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Encyclopedia > Bizarro
Bizarro
Publisher DC Comics
First appearance Superboy #68 (1958)
Created by Otto Binder
George Papp
Characteristics
Real name Bizarro #1
Notable aliases Kent Clark
Team affiliations Injustice League
The Society
Htrae
Abilities Originally Kryptonian powers, which later evolved into reverse versions, including freeze-vision, heat-breath, vacuum breath, spot-light vision, x-ray hearing, etc.

Bizarro is a fictional character, a doppelgänger of DC ComicsSuperman. Created by writer Otto Binder and artist George Papp, he first appeared in Superboy #68 (October 1958). The word Bizarro may refer to Bizarro, a character in Superman comics. ... Screen Capture Still from the Justice League Unlimited Television series. ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... In comic books, first appearance refers to first comic book to feature a character. ... Otto Oscar Binder (August 26, 1911 - October 14, 1974) was a writer of American science fiction, non-fiction UFO, and comic books. ... George Papp (1916-1989) was a U.S. cartoonist and comic book artist. ... The original Injustice League was the brainchild of the interplanetary conqueror, Agamemno. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSoSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... Htrae is a fictional planet in the DC comics universe. ... The powers of the DC Comics character Superman have changed a great deal since his introduction in the 1930s. ... Alice, a fictional character based on a real character from the work of Lewis Carroll. ... For other uses, see Doppelgänger (disambiguation). ... DC Comics is an American comic book and related media company. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Otto Oscar Binder (August 26, 1911 - October 14, 1974) was a writer of American science fiction, non-fiction UFO, and comic books. ... George Papp (1916-1989) was a U.S. cartoonist and comic book artist. ... Superboy is a fictional superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... Jan. ...


Due to a somewhat disjointed continuity, several versions of Bizarro have appeared in DC comic books, all of them inversions of Superman (or Superboy) with gray or chalk-white skin, a twisted sense of logic which typically manifests as a superficial "opposite" of anything Superman would do or say and a resultant speech pattern ("Me am going to kill you" would mean "I will save you" in Bizarro speech). Due to his imperfections, Bizarro is frequently a foe of Superman, but sometimes finds himself in the role of hero (in this case, an anti-hero). In fiction, continuity is consistency of the characteristics of persons, plot, objects, places and events seen by the reader or viewer. ... A comic book is a magazine or book containing the art form of comics. ... Superboy is a fictional superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... In literature and film, an anti-hero is a central or supporting character that has some of the personality flaws and ultimate fortune traditionally assigned to villains but nonetheless also have enough heroic qualities or intentions to gain the sympathy of readers or viewers. ...


The original Bizarro was created when Superboy was exposed to a "duplicate ray." In accordance with the science fiction concepts of Superman stories of the era, a subsequent version of Bizarro would relocate to "the Bizarro World," a cubical planet called Htrae [in keeping with Bizarro logic, Earth spelled backwards] which operated under "Bizarro logic" (it was a crime to do anything good or right) and which Bizarro populated with inverted versions of Superman’s supporting cast and other DC heroes. Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... The Bizarro World, Htrae, is a fictional planet in the DC comics universe. ... The List of supporting characters in Superman is the cast of characters secondary to the main character of Superman in the Superman comics, television programs, cartoons, and movies. ...


The 1985 event Crisis on Infinite Earths rewrote DC’s continuity, eliminating Htrae. Since then, two Bizarro characters have appeared, one of them a flawed clone created by Lex Luthor. The second, longer lasting Bizarro, was an idea of the Joker, brought to life by the cosmic Mister Mxyzptlk. This article is about the year. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Mister Mxyzptlk (roughly pronounced Miks-yez-pit-lik, or Mix-yez-pittle-ik, also nicknamed Mxy) is a fictional supervillain who appears in DC Comics Superman comic books. ...


Bizarro has been a consistent enemy of Superman since his first appearance. Faithful adaptations of Bizarro appeared in the animated series Super Friends and series in the subsequent DC animated universe. Also, doppelgängers of Superman with some attributes of Bizarro appeared in live action adaptations. An animated series or cartoon series is a television series produced by means of animation. ... This article is about the Hanna-Barbera television series. ... An image of many of the DCAU heroes. ...


Bizarro and the Bizarro World have become somewhat well known in popular culture, and the term Bizarro is used as to describe anything that utilizes twisted logic or that is the opposite of something else. [1]

Contents

Pre-Crisis Bizarro

The original Bizarro was created in a laboratory accident. A scientist was demonstrating his newly invented "duplicating ray" to Superboy, testing it on a radium pellet and a jewel. However, the duplicated radium was non-radioactive and the jewel melted. The scientist then stumbled and knocked the machine, inadvertently creating an imperfect Superboy. Although the scientist insisted the duplicate was not alive, it nonetheless escaped from the lab. Although Bizarro wanted to be accepted, his appearance and erratic behavior scared people, especially since he had no idea of his own super-strength. He was befriended by a blind girl, shortly before Superboy realized the remains of the machine would act as Kryptonite to him. Bizarro headed straight towards Superboy, having somehow realized that the shockwave from his destruction would cure his friend's blindness. Superboy is a fictional superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... General Name, Symbol, Number radium, Ra, 88 Chemical series alkaline earth metals Group, Period, Block 2, 7, s Appearance silvery white metallic Standard atomic weight (226) g·mol−1 Electron configuration [Rn] 7s2 Electrons per shell 2, 8, 18, 32, 18, 8, 2 Physical properties Phase solid Density (near r. ...


The later Bizarro was created by Lex Luthor, who used the "duplicating ray" on the adult Superman and hoped to use the duplicate to attack Superman. However, this Bizarro did not cooperate and instead tried to emulate Superman. Unfortunately, his attempts to match the original's heroics were clumsy and destructive, and he kidnapped Lois. This was resolved when Lois created a Bizarro-Lois for Bizarro using the "duplication ray". Feeling rejected by the people of Earth, they moved to the world of Htrae, which had ancient advanced technology which was used to populate the planet with other Bizarros created in the same manner. Almost everyone on Htrae looked like an ugly Superman (and possessed super powers) or an ugly Lois Lane. On Superman's first visit to Htrae in Action Comics #264 (May 1960), he was arrested for being normal, but he plea-bargained a proposal to change the shape of the world into a cube (thereby making it imperfect) for his release. Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ...


Bizarro's only weakness is blue Kryptonite, created by using the same machine to duplicate green Kryptonite. Though Bizarro acts in what he believes to be the best manner, his Bizarro logic often causes him to act for evil. This article is about the fictional substance. ...


Originally Bizarro's abilities were the same as Superman's but he was hit by a meteorite which reversed his powers: flame breath, ice vision, microscopic vision that actually decreased the size of things, X-ray vision that could only see through lead, etc. Superman had to deal with these new powers in Superman #333 (1979) when Bizarro says he is going to save Lois Lane (meaning in Bizarro logic, he is going to kill her). Superman manages to trick Bizarro into thinking he has 'saved' Lois and returns to Bizarro World.


Appearance

Bizarro has chalky and sometimes rock-like skin, a pale complexion, and a misshapen face. While the original Bizarro costume was identical to Superman's, he later changed it to one with a reversed S-shield so he could be even more imperfect; subsequent modifications to the costume have included a dented belt buckle and poorly fitting boots, although these modifications weren't consistent between stories. Bizarro wears a medallion that says "Bizarro #1", in order to distinguish himself from the other Bizarros on Htrae.


The Bizarro World

Main article: Bizarro World

In the Bizarro world, a cube-shaped planet known as "Htrae" (Earth spelled backwards), society is ruled by the Bizarro Code, which states that it is a crime to do anything well or to make anything perfect or beautiful. The Bizarro World, Htrae, is a fictional planet in the DC comics universe. ...


Later stories introduced Bizarro versions of Superman's supporting cast, including Bizarro-Perry White and Bizarro-Jimmy Olsen, created by using the duplicator ray on characters other than Superman and Lois Lane, as well as the children of Bizarro and Bizarro Lois. There was even a Bizarro-Justice League and Legion of Super-Heroes, as well as a "Bizarro-Kltpzyxm". The List of supporting characters in Superman is the cast of characters secondary to the main character of Superman in the Superman comics, television programs, cartoons, and movies. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist that appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ... LSH redirects here. ... Mr. ...


