FACTOID # 23: Wisconsin has more metal fabricators per capita than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Black Rod

The Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod, generally shortened to just Black Rod, is an official in the parliaments of a number of Commonwealth countries. The position originates in the House of Lords of the British Parliament. His equivalent in the House of Commons is the Sergeant-at-Arms. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Type Bicameral Houses House of Commons House of Lords Speaker of the House of Commons The Right Honourable Michael Martin MP Lord Speaker Hélène Hayman, Baroness Hayman, PC Members 1377 (646 Commons, 731 Peers) Political groups (as of May 5, 2005 elections) Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats... British House of Commons Canadian House of Commons The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliament in the United Kingdom and Canada. ... A Serjeant at Arms (also spelt Sergeant at Arms, and sometimes Serjeant-at-Arms) is an officer appointed by a deliberative body, usually a legislature, to keep order during its meetings. ...

Contents

Origin

The office was created in 1350 by royal letters patent, though the current title dates from 1522. The position was adopted by other members of the Commonwealth when they copied the British Westminster system. The title is derived from the staff of office, an ebony staff topped with a golden lion, which is the main symbol of the office's authority. Events 29 August - An English fleet personally commanded by King Edward III defeats a Spanish fleet in the battle of Les Espagnols sur Mer. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal instrument in the form of an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting an office, a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as... Events January 9 - Adrian Dedens becomes Pope Adrian VI. February 26 - Execution by hanging of Cuauhtémoc, Aztec ruler of Tenochtitlan under orders of conquistador Hernán Cortés. ... The Houses of Parliament, also known as the Palace of Westminster, in London. ... Binomial name Diospyros ebenum Koenig ex Retz. ...


Black Rod in the United Kingdom

Appointment

Black Rod is formally appointed by the Crown based on a recruitment search performed by the Clerk of the Parliaments, to whom he reports. Prior to 2002 the office was held by a retired senior officer from the British Army, the Royal Navy or the Royal Air Force and was rotated between each service. It is now advertised openly. Black Rod is required to be a natural born English subject, as the office-bearer is an officer of the English Order of the Garter, and takes the rank of knight bachelor. The present Black Rod is Lieutenant-General Sir Michael Willcocks. His deputy is the Yeoman Usher of the Black Rod. The Clerk of the Parliaments is the chief clerk of the House of Lords in the parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... The dignity of Knight Bachelor is a part of the British honours system. ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... Lieutenant General Sir Michael Willcocks is The Gentleman Usher of The Black Rod For The Parliament of The United Kingdoms House of Lords. ... Yeoman is a word with several modern and historical meanings. ...


Official duties

Black Rod has a number of official duties: he is the personal attendant of the Sovereign in the Lords; as secretary to the Lord Great Chamberlain is responsible as the usher and doorkeeper at meetings of the Order of the Garter (stemming from the Garter Statute 1522); and, as the Sergeant-at-Arms and Keeper of the Doors of the House he is concerned in the admission of strangers to the House of Lords. Black Rod further has the task of arresting any Lord guilty of breach of privilege or other Parliamentary offence, such as contempt or disorder, or the disturbance of the House's proceedings. He is also responsible, as the representative of the Administration and Works Committee, for more important services; the black rod is used to tap the governor's shoulder as a blessing from the Queen and security of the Palace of Westminster. Either Black Rod or his deputy, the Yeoman Usher, is required to be present when the House of Lords, upper house of Parliament, is in session, and plays a role in the induction of all new Lords Temporal into the House (but not of bishops as new Lords Spiritual). The Lord Great Chamberlain of England is the sixth of the Great Officers of State, ranking beneath the Lord Privy Seal and above the Lord High Constable. ... The insignia of a knight of the Order of the Garter. ... Parliamentary privilege, also known as absolute privilege, is a legal mechanism employed within the legislative bodies of countries whose constitutions are based on the Westminster system. ... “Houses of Parliament” redirects here. ... In the United Kingdom Parliament the Lords Temporal are secular members of the House of Lords due to appointment as Life Peers or inheriting the title as an Hereditary peer, although the hereditary rights to the house of lords was abolished in 1999. ... The Lords Spiritual of the United Kingdom, also called Spiritual Peers, consist of the 26 clergymen of the established Church of England who serve in the House of Lords along with the Lords Temporal. ...


