the American civil rights movement. ... Bishop T.D. (Thomas Dexter) Jakes is an American televangelist. ...

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Practicing Liberation in the Black Church (2387 words)
Ironically, while fl theology theoretically relies heavily upon expressions of the people, such as freedom and sorrow songs and sermons, the more academic elites of fl theology -- those who have the luxury of tenure and endowed professorships in prestigious white seminaries and universities -- seem to have little respect for the modern fl church.
Meanwhile, fl churches that have succeeded in white-dominated society tend to neglect aspects of fl theology that preserve and celebrate African-American culture.
Black theology teaches self-respect and self-esteem in spite of social and political condescension to and oppression of fls.
The Black Church (1125 words)
The "Black Church" with a lenght of 89 m is the largest church between Viena and Constantinople.
The Black Church belongs to the so-called "Hallenkirchen" having naves of equal height thus differing from the "Basilicas" with naves of various heights.
The most precious treasures of art in the Black Church are the anatolian carpets of the 17th and 18th century.
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