"Tales of the Bizarro World" became a recurring segment in Adventure Comics from 1961 to 1962. Adventure Comics #296 Adventure Comics is a comic book series published by DC Comics from 1935 to 1983. ...


On one occasion, Keith Giffen portrayed Htrae itself as being sentient - "Me am the Bizarro World. Planet Earth not think... therefore, me do" - and its only sane inhabitant was the Bizarro Ambush Bug. Keith Ian Giffen (born November 30, 1952) is an American artist, writer, and penciller of comic books. ... Ambush Bug is a fictional comic book character who has appeared in several DC Comics. ...


Linguistics

Bizarro and the other inhabitants of the Bizarro world used an odd but predictable form of English. The most notable characteristics were:

  • The lack of nominative case when using pronouns; Bizarro replaces pronouns that should be nominative with their analogues in the accusative case. Bizarro might introduce himself by saying "Me am Bizarro" instead of "I am Bizarro," for example.
  • The lack of proper verb conjugation; Bizarro only uses the first person conjugation for any verb. For example, the verb "is" is always conjugated as "am", leading to sentences like "This am great".
  • Speaking the opposite of what is really meant in a situation. Thus, "This am great" would mean that the thing isn't great at all. The exception would be "Me am Bizarro", which would actually mean what was said. Bizarro-English words are thus antonyms of the corresponding English words.

The nominative case is a grammatical case for a noun, which generally marks the subject of a verb, as opposed to its object or other verb arguments. ... The accusative case (abbreviated ACC) of a noun is the grammatical case used to mark the direct object of a transitive verb. ... In linguistics, conjugation is the creation of derived forms of a verb from its principal parts by inflection (regular alteration according to rules of grammar). ... For other uses, see Point of view (literature). ... Look up Antonym in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

Death

In Superman #423 & Action Comics #583, Alan Moore wrote the final Superman story for the Pre-Crisis era (though subsequent writers have retconned it into being an alternate reality). In the beginning of Superman #423, Superman has his final encounter with Bizarro, who had gone on a killing spree. For other persons named Alan Moore, see Alan Moore (disambiguation). ...


Superman has been off the Earth, doing research for the government. When he returns, he finds complete city blocks horribly destroyed, and is told Bizarro has gone berserk, smashing buildings and injuring innocent people.


Confronted by Superman, Bizarro tells him, "This am part of genius Bizarro self-improvement plan." Bizarro tells Superman that he has destroyed Bizarro world, as Krypton had been destroyed. His reason for killing so many humans is that Superman never kills, so Bizarro reasons that he should do the opposite. Bizarro then exposes himself to blue kryptonite, because Superman is alive so he must be the opposite and die. His last words are "... everything, him go d-dark... Hello, Superman. Hello." dies. This article is about the fictional substance. ...


Not much later, Superman's secret identity is exposed and all the members of his rogues gallery attempt to kill him and everyone associated with him. Superman later discovers that Mr. Mxyzptlk is the villain orchestrating the attacks, and was most likely responsible for Bizarro's strange(er) behavior. Mr. ...


Post-Crisis appearances of Pre-Crisis Bizarro

Though Bizarro was destroyed in the Crisis on Infinite Earths, his character later to be reimagined and reintroduced, the original Bizarro was able to make a few appearances. For instance: Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ...

Animal Man (Buddy Baker) is a fictional DC Comics superhero. ... The Psycho-Pirate is the name of two DC comics supervillains, dating back to the Golden Age of Comics. ... Arkham Asylum as it appeared on Batman: The Animated Series. ... The fourth wall is the imaginary invisible wall at the front of the stage in a proscenium theater, through which the audience sees the action in the world of the play. ...

Post-Crisis Bizarro

Post-Crisis Bizarro debut in Man of Steel #5.

LexCorp Bizarros

Bizarro World was erased from the history of the DC Universe during the Crisis on Infinite Earths. Since then, two Bizarros have been created by Lex Luthor. However, in the post-Crisis version, the imperfections in the duplicates are eventually fatal. The first Bizarro created Post-Crisis appeared in Man of Steel #5 (1986), and made several attempts to "be" Superman, including wearing a jacket and glasses over his costume, although leaving it visible. He was apparently not capable of speech. As his non-living matter was continually flaking off, he was destroyed when he and Superman smashed into each other (the flakes of his body restoring Lucy Lane's vision, in homage to the original story). Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... Crisis on Infinite Earths was a 12-issue comic book limited series (identified as a 12-part maxi-series) and crossover event, produced by DC Comics in 1985 in order to simplify their fifty-year-old continuity. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Lucy Lane is a fictional character published by DC Comics. ...


Luthor later recreated Bizarro to see if it would offer insight into how to stop the "Clone Plague". This Bizarro escaped, and kidnapped Lois Lane, taking her to "Bizarro World"; a warehouse set up like a surreal version of Metropolis. He subjected her to danger, so that he would be able to rescue her from it. She managed to escape, and Bizarro was recaptured by Lexcorp, where it subsequently died. Metropolis Skyline, as seen in Smallville. ...


These Bizarros were similar to the original in appearance and abilities, although the second was less angular. While the first did not speak, the second had the speech patterns of the original.


Emperor Joker

A later version of Bizarro has a very different origin, having been created by the Joker by the use of the powers of Mr. Mxyzptlk; his first appearance was in Superman vol. 2, #160, and he seems to be the longest lived Post-Crisis Bizarro yet; in a nod to Htrae, Jokerworld, the Joker's twisted version of Earth, is a perfect cube with Joker's image on each facet. Bizarro also retains most of the classic Bizarro speech patterns. The "Emperor Joker" Bizarro is not as chalky and angular as the original Bizarro. He has a light greyish skin-tone, yellow and red eyes, an overly muscular body, and a maniacal smile. Bizarro has a purple and indigo uniform, and the logo on his chest is inverted, so the "S" is backwards. The current Bizarro has the classic "Bizarro #1" engraved stone amulet. The Joker redirects here. ... Mr. ...


Originally created as the greatest hero of Jokerworld and leader of that world's JLA (Joker's League of Anarchy), Bizarro was one of a number of characters Mxyzptlk saved from that world after Joker lost the powers he had stolen from the imp. He was subsequently captured by the Pokolistanian dictator General Zod, who used to torture him for months, apparently just for the pleasure of beating someone who resembled Superman. General Zod is a fictional comic book supervillain who is an enemy of Superman. ...


After escaping from Pokolistan with Superman's help, Bizarro recreated his Jokerworld headquarters, the Graveyard of Solitude, and at erratic intervals emerges to help or hinder Superman; the decision as to which being seemingly random, and the same amount of trouble caused either way.


To decide whether or not to join the new Secret Society of Supervillains, Bizarro challenged Zoom to a race (obviously meant as a homage/parody to the Superman/Flash races). However, due to Bizarro's complicated speech patterns, Zoom and Cheetah were not sure which end result of the race would convince Bizarro to join. Also, Zoom soon grew frustrated since Bizarro wouldn't run in a straight line (Bizarro would just zig-zag across the planet).


Bizarro (probably unknowingly) became a killer in Infinite Crisis #1 (Oct, 2005) while a member of the Secret Society of Super Villains. After the Human Bomb killed Doctor Polaris, Bizarro, commenting that he liked the flashes of light that the Human Bomb's powers created, attacked the Bomb, hammering his face to produce more colorful explosions. Lincoln's body was pulped by the brutal beating received, his explosive nature not harming the impervious Bizarro. The explosions stopped even though Bizarro continued punching, indicating that the power ended at the instant of death. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSoSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... The Human Bomb is a fictional superhero from the Golden Age of Comic Books. ... Doctor Polaris is a DC Comics supervillain, mainly to the Green Lantern // Once a researcher working for the betterment of mankind, Neal Emerson became one of the deadliest metahumans on Earth. ...


