FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Binding of Isaac
Abraham Sacrificing Isaac by Laurent de LaHire, 1650
Abraham Sacrificing Isaac by Laurent de LaHire, 1650

The Binding of Isaac, in Genesis 22, is a story from the Hebrew Bible in which God asks Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac on Mount Moriah. In Islam, Muslims believe that the Qur'an teaches that God's command to Abraham was to sacrifice his older son Ishmael rather than Isaac. The event is remembered on the 1st of Tishrei in the Jewish calendar and from the 10th - 13th of Dhu al-Hijjah in the Muslim calendar: on Eid ul-Adha. Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Laurent de LaHire: Abraham Sacrificing Isaac 1650 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Laurent de LaHire: Abraham Sacrificing Isaac 1650 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... For other uses, see Genesis (disambiguation). ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... For other uses, see Abraham (name) and Abram (disambiguation). ... Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... For people named Islam, see Islam (name). ... A Muslim is a believer in or follower of Islam. ... The Qur’ān [1] (Arabic: , literally the recitation; also sometimes transliterated as Quran, Koran, or Al-Quran) is the central religious text of Islam. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Tishrei (or Tishri) (IPA: ) (Hebrew: תִּשְׁרֵי‎ (תִּשְׁרִי‎) Standard () Tiberian () ; from Akkadian Beginning, from To begin) is the first month of the civil year and the seventh month of the ecclesiastical year in the Hebrew calendar. ... Dhu al-Hijja ( ذو الحجة ) is the twelfth and final month in the Islamic Calendar. ... Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى ‘Īd al-’Aḍḥā) is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide as a commemoration of Ibrahims (Abrahams) willingness to sacrifice his son Ismael for Allah, but a voice from heaven allows Ibrahim to sacrifice a goat instead. ...


The narration is referred to as the Akedah (עקדה) or Akedat Yitzchak (עקידת יצחק) in Hebrew and as the Dhabih (ذبح) in Arabic. The sacrifice itself is called an Olah in Hebrew — for the significance of sacrifices, especially in Biblical times, see the korbanot. Hebrew redirects here. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Korban (קרבן) (plural: Korbanot קרבנות) in Judaism, is commonly called a religious sacrifice or an offering in English, but is known as a Korban in Hebrew because its Hebrew root K [a] R [o] V (קרב) (or K [o] R [a] V) means to [come] Close (or Draw Near) [to...


According to the narration, Abraham sets out to obey God's command without questioning. Some believe that God wishes to test Abraham, which indicates that he does not intend Abraham to actually sacrifice his son. Indeed, after Isaac is bound to an altar, the angel of the Lord stops Abraham at the last minute, at which point Abraham discovers a ram caught in some nearby bushes. Abraham then sacrifices the ram in Isaac's stead. Look up Altar in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Binomial name Ovis aries Linnaeus, 1758 A sheep is any of several woolly ruminant quadrupeds, but most commonly the Domestic Sheep (Ovis aries), which probably descends from the wild moufflon of south-central and south-west Asia. ...


While it is often imagined that Isaac was a young boy at the time of the incident, this is mostly a modern idea, with most traditional sources claiming he was an adult. According to Josephus, Isaac is twenty-five years old at the time of the sacrifice; the Talmudic sages teach that Isaac is thirty-seven, likely based on the fact that the next Biblical story is of Sarah's death at 127 (she was ninety when Isaac was born). In either case, Isaac is a fully grown man, strong enough to prevent the elderly Abraham from tying him up had he wanted to resist. A fanciful representation of Flavius Josephus, in an engraving in William Whistons translation of his works Josephus (37 – sometime after 100 CE),[1] who became known, in his capacity as a Roman citizen, as Titus Flavius Josephus,[2] was a 1st-century Jewish historian and apologist of priestly and... The Talmud (Hebrew: ) is a record of rabbinic discussions pertaining to Jewish law, ethics, customs, and history. ...


Genesis 22:14 states that it occurred at "the mount of the LORD": in 2 Chronicles 3:1; Psalm 24:3; Isaiah 2:3; 30:29; and Zechariah 8:3, the Bible seems to identify the location of this event as the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. (Redirected from 2 Chronicles) The Book of Chronicles is a book in the Hebrew Bible (also see Old Testament). ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Isaiah the Prophet in Hebrew Scriptures was depicted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling by Michelangelo. ... Zechariah (or its many variant forms and spellings) may refer to: // Main article: Zechariah (given name) Main article: Zacharias (surname) Prophets, saints and popes Zechariah Ben Jehoiada, martyred son of the High Priest in the times of Ahaziah and Joash Zechariah (Hebrew prophet), a prophet of the kingdom of Judah... The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ...