Ceremonial duties

The Mace

Black Rod is in theory responsible for carrying the Mace into and out of the chamber for the Speaker of the House of Lords (formerly the Lord Chancellor, now the Lord Speaker), though this role is delegated to the Yeoman Usher and Deputy Serjeant-at-Arms, or on judicial occasions, to the Lord Speaker's deputy, the Assistant Serjeant-at-Arms. This article needs cleanup. ... The Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain, or Lord Chancellor and prior to the Union the Chancellor of England and the Lord Chancellor of Scotland, is a senior and important functionary in the government of the United Kingdom, and its predecessor states. ... The Lord Speaker (or Lady Speaker) will be a new position in the British Parliament created once the Constitutional Reform Acts provisions about the Speakership of the House of Lords comes into effect. ... Yeoman is a word with several modern and historical meanings. ...


State Opening of Parliament

Black Rod is best known for his part in the ceremonies surrounding the State Opening of Parliament and the Throne speech. He summons the Commons to attend the speech and leads them to the Lords. As part of the ritual, as Black Rod approaches the doors to the chamber of the House of Commons to make his summons, they are slammed in his face. This is to symbolise the Commons' independence of the Sovereign. Black Rod then strikes the door three times with his staff, and in reply to the challenge "Who is there?" answers "Black Rod". He is then admitted and issues the summons of the monarch to attend. This ritual is derived from the attempt by Charles I of England to arrest five members in 1642, in what was seen as a breach of privilege, though strictly the King was entitled to enter the chamber. After that incident, the House of Commons has maintained its right to question the right of the monarch's representative to enter their chamber, though they can not bar him from entering with lawful authority. In the United Kingdom, the State Opening of Parliament is an annual event held usually in October or November that marks the commencement of a session of Parliament. ... Queen Beatrix of The Netherlands reads her countrys Speech from the Throne Queen Elizabeth II reads Canadas Speech from the Throne in 1977 The Speech from the Throne, sometimes referred to by the shorter term Throne Speech, is an event in certain monarchies in which the monarch (or... Charles I (19 November 1600 – 30 January 1649) was King of England, King of Scotland and King of Ireland from 27 March 1625 until his execution in 1649. ... Events January 4 - Charles I attempts to arrest five leading members of the Long Parliament, but they escape. ...


Scottish Parliament

Before the Acts of Union 1707 united the English and Scottish parliaments, there was a Gentleman Usher of the White Rod who had a similar role in the Scottish Parliament. [1] This office no longer exists. The Acts of Union were a pair of Acts of Parliament passed in 1706 and 1707 (taking effect on 1 May 1707) by, respectively, the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland. ...

See also Gentleman Usher for other colours.

An officer of the Royal Household of the United Kingdom. ...

Black Rod in other Commonwealth countries

As in the United Kingdom, Black Rod is responsible for arresting any senator or intruder who disrupts the proceedings.


Canada

The present Usher of the Black Rod for Canada is Lieutenant-Commander Terrance Christopher. Each Canadian province's parliament has its own Black Rod, despite all now being unicameral. The Black Rod therefore functions only on visits from the Lieutenant Governors. In Canada, the Usher leads the Speaker's Parade at the beginning of each sitting of the Senate carrying the ebony rod, and is immediately followed by a Mace Bearer who carries the Mace. Black Rod or his deputy is present for the induction of all Senators. Terrance Christopher is the Canadian Usher of the Black Rod. ... Unicameralism is the practice of having only one legislative or parliamentary chamber. ... A Lieutenant Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ...


Australia

The Australian Senate has Ms Andrea Griffiths as Usher of the Black Rod and Mr Nick Tate as Deputy Usher of the Black Rod. One of these is present for the induction of all Senators. Each bicameral Australian state (that is, all but Queensland) also has its own Black Rod. Australian Senate chamber Entrance to the Senate The Senate is the upper of the two houses of the Parliament of Australia. ... Slogan or Nickname: Sunshine State, Smart State Motto(s): Audax at Fidelis (Bold but Faithful) Other Australian states and territories Capital Brisbane Government Constitutional monarchy Governor Quentin Bryce Premier Anna Bligh (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 28  - Senate seats 12 Gross State Product (2004-05)  - Product ($m)  $158,506 (3rd...