One year later

With the publication of the Infinite Crisis limited series, DC took the opportunity to revise some characters' histories, and Bizarro seems to be one of those affected. Based on comments in Action Comics #855 and Action Comics Annual #10, Bizarro is now an "imperfect clone" of Superman. Based on his appearance in flashback in the the Titans East Special, he has existed for much longer than previously thought. There has been no mention of his Emperor Joker origins. Infinite Crisis was a seven-issue limited series of comic books published by DC Comics, beginning in October of 2005. ... The limited series is a term referring to a comic book series with a set finite number of issues. ...


One year later, Bizarro is a captive of Lex Luthor and has been watching television in a small room for thirteen months. As a result, he is much smarter than before (although still not close to an average intellect) and instead of talking backwards he talks similarly to his pre-Crisis counterpart. One Year Later event logo. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ...


Recently, Bizarro has once again become affiliated with a square Bizarro World reminiscent of the Silver Age. Bizarro found he can create other Bizarros under the power of a blue sun, and used his new ability to populate the planet with new Bizarros. With Superman's help, he has become the new Bizarro World's greatest hero.


Abilities

Originally, this Bizarro's abilities were the same as Superman's, but in homage to his Pre-Crisis counterpart, this Bizarro also developed reversed powers as well as adding things like "x-ray hearing" and "spotlight vision". [2] Instead of possessing heat vision and freeze breath like Superman, he has freeze vision and flame breath, the latter recently shown in Batman/Superman #22 (Loeb, McGuinness, Vines). He is physically as powerful as Superman and can hold his own against him. In Action Comics #855 (Part one of the "Escape From Bizarro World" storyline), it is revealed that the light of a blue sun can give Bizarro extra powers, such as "Bizarro Vision", which creates Bizarro duplicates of any person it hits.


Post-Crisis Bizarro has encountered Blue Kryptonite on two occasions. The first was pre-Infinite Crisis Batzarro presented him with a ring set with a stone of it. [3] [4] The ring caused Bizarro to speak normally and act rationally, as well as granting him a 12th level intellect. The effect seems to be the opposite of the expected outcome. Instead of killing this Bizarro, it has the imperfect effect of making him intelligent. Still, he feared the ring. The ring appeared to have no effect on Batzarro since he is a Batman clone. Post-Infinite Crisis Luthor created a version of Blue Kryptonite that affects Bizarro just like Green Kryptonite affects Superman (Action Comics Annual #10). Batzarro is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ...


Linguistics

Post-Crisis Bizarro adopted all of the linguistic idiosyncrasies of his Pre-Crisis self, but also negated every possible word in the sentence. Though the usage was slightly inconsistent, this usually included:

  • Negating verbs.
  • Replacing adjectives with their opposite.
  • Replacing certain nouns with their opposite.

The ultimate end of this caused sentences to frequently have double and triple negatives. Combined with the fact that Bizarro's logic is already flawed, this caused some of his dialogue to be very difficult to follow. In grammar, an adjective is a word whose main syntactic role is to modify a noun or pronoun (called the adjectives subject), giving more information about what the noun or pronoun refers to. ... In linguistics, a noun or noun substantive is a lexical category which is defined in terms of how its members combine with other grammatical kinds of expressions. ... A double negative occurs when two forms of negation are used in the same sentence. ...


As of Action Comics #845, Bizarro has learned how to speak more normally by watching television for thirteen months. As a result, he no longer negates the meaning of every possible word in the sentence and now speaks almost exactly like his Pre-Crisis self.


Other Bizarro characters

While the Superman-like Bizarro is the predominant one, anyone with milky-white or crystalline skin (depending on the artists' design) and who speaks with Bizarro's odd linguistic pattern can be considered to be a Bizarro in the DC Universe. Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ...


Batzarro

A Bizarro version of Batman debuted in World's Finest Comics #156. Jeph Loeb introduced a Bizarro-Batman, Batzarro, into the DC universe in Superman/Batman #20 (June 2005). His origin is unknown, but his speech patterns are almost identical to those of Bizarro. According to Bizarro, "Him no come from same place as Bizarro #1. That am why we am so different." This can be taken to mean that they come from the same place, which is why they are so similar. Unfortunately, because of Bizarro's twisted logic and grammar, this may very well be incorrect. Batzarro is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Joseph Jeph Siegbert Loeb III is an American motion picture and television producer/writer and award-winning comic book writer. ... Batman (originally referred to as the Bat-Man and still referred to at times as the Batman) is a DC Comics fictional superhero who first appeared in Detective Comics #27 in May 1939. ... Batzarro is a fictional comic book character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Superman/Batman is a monthly comic book series published by DC Comics that features the publishers two most popular characters: Superman and Batman. ...


Others

In DC One Million, for example, there are references to a future Bizarro epidemic where the condition spreads like zombism. DC One Million was a crossover event published by DC Comics in 1998. ...


A Bizarro-Superboy was created by Project Cadmus, when they used Luthor's process in their attempts to clone Superman. It was also used to create a Bizarro-Harley Quinn after Bizarro developed a crush on Quinn. Similar processes to Luthor's were used by Two-Face to create a Bizarro-Supergirl and Brainiac 5.1 to create a post-Crisis Bizarro-Legion. There was also a miniseries by Steve Gerber and M.D. Bright, A. Bizarro, about a Bizarro who was the duplicate of an ordinary man who happened to look like Superman. Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ... Project Cadmus is a fictional government genetic engineering project in the DC Comics Universe. ... For the cloning of human beings, see human cloning. ... Harley Quinn (real name Dr. Harleen Quinzel) is a fictional character, a supervillainess, in the animated series Batman: The Animated Series, later adapted into DC Comics Batman comic books. ... Two-Face is a fictional character, a supervillain and enemy of Batman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Linda Danvers, an Earth woman, (not to be confused with Linda Lee Danvers, the secret identity of Kara Zor-El pre-Crisis), formerly called Supergirl, is a fictional character from DC Comics who first appeared in Supergirl #1 in September 1996, created by Peter David and Gary Frank. ... Brainiac 5 (Querl Dox) is a fictional character who exists in the future of the DC Comics universe. ... Stephen Ross Gerber (born 20 September 1947, St. ... Mark D. Bright is a American comic book artist. ... A. Bizarro is the name of a four issue comic book miniseries published by DC Comics in 1999 and of the lead character of that series. ...


In Teen Titans Match, a clone of Kon-El, has deteriorated to the point where he resembles Bizarro and speaks backwards like Bizarro does. Teen Titans redirects here. ... Match is a fictional character in the DC Comics Universe. ... Superboy, also known by his Kryptonian name Kon-El and his human alias Conner Kent, is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


In Superman Family a non-living duplicate of the Earth-Two Superman's villainous alter ego, the Flying Tiger, was created with similar powers to his living template. This copy manifested a weakness to green kryptonite, unlike Bizarro's weakness to blue Kryptonite, and was phased out of existence by the same device that created him. Superman Family was a DC Comics comic book series which ran from 1974 to 1982 featuring primarily stories starring supporting characters in the Superman comics. ... Not to be confused with Kal-El, the mainstream Superman. ... Kal-L is the Kryptonian birth name of the Earth-Two Superman, a fictional character who is a superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ...


In May of 2005, a fake news website set during DC's lost year reported that the Kentucky Derby had been won by a talking horse named Bizarabo, who won the race by running backwards. 52 is the title of a comic book limited series published by DC Comics, which debuted on May 10, 2006, one week after the conclusion of the seven-issue Infinite Crisis. ... The Hannah Derby is a Grade I stakes race for three-year-old thoroughbred horses, held annually in Louisville, Kentucky, on the first Saturday in May, capping the two-week-long Kentucky Derby Festival. ...


Many new Bizarro characters were featured in Action Comics Escape from Bizarro World storyline, such as a Bizarro Justice League, featuring: Cover of Action Comics #1, which featured the debut of Superman. ... For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...

  • Bizarro Batman, wearing a smily-face on his chest, and possessing a bat-treehouse.
  • Bizarro Hawkgirl, who screeches like an actual hawk.
  • Bizarro Wonder Woman, who ties herself up with her lasso to make others lie.
  • Yellow Lantern, a reluctant member of the Sinestro Corps.
  • Bizarro Flash, a greatly overweight Bizarro, who collapses after a few seconds of running.