Contents

Jewish responses

The majority of Jewish Biblical commentators argue that God was testing Abraham to see if he would actually kill his own son, as a test of his loyalty. However, a number of Jewish Biblical commentators from the mediæval era, and many in the modern era, do not agree with this notion. They read the text in another way.


The early rabbinic midrash Genesis Rabbah imagines God as saying "I never considered telling Abraham to slaughter Isaac (using the Hebrew root letters for "slaughter", not "sacrifice")". Rabbi Yona Ibn Janach (Spain, 11th century) wrote that God demanded only a symbolic sacrifice. Rabbi Yosef Ibn Caspi (Spain, early 14th century) wrote that Abraham's "imagination" led him astray, making him believe that he had been commanded to sacrifice his son. Ibn Caspi writes "How could God command such a revolting thing?" But according to Rabbi J. H. Hertz (Chief Rabbi of the British Empire), child sacrifice was actually "rife among the Semitic peoples," and suggests that "in that age, it was astounding that Abraham's God should have interposed to prevent the sacrifice, not that He should have asked for it." Hertz interprets the Akedah as demonstrating to the Jews that human sacrifice is abhorrent. "Unlike the cruel heathen deities, it was the spiritual surrender alone that God required." In Jeremiah 32:35, God states that the later Israelite practice of child sacrifice to the deity Molech "had [never] entered My mind that they should do this abomination." Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש; plural midrashim) is a Hebrew word referring to a method of exegesis of a Biblical text. ... Note: This article contains special characters. ... // Chief Rabbinate redirects here. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ... Child sacrifice is the ritualistic killing of children in order to please, propitiate or force supernatural beings in order to achieve a desired result. ... In linguistics and ethnology, Semitic (from the Biblical Shem, Hebrew: שם, translated as name, Arabic: سام) was first used to refer to a language family of largely Middle Eastern origin, now called the Semitic languages. ... Moloch or Molech or Molekh representing Hebrew מלך mlk is either the name of a god or the name of a particular kind of sacrifice associated historically with Phoenician and related cultures in north Africa and the Levant. ...


Other rabbinic scholars also note that Abraham was willing to do everything to spare his son, even if it meant going against the divine command: while it was God who ordered Abraham to sacrifice his son, it was an angel, a lesser being in the celestial hierarchy, that commanded him to stop. However, the actions and words of angels (from the Greek for "messenger") are generally understood to derive directly from God's will, and indeed, the angel in question speaks as if he were God Himself. This article is about the supernatural being. ...


In some later Jewish writings, most notably those of the Hasidic masters, the theology of a "divine test" is rejected, and the sacrifice of Isaac is interpreted as a "punishment" for Abraham's earlier "mistreatment" of Ishmael, his elder son, whom he expelled from his household at the request of his wife, Sarah. According to this view, Abraham failed to show compassion for his son, so God punished him by ostensibly failing to show compassion for Abraham's son. This is a somewhat flawed theory, however, since the Bible says that God agreed with Sarah, and it was only at His insistence that Abraham actually had Ishmael leave. In The Last Trial, Shalom Spiegel argues that these commentators were interpreting the Biblical narration as an implicit rebuke against Christianity's claim that God would sacrifice His own son. This article is about the Hasidic movement originating in Poland and Russia. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ... Engraving of Sarah by Hans Collaert from c. ...


In The Binding of Isaac, Religious Murders & Kabbalah, Lippman Bodoff argues that Abraham never intended to actually sacrifice his son, and that he had faith that God had no intention that he do so.

This 18th-century relief of Abraham's offering of Isaac is one of a series of reliefs in the chapel inside the Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc with sacrifices to the God as the main topic, ending with Jesus' crucifixion.
This 18th-century relief of Abraham's offering of Isaac is one of a series of reliefs in the chapel inside the Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc with sacrifices to the God as the main topic, ending with Jesus' crucifixion.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1408x2814, 640 KB) en: Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc (Czech Republic) - one of reliefs in the inner chapel depicting Abrahams offering of Isaac. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1408x2814, 640 KB) en: Holy Trinity Column in Olomouc (Czech Republic) - one of reliefs in the inner chapel depicting Abrahams offering of Isaac. ... To the glory of God the Almighty, the Virgin Mary and the saints I will build a column that in its height and splendour will be unrivalled in any other town. ...

