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Encyclopedia > Bill Russell
Bill Russell
Position(s):
Center
Jersey #(s):
6
Height:
6 ft 10 in (2.08 m)
Weight:
220 lb (100 kg)
Born: February 12, 1934 (1934-02-12) (age 74)
Monroe, Louisiana
Career information
Year(s): 1956–1969
NBA Draft: 1956 / Round: 1 / Pick: 2
College: San Francisco
Professional teams
Career stats
Points     14,522
Rebounds     21,620
Assists     4,100
Stats at Basketball-Reference.com
Career highlights and awards
  • 12x NBA All-Star (1958, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1963, 1964, 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969)
  • 5x NBA MVP (1957, 1960, 1961, 1962, 1964)
  • 3x All-NBA First Team (1958, 1962, 1964)
  • 8x All-NBA Second Team (1957, 1959, 1960, 1961, 1963, 1965, 1966, 1967)
  • 1x NBA All-Defensive Team (1968)
  • NBA's 50th Anniversary All-Time Team
Basketball Hall of Fame
Medal record
Competitor for Flag of the United States United States
Men's Basketball
Olympic Games
Gold 1956 Melbourne Team Competition

William Felton "Bill" Russell (born February 12, 1934) is a retired American professional basketball player who played center for the Boston Celtics of the NBA. A five-time winner of the NBA Most Valuable Player Award and a twelve-time All-Star, the 6 ft 10 in (2.1 m) Russell was the centerpiece of the Celtics dynasty that won eleven NBA Championships during Russell's thirteen-year career. Along with Henri Richard of the NHL's Montreal Canadiens, Russell holds the record for the most championships won by an athlete in a North American sports league. Before his professional career, Russell led the University of San Francisco to two consecutive National Collegiate Athletic Association championships (1955, 1956). He also won a gold medal at the 1956 Summer Olympics as captain of the U.S. national basketball team. There are many well-known people named William Russell: William Russell (bishop), Bishop of Sodor and Man from 1348 to 1374. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 418 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1554 × 2226 pixels, file size: 1. ... The five tactical basketball positions normally employed by organized basketball teams are: point guard, shooting guard, small forward, power forward, and center. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In team sports, the squad number, jersey number, sweater number, or uniform number is the number worn on a players outfit. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The city of Monroe is the parish seat of Ouachita Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ... In an organised sports league, a season is the portion of one year in which regulated games of the sport are in session. ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... The 1956 NBA Draft was held in New York on April 30th. ... This is a list of athletic conferences of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA). ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The slam dunk by LeBron James is a field goal worth 2 points. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... In basketball, an assist is attributed to a player who passes the ball to a teammate in a way that leads to a score by field goal, meaning that he or she was assisting in the basket. ... The National Basketball Association (NBA) holds an All-Star Weekend every February, with a variety of basketball-related events, exhibitions, and performances culminating in the NBA All-Star Game held on Sunday night. ... National Basketball Association Most Valuable Player Award was first awarded after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The NBA All-Defensive Team is the NBAs annual honor given to the best defensive players in the NBA during the regular season. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (commonly referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA) to comprise the fifty best and most influential players... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Basketball has been played consistently at the Summer Olympic Games since 1936, with a demonstration event in 1904. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The 1956 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVI Olympiad, were held in 1956 in Melbourne, Australia, although the equestrian events could not be held in Australia due to quarantine regulations. ... Basketball at the 1956 Summer Olympics was the fourth appearance of the sport in Olympic competition. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the sport. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... NBA redirects here. ... The National Basketball Association first named a Most Valuable Player after the 1955-56 NBA season. ... The National Basketball Association staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... In sports, the term dynasty is often used to refer to a team that dominates their sport for a period of time. ... Logo of the NBA Finals. ... Joseph Henri Richard (born February 29, 1936 in Montreal, Quebec) is a former professional ice hockey player who played centre with the Montreal Canadiens in the National Hockey League (NHL) from 1955 to 1975. ... NHL redirects here. ... The Montreal Canadiens (French: ) are a professional mens hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... Basketball at the 1956 Summer Olympics was the fourth appearance of the sport in Olympic competition. ... The United States mens national basketball team is the representative for the United States of America in international mens basketball. ...