New Zealand

In New Zealand, where the Legislative Council was abolished in 1951, the Usher of the Black Rod continues to summon MPs to the chamber for the Throne Speech. It is not a full-time position. Colonel William (Bill) Nathan, OBE ED, was Usher of the Black Rod 1993 to 2005, and a successor will be appointed shortly. The Legislative Council of New Zealand was the upper house of the New Zealand Parliament from 1853 until 1951. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... Ed, ed or ED can mean any of the following: // ed (text editor), a UNIX text editor ed (biblical reference), an altar or related place in some English translations of the Bible. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Black Rods (UK) from 1361

Sir Henry Norreys or Norris (c. ... Sir Philip Hoby (1505 - 31 May 1558) was a politician of the Tudor era. ... James Maxwell may be: James Clerk Maxwell (1831 to 1879), physicist James Laidlaw Maxwell (1836 to 1921), missionary to Formosa James Maxwell (actor) (1929 to 1995) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... Fleetwood Sheppard (sometimes spelled as Shepphard, Sheppheard, and Sheppeard) (January 1, 1634 – August 25, 1698) was a British courtier and literary wit who was instrumental in the courts of Charles II of England and William of Orange. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 4 - Palace of Whitehall in London is destroyed by fire. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events April 10 - The worlds first copyright legislation became effective, Britains Statute of Anne Ongoing events Great Northern War (1700-1721) War of the Spanish Succession (1702-1713) Births January 3 - Richard Gridley, American Revolutionary soldier (d. ... For other uses, see Admiral (disambiguation). ... Sir David Mitchell (c. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1765 (MDCCLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1832 (MDCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 280th day of the year (281st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Admiral Sir James Robert Drummond (1812-1895) was a British naval officer, who was captain of HMS Retribution, HMS Tribune, and HMS Albion as part of the Mediterranean/Black Sea Fleet during the Crimean War, and who as an admiral commanded the Mediterranean Fleet from 13 January 1874 to 15... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... is the 204th day of the year (205th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1941 (disambiguation). ... Lieutenant General is a military rank used in many countries. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in RAF No 1 Dress uniform Air Chief Marshal (Air Chf Mshl or ACM) is a senior air officer rank in the Royal Air Force of the United Kingdom As well as the Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and air forces of many Commonwealth... Air Chief Marshal Sir William Gore Sutherland Mitchell (8 March 1888 - 15 August 1944) was a senior commander in the Royal Air Force and the first RAF officer to hold the post of Black Rod. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Vice Admiral is a naval rank of three star level, equivalent to Lieutenant General in seniority. ... For other persons of the same name, see Geoffrey Blake. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lieutenant-General Sir Brian Gwynne Horrocks, (September 7, 1895 - January 4, 1985) was a British military officer. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Air Chief Marshal Sir George Holroyd Mills GCB DFC RAF (26 March 1902 – 14 April 1971) was a senior Royal Air Force commander. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... Air Chief Marshal Sir John Gingell (born 1925) was a senior Royal Air Force commander. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Admiral Sir Richard Thomas KCB KCVO OBE RN was the Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod (or simply Black Rod) in the British Parliaments House of Lords. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... General Sir Charles Edward Webb Jones KCB CVO CBE (25 September 1936 - 14 May 2007) was a senior officer in the British Army. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Lieutenant General Sir Michael Willcocks is The Gentleman Usher of The Black Rod For The Parliament of The United Kingdoms House of Lords. ...

Black Rods (Canada) from 1867

  • 1867 - 1875 René Kimber
  • 1875 - 1901 René Edouard Kimber
  • 1902 - 1904 Molyneux St. John
  • 1904 - 1925 Ernest John Chambers
  • 1925 - 1946 Andrew Ruthven Thompson
  • 1947 - 1970 Charles Rock Lamoureux
  • 1970 - 1979 A. Guy Vandelac
  • 1979 - 1984 Thomas Guy Bowie
  • 1984 - 1985 Claude G. Lajoie
  • 1985 - 1989 René M. Jalbert
  • 1989 - 1990 Rene Gutknecht
  • 1990 - 1997 Jean Doré
  • 1997 - 2001 Mary C. McLaren
  • 2001 - 2002 Blair Armitage (Acting)
  • 2002 - present Terrance J. Christopher

External links

  • The Canadian Parliament's information about Black Rod
  • The Australian Commonwealth Parliament's information about Black Rod

References

  • Gentleman Usher of the Black Rod. Retrieved on 2007-08-04.

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Black Rod: A History Lesson for Paul Martin about the FLQ (1435 words)
The origin of the Usher of the Black Rod goes back to early fourteenth century England.
The rod is a symbol for the authority of debate in the upper house.
We of The Black Rod have adopted the symbol to knock some sense and the right questions into the heads of Legislators, pundits, and other opinion makers.
Rod Black Music Vancouver Canada (184 words)
Black's soulful lyrics and melodic writing style come together to craft songs with energy and have the depth to stand the test of time.
Rod Blacks performance can only be described as mesmerizing; harnessing some of the best moves on the stage today.
In short, Rod Black was born to rock the stage.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m