Christian responses

The Binding of Isaac is mentioned in the New Testament Book of Hebrews among many acts of faith recorded in the Old Testament: This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... The Epistle to the Hebrews (abbreviated Heb. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism...

By faith Abraham, when he was tested, offered up Isaac, and he who had received the promises offered up his only begotten son, of whom it was said, "In Isaac your seed shall be called," concluding that God was able to raise him up, even from the dead, from which he also received him in a figurative sense. (Hebrews 11:17-19, NKJV)

The Author of Hebrews here considers Abraham's faith in God to be of such a magnitude that he felt reassured that if God would allow him to perform the task which he'd requested, he would be able to resurrect the slain Isaac, in order that his prophecy (Genesis 21:12) might be fulfilled. Such faith in God's word and in his promise lead this particular Old Testament passage to be regarded by many Christians as an incredibly significant (and exemplary) one.


The majority of Christian Biblical commentators hold this whole episode to be an archetype of the way that God works; this event is seen as foreshadowing God's plan to have his own Son, Jesus, die on the cross as a substitute for humanity, much like the ram God provided for Abraham. And Abraham's willingness to give up his own son Isaac is seen, in this view, as foreshadowing the willingness of God the Father to sacrifice his Son; also contrasted is Isaac's submission in the whole ordeal with Christ's, the two choosing to lay down their own lives in order for the will of God to be accomplished, as no struggle is mentioned in the Genesis account. Indeed, both stories portray the participants carrying the wood for their own sacrifice up a mountain. This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ... Substitutionary atonement is the act of restoring balances by substitution. ...


There has been speculation within Christianity whether the Binding occurred upon the Temple Mount or upon Calvary, the hill upon which Christ was crucified, which is in the vicinity. Genesis 22:2 states that it occurred "in the region of Moriah" and not necessarily upon the Temple Mount, specifically. Some Christians view Abraham's statement in 22:14, "On the mountain of the LORD it will be provided," as a prophecy that upon this spot God would provide the substitutionary sacrifice of Christ. The Temple Mount A reconstruction of Herods Temple in Jerusalem. ... Golgotha redirects here. ...


Muslim responses

Muslims believe that it was Ishmael rather than Isaac whom Abraham was told to sacrifice. Some say that God would not have asked for the sacrifice after He has foretold Abraham and Sarah the glad tidings of Isaac and his offspring (Quran 11:71; 15:53, 37:112 etc). Others note that Genesis 22:2, despite specifying Isaac, states that Abraham was told to sacrifice his only son, so they believe this took place with Ishmael before Isaac was born, and that the name of Ishmael was later replaced by Isaac. There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... Hagar and Ishmael in the Wilderness, by Karel Dujardin Ishmael (Hebrew: יִשְׁמָעֵאל, Standard Tiberian ; Arabic: إسماعيل, Ismāīl) was Abrahams eldest son, born by his wifes handmaiden Hagar. ...

Quran 37:101-113 So We gave him tidings of a gentle son. And when (his son) was old enough to walk with him, (Abraham) said: O my dear son, I have seen in a dream that I must sacrifice thee. So look, what thinkest thou? He said: O my father! Do that which thou art commanded. Allah willing, thou shalt find me of the steadfast. Then, when they had both surrendered (to Allah), and he had flung him down upon his face, We called unto him: O Abraham! Thou hast already fulfilled the vision. Lo! thus do We reward the good. Lo! that verily was a clear test. Then We ransomed him with a tremendous victim. And We left for him among the later folk (the salutation): Peace be unto Abraham! Thus do We reward the good. Lo! he is one of Our believing slaves. And we gave him tidings of the birth of Isaac, a prophet of the righteous. And We blessed him and Isaac. And of their seed are some who do good, and some who plainly wrong themselves.[1]