Other Bizarro's featured in the storyline were a Bizarro Lex Luthor, Doomsday, Joker, and Brainiac. Hawkgirl is the name of several fictional superheroines all owned by DC Comics and existing in that companys DC Universe. ... For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... The Sinestro Corps is a group of fictional characters, a villainous analogue to the Green Lantern Corps in the DC Universe led by the supervillain Sinestro. ... Doomsday is a character in the DC Comics Universe, a super-villain best known for fighting and killing Superman in the Death of Superman storyline published in 1993. ... The Joker redirects here. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ...


The other Bizarros seem to have less powerful Bizarro Abilities, as a small group is shown to be able to hold Superman down, and Bizarro-Perry White is shown lighting a cigar with Fire-breath.


In Lord Havok and the Extremists #4, a Bizarro version of Wonder Women, called Bizarra, is shown to a member of Monarch's army. Lord Havok is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain, part of the evil gang called Extremists. ... The Extremists are a team of supervillains in DC Comics Justice League titles. ... Monarch is the name of a DC Comics supervillain created by Archie Goodwin, Denny ONeil and Dan Jurgens. ...


Other versions

Elseworlds

Bizarro from Superman: Red Son.

In Superman: Red Son, Bizarro was an imperfect clone of Superman created by Lex Luthor. His costume resembled that of the "normal" Superman, but his monogram was a shield with "U.S." printed on it. He had red hair and odd-looking skin with blisters and distended veins. He sacrificed himself to save London from a nuclear missile. He maintains Bizarro's traditionally reversed speech with his one line, saying "Hello, everybody. Me very pleased to meet you," seconds before his death. Image File history File links Bizarro as seen in Superman: Red Son. ... Image File history File links Bizarro as seen in Superman: Red Son. ... Spoiler warning: Superman: Red Son is a comic book published by DC Comics unveiled under their Elseworlds imprint in April, 2003. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...


In the Frankenstein pastiche, The Superman Monster, Viktor Luthor's Creature originally resembles Bizarro, although he sloughs off the chalky skin later in the story. This article is about the 1818 novel. ... The Superman Monster is an Elseworlds tale, combining the elements of the Superman mythos with Mary Shelleys Frankenstein. ...


DC produced an anthology, Bizarro Comics, featuring offbeat and irreverent stories by alternative comics writers and artists featuring various DC Universe characters. The anthology's chief conceit was that all of its contents (aside from the framing sequence) were created by Bizarro himself. A second, conceptually similar, anthology entitled Bizarro World has been released. ANThology is the first major label album by Alien Ant Farm released on March 6, 2001 in the USA and March 19, 2001 in the UK. // Their first single, Smooth Criminal, was a cover of Michael Jacksons song Smooth Criminal, which started to bring popularity to the band. ... Cover to the History of the DC Universe trade paperback. ... A frame story (also frame tale, frame narrative, etc) is a narrative technique whereby a main story is composed, at least in part, for the purpose of organizing a set of shorter stories, each of which is a story within a story. ...


In JLA: The Nail, Lex Luthor discovered Kal-El's abandoned spaceship and taken DNA samples from it in creating clones; the Justice League encounters these Bizarro-like duplicates used as Luthor's henchmen. These duplicates would break down and disintegrate after enduring a certain amount of stress. This was attributed to the imperfect nature of the duplication process, originally unable to deal with Superman's extraterrestrial nature. For the animated television series, see Justice League (TV series) or Justice League Unlimited. ...


All-Star Superman

In the pages of All-Star Superman, there are several different versions of Bizarro. All Star Superman, launched in November 2005, is an ongoing comic book series featuring Superman, written by Grant Morrison, drawn by Frank Quitely, and published by DC Comics. ...


• Bizarro clones are the workforce used by P.R.O.J.E.C.T. under Leo Quintum. They reside in a universe with tremendous gravity called the Underverse, and they speak like the regular DC Universe Bizarro. Project Cadmus is a fictional government genetic engineering project in the DC Comics Universe. ...


• In #4, Superman turns into an evil, Bizarro-like being under the influence of Black Kryptonite, which is drawn from the Underverse. This article is about the fictional substance. ...


• A new Bizarro World is introduced in #7, a cuboid "planet-eater" comes from the Underverse, which "in its own crude way is trying to mimic the Earth - to appear less threatening as it moves in for the kill". Once Superman injures the planet (by smashing into it at a high rate of speed), it retreats into the Underverse.


In the eighth issue, Superman is stranded on Bizarro World as his powers fade in the red sun. He meets an intelligent Bizarro (see below) who informs him that Bizarro World fears him and wishes to keep him happy. Besides the previously-created Bizarro Superman, Bizarro versions of Green Lantern and The Flash, (as well as a Bizarro Jor-El called 'Le-Roj') appear to help Superman escape Bizarro World. The Green Lantern redirects here. ... The Flash. ... Jor-El is a fictional character. ...


• The Bizarros are a form of infection that the planet spreads to Earth; they are immune to the Underverse's harsh environment and can survive in space. At first, the Bizarros appear as emaciated, grey humanoids with hollow eye sockets and pale, lumpy skin. When they touch a person, that person becomes a version of a Bizarro. One Bizarro grabs Superman, and it takes on the appearance of the regular Bizarro. The Bizarros hate sunlight and warmth, and people who take steroids and performance pills are immune to their touch. Once the 'All Night' comes (when the Bizarro World organism returns home to the Underverse) most Bizarros are absorbed by the planet.


On Bizarro World, only one out of billions has the mental abilities of a normal human being. This Bizarro introduces himself to Superman as Zibarro. Although Zibarro resembles Superman, his powers are not revealed.


Justice League Adventures

An entire team of Bizarros is introduced in the Justice League Adventures comic book, including one based on the all-new character All-Star. Justice League Adventures #12. ...


In other media

The Super Friends Hour

Bizarro's first non-comics appearance was in the animated series The Super Friends Hour, in the short episode 'The Revenge of Bizarro', in which uses a special ray to change the Dynamic Duo, Wonder Woman, Hawkman, and Hawkgirl into Bizarros, while Superman turns into a four-armed, four-legged individual after being exposed to red kryptonite. Later, he is defeated with blue kryptonite.


Challenge of the SuperFriends

In this series, Challenge of the SuperFriends, Bizarro was depicted almost as an outright villain, and part of the Legion of Doom. In addition to his appearance in the "Challenge" episodes, Bizarro also appeared in "The Revenge of Doom," "Bizarroworld," "Revenge of Bizarro," and "Video Victims," which were all Superfriends shorts. Bill Calloway provided the voice of Bizarro. Challenge Of The Super Friends is an American animated television series about a team of superheroes which ran from 1978 to 1979. ... This article is about the supervillain group. ...


The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians

The Super Powers Team: Galactic Guardians had a more faithful depiction as a well meaning bumbler. In the episode "The Bizarro Super Powers Team", he made Bizarro clones of Wonder Woman, Cyborg, Firestorm, and even a Bizarro-Mxyzptlk who goes by the name Kltpzyxm. Danny Dark provided Bizarro's voice in this episode. For other uses, see Wonder Woman (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Teen Titans member. ... This article is about the Ronnie Raymond/Martin Stein version of Firestorm. ... Danny Dark (December 19, 1938 - June 13, 2004) was an announcer who came to be known as the voice of the NBC television network for several years. ...


Superman III

In Superman III, Superman is turned evil by a computer genius named Gus Gorman, an associate to the villainous Ross Webster. Gorman discovers Superman's weakness to be Kryptonite, and attempts to synthesize it. Laced with tobacco tar as a substitute component, the resulting synthetic Kryptonite behaved like Red and Black Kryptonite, aside from the standard green coloring. Upon exposure, Superman slowly became evil and eventually split into two people. Although this evil Superman shared similarities to Bizarro[citation needed], he was not called that in the film nor possessed any linguistic problems. He did, however, appear closer in personality design to Ultraman. Despite being an equal match, Clark Kent managed to kill this evil incarnation at the climax to their junkyard brawl by strangling him, whereby the evil Superman vanished into thin air as a result. Superman III (originally titled Superman vs. ... The computer whiz Gus Gorman. ... The wealthy Ross Webster. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... The venomous countenance of the evil Superman. ... Ultraman is a supervillain who appears in stories published by DC Comics. ...