Russell is widely considered one of the best defensive players in NBA history. His shot-blocking and man-to-man defense were major reasons for the Celtics' success, and he inspired other players to elevate their own defensive play. Russell was equally notable for his rebounding abilities. He led the NBA in rebounds four times and tallied 21,620 total rebounds in his career. He is one of just two NBA players (the other being prominent rival Wilt Chamberlain) to have grabbed over fifty rebounds in a single game. Though never the focal point of the Celtics' offense, Russell also scored 14,522 career points and provided effective passing. In sport, defense (AmE) and defence (CwE) is the action of preventing an opponent from scoring. ... Oscar Torres (13) is in position to block this shot. ... Man to man defense is a type of defensive tactic used in basketball and Football (Soccer) in which each player is assigned to defend and follow the movements of a single player on offense. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... In sport, offense (American English) and offence (British English and Canadian English) is the action of attacking or engaging an opposing team with the objective of scoring points or goals. ...


Playing in the wake of pioneers like Earl Lloyd, Chuck Cooper, and Ray Felix, Russell was the first African American player to achieve superstar status in the NBA. He also served a three-year (1966–69) stint as player-coach for the Celtics, thus becoming the first African American coach in any major American professional sports league. However, Russell frequently battled with racism. Many sports fans in Boston shunned the Celtics during Russell's tenure with the team, and Russell received little support from the local press. When he retired, Russell left Boston with a bitter attitude, although in recent years his relationship with the city has improved. Earl Francis Lloyd (born April 3, 1928 in Alexandria, Virginia, US) is a retired American basketball player. ... Charles Harrison Cooper (September 29, 1926 - February 5, 1984), better known as Chuck Cooper, was one of three players with legitimate claims to be the first African American basketball player in the NBA. Each satisfied a different condition of being first: Cooper was the first black player to be drafted... Raymond Darlington Felix (b. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... A player-coach, in sports, is a member of a sports team who simultaneously holds both playing and coaching duties. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...


Russell is now a member of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame and the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame. He was named one of the 50 Greatest Players in NBA History in 1996. In 2007, he was enshrined in the FIBA Hall of Fame. Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame is an integral portion of the College Basketball Experience proposed by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) to be located at the Sprint Center which is scheduled to open in 2007 in Kansas City, Missouri. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... FIBA Hall of Fame honors basketball players, coaches and administrators who have contributed to international competitive basketball. ...

Contents

Early years

Bill Russell was born to Charles and Katie Russell in Monroe, Louisiana, where his family often struggled with racism.[1] In one particular instance, Russell's father was denied service at a gasoline station until the staff had taken care of all the white customers. When his father attempted to leave and find a different station, the attendant stuck a shotgun in his face, threatening to kill him unless he stayed and waited his turn.[1] In another instance, Russell's mother was walking down a street in a fancy dress when the local sheriff accosted her. He told her to go home and remove the dress, which he described as "white woman’s clothing".[1] Due to this racism Russell's father moved the family out of Louisiana when Russell was eight years old and settled them in Oakland, California.[1] While there the family fell into poverty, and Russell spent his childhood living in a series of project homes.[1] The city of Monroe is the parish seat of Ouachita Parish, in the US state of Louisiana. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Oakland redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... A local authority tower block in Cwmbrân, South Wales Public housing or project homes are forms of housing tenure in which the property is owned by a government authority, which may be central or local. ...


In his early years, Russell struggled to develop his skills as a basketball player. In junior high school, he was cut from his team, and as a sophomore at McClymonds High School he had barely made the junior varsity team.[2] It was not until his junior and senior years that he began to excel as a player.[2] One of his high school basketball teammates was future Baseball Hall-of-Famer Frank Robinson. Middle school and junior high school cover a period of education that straddles primary education and secondary education and serve as a bridge between them. ... Tenth grade (called Grade 10 in some regions and in Canada, also known as sophomore year in the U.S.) is a year of education in the United States and many other nations. ... Before becoming McClymonds Educational Complex in 2005, McClymonds High School, also known as Mack, and Mack House, was a public high school in the West Oakland neighborhood of Oakland, California, USA. The school song was as follows: O McClymonds, O McClymonds, Youre the High for me. ... Eleventh grade (called Grade 11 in some regions, also known as junior year in the U.S.) is a year of education in the United States and many other nations. ... Twelfth grade (called Grade 12 in some regions, also known as senior year in the U.S.) is the final year of secondary education in the United States and many other nations. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... This article is about the baseball player and manager. ...


