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Encyclopedia > Black Rhinoceros
Black Rhinoceros

Conservation status
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Perissodactyla
Family: Rhinocerotidae
Genus: Diceros
Species: D. bicornis
Binomial name
Diceros bicornis
Linnaeus, 1758
Black Rhinoceros range
Black Rhinoceros range
Subspecies

Diceros bicornis michaeli
Diceros bicornis longipes
Diceros bicornis minor
Diceros bicornis bicornis Description: A Black Rhinoceros Info: By John and Karen Hollingsworth in Tanzania / US Fish and Wildlife Service Source: USFWS (file) License: Public domain This image is in the public domain in the United States and possibly other jurisdictions. ... The conservation status of a species is an indicator of the likelihood of that species continuing to survive either in the present day or the future. ... Image File history File links Status_iucn2. ... . ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List and Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species and can be found here. ... For other uses, see Scientific classification (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Typical Classes See below Chordates (phylum Chordata) are a group of animals that includes the vertebrates, together with several closely related invertebrates. ... Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Families Equidae Tapiridae Rhinocerotidae The odd-toed ungulates or Perissodactyla are large to very large browsing and grazing mammals with relatively simple stomachs and a large middle toe. ... For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Carl Linnaeus, Latinized as Carolus Linnaeus, also known after his ennoblement as  , (May 13, 1707[1] – January 10, 1778), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist[2] who laid the foundations for the modern scheme of nomenclature. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the zoological term. ... Binomial name Diceros bicornis michaeli Zukowsky, 1965 The Eastern Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) also known as the East African Black Rhinoceros is a subspecies of the Black Rhino. ... Binomial name Diceros bicornis longipes Zukowsky, 1949 The Western Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis longipes) or West African Black Rhinoceros is the rarest of the Black Rhino subspecies and on June 8th 2006 it was declared tentatively extinct. ... Trinomial name Diceros bicornis minor Drummond, 1876 The South-central Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis minor) is a subspecies of the Black Rhinoceros. ... Trinomial name Diceros bicornis bicornis Linnaeus, 1758 The South-western Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis bicornis) is a subspecies of the Black Rhinoceros. ...

The Black Rhinoceros, Diceros bicornis also colloquially Black Rhino is a mammal in the order Perissodactyla, native to the eastern and central areas of Africa including Kenya, Tanzania, Cameroon, South Africa, Namibia and Zimbabwe. Although the Rhino is referred to as a "Black" creature, it is actually more of a grey-white color in appearance. Tada. Subclasses & Infraclasses Subclass †Allotheria* Subclass Prototheria Subclass Theria Infraclass †Trituberculata Infraclass Metatheria Infraclass Eutheria Mammals (class Mammalia) are warm-blooded, vertebrate animals characterized by the presence of sweat glands, including milk producing sweat glands, and by the presence of: hair, three middle ear bones used in hearing, and a neocortex... Families Equidae Tapiridae Rhinocerotidae The odd-toed ungulates or Perissodactyla are large to very large browsing and grazing mammals with relatively simple stomachs and a large middle toe. ...


The name of the species was chosen to distinguish it from the White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum). This is very misleading, as those two species are not really distinguishable by colour. The word "White" in name "White Rhinoceros" deriving from the Afrikaans word for "wide" rather than the color white. Binomial name Burchell, 1817 The White Rhinoceros original range (orange: Northern (C. s. ... Look up Wiktionary:Swadesh lists for Afrikaans and Dutch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The World Conservation Union (IUCN) announced on 7 July 2006 that one of the four subspecies, the West African Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis longipes), has been tentatively declared as extinct.[1] is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the zoological term. ... Binomial name Diceros bicornis longipes Zukowsky, 1949 The Western Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis longipes) or West African Black Rhinoceros is the rarest of the Black Rhino subspecies and on June 8th 2006 it was declared tentatively extinct. ...

