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Encyclopedia > Biomass (ecology)
An Antarctic krill, whose species comprises roughly 0.66% of the Earth's biomass, the highest of any single animal species.
An Antarctic krill, whose species comprises roughly 0.66% of the Earth's biomass, the highest of any single animal species.[1]

In ecology, biomass refers to the accumulation of life that is possibly living matter.[2] That is, it is the total living biologica (usually measured per square metre or square kilometre). This means that only 30% of the weight of any creature is counted, the rest being water. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... For the use of the term in ecology, see Biomass (ecology). ... Antarctic krill Euphausia superba (Photo by Uwe Kils) GFDL larger images http://www. ... Antarctic krill Euphausia superba (Photo by Uwe Kils) GFDL larger images http://www. ... For the journal, see Ecology (journal). ... This article is about life in general. ...


The most successful animal, in terms of biomass, is the Antarctic krill, Euphausia superba, with a biomass of probably over 500 million tons, roughly twice the total biomass of humans. The entire earth contains about 75 billion tons of biomass[dubious ], or 0.00000000126% of the total mass of the Earth. Humans comprise about 100 million tons (0.13%) of the Earth's biomass[3], domesticated animals about 700 million (1.0%), and crops about 2 billion tons or 2.7% of the Earth's biomass.[citation needed] The total biomass of bacteria is estimated to equal that of plants [4]. For other uses, see Animal (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Dana, 1850 Antarctic krill are eaten by penguins(Euphausia superba) is a species of krill found in the Antarctic waters of the Southern Ocean. ... This article is about modern humans. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Domesticated animals, plants, and other organisms are those whose collective behavior, life cycle, or physiology has been altered as a result of their breeding and living conditions being under human control for multiple generations. ... Agriculture refers to the production of goods through the growing of plants, animals and other life forms. ...


Biomass may also be a measure of the dried organic mass of an ecosystem. As the trophic level increases, the biomass of each trophic level decreases. That is, producers (grass, trees, scrubs, etc.) have a much higher biomass than animals that consume them (deer, zebras, insects, etc.). The level with the least biomass is the highest predators in the food chain (foxes, eagles, etc.) Biomass is also influenced by net primary productivity (NPP). For other uses, see Ecological Systems Theory. ... In ecology, the trophic level (Greek trophē, food) is the position that an organism occupies in a food chain - what it eats, and what eats it. ... Green (from chlorophyll) fronds of a maidenhair fern: a photoautotroph Flowchart to determine if a species is autotroph, heterotroph, or a subtype An autotroph (from the Greek autos = self and trophe = nutrition) is an organism that produces complex organic compounds from simple inorganic molecules and an external source of energy... Flowchart to determine if a species is autotroph, heterotroph, or a subtype A heterotroph (Greek heterone = (an)other and trophe = nutrition) is an organism that requires organic substrates to get its carbon for growth and development. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... Global oceanic and terrestrial photoautotroph abundance, from September 1997 to August 2000. ...


See also

For the use of the term in ecology, see Biomass (ecology). ... It has been suggested that Biota (taxonomy) be merged into this article or section. ... An ecological pyramid. ... An oceanographic water mass is an identifiable body of water which has physical properties distinct from surrounding water. ...

References

  1. ^ Nicol, S., Endo, Y. (1997). Fisheries Technical Paper 367: Krill Fisheries of the World. FAO. 
  2. ^ International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry. "biomass". Compendium of Chemical Terminology Internet edition.
  3. ^ The world human population was 6.6 billion in January 2008. At an average weight of 100 pounds (30 lbs of biomass), that equals 100 million tons.
  4. ^ Whitman, Coleman, and Wiebe, Prokaryotes: The unseen majority, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, Vol. 95, pp. 6578–6583, June 1998

FAO redirects here. ... IUPAC logo The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) (Pronounced as eye-you-pack) is an international non-governmental organization established in 1919 devoted to the advancement of chemistry. ... Compendium of Chemical Terminology (ISBN 0-86542-684-8) is a book published by IUPAC containing internationally accepted definitions for terms in chemistry. ... The current estimated world human population is 6,427,631,117. ...

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