College career

The only college to offer Russell a sports scholarship was the local University of San Francisco (USF), where Russell played under coach Phil Woolpert.[2] In 1954, Woolpert became the first coach of a major amateur basketball squad to start three African-American players: Hal Perry, K.C. Jones and Russell.[3] Unfortunately, Russell and his African American teammates became targets of racist jeers, both at USF and on the road.[4] In one notable incident, hotels in Oklahoma City refused to admit Russell and his black teammates while they were in town for the 1954 All-College Tournament. In protest, the whole team decided to camp out in a closed college dorm, which they later considered an important bonding experience.[3] Decades later, Russell explained that his experiences hardened him against abuse of all kinds. "I never permitted myself to be a victim," he said.[5][6] University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... Phil Woolpert (December 15, 1915 - May 7, 1987) is an American college basketball coach. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... A typical American college dorm room A typical Polish college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...


On the hardwood, his experiences were far more pleasant. Russell led USF to NCAA championships in 1955 and 1956, including an impressive string of 55 consecutive victories. He became famous for his strong defense and his shot-blocking skills, once denying 13 shots in a single game. UCLA coach John Wooden called Russell "the greatest defensive man I've ever seen".[3] During his college career, Russell averaged 20.7 points per game and 20.3 rebounds per game.[7] He was so dominant that he forced the NCAA to institute several rules changes in college basketball, which came to be known as "Russell's Rules".[8] After the 1955 season, the lane was widened from six to twelve feet.[9] This rule change forced centers to play further from the basket. Another NCAA rule that emerged in response to Russell (and fellow dominant center Wilt Chamberlain) was that offensive goaltending became illegal. This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Oscar Torres (13) is in position to block this shot. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Points per game, often abbreviated PPG, is the average number of points scored by a player in a sport, over the course of a whole season or career. ... Rebound is a term used in sports describe the ball (or puck or other object of play) becoming available for possession by either opponent after an attempt to put the ball or puck into the goal has been unsuccessful. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... In basketball, the basketball court is the playing surface, consisting of a rectangular floor with baskets at either end. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... In basketball, goaltending is the violation of interfering with the ball or the basket on the balls downward flight to the basket or while it is on the ring (or, in the NBA, while it is directly above the basket). ...


Besides basketball, Russell represented USF in track and field events. Russell competed in the 440 yard (402 m) race, which he could complete in 49.6 seconds.[10] He also participated in the high jump; Track & Field News ranked him as the seventh-best high jumper in the world in 1956. That year, Russell won high jump titles at the Central California AAU meet, the Pacific AAU meet, and the West Coast Relays. One of his best jumps occurred at the West Coast Relays, where he achieved a mark of 6 feet 9¼ inches (2.06 m).[11] A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ... This article is about the athletic event. ... Track & Field News, the magazine, was founded in 1948 by brothers Bert Nelson & Cordner Nelson. ... - The Amateur Athletic Union, widely known as the AAU, was formed in United States. ...


After his years at USF, the Harlem Globetrotters invited Russell to join their legendary basketball squad. However, since owner Abe Saperstein would only discuss the matter with Russell's coach, Russell declined the offer. He reasoned that if Saperstein was too smart to speak with him, then he was too smart to play for Saperstein. Instead, Russell made himself eligible for the 1956 NBA Draft.[12] For the animated television series, see Harlem Globetrotters (TV series). ... Abe M. Saperstein (July 4, 1902 - March 15, 1966) is the famous creator of the Savoy Big Five, which later became the Harlem Globetrotters. Born in London, England, he was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1970. ... The 1956 NBA Draft was held in New York on April 30th. ...