Contents

Taxonomy and naming

Subspecies

There are four subspecies of the black rhinoceros:

  • South-central (Diceros bicornis minor) which are the most numerous, and once ranged from central Tanzania south through Zambia, Zimbabwe and Mozambique to northern and eastern South Africa.
  • South-western (Diceros bicornis bicornis) which are better adapted to the arid and semi-arid savannas of Namibia, southern Angola, western Botswana and western South Africa.
  • East African (Diceros bicornis michaeli) which had a historic distribution from south Sudan, Ethiopia, Somalia down through Kenya into north-central Tanzania. Today, its range is limited primarily to Tanzania.
  • West African (Diceros bicornis longipes) is the rarest and most endangered subspecies. Historically, it once occurred across most of the west African savanna. Until recently, only a few individuals survived in northern Cameroon, but on July 8, 2006 the World Conservation Union declared the subspecies to be tentatively extinct.[1]

Trinomial name Diceros bicornis bicornis Linnaeus, 1758 The South-western Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis bicornis) is a subspecies of the Black Rhinoceros. ... Binomial name Diceros bicornis michaeli Zukowsky, 1965 The Eastern Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis michaeli) also known as the East African Black Rhinoceros is a subspecies of the Black Rhino. ... Binomial name Diceros bicornis longipes Zukowsky, 1949 The Western Black Rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis longipes) or West African Black Rhinoceros is the rarest of the Black Rhino subspecies and on June 8th 2006 it was declared tentatively extinct. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The World Conservation Union or International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) is an international organization dedicated to natural resource conservation. ...

Description

An adult Black Rhinoceros stands 147–160 cm (57.9–63 inches) high at the shoulder and is 3.3-3.6 m (10.8–11.8 feet) in length.[2] An adult weighs from 800 to 1400 kg (1,760 to 3,080 lb), exceptionally to 1820 kg (4,000 lb), with the females being smaller than the males. Two horns on the skull are made of keratin with the larger front horn typically 50 cm long, exceptionally up to 140 cm. Sometimes, a third smaller horn may develop. These horns are used for defense, intimidation, and digging up roots and breaking branches during feeding. Skin color depends more on local soil conditions and the rhinoceros' wallowing behavior than anything else, so many black rhinos are typically not truly black in color. The Black Rhino is much smaller than the White Rhino, and has a pointed mouth, which they use to grasp leaves and twigs when feeding. White Rhinoceros have square lips used for eating grass. The Black Rhinoceros can also be recognized from the White Rhinoceros by its smaller skull and ears. Black Rhinoceros also do not have a distinguishing shoulder hump like the White Rhinoceros. Highland cow, a very old long-horned breed from Scotland. ... Not to be confused with kerogen or carotene. ... Binomial name Ceratotherium simum Burchell, 1817 The White Rhinoceros or Square-lipped rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) is one of the five species of rhinoceros that still exists and is one of the few megaherbivore species left. ... Binomial name Burchell, 1817 The White Rhinoceros original range (orange: Northern (C. s. ... Binomial name Burchell, 1817 The White Rhinoceros original range (orange: Northern (C. s. ...


Their thick layered skin protects the rhino from thorns and sharp grasses. Although their skin harbors many external parasites, such as crabs, which are eaten by oxpeckers and egrets that live with the rhino. They have terrible eyesight relying more on hearing and smell. It has large ears that rotate much like satellite dishes to detect any sound and a large nose that has an excellent sense of smell to detect predators. Raised thorns on the stem of the wait-a-bit climber Thorns on rose stems A spine is a rigid, pointed surface protuberance or needle-like structure on an animal, shell, or plant, presumably serving as a defense against attack by predators. ... For other uses, see Grass (disambiguation). ... A parasite is an organism that spends a significant portion of its life in or on the living tissue of a host organism and which causes harm to the host without immediately killing it. ... Species See text. ... an egret and a fish Genera Egretta Ardea An egret is any of several herons, most of which are white or buff, and several of which develop fine plumes during the breeding season. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ...


Distribution

Black rhino grazing.
Black rhino grazing.