Muslims consider that visions experienced by prophets are revelations from God, and as such it was a divine order to Abraham. The entire episode of the sacrifice is regarded as a trial of God for Abraham and his son, and both are seen as having passed the test by submitting to God and showing their awareness that God is the Owner and Giver of all that we have and cherish, including life and offspring. The submission of Abraham and his son is celebrated and commemorated by Muslims on the days of Eid ul-Adha Sacrifice festival. During the festival, those who can afford and the ones in the pilgrimage sacrifice a ram, cow, sheep or a camel. Part of the sacrifice meat is eaten by the household and remaining is distributed to the neighbor and the needy. The festival happens in the pilgrimage hajj season. The well-known site of Marwah (Arabic مروة) may be identified with the biblical Moriah (Hebrew מוריה) in Gn 22:2. The belief of Muslims in the sacrifice of Ishmaiel and not Isaac is strengthened by the above verse of Koran in which God gave merry tidings to Abraham of another son after he stood successful in the test of subjugation to God's will. Eid al-Adha (Arabic: عيد الأضحى ‘Īd al-’Aḍḥā) is a religious festival celebrated by Muslims worldwide as a commemoration of Ibrahims (Abrahams) willingness to sacrifice his son Ismael for Allah, but a voice from heaven allows Ibrahim to sacrifice a goat instead. ... A supplicating pilgrim at Masjid Al Haram, the mosque which was built around the Kaaba (the cubical building at center). ... Arabic can mean: From or related to Arabia From or related to the Arabs The Arabic language; see also Arabic grammar The Arabic alphabet, used for expressing the languages of Arabic, Persian, Malay ( Jawi), Kurdish, Panjabi, Pashto, Sindhi and Urdu, among others. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards and make it more accessible to a general audience, this article may require cleanup. ... The word Hebrew most likely means to cross over, referring to the Semitic people crossing over the Euphrates River. ...


Modern-day interpretations

It also figures prominently in the writings of many major modern theologians, such as Søren Kierkegaard in Fear and Trembling and Shalom Spiegel in The Last Trial. Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (pronounced , but usually Anglicized as ;  ) (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. ... Fear and Trembling Fear and Trembling (original Danish title: Frygt og Bæven) is a philosophical work by Søren Kierkegaard, published in 1843 under the pseudonym Johannes de Silentio. ...


In Mimesis: The Representation of Reality in Western Literature, the literary critic Erich Auerbach considers the Hebrew narrative of the Binding of Isaac, along with Homer's description of Odysseus's scar, as the two paradigmatic models for the representation of reality in literature. Auerbach contrasts Homer's attention to detail and foregrounding of the spatial, historical, as well as personal contexts for events to the Bible's sparse account, in which virtually all context is kept in the background or left outside of the narrative. As Auerbach observes, this narrative strategy virtually compels readers to add their own interpretations to the text. Erich Auerbach (November 9, 1892 in Berlin - October 13, 1957 in Wallingford, Connecticut) was a German philologist and comparative scholar and critic of literature. ... For other uses, see Paradigm (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Reality (disambiguation). ... This article is about (usually written) works. ...


Some have argued that the narration should be read in the context of ancient Near Eastern culture. In the time and era in which Abraham lived, he was surrounded by cultures where the sacrifice of animals to gods was the normal way of showing devotion and loyalty. Abraham lived among some cultures that sacrificed human beings to their gods - sometimes even their own children. Inhabitants of the Near East, late nineteenth century. ...


The binding of Isaac in art

  • The Binding of Isaac: 6th Century B.C.E. mosaic floor panel at Beit Alpha by Marianos and Hanina. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1401 bronze relief by Brunelleschi. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1418 sculpture by Donatello. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1512-1514 fresco on the ceiling of the Stanza di Eliodoro by Raphael. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: painting by Domenichino. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Abraham: 1520-1525 painting by Sarto. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1526-1532 sculpture by Berruguete. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1582-1647 painting by Giovanni Lanfranco.
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1590 painting by Empoli. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1596 painting by Ligozzi.Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1601-1602 painting by Caravaggio. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1607 painting by Cigoli. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1625 painting by Riminaldi. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Abraham: 1634 painting by Rembrandt. Photo
  • Abraham Sacrificing Isaac: 1650 painting by de LaHire. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1726-1729 fresco by Tiepolo. Photo
  • The Sacrifice of Isaac: 1960-1965 painting by Chagall. Photo