1956 NBA Draft

In the 1956 NBA Draft, Boston Celtics coach Red Auerbach had set his sights on Russell, thinking his defensive toughness and rebounding prowess was the missing link the Celtics needed. In perspective, Auerbach’s thoughts were unorthodox. In that period, centers and forwards were defined by their offensive output, and the ability to play defense was secondary.[13] However, the chances of getting Russell seemed slim. Because the Celtics had finished second in the previous season and the worst teams had the highest draft picks, the Celtics had slipped too low in the draft order to pick Russell. In addition, Auerbach had already used his territorial pick to acquire talented forward Tom Heinsohn. But Auerbach knew that the Rochester Royals, who owned the first draft pick, already had a talented young rebounder in Maurice Stokes and were unwilling to pay Russell the $25,000 signing bonus he requested.[7] The St. Louis Hawks, who owned the second pick, originally drafted Russell, but were vying for Celtics center Ed Macauley, a six-time All-Star who had roots in St. Louis. Auerbach agreed to trade Macauley if they gave up Russell, and after the Celtics also agreed to give up rookie Cliff Hagan, the Hawks made the trade. During that same draft, Boston also claimed guard K.C. Jones, Russell's former USF teammate. Thus, in one night, the Celtics managed to draft three future Hall-of-Fame players (and, in time, three NBA championship winning coaches): Russell, K.C. Jones and Heinsohn.[7] The 1956 NBA Draft was held in New York on April 30th. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was a highly successful and influential basketball coach of the BAA Washington Nationals, the NBA Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the NBA Boston Celtics. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the context of basketball, forward usually refers to one of two positions: Power forward Small forward In addition, some basketball players share the attributes of a small forward and a point guard, and are accordingly called point forwards. ... Tom Heinsohn Thomas William Heinsohn (born August 26, 1934) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics National Basketball Association (NBA) team. ... The Sacramento Kings are a National Basketball Association team based in Sacramento, California. ... Maurice Stokes (born June 17, 1933 in Rankin, Pennsylvania - died April 6, 1970 in Cincinnati, Ohio) was a pro basketball player in the 1950s, whose promising career was shortened by an injury. ... The Atlanta Hawks are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Ed Macualey (born March 22, 1928 in Saint Louis, Missouri), is a former professional basketball player. ... All-star (also, Allstar or All Star) is a term with meanings in both the worlds of sports and entertainment. ... Nickname: Location in the state of Missouri Coordinates: , Country State County Independent City Government  - Mayor Francis G. Slay (D) Area  - City  66. ... Clifford Oldham Hagan (born December 9, 1931, in Owensboro, Kentucky) is an American former professional basketball player. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ...


1956 Olympics

Before his NBA rookie year, Russell was the captain of the U.S. national basketball team that competed at the 1956 Olympic tournament. Russell had the option to skip the tournament and play a full season for the Celtics, but he was determined to play in the Olympics. He later commented that he would have participated in the high jump if he had been snubbed by the basketball team.[14] Under coach Gerald Tucker, Russell helped the national team win the gold medal in Melbourne, defeating the Soviet Union 89–55 in the final game. The United States dominated the tournament, winning by an average of 53.5 points per game. Russell led the team in scoring, averaging 14.1 points per game for the competition. His Celtics teammate K.C. Jones joined him on the Olympic squad and contributed 10.9 points per game.[15] The United States mens national basketball team is the representative for the United States of America in international mens basketball. ... Basketball at the 1956 Summer Olympics was the fourth appearance of the sport in Olympic competition. ... This article is about the athletic event. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... This article is about the Australian city; the name may also refer to City of Melbourne or Melbourne city centre (also known as The CBD). ...