For most of the 20th century the continental black rhino was the most numerous of all rhino species. Around 1900 there were probably several hundred thousand[3] living in Africa. During the later half of the 20th century their number severely reduced from an estimated 70,000[4] in the late 1960s to only 10,000 to 15,000 in 1981. In the early 1990s the number dipped below 2500, and in 2004 it was reported that only 2,410 black rhinos remained. According to the International Rhino Foundation, the total African population has since then slightly recovered to 3,610 by 2003.[5] According to a July 2006 report by the World Conservation Union, a recent survey of the West African Black Rhino, which once ranged across the savannahs of western Africa but had dropped to just 10, concluded the subspecies to be extinct. [6] The northern white is soon to join the western black rhino on the extinction list as its last noted numbers were as few as 4. The only rhino that has recovered somewhat from the brink of extinction is the southern white whose numbers now are estimated around 14,500, up from only 50 a century ago.[7] The Black Rhinoceros has been pushed to the brink of extinction by illegal poaching for their horn and by loss of habitat. The horn is used in traditional Chinese medicine, and is said by herbalists to be able to revive comatose patients and cure fevers.[8] The purported effectiveness of the use of rhino horn in treating any illness has not been confirmed by medical science. In June of 2007, the first-ever documented case of the medicinal sale of black rhino horn in the United States (confirmed by genetic testing of the confiscated horn) occurred at a Traditional Chinese Medicine supply store in Portland, Oregon's Chinatown.[8] It is used in the Middle East to make ornately carved handles for ceremonial daggers called jambiyas. Demand for these exploded in the 1970s causing the Black Rhinoceros population to decline 96% between 1970 and 1992. Black rhino from US F&WS. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Black rhino from US F&WS. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... The International Rhino Foundation is a Yulee, Florida-based charity focused on the conservation of the five species of rhinoceros: the White Rhinoceros and Black Rhinoceros in Africa; the Indian Rhinoceros, Javan Rhinoceros and Sumatran Rhinoceros in Asia. ... Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... Traditional Chinese medicine shop in Tsim Sha Tsui, Hong Kong. ... Nickname: Location of Portland in Multnomah County and the state of Oregon Coordinates: , Country State Counties Multnomah County Incorporated February 8, 1851 Government  - Mayor Tom Potter[1]  - Commissioners Sam Adams Randy Leonard Dan Saltzman Erik Sten  - Auditor Gary Blackmer Area  - City 376. ... This article is about sections of an urban area associated with a large number of Chinese residents or commercial activities. ... Jambiya (Arabic script جمبية or جنبية) is the Arabic term for dagger, but it is generally used to describe a specific type of dagger with a short curved blade that is worn on a belt. ...


Behavior and ecology

The Black Rhinoceros is a herbivorous browser that eats leafy plants, branches, shoots, thorny wood bushes and fruit. Their diet helps to reduce the amount of woody plants which results in more grasses growing for the benefit of other animals. Its been known to eat up to 220 different species of plant. It can live up to 5 days without water during drought. Black Rhinos live in primarily grasslands, savannahs and tropical bushland habitats. A deer and two fawns feeding on some foliage A herbivore is often defined as any organism that eats only plants[1]. By that definition, many fungi, some bacteria, many animals, about 1% of flowering plants and some protists can be considered herbivores. ...


They browse for food in the morning and evening. In the hottest part of the day they are most inactive spent resting, sleeping and wallowing in the mud. Wallowing is an essential part of all rhino species lives. It helps cool down their body temperature during the day and protects against parasites. If mud is not available they will resort to wallowing in dust. Drinking water is most commonly done towards the afterhours.


Solitary animals with the exception of coming together to mate, mothers and calfs will sometimes congregate in small groups for short periods of time. Males are not as sociable as females, although they will sometimes allow the presence of other rhinos. They are not very territorial and often intersect other rhino territories. Home ranges vary depending on season and the availability of food and water. Generally they have smaller home ranges and larger density in habitats that have plenty of food and water available, and vice versa if resources are not readily available. In the Serengeti home ranges are around 43 to 133 km², while in the Ngorongoro it is between 2.6 to 44 km². Black Rhinos have also been observed to have a certain area they tend to visit and rest frequently called "houses" which are usually on a high ground level.


The Black Rhino has a reputation for being extremely aggressive. Due to their very poor eyesight they will charge if they sense a threat. They have even been observed to charge tree trunks and termite mounds. Black Rhinoceros are not very aggressive towards others of their species, usually only bluffing aggression. Males will fight sometimes by pushing head to head or horn jousting. They usually avoid other males when possible. Females are not aggressive towards each other.


Black Rhinoceros follow the same trails as elephants use to get from foraging areas to water holes. They also use smaller trails when they are browsing. They are very fast and can get up to speeds of 35 miles per hour running on their toes.