Sculpture of Brunelleschi looking at the dome in Florence Filippo Brunelleschi (1377 – April 15, 1446) was one of the foremost architects of the Italian Renaissance. ... Statue of Habacuc (popularly known as Zuccone) for the Giottos Bell Tower. ... The Raphael Rooms (also called the Raphael Stanze or, in Italian, Stanze di Raffaello) in the Palace of the Vatican are papal apartments with frescoes painted by the Italian artist Raphael and his workshop. ... This page is about the artist. ... Domenico Zampieri (or Domenichino) (October 21, 1581 - April 15, 1641), was a prominent high Baroque painter of the Bolognese or Carracci School of Painters. ... A self portrait. ... Salome by Alonso Berruguette (1512 - 16), on display at the Uffizi Gallery in Florence Alonso Berruguete (c. ... Giovanni Lanfranco (born: 26 January 1582, Parma, Italy - died: 30 November 1647, Rome) was an Italian baroque painter. ... Empoli is a town in Tuscany, Italy, about 30 km southwest of Florence. ... For other uses, see Caravaggio (disambiguation). ... Lodovico Cigoli Lodovico Cardi called Cigoli (1559, Villa Castelvecchi di Cigoli - 1613, Rome)) is an Italian painter, architect and poet, born at Cigoli in Tuscany. ... This article is about the Dutch painter. ... The Death of Hyacinth Giovanni Battista Tiepolo (March 5, 1696 - March 27, 1770) was a Venetian painter. ... Marc Chagall as photographed in 1941 by Carl Van Vechten Marc Chagall (July 7, 1887 - March 28, 1985) was a Belarusian painter of Jewish origin. ...

The binding of Isaac in literature

  • The Brome Play of Abraham and Isaac: 14th century English mystery play (Gassner, 1963)
  • Fear and Trembling: 1843 philosophical work by Søren Kierkegaard. Explores the ethical implications of Abraham's act, tries to place it in his contemporary world, and distills from this an admirable picture of how a "knight of faith" is more than just someone who knows the rules of religion. Abraham was ready to sacrifice his son, but this submission to the will of God was not where he stopped, for he believed that he would have him back: he trusted the "absurd" — a trust that is a paradox, beyond ethics and intellectual comprehension. It develops the leap of faith, that faith is separate from religious or empirical knowledge, and thus always "absurd".
  • The Parable of the Old Man and the Young: 1920 poem by Wilfred Owen. It used the binding of Isaac, altered to a successful slaughter, as an allusive metaphor for World War I.
  • Without Feathers: 1975 book by Woody Allen. Contains an essay (The Scrolls) that humorously re-tells the Binding of Isaac. Excerpt embedded in speech
  • Roderick: 1980 satiric science fiction novel by John Sladek. The title character offends and confuses the teachers at his Catholic school when he creates a flow chart to document the various ways that the Binding of Isaac could have been played out, as well as their possible meanings.
  • Hyperion: 1989 science fiction novel by Dan Simmons. The novel is first in the science-fiction series Hyperion Cantos. One of the characters, Sol Weintraub, ponders the binding of Isaac in relation to his own problem of being told by a voice to take his daughter Rachel to the planet Hyperion and offer her to the Time Tombs, publishing a number of widely-read works on the ethical dilemma. In The Fall of Hyperion, Weintraub concludes (after giving his daughter to the Shrike) that the answer is that Abraham was testing God, not the other way around: if God had allowed the sacrifice, then he would thereby have proven that he was not to be worshipped.
  • Testament: 2005 comic book by Douglas Rushkoff. The binding of Isaac is directly paralleled by a father refusing to implant an RFID chip into his adolescent son and putting it into the family dog instead.