Professional career

1956–59

Russell could not join the Celtics for the 1956-57 NBA season until December, due to his Olympic commitment. After rejoining the Celtics, Russell played 48 games, averaging 14.7 points per game and a league-high 19.6 rebounds per game.[16] During this season, the Celtics featured six-future Hall of Famers: center Bill Russell, forwards Tom Heinsohn and Jim Loscutoff, guards Bill Sharman and Bob Cousy, and forward Frank Ramsey, who came off the bench. (K.C. Jones did not play for the Celtics until 1958 because of military service.)[17] The 1956-57 NBA season was the 11th season of the National Basketball Association. ... NBA minimum requirements for rebounding average are 70 games played or 800 rebounds. ... James Loscutoff (born February 4, 1930 in San Francisco, California, United States) is a former professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Sara Giauro shoots a three-point shot, FIBA Europe Cup for Women Finals 2005 For other uses, see Basketball (disambiguation). ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Frank Vernon Ramsey, Jr. ...


In previous years, the Celtics had been a high-scoring team, but lacked the defensive presence needed to close out tight games. However, with the added defensive presence of Russell, the Celtics had laid the foundation for one of the most impressive sports dynasties of all time. The team utilized a strong defensive approach to the game, forcing opposing teams to commit many turnovers that would ultimately lead to easy fast break points. This approach allowed the Celtics to finish with an impressive 44–28 regular season record, their second-best record since inception in the 1946–47 BAA season, and guaranteed a post-season playoff appearance.[18] In basketball, a turnover occurs when a player from one team gives possession to a member of another team by losing the ball. ... NBA redirects here. ...


In Game 1 of the first round, the Celtics met the Syracuse Nationals, who were led by future Hall-of-Famer Dolph Schayes. It was here that Russell completed one of the best games of his career. He finished with 16 points and 31 rebounds, along with a reported 7 blocks. (At the time, blocks were not yet an officially registered statistic.) After the Celtics' convincing victory (108–89), Schayes quipped, “How much does that guy make a year? It would be to our advantage if we paid him off for five years to get away from us in the rest of this series.”[13] The Celtics swept the Nationals in three games and eventually earned an appearance in the NBA Finals.[19] The 1957 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1956-1957 season. ... The Philadelphia 76ers are a National Basketball Association team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... Adolph Schayes (known as Dolph Schayes) (born May 19, 1928 in New York, New York) was a professional basketball player and coach in the NBA. He played his college basketball at New York University 1944-48. ... The slam dunk by LeBron James is a field goal worth 2 points. ... A rebound in basketball is the act of successfully gaining possession of the basketball after a missed field goal or free throw. ... Oscar Torres (13) is in position to block this shot. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-3 Categories: | ...


In the NBA Finals, the Celtics met the St. Louis Hawks, who were led by superstar forward Bob Pettit and former Celtic Macauley. The teams split the first six games, leading to a deciding Game 7. It was during this game that Russell completed the famous “Coleman Play.” Here, Russell ran down Hawks guard Jack Coleman, who had received an outlet pass at midcourt, and blocked his shot despite the fact that Russell had been standing at his own baseline when the ball was thrown to Coleman. The block preserved the slim 103–102 lead with 40-odd seconds left to play, saving the game for the Celtics. The game would eventually lead into double overtime, where the Celtics prevailed 125-123, earning their first NBA Championship.[13] Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Jack L. Coleman (May 23, 1924–December 11, 1998) was an American professional basketball player. ...


In the 1957-58 NBA season, Russell averaged 16.6 points per game and a league-record average of 22.7 rebounds per game.[16] An interesting phenomenon began that year: Russell was voted the NBA Most Valuable Player, but, strangely, only named to the All-NBA Second Team. This would repeatedly occur throughout his career. The NBA reasoned that other centers were better all-round players than Russell, but no player had meant more to his team. The 1957-58 NBA Season was the 12th season of the National Basketball Association. ...


For the second straight year, the Celtics had the NBA's best record, breezed through the Eastern Division finals, and met the Hawks in the 1958 NBA Finals. After splitting the first two games, Russell injured his ankle in Game 3. Powered by a frontcourt of Macauley and Pettit, the Hawks and their coach Alex Hannum won the NBA title in six games.[7][20] Series Summary Hawks win series 4-2 Categories: | ... Alexander Murray Hannum (July 19, 1923 - January 18, 2002) was a pro basketball coach. ...