Communication

Many forms of communication are exhibited by these animals. Due to their bad eyesight and solitary nature, scent marking is often used to identify other Black Rhinos. Urine spraying occurs on bushes, around water holes and feeding areas. Females urine spray more often when receptive for breeding. Defecation occurs in the same spot used by many different rhinos found around feeding stations, watering tracks, and other areas. These are very important for identifying each other. Coming upon these spots, rhinos will smell to see who is in the area and add their own marking. Less commonly they will rub their head or horn against tree trunks to scent mark.


Different types of complex vocalizations have also been observed. Growls and trumpets may be used during a fight. A long snort indicates anger, while sneeze-like calls are used as an alarm to danger. Short snorts with pricked ears and wrinkled nostrils are a startled reaction to a newcomer. A high-pitched wonk has been described for when they are fearful. Even worse is a high-pitched scream observed in times of terror. "Mmwonk", a deep, resonant sound is a sign of contentment. Squeak, done with different tones and intonations can mean "I'm lost", "Where are you?", "I'm over here", and other emotions that are not yet understood. Breathing speeds can be used to communicate greetings, anxiety, and reassurance. A puffing snort is a common greeting when males and females encounter one another.


Body language is the least important of Black Rhinoceros communications. A bull will sometimes display an aggressive ritual towards a potential rival. They will smell, spray repeatedly, scrape, trample, and bash with their heads in bushes. They may also snort in an attack posture. When their tail is up, it may indicate one of several things: curiosity, alarm, or sexual receptivity. Erect ears also indicate curiosity, though flat ears express anger.


Reproduction

Black Rhino in Zürich zoo.
Black Rhino in Zürich zoo.

The adults are solitary in nature, coming together only for mating. Mating does not have a seasonal pattern but births tend to be towards the end of the rainy season in drier environments. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 1811 KB) Ostafrikanisches Spitzmaulnashorn in anderen Sprachen: -Rhinocéros noir (Französisch) -Rinoceronte nero (Italienisch) -Black Rhinoceros (Englisch) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Black Rhinoceros... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (3008x2000, 1811 KB) Ostafrikanisches Spitzmaulnashorn in anderen Sprachen: -Rhinocéros noir (Französisch) -Rinoceronte nero (Italienisch) -Black Rhinoceros (Englisch) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Black Rhinoceros... For other uses of Zurich, see Zurich (disambiguation). ...


When in season the females will scrape their vages more vigorously with dung piles. Males following females that are in season will follow her; when she defecates he will scrape and spread the dung, making it more difficult for any other adult males to pick up her scent trail.


Courtship behaviors before mating include snorting and sparring with the horns among males. Another courtship behavior is called bluff and bluster, where the rhino will snort and swing its head from side to side aggressively before running away repeatedly. Breeding pairs stay together for 2–3 days and sometimes even weeks. They mate several times a day over this time and copulation lasts for a half an hour.


The gestation period is 15–16 months. The single calf weighs about 35–50 kg at birth, and can follow its mother around after just three days. Weaning occurs at around 2 years of age for the offspring. The mother and calf stay together for 2–3 years until the next calf is born; female calves may stay longer, forming small groups. The young are occasionally taken by hyenas and lions. Sexual maturity is reached from 5–7 years old for females, and 7–8 years for males. The life expectancy in natural conditions (without poaching pressure) is from 35 – 50 years.[2] Subfamilies and Genera Hyaeninae Crocuta Hyaena Parahyaena Protelinae Proteles Hyenas or Hyænas are moderately large terrestrial carnivores native to Africa, Arabia, Asia and the Indian subcontinent. ... For other uses, see Lion (disambiguation). ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ a b "West African black rhino 'is extinct'", The Times, July 7, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-10-09. 
  2. ^ a b Dollinger, Peter and Silvia Geser. Black Rhinoceros. World Association of Zoos and Aquariums. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  3. ^ African Rhino Specialist Group (2003). Diceros bicornis. IUCN Redlist. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  4. ^ WWF Factsheet; Black Rhinoceros Diceros Bicornis. World Wildlife Fund (October 2004). Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  5. ^ Black Rhino Information. International Rhino Foundation. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  6. ^ Andrew Meldrum. "West African black rhino feared extinct", The Guardian, July 12, 2006. Retrieved on 2007-10-09. 
  7. ^ Sean Markey (July 12, 2006). West African Black Rhino Extinct, Group Says. National Geographic. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  8. ^ a b Michael Milstein. "Shop owner pleads guilty to selling black rhino horn", The Oregonian, Wednesday, June 27, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-06-29. (English) 