Mystery plays are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. ... Fear and Trembling Fear and Trembling (original Danish title: Frygt og Bæven) is a philosophical work by Søren Kierkegaard, published in 1843 under the pseudonym Johannes de Silentio. ... Søren Aabye Kierkegaard (pronounced , but usually Anglicized as ;  ) (5 May 1813 – 11 November 1855) was a prolific 19th century Danish philosopher and theologian. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Parable of the Old Man and the Young The Parable of the Old Man and the Young is a poem by Wilfred Owen which compares the ascent of Abraham to Mount Moriah and his near-sacrifice of Isaac there with the... Wilfred Edward Salter Owen MC (March 18, 1893 – November 4, 1918) was a British poet and soldier, regarded by many as the leading poet of the First World War. ... An allusion is a figure of speech that makes a reference/representation of/to a well-known person, place, event, literary work, or work of art. ... This article is about metaphor in literature and rhetoric. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Woody Allens Without Feathers is one of his most well-known literary masterpieces. ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Roderick is a 1980 science fiction novel by John Sladek. ... John Thomas Sladek (December 15, 1937 - March 10, 2000) was an American science-fiction author. ... A simple flowchart for what to do if a lamp doesnt work A flowchart (also spelled flow-chart and flow chart) is a schematic representation of a process. ... Hyperion is a Hugo Award-winning 1989 science fiction novel by Dan Simmons. ... Dan Simmons (born April 4, 1948 in Peoria, Illinois) is an American author most widely known for his Hugo Award-winning science fiction novel Hyperion and its sequel The Fall of Hyperion. ... Hyperion The Hyperion Cantos form a tetralogy of science fiction novels by Dan Simmons. ... Hyperion The Hyperion Cantos is a tetralogy of novels by Dan Simmons. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... Douglas Rushkoff (born 18 February 1961) is a New York-based writer, columnist and lecturer on technology, media and popular culture. ... An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) is an automatic identification method, relying on storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ...

The binding of Isaac in music

  • Canticle II: Abraham and Isaac, for alto, tenor, and piano, Op. 51: 1952 song/opera by Benjamin Britten. Text adapted from the medieval Chester Mystery Plays. One voice sings the role of Abraham, the other Isaac. The two voices sing homophonically to create a third voice for God. Lyrics
  • Highway 61 Revisited: 1965 song by Bob Dylan from the album Highway 61 Revisited. Lyrics reference the binding of Isaac. Highway 61 was a highway near Bob Dylan's home. Bob Dylan's father was named Abraham. Lyrics
  • Story of Isaac: 1969 song by Leonard Cohen from the album Songs from a Room. Lyrics
  • Isaac and Abraham: 1992 song by Joan Baez from the album Play Me Backwards. Lyrics
  • The Cave: 1994 opera by Steve Reich. Contains the song The Binding of Isaac in the third act.
  • Abraham: 2004 song by Sufjan Stevens from the album Seven Swans. Discusses the binding of Isaac from a Christan perspective. Lyrics
  • Mr. Shiny Cadillackness: 2007 song by Clutch from the album From Beale Street to Oblivion. References the binding of Isaac with the lyrics, "Will you sacrifice your first born like Abraham would his Isaac?" Lyrics

Britten redirects here. ... Mystery plays are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. ... Homophony is a musical term that describes the texture of two or more instruments or parts moving together and using the same rhythm. ... Highway 61 Revisited is the title track of Bob Dylans 1965 album Highway 61 Revisited. ... This article is about the recording artist. ... Highway 61 Revisited is Bob Dylans sixth studio album, released in 1965 by Columbia Records. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC, (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Quebec) is a Canadian singer-songwriter, poet and novelist. ... Songs from a Room was the Canadian poet Leonard Cohens second album. ... Joan Chandos Baez (born January 9, 1941) is an American folk singer and songwriter known for her highly individual vocal style. ... Play Me Backwards was a 1992 album by Joan Baez. ... The Cave is a multimedia opera in three acts by Steve Reich to an English libretto by his wife Beryl Korot. ... Stephen Michael Reich (born October 3, 1936) is an American composer. ... Sufjan Stevens (IPA pronunciation: ) (born July 1, 1975) is an American singer-songwriter and musician from Petosky, Michigan. ... Seven Swans is a folk rock music album by Sufjan Stevens. ... Clutch is a musical group from Germantown, Maryland in the United States. ... From Beale Street to Oblivion is the eighth full-length studio album by rock band Clutch. ...

The binding of Isaac in film

  • The Sacrifice: 1986 movie directed by Andrei Tarkovsky. Internet Movie Database WWIII threatens nuclear holocaust and the main character offers his son and his home to God if everything is put right again. He is saved, he burns his house and is ultimately prevented from killing his son by external forces.
  • The Rapture: 1991 movie directed by Michael Tonklin. Internet Movie Database Contains a key scene that closely resembles the binding of Isaac.
  • Abraham: 1994 TV-movie directed by Joseph Sargent. Internet Movie Database
  • Frailty: 2001 movie directed by Bill Paxton. Internet Movie Database
  • The Believer: 2001 movie directed by Henry Bean. Internet Movie Database The central character has a particularly powerful moment centered around his critique of the kind of God that would expose a father to such torment.