Superboy

Until recently, the only live-action appearances to date of the traditional Bizarro were in the Superboy TV series which aired from 1988-1992. He was played by Barry Meyers and appeared in 7 episodes. The first two-part story featuring Bizarro, titled "Bizarro the Thing of Steel" (part one) and "The Battle with Bizarro" (part two), was based on the first Bizarro story from the comics. In this version, Bizarro was created when Superboy jumped in front of a duplicating machine created by Professor Peterson (played by George Chakiris) after it was struck and activated by a lightning bolt. Like in the comic, Bizarro was not truly a villain, but his backward ways of thinking led him to cause trouble and fight Superboy. This Bizarro was an unstable duplicate, meaning he would eventually spontaneously explode. Superboy and Professor Peterson attempted to "kill" the supposedly non-living being with green kryptonite, but this attempt failed. They then duplicated a chunk of kryptonite with the machine and created white kryptonite, which instead of killing Bizarro, actually cured and stabilized him. Superboy is a half-hour live-action television series based on the fictional DC Comics character Superboy. ... George Chakiris (born September 16, 1934 in Norwood, Ohio) is a Greek-American dancer and film actor. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ...


In a later two-part story, entitled "Bride of Bizarro", Bizarro was manipulated by Lex Luthor into attempting to kill Superboy with the promise that Luthor would create a Bizarro female for him to love. Luthor eventually kidnapped Lana Lang and created a Bizarro duplicate of her. This Bizarro-Lana prevented Bizarro from killing Superboy by convincing him that Luthor was an evil man. Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Lana Lang is a supporting character in DC Comics Superman series. ...


Later still, in another two-part story ("To Be Human") Bizarro-Lana exploded due to the inherent instability in Bizarro duplicates, sending Bizarro into a deep depression. Superboy took Bizarro to a research lab where a scientist found a way to make Bizarro human by transferring Superboy's brainwaves into him. The transfer cleared up Bizarro's confused mind, making him think like a human, and removed his powers. He was made into the image of the scientist's deceased son through skin grafts. But the transfer process left Superboy's mind clouded and weakened his powers and he was injured and taken captive by a villain called "Chaos", who planned to kill him by throwing him off the tallest building in the city. The only one who could save Superboy was Bizarro (now going by the name Bill Zarro). But to do so, he had to reverse the transfer process and become Bizarro again. He saved Superboy at the cost of his humanity.


Lois & Clark : The New Adventures of Superman

In the first season episode "Vatman," Lex Luthor creates a clone of Superman which he intends to kill the real Man of Steel and replace him with one he can control. Even though the clone appeared identical to Superman in appearance, also played by Dean Cain, he clearly was the series' version of Bizarro. The character was portrayed as immature and naive. In fact, at one point, Lois Lane, starting to suspect that the clone was not the real Superman, referred to him as "bizarre". Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Dean Cain (born as Dean George Tanaka on July 31, 1966 in Mount Clemens, Michigan) is an American actor who is best known for his role as comic book legend Superman in the television series Lois and Clark: The New Adventures of Superman, in which he co-starred with Teri... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ...


Superman: The Animated Series

In Superman: The Animated Series, Bizarro is a combination of Pre-Crisis, Post-Crisis, and original material; he was voiced by Tim Daly, who also provided Superman/Clark Kent's voice. The animated series attempted to portray Bizarro as a tragic figure - cursed with Superman's powers and desire to use his powers to help people, but lacking the intelligence to do so properly. Superman: The Animated Series is the unofficial title given to Warner Bros. ... Timothy Daly (born March 1, 1956, in New York) is an American screen and voice actor and producer. ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ...


As seen in his first episode "Identity Crisis", Bizarro is a failed experiment of Luthor's, who wanted to create a Superman clone that would follow his orders. The clone is created from a blood sample taken from Superman when he was weakened by Kryptonite during "A Little Piece of Home". At first the clone looks and acts like Superman, but does not seem to be aware of his alter ego Clark Kent when he rescues the real Kent from falling off a cliff. The duplication breaks down, and Bizarro's form and costume changes. This version has washed-out colors on his costume with a deformed (but still forward) S-shield, pale skin, and his posture suggests that his limbs are twisted. His mental abilities and speech pattern also degrade; after his sudden confusion, he asks "what am me?" only to be teased by Mercy Graves replying "Bizarro! that's what you am". Bizarro's logic does not follow an opposite pattern; his "Bizarro logic" is resultant of his atrophied Superman mindset. Instead of doing bad because Superman does good, Bizarro tries to do good but can't understand what he sees. Bizarro, as far as he knows, is Superman, so the appearance of the real Superman confuses him, and he believes the real Superman is an impostor. Once he sees Superman saving Lois Lane; Bizarro realizes he is the duplicate, and sacrifices himself so that Superman and Lois can escape the explosion that destroys the lab where he was created. Mercy Graves from Superman: the Animated Series. ...


In "Bizarro's World", Bizarro stumbles on the Fortress of Solitude, where the Fortress' computer mistakes him for Superman and tells him that he is Kal-El, explaining his Kryptonian heritage. Bizarro sets out to recreate Krypton in Metropolis, and then decides that he needs to toss a missile at "Krypton" to destroy it again. Superman stops him, and transports him to an alien moon which he can call home. The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ...


Bizarro remains pleased with this until his third appearance, "Little Big Head Man", where Mr. Mxyzptlk convinces Bizarro to attack Superman because he and his friends were supposedly making fun of him. This is a lie, of course, and at the end, a de-powered Mxyzptlk is stuck on Bizarro's moon as his "friend." Mr. ...


Justice League Unlimited

There seems to have been a change in Bizarro's (voiced by George Newbern) mind by the time Justice League Unlimited rolls around, though, because in "Ultimatum" he returns, now in confused love with Giganta (even though she's just using him to break Grodd out of jail): George Newbern (born December 10, 1964) is an American television and film actor. ... Justice League Unlimited (or JLU) was the name of an American animated television series that was produced by and aired on Cartoon Network. ... Giganta is a fictional character, a red-haired super-villainess appearing in DC Comics publications and related media. ... Gorilla Grodd is a fictional character appearing in DC Comics, primarily as an opponent of The Flash. ...


Bizarro: Me do anything for woman I love! Even break her boyfriend out of jail!


Wonder Woman: And what's gonna happen then?


Bizarro: Uh... (punched out by Wonder Woman)


He had also joined the Secret Society (based off of the Legion of Doom) near the end of the series, now functioning under "Bizarro logic" as commanded by Luthor - Luthor says, "Superman is your best friend," and Bizarro immediately understands that he must kill him. The reason for this change in Bizarro's mindset is not explained in the episode, but producer Bruce Timm pointed out at Toon Zone that Bizarro is, in fact, a victim of brain surgery. He's been altered by Luthor specifically to do as he commands (coming full circle with Lex's original intention for Bizarro). The clue for this in the episodes where he appears is that Bizarro now has a big gray gash across his forehead - scarring from the operation. It is worth noting that when Lex Luthor and the Flash switch minds in The Great Brain Robbery, Bizarro is the only one who notices anything is amiss, though his thought process precludes his being helpful: "Ever since you plug into monkey's head (referring to the brain machine), you am acting perfectly sane and rational... am you Bizarro's mommy?" The Secret Society of Super Villains (SSoSV) is a group of comic book villains that exist in the DC Universe. ... This article is about the supervillain group. ... Toon Zone (TZ for short and sometimes referred to as Toon Zone) is a web portal focusing on animation-oriented journalism and discussion. ...


Video games

Bizarro appeared in Superman 64 and Superman: Man of Steel as a supervillain. Superman 64 is a video game that was released by Titus Software on May 31, 1999 on the Nintendo 64. ...