The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The World Association of Zoos and Aquariums (WAZA) is the umbrella organisation for the world zoo and aquarium community. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (also known as the IUCN Red List or Red Data List), created in 1963, is the worlds most comprehensive inventory of the global conservation status of plant and animal species. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Note: After losing a court case in 2002 on the use of the initials WWF, the organization previously known as the World Wrestling Federation has rebranded itself as World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE. WWF - The Conservation Organization was formerly known as World Wildlife Fund and Worldwide Fund for Nature. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The International Rhino Foundation is a Yulee, Florida-based charity focused on the conservation of the five species of rhinoceros: the White Rhinoceros and Black Rhinoceros in Africa; the Indian Rhinoceros, Javan Rhinoceros and Sumatran Rhinoceros in Asia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... October 2, 2004 edition. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Emslie, R. and Brooks, M. (1999), African Rhino. Status Survey and Conservation Action Plan., IUCN/SSC African Rhino Specialist Group. IUCN, Gland, Switzerland and Cambridge, UK, ISBN 2831705029
  • Rookmaaker, L. C. (2005), "Review of the European perception of the African rhinoceros", Journal of Zoology 265 (4): 365–376, DOI 10.1017/S0952836905006436

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Black Rhinoceros
Wikispecies has information related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikispecies-logo. ... Wikispecies is a wiki-based online project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation that aims to create a comprehensive free content catalogue of all species (including animalia, plantae, fungi, bacteria, archaea, and protista). ... ARKive logo ARKive is a global initiative to locate and gather films, photographs and audio recordings of the worlds species into one centralised digital library for the benefit of present and future generations. ... The International Rhino Foundation is a Yulee, Florida-based charity focused on the conservation of the five species of rhinoceros: the White Rhinoceros and Black Rhinoceros in Africa; the Indian Rhinoceros, Javan Rhinoceros and Sumatran Rhinoceros in Asia. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... MacGyver is an American adventure television series, produced in Canada, about a laid-back, extremely resourceful secret agent, played by Richard Dean Anderson. ... Richard Dean Anderson (born January 23, 1950 in Minneapolis, Minnesota) is an American television actor. ... For other uses, see Rhinoceros (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Burchell, 1817 The White Rhinoceros original range (orange: Northern (C. s. ... Binomial name (Linnaeus, 1758) Indian Rhinoceros range The Indian Rhinoceros or the Great One-horned Rhinoceros (Rhinoceros unicornis) is a large mammal found in Nepal and in Assam, India. ... Binomial name Desmarest, 1822 Javan Rhinoceros Range Subspecies Rhinoceros sondaicus annamiticus Rhinoceros sondaicus inermis (extinct) Rhinoceros sondaicus sondaicus The Javan Rhinoceros, Rhinoceros sondaicus is one of the rarest and most endangered large mammals anywhere in the world. ... Binomial name Fischer, 1814 Sumatran Rhinoceros range Subspecies Dicerorhinus sumatrensis harrissoni Dicerorhinus sumatrensis sumatrensis †Dicerorhinus sumatrensis lasiotis The Sumatran Rhinoceros, Dicerorhinus sumatrensis is the smallest extant rhinoceros species, as well as the one with the most fur, which allows it to survive at very high altitudes in Borneo and Sumatra. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Rhinoceros - MSN Encarta (716 words)
As a result of illegal trade in rhinoceros horn and habitat destruction, the populations of the fl, Sumatran, and Javan rhinos have suffered a sharp decline in recent years, and are now close to extinction in the wild.
The fl rhinoceros feeds on leaves and twigs, while the white rhinoceros is the world’s biggest grazing animal, living almost entirely on low-growing grass.
Black rhinos were once found in many parts of Africa south of the Sahara Desert, but unrestrained hunting in the last half of the 20th century caused the population to collapse by more than 90 percent.
Denver Zoo: Animal Description: Black Rhinoceros (239 words)
The fl rhinoceros is approximately 12 feet long with a shoulder height of 5½ feet.
Black rhinoceros are still found in eastern and southern Africa where they inhabit the transitional zone between grassland and forest, generally in thick brush and acacia scrub.
The fl rhinoceros is a highly endangered animal still poached today for its horns which are used for medicinal remedies and decorative dagger handles.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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