This article is about the 1986 Swedish film. ... “Tarkovsky” redirects here. ... The Rapture is a 1991 psychological/religious drama film starring Mimi Rogers, Darwyn Carson, Patrick Bauchau, Marvin Elkins, David Duchovny, and Stephanie Menuez; directed by Michael Tolkin; rated R; 100 minutes long; and produced by New Line Cinema. ... Abraham is a television movie based on the life of the prophet Abraham. ... Joseph Sargent (born 22 July 1925, Jersey City, New Jersey) is an American film director. ... Frailty is a 2001 film, directed by Bill Paxton and starring Bill Paxton and Matthew McConaughey. ... William Paxton (born May 17, 1955) is a Golden Globe-nominated American actor and film director. ... The Believer is a 2001 film written by Henry Bean and Mark Jacobson, and directed by Bean. ... Henry Bean (born 1945, Philadelphia, United States) is a scriptwriter, film director, producer and actor. ...

The binding of Isaac in television

  • Law & Order season 6 episode 8 Angel (first aired 1995-11-29): loosely based on the story of Susan Smith, but added a religious motive for the murder.
  • Xena: Warrior Princess season 1 episode 19 Altared States (first aired 1996-04-22): changes the names ("Anteus" for Abraham, "Icus" for Isaac, "Mael" for Ishmael, "Zora" for Sarah) but follows the story of the command and the final reprieve.
  • Family Guy season 2 episode 2 Holy Crap (first aired 1999-09-30): Brian Griffin mentions the Old Testament narration in which "God told Abraham to kill Isaac." In the show's irreverent style, a cutaway then shows President Abraham Lincoln shooting bartender Isaac from the television show Love Boat.
  • Lost season 3 episode 17 Catch-22 (first aired 2007-04-18): the binding of Isaac is a theme in the episode.
  • Family Guy season 6 episode 7 Peter's Daughter (first aired 2007-11-25): Peter states that he has been a worse father than Abraham, leading to the scene quickly cutting to Abraham and Isaac walking down a hill and Isaac stating "Okay, mind telling me what the &#$% that was?"

This article is about the original television series. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... for the Playboy playmate see Susan Smith Susan Smith (born September 26, 1971 as Susan Leigh Vaughan), of Union, South Carolina, and a student at the University of South Carolina Union, was convicted July 22, 1995, of murdering her two sons, 3-year-old Michael Daniel Smith, born October 10... Xena. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... “Holy Crap” is an episode from the FOX animated television series Family Guy. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Brian Griffin is a fictional character from the animated television series Family Guy, and is voiced by show creator, Seth MacFarlane. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Note: Judaism... For other uses, see Abraham Lincoln (disambiguation). ... For the Taiwanese youth program informally known as Love Boat, see Overseas Chinese Youth Language Training and Study Tour to the Republic of China. ... LOST redirects here. ... List of Lost episodes Catch-22[1] is the seventeenth episode of the third season of Lost. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... Peters Daughter is a season six episode of the FOX animated television series Family Guy; the title is a reference to Ryans Daughter. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Sacrifice of Isaac, a detail from the sarcophagus of the Roman consul Junius Bassus, ca. ... This article is about the term Hebrew Bible. For the Jewish scriptures see Tanakh. ... Theodicy (IPA: ) (adjectival form theodicean) is a specific branch of theology and philosophy that attempts to reconcile the existence of evil or suffering in the world with the belief in an omniscient, omnipotent, and benevolent God, i. ... Free-Will is a Japanese independent record label founded in 1986. ... 112 Iphigenia is an asteroid. ... Filicide is the deliberate act of a parent killing his or her own son or daughter. ... Child sacrifice is the ritualistic killing of children in order to please, propitiate or force supernatural beings in order to achieve a desired result. ... Vayeira, Vayera, or Va-yera (וירא — Hebrew for and He appeared,” the first word in the parshah) is the fourth weekly parshah or portion in the annual Jewish cycle of Torah reading. ... In Jewish services, a Parsha or Parshah or Parashah, פרשה, meaning Portion in Hebrew, is the weekly Torah reading text selection. ...

External links

Mystery plays are among the earliest formally developed plays in medieval Europe. ...