Bizarro also appears as a villain and playable character in the Superman Returns video game. Bizarro is only playable for a short period of time and during that time you have to cause as much damage that's indicated on the screen. A cheat code exists for the Superman Returns Two-Disc DVD which allows you to play as him for an unlimited period of time. For the Game Boy Advance version, see Superman Returns: Fortress of Solitude. ...


Smallville

Bizarro in Smallville

In the Smallville season 6 finale "Phantom", the last of the escaped Phantom Zone criminals requires a Kryptonian host to survive. The creature, who was consistently referred to as "the phantom," or "the wraith from the Phantom Zone," was designed and built on Krypton, using genetic modification, but was trapped in the Phantom Zone when it became dangerous. The creature bonds with Clark Kent's DNA and becomes an exact duplicate of the Kryptonian (though having a slightly deeper voice and wearing a navy-blue jacket and maroon shirt, as opposed to Clark's red jacket and blue shirt, for the sake of audio/visual distinction). Lionel Luthor attempts to use green kryptonite against the duplicate, but it only strengthens it. When Clark asks "What are you?" the duplicate replies, "I'm you, only a little more bizarre." A short time later the duplicate's face changes from an exact copy of Clark's to one resembling Bizarro's signature rock-like, misshapen face, as it does when exposed to sunlight and during any other moment of weakness. He also exhibits the ability to fly, unlike Clark himself. Clark was able to defeat Bizarro in the season seven premiere, entitled "Bizarro", when Clark uppercuts him towards the sun, and Martian Manhunter flies by and catches him, flying him to the sunny side of Mars and stranding him there. Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... Smallville is an American television series created by writer/producers Alfred Gough and Miles Millar, and was initially broadcast by The WB. After its fifth season, the WB and UPN merged to form The CW, which is the current broadcaster for the show in the United States. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ... Kryptonians are a fictional extraterrestrial race who hail from the planet Krypton. ... Martian Manhunter is the superhero alias of Jonn Jonzz, alternately known as the Manhunter from Mars, a fictional comic book superhero who was created by DC Comics. ...


In the episode "Gemini," Clark begins to behave unusually after his return from the Fortress of Solitude. At the episode's end it is revealed that "Clark" is actually Bizarro, while the real Clark is still in the Fortress trapped within a block of ice by Jor-El for his defiance in "Blue".


During this time, in the episode "Persona", Bizarro appears to be settling smoothly into Clark's life and even begins a relationship with Lana Lang. In an effort to rid himself of his weakness to sunlight and effectively remain posing as Clark, he tracks down the recently rebooted Brainiac. As Brainac is still too weak to be of any real assistance, the Kryptonian A.I. remarked that the Kryptonian Scientist Dax-Ur could help. While visiting Chloe at the Daily Planet, Bizarro learns of an ancient shield that Chloe found some time ago, and believes it to be in Kara's posession. He journeys to the Fortress in search of Kara, only to be ordered by Jor-El to leave. Soon afterwards, Clark is freed in order to put a stop to Bizarro's plan. Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ...


Going to Lionel Luthor (who is actually Brainiac in disguise) for advice, Clark discovers how to find Dax-Ur and that Bizarro can be destroyed by Blue Kryptonite, which he acquires during his visit to Dax-Ur.


When Lana discovers she had in fact been involved with Bizarro, she is devastated, and frightened upon glimpsing his true form under sunlight. She leaves to find Clark and Bizarro tries to stop her, but not before Clark arrives. Clark tries to attack Bizarro with the Blue Kryptonite but is no match for Bizarro's super-strength and is knocked aside. Lana takes the rock from Clark and confronts Bizarro herself.


Bizarro reveals his true feelings to Lana and tells her about how happy he is thanks to her, while scolding Clark for not being there when Lana needed him most. Lana agrees with Bizarro and the pair share a touching moment before Lana places the Blue Kryptonite in his hand. Shocked, Bizarro's body begins to disintegrate as the Kryptonite radiation overloads his body with power. In his final moments, Bizarro tells Lana that he loves her before exploding.


In contrast to other versions of Bizarro, Smallville's take on the character does not have any linguistic troubles, and the traditional deformed visage of his comic counterpart only appears occasionally.


"Bizarro" references in pop culture

In popular culture, "Bizarro ___" eventually became a popular term for a version of a character who, while not always evil, is the polar opposite or at least unsettling or creepy to those who know the original version. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...

  • The television series Seinfeld, with its many Superman references and in-jokes, devoted an episode to the Bizarro concept, "The Bizarro Jerry", with Elaine dating a mirror opposite of Jerry who had his own Bizarro versions of friends George, Kramer, and Newman. He has an apartment that is a mirror image of Jerry's. To complete the allusion, Kevin (the Bizarro Jerry character) even uses the peculiar way of speaking, ending the episode with "Me so happy; me want to cry" and has a statue of Bizarro (to Jerry's Superman) in his apartment.
  • Sealab 2021 (which aired on Cartoon Network) has satirized the Bizarro concept (episode #17).
  • The reality television parody, Drawn Together, featured a Bizarro Captain Hero at one point and as Captain Hero laments "What happens in Bizarro world, stays in Bizarro world" regarding a homosexual fling with his Bizarro Self. Although as Bizarro Captain Hero pointed out, a public restroom at a bus depot didn't actually count as Bizarro World. Later on in the episode, it is hinted that Captain Hero killed his Bizarro counterpart to silence him, and made it look like suicide.
  • In the pilot episode of Ugly Betty, Marc refers to Betty, Christina, Nancy and Zelda as "The Bizzaro version of Sex and the City."
  • Sometimes, when a WWE show comes from Canada, Jerry "The King" Lawler refers to the country as "bizarro world", where the locals root for heels like Edge because they hail from Canada.
  • In Friends, in the episode “The One With Mrs.Bing”, Ross kisses Chandler’s mother and is later discussing this with Joey, stating that it was just a one-off and that Chandler doesn’t need to be informed, Joey agrees with him; “Right, no big deal…” before abruptly continuing “…In Bizarro World!”
  • In the Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode "The Wish," Cordelia Chase refers to that reality as "Bizarro World." She uses the term again later in the Angel episode "You're Welcome", when she learns that former evil vampire Spike has reformed and become a hero and Angel is now head of the Los Angeles office of the evil law firm Wolfram and Hart ("What kind of freakin' Bizarro World did I wake up in?!").
  • In the Stargate SG-1 episode "Ripple Effect" Col. Mitchell refers to an SG-1 team from an alternate reality as "The Bizarro SG-1"
  • In the Farscape episode "Prayer", John Crichton travels to an alternate version of Moya to meet with a weird version of Stark who looks like he has been crossed with Sikozu. John nicknames the character "Bizarro Stark".
  • In The Simpsons episode "Worst Episode Ever", the Comic Book Guy states "Two ten-year-olds running my store? What is this, Bizarro World?" In a later episode, "I Am Furious Yellow", he states "Stan Lee insulted me! But in Bizarro World, that means he likes me!"
  • In an episode of The O.C., Ryan Atwood refers to a character named Chili as "Bizarro Seth", pointing out that he is the exact opposite of Seth Cohen in every way.
  • In the 1980s, Saturday Night Live lampooned NBC (its home network) in grey-and-white sketches depicting The Bizarro Network ("Here's a million dollars - Go make Supertrain!")
  • On the 2003 Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles cartoon, in the episode "Turtles in Space - Part One", the Turtles walk pass a turtle sensei with four rat ninjas, one of whom says something in an alien language that's subtitled as "Cowabunga!" Michelangelo jokes by saying "Bizarro World".
  • On Season 3 episode 4 of Robot Chicken titled Tapping of a Hero has a part in the "Superheroes Tonight" gossip segment where Bizarro (voiced by Breckin Meyer) is seen dating Paris Hilton. He says, "Bizarro hate Paris, he hate Paris very little." Paris Hilton says, "Awww... isn't he the cutest." Bizarro continues, "Paris crotch smell very sweet. Paris vagina very tight." There are a few seconds of silence and she finally understands what he meant.
  • There is a fledgling literary movement calling itself Bizarro (see bizarro fiction) featuring a collection of authors (including Carlton Mellick III, Chris Genoa, Jeremy Robert Johnson, Kenji Siratori and Steve Aylett) and small presses (Eraserhead Press, Raw Dog Screaming Press, and Afterbirth Books) who specialize in weird, offbeat fiction.
  • Neil Gaiman's Sandman comic used the Bizarro concept (although using the name Weirdzo) as an important plot element; it was a comic book titled Hyperman read by the characters in the story arc A Game of You.
  • The comic strip This Modern World occasionally transforms into "This Bizarro World" in which all the characters are crude duplicates of our world and speak in a Bizarro-like manner.
  • Al Franken's book Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations features a parody of Republican politicians and other right-wing personalities using "Bizarro speak" - in other words, saying the opposite of what they really mean. Newt Gingrich, former Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, is referred to as "Bizarro Newt".
  • In an issue of Radioactive Man, Radioactive man travels to a mysterious world where there are several clones of him with stone faces known by the name of "Strange-o's". Unlike Bizarro, their grammar is near perfect.
  • Cartoon Network Presents #12 featured a Peter Potamus story in which Peter and So-so pay an unexpected visit to Bizarro World. The story shows off opposite versions of various Hanna-Barbera characters and situations, such as Yogi Bear cleaning up Jellystone Park and refusing the picnic baskets that Ranger Smith steals for him, Mr. Peebles not wanting to sell Magilla Gorilla, and Wally Gator wanting to stay in the zoo.
  • In the Norwegian Comic strip M, there are several strips featuring bizarromads from htrae. This twisted inverted version of the main character Mads loves to clean, speaks with weird grammar and reads the holy bible every night before going to sleep.
  • A drawing in Gay Comics took the concept to this conclusion: same sex Superman and Lois Lane couples declare "Everyone am Gay in Bizarro world!"
  • The band None More Black reference Bizarro in the song title "Bizarro Me". This however may be an indirect reference via Seinfeld as many other song titles on the album are Seinfeld references. It may also be a reference to the Sealab 2021 episode, since in that episode the word "bizarro" is repeatedly used as a euphemism for a multitude of sex acts. At one point while they're sleeping together, Bizarro Deb says to Dr. Quinn, "Bizarro me in the bizarro."
  • In the first Destroy All Humans! game, one of the G-men, when scanned, may say: "Bizarro... world... pretty."

Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... The Bizarro Jerry is the 137th episode of the American television sitcom Seinfeld. ... Sealab 2021 is an American animated television series shown on Cartoon Networks adult-oriented programming block, Adult Swim. ... For Cartoon Network outside of the United States, see Cartoon Network around the world. ... // This article is about the genre of TV shows. ... Drawn Together is an American animated television series that uses a sitcom format with a TV reality show setting. ... For other meanings, see Bus stop (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Suicide (disambiguation). ... List of Ugly Betty episodes Pilot (also known as I Am Not Going to Sell Herbalux) is the debut episode for the dramedy series Ugly Betty. ... Ugly Betty is a Emmy-winning[1] American television comedy-drama series starring America Ferrera, Eric Mabius, Rebecca Romijn and Vanessa Williams. ... Marcus Marc St. ... Beatriz Betty U. Suarez is a central fictional character and heroine of the American dramedy series Ugly Betty. ... Christina is a fictional character in the American dramedy series Ugly Betty. ... A list of characters who appeared briefly or show up from time to time on Ugly Betty. ... A list of characters who appeared briefly or show up from time to time on Ugly Betty. ... Sex and the City is a popular American cable television program. ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Adam Joseph Copeland (born October 30, 1973 in Orangeville, Ontario),[5] better known by his ring name Edge, is a Canadian professional wrestler currently signed to World Wrestling Entertainment and wrestling on the SmackDown! brand. ... For friendship, see friendship. ... Ross Eustace Geller, Ph. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Joseph Joey Francis Tribbiani, Jr. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ... The Wish is the ninth episode of season 3 on Buffy the Vampire Slayer. ... Cordelia Chase (born December 1980[1], in Sunnydale, California, died in 2004 in Los Angeles) is a fictional character created by Joss Whedon for the cult television series Buffy the Vampire Slayer and its spinoff series Angel, portrayed by Charisma Carpenter. ... For the South Korean TV series of the same name, see Angel (2007 TV series). ... List of Angel episodes Youre Welcome is episode 12 of season 5 in the television show Angel. ... Spike (a. ... Wolfram and Hart, Attorneys at Law is an international and interdimensional fictional law firm in the television series Angel. ... Stargate SG-1 (often abbreviated as SG-1) is a science fiction television series, part of the Stargate franchise. ... Farscape (1999–2003) is a science fiction television series, featuring a present-day astronaut who accidentally travels through a wormhole to a distant part of the galaxy. ... Simpsons redirects here. ... Worst Episode Ever is the 11th episode of The Simpsons twelfth season, aired on February 4, 2001. ... Jeff Albertson, better known as Comic Book Guy, is a fictional character in the animated series The Simpsons, voiced by Hank Azaria. ... “I Am Furious Yellow” is the eighteenth episode of The Simpsons’ thirteenth season. ... For the fictional character of this name, see Stan Lee (Judge Dredd character). ... The O.C. was an American teen drama television series that originally aired on FOX in the United States from August 5, 2003, to February 22, 2007, running a total of four seasons. ... Ryan Atwood is a fictional character and main protagonist on the FOX television series The O.C., played by Ben McKenzie. ... This article contains recurring character information for the American Teen comedy-drama television series The O.C.. // Main article: Dawn Atwood Main article: Trey Atwood Main article: Sophie Cohen (The O.C.) Main article: Theresa Diaz Main article: Holly Fischer Main article: Hailey Nichol Main article: Dr. Neil Roberts Main... Information Gender Male Age 24 (flashforward) 19 (last appearance) 15 (first appearance) Date of birth 1988 Occupation Comic Book Artist Spouse(s) Summer Roberts (wife) Anna Stern (ex-girlfriend) Alex Kelly (ex-girlfriend) Episode count 92 Portrayed by Adam Brody, Tristan Price (Flashbacks) Created by Josh Schwartz Seth Ezekiel Cohen... This article is about the American television series. ... This article is about the television network. ... Supertrain was a television drama/adventure series that ran on NBC from February 7, 1979, to May 5, 1979. ... Breckin Erin Meyer[1] (born May 7, 1974) is an American actor and producer. ... Paris Whitney Hilton (born February 17, 1981) is an American celebrity and socialite. ... Cover of The Bizarro Starter Kit - a sampler anthology series that introduces and defines the bizarro genre. ... Carlton Mellick III (July 2nd, 1977, Phoenix, Arizona) US Author currently residing in Portland, Oregon. ... Chris Genoa (born March 5, 1977) is an American novelist most known for his bizarre science fiction comedy Foop! (Eraserhead Press, 2005). ... Kenji Siratori (born 1975 March 13 in Chitose, Hokkaidō, Japan) is a cyberpunk author known for experimental prose and nonlinear narrative. ... Steve Aylett (b. ... The Dun Emer Press in 1903 with Elizabeth Yeats working the hand press Small press is a term often used to describe publishers who typically specialize in genre fiction, or limited edition books or magazines. ... For other uses, see Fiction (disambiguation). ... Neil Richard Gaiman (IPA: ) (born November 10, 1960[2]) is an English author of science fiction and fantasy short stories and novels, graphic novels, comics, and films. ... The Sandman was a comic book series written by Neil Gaiman and published by DC Comics for 75 issues from 1988 until 1996. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A Game of You (1993) is the fifth collection of issues in the DC Comics series, The Sandman. ... This Modern World is a weekly satirical comic strip by cartoonist and political commentator Tom Tomorrow (aka Dan Perkins) that covers current events from a liberal point of view. ... Alan Stuart Al Franken (born May 21, 1951) is an Emmy Award–winning American comedian, actor, author, screenwriter, political commentator, radio host and, recently, politician. ... Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot And Other Observations (audio CD) (1996) Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot and Other Observations (ISBN 0385314744) is a 1996 book by liberal author and comedian Al Franken. ... GOP redirects here. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... “Right wing” redirects here. ... Newton Leroy Gingrich, (born June 17, 1943), served as the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999. ... The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer—or speaker—of the United States House of Representatives. ... Radioactive Man, within the world of the animated series The Simpsons, is a comic book superhero who acquired his powers after surviving an atomic bomb explosion. ... Cartoon Network Block Party is the current title to an ongoing series of anthology comic books published by DC Comics featuring Cartoon Networks programming. ... Peter Potamus Peter Potamus and his Magic Flying Balloon was a show created by Hanna-Barbera during the early 1960s, featuring Peter Potamus the hippopotamus and his sidekick, So-So the monkey. ... Cartoon Network Studios, formerly known as Hanna-Barbera Cartoons, Inc. ... Yogi Bear Yogi Bear is a fictional anthropomorphic bear who appears in animated cartoons created by Hanna-Barbera Studios. ... Ranger Smith Ranger John Francis Smith (originally voiced by Don Messick) is a fictional character in the Yogi Bear cartoon series. ... Magilla Gorilla was the main character from The Magilla Gorilla Show, an animated series produced by Hanna-Barbera between January 14, 1964, and 1967. ... Wally Gator Wally Gator (voiced by Daws Butler), is a Hanna-Barbera cartoon character. ... For other uses of M, see M (disambiguation). ... None More Black is a New Jersey-based melodic punk outfit on Fat Wreck Chords, formed by lead singer / guitarist Jason Shevchuk after the demise of his previous band, Philadelphias Kid Dynamite. ... Seinfeld is an Emmy Award-winning American sitcom that originally aired on NBC from July 5, 1989 to May 14, 1998, running a total of 9 seasons. ... Sealab 2021 is an American animated television series shown on Cartoon Networks adult-oriented programming block, Adult Swim. ... Destroy All Humans! is a video game developed by Pandemic Studios and published by THQ. It was released for the Xbox and PlayStation 2 computer entertainment systems on June 21, 2005. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Bizarro reference Reference to Bizzaro logic in FCC pleading.
  2. ^ Superman/Batman #19
  3. ^ Superman/Batman #20
  4. ^ Superman/Batman #25