References

Further Reading

  • Berman, Louis A. (1997). The Akedah: The Binding of Isaac. Rowman & Littlefield. ISBN 1-56821-899-0. 
  • Bodoff, Lippman (2005). The Binding of Isaac, Religious Murders & Kabbalah: Seeds of Jewish Extremism and Alienation?. Devora Publishing. ISBN 1-932687-52-1 (Cloth), ISBN 1-932687-53-X (Paper). 
  • Bodofff, Lippman (1993). "The Real Test of the Akedah: Blind Obedience versus Moral Choice". Judaism 42 (1). 
  • Bodofff, Lippman (1993). "God Tests Abraham - Abraham Tests God". Bible Review IX (5): 52. 
  • Caspi, Mishael Maswari and Sascha Benjamin Cohen (1995). The Binding and Its Transformations in Judaism and Islam. Mellen Biblical Press. ISBN 0-7734-2389-3. 
  • Delaney, Carol (1998). Abraham on Trial. Princeton University Press. ISBN 0-691-05985-3. 
  • Delaney, Carol (1999). "Abraham, Isaac, and Some Hidden Assumptions of Our Culture" ([dead link]Scholar search). The Humanist May/June. 
  • Feiler, Bruce (2002). Abraham: A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths. HarperCollins. ISBN 0-06-083866-3. 
  • Firestone, Reuven (1990). Journeys in Holy Lands: The Evolution of the Abraham-Ishmael Legends in Islamic Exegesis. State University of New York Press. ISBN 0-7914-0332-7. 
  • Gassner, John (Ed.) (1963). Medieval and Tudor Drama: Twenty-Four Plays, 2000 reprint, Applause. ISBN 0-936839-84-8. 
  • Josephus, Flavius (93-94 C.E.). Antiquities of the Jews. Interhack Digital Library. ISBN 1-58827-612-0. 
  • Jensen, Robin M. (1993). "The Binding or Sacrifice of Isaac: How Jews and Christians See Differently". Bible Review 9 (5): 42–51. 
  • Levenson, Jon D. (1995). The Death and Resurrection of the Beloved Son: The Transformation of Child Sacrifice in Judaism and Christianity. Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-06511-6. 
  • Plaut, W. Gunther (1974). The Torah: A Modern Commentary I. Genesis. Union of American Hebrew Congregations. ASIN B0006DJTU8.  p. 210.
  • Aviezer Ravitzky of Hebrew University , Abraham: Father of the Believers, (Hebrew)
  • Sarna, Nahum (1989). The JPS Torah Commentary: Genesis. Jewish Publication Society. ISBN 0-8276-0326-6. 
  • Spiegel, Shalom (1967). The Last Trial: On the Legends and Lore of the Command to Abraham to Offer Isaac As a Sacrifice: The Akedah, 1993 reprint, Jewish Lights Publishing. ISBN 1-879045-29-X. 
  • Vaux, Kenneth L. (2003). Jew Christian, Muslim: Faithful Unification or Fateful Trifurcation? Word, Way, Worship and War in the Abrahamic Faiths. Wipf and Stock Publishers. ISBN 1-59244-363-X. 
Bruce Feiler is a writer, on social issues and, particularly more recently, on religion. ... Josephus, also known as Flavius Josephus (c. ... Categories: Possible copyright violations ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Binding of Isaac (2239 words)
Thus I shall bless you, and multiply your descendants as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand that is at the shore of the sea...’ ”
By binding Isaac upon the altar, Abraham demonstrated that man is capable of a love and awe of G-d that surpasses his every other feeling or commitment.
When Abraham was told to offer Isaac as a sacrifice to G-d, this was contrary to everything Abraham was and stood for, contrary to everything he knew and believed about G-d, and contrary to what G-d Himself had said to him.
Isaac Summary (1477 words)
Isaac (Yitzchak or Yitzhak) (יִצְחָק "laughed", Standard Hebrew Yiẓḥaq, Tiberian Hebrew Yiṣḥāq; Arabic اسحاق ʾIsḥāq) is the son and heir of Abraham and the father of Jacob and Esau as described in the Hebrew Bible.
Isaac was named because when his mother, Sarah, overheard that she would bear a child in her old age, she laughed (Genesis 18:10-15, 21:6-7).
Isaac was circumcised by his father when eight days old (Genesis 4-7); and a great feast was held in connection with his being weaned.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m