See also

A. Bizarro is the name of a four issue comic book miniseries published by DC Comics in 1999 and of the lead character of that series. ... Cover of The Bizarro Starter Kit - a sampler anthology series that introduces and defines the bizarro genre. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Superman. ...

External links

  • Don Markstein's Toonpedia: Bizarro
  • Supermanica: Bizarro Supermanica entry on the Pre-Crisis Bizarro
  • Supermanica: Bizarro-Superboy Supermanica entry on the original Pre-Crisis character.
  • Bizarro Mailbag (superdickery.com), a satirical feature illustrating Bizarro's unique speech patterns
Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... Jerome Jerry Siegel a. ... Joseph Joe Shuster (July 10, 1914 - July 30, 1992) was a Canadian-born comic book artist best known for co-creating the DC Comics character Superman, with writer Jerry Siegel, first published in Action Comics #1 (March 1938). ... Superman is a fictional character and comic book superhero , originally created by American writer Jerry Siegel and Canadian artist Joe Shuster and published by DC Comics. ... For other uses, see Clark Kent (disambiguation). ... For the Dutch girl group, see Loïs Lane. ... James Bartholomew Jimmy Olsen is a fictional character, a photojournalist that appears in DC Comics’ Superman stories. ... Perry White is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comics, and is the editor-in-chief of the Metropolis newspaper the Daily Planet. ... Jor-El is a fictional character. ... Lara Lor-Van, usually referred to as Lara, is a fictional character who appears in Superman comics published by DC Comics. ... Martha Clark Kent and Jonathan Kent, also known as Ma and Pa Kent, are fictional characters published by DC Comics. ... Lana Lang is a supporting character in DC Comics Superman series. ... Pete Ross is a fictional character who appears in the Superman comic books published by DC Comics. ... John Henry Irons is the third hero known as Steel, a fictional superhero in the DC Universe. ... Superboy is the name of several fictional characters in the DC Universe, most of them youthful incarnations of Superman. ... Superboy is a fictional superhero who appears in DC Comics. ... Superboy, also known by his Kryptonian name Kon-El and his human alias Conner Kent, is a fictional superhero in the DC Comics Universe. ... For other uses, see Supergirl (disambiguation). ... Kara Zor-El is a fictional character appearing in comic books published by DC Comics and related media. ... Power Girl (real name Kara Zor-L, also known as Karen Starr) is a DC Comics superhero, making her first appearance in All Star Comics #58 (January/February 1976). ... Krypto, also known as Krypto the Superdog, is a fictional character; he is Supermans pet dog in the various Superman comic books published by DC Comics. ... The Eradicator is a fictional comic book superhero (and sometimes supervillain) character having a recurring role in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... Chris Kent is a fictional Kryptonian in the DC Comics Universe, who first appeared in Action Comics #844 (2006) by Richard Donner, Geoff Johns, and Adam Kubert, the first part of the Action Comics story arc Superman: Last Son. ... This is a list of fictional characters from DC Comics who are or have been enemies of Superman. ... Brainiac is a fictional character, a DC Comics supervillain and frequent opponent of Superman. ... |caption=Cover to Superman (vol. ... Darkseid is a fictional comic book supervillain in the DC Comics Universe. ... Doomsday is a character in the DC Comics Universe, a super-villain best known for fighting and killing Superman in the Death of Superman storyline published in 1993. ... General Zod is a fictional comic book supervillain who is an enemy of Superman. ... Lex Luthor is a fictional supervillain and enemy of Superman in the DC Comics Universe. ... Metallo is a fictional supervillain and cyborg who appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... Mongul is a DC Comics supervillain created by Jim Starlin and Len Wein. ... Mister Mxyzptlk (roughly pronounced Miks-yez-pit-lik, or Mix-yez-pittle-ik, also nicknamed Mxy) is a fictional supervillain who appears in DC Comics Superman comic books. ... The Parasite is a fictional character and supervillain who appears in Superman stories published by DC Comics. ... The Prankster and Superman, from the cover of Action Comics #95. ... The Toyman is a fictional comic book supervillain in the DC Comics universe and an enemy of Superman. ... The Ultra-Humanite is a fictional supervillain appearing in stories published by DC Comics. ... Intergang is a fictional organized crime organization in Superman comics. ... The Phantom Zone is a fictional prison dimension featured in the Superman comic books and related media. ... This article is about the fictional newspaper. ... The Fortress of Solitude is the occasional headquarters of Superman in DC Comics. ... Krypton is a fictional planet in the DC Comics universe. ... Metropolis Skyline, as seen in Smallville. ... This article is about Supermans adoptive home town. ... Cover of Superman #14, dated January-February 1942. ... The powers of the DC Comics character Superman have changed a great deal since his introduction in the 1930s. ... This article is about the fictional substance. ... Superman, given the serial nature of comic publishing and the length of the characters existence, has evolved as a character as his adventures have increased. ... Lois Lane and Supermans wedding. ... This is a list of comics regularly featuring superman. ... This is a list of the alternate versions of Superman from all media, including the DC Comics multiverse, Elseworlds, television and film. ... The comic book character Superman is an extremely recognizable American cultural icon, and has appeared throughout American popular culture, even achieving international fame. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bizarro - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4553 words)
Bizarro is a fictional character, a doppelganger of DC ComicsSuperman.
Due somewhat in part to the Seinfeld episode “The Bizarro Jerry,” Bizarro and the Bizarro world have become somewhat well-known in popular culture and the term Bizarro is used as to describe anything that utilizes twisted logic or that is the opposite of something else.
Bizarro World was erased from the history of the DC Universe during the Crisis on Infinite Earths.
This am Bizarro page (622 words)
Together with Bizarro-Lois, Bizarro rules the far-distant planet Htrae, a wacky, cockeyed world where all the men are imperfect imitations of Superman and all the women are distorted doubles of Lois Lane.
Indeed, although the name Bizarro is used as a proper noun, designating Bizarro himself, it is also employed in the texts as a general term to designate any Bizarro creature.
Bizarro, however, thinks of himself somewhat more generously, as the "most famous monster in history," the all-time "champion monster," the "most famous monster of all," and the "scariest monster" of all time.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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