In the following 1958-59 NBA season, Russell continued his strong play, averaging 16.7 points per game and 23.0 rebounds per game. He began one of the most impressive rebounding performances of all time, never failing to average less than 23 rebounds for the next seven years.[7][16] The Celtics broke the league record by winning 52 games, and Russell's strong performance once again helped lead the Celtics through the post-season, and eventually, into the NBA Finals. In the 1959 NBA Finals, the Celtics easily recaptured the NBA Title, sweeping the Minneapolis Lakers 4–0.[21] Lakers Head Coach John Kundla, praised Russell, stating, “We don’t fear the Celtics without Bill Russell. Take him out and we can beat them… He’s the guy who whipped us psychologically.”[13] The 1958-59 NBA Season was the 13th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-0 Categories: | ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... John Albert Kundla (born July 3, 1916 in Star Junction, Pennsylvania) is a former professional and college basketball coach. ...


1959–66

In the 1959-60 NBA season, the NBA witnessed the debut of legendary 7 ft 1 in (2.2 m) Philadelphia Warriors center Wilt Chamberlain.[22] The matchup between Russell and Chamberlain, the greatest defensive and the greatest offensive pivots in the NBA, became one of basketball's legendary rivalries.[7] In that season, Russell's Celtics won a record 59 regular season games (including a then-record tying 17 game win streak) and met Chamberlain's Warriors in the Eastern Division Finals. Chamberlain outscored Russell by 81 points, but the Celtics walked off with a 4–2 series win.[23] Years later, the Russell-Chamberlain rivalry became the subject of the 2005 book The Rivalry by sports journalist John Taylor. In the 1960 Finals, the Celtics outlasted the Hawks 4–3 and won yet another championship.[24] Russell grabbed an incredible 40 rebounds in Game 2, and he added 22 points and 35 rebounds in the deciding Game 7, a 122–103 victory for Boston.[7][13] The 1959-60 NBA Season was the 14th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Golden State Warriors are a National Basketball Association team based in Oakland, California. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... This is a list of the longest winning streaks in National Basketball Association history. ... The 1960 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1959-1960 season. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-3 Categories: | ...


In the 1960-61 NBA season, Russell completed another fine year, averaging 16.9 points and 23.9 rebounds per game.[16] His team completed the season by posting a regular season mark of 57-22, earning another post-season appearance, where they defeated the Syracuse Nationals 4–1 in the Eastern Division Finals. Ultimately, they went on to defeat the St. Louis Hawks 4–1 in the 1961 NBA Finals.[25] The 1960-61 NBA Season was the 15th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1961 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1960-1961 season. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-1 Categories: | ...


In the following 1961-62 NBA season, Russell scored a career-high 18.9 points per game, accompanied by 23.6 rebounds per game.[16] While his rival Chamberlain had a record-breaking season of 50.4 points per game and a legendary 100 point game,[22] the Celtics became the first team to win 60 games in a season, and Russell was voted as the NBA's Most Valuable Player. In the post-season, the Celtics captured their fourth title at the 1962 NBA Finals by defeating the Los Angeles Lakers in a deciding Game 7.[26] There, Russell added a clutch performance at the offensive end, scoring 30 points.[13] The 1961-62 NBA Season was the 16th season of the National Basketball Association. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-3 Categories: | ... In American sports terminology, clutch means performing well under extreme pressure. ...


The Celtics lost playmaker Bob Cousy to retirement after the 1962-63 NBA season, but they drafted another legendary player, future Hall-of-Famer John Havlicek. Once again, the Celtics were powered by an inspired Russell, who averaged 16.8 points and 23.6 rebounds per game, won his fourth regular-season MVP title, and earned MVP honors at the 1963 NBA All-Star Game following his 19 point, 24 rebound performance for the East.[16] The Celtics reached the 1963 NBA Finals, where they faced the Los Angeles Lakers. The Lakers and the Celtics split the first six games, but in Game 7, Russell’s clutch play powered the Celtics to victory. He scored 30 points and snared 40 rebounds in a dramatic double-overtime game.[13][27] Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... The 1962-63 NBA Season was the 17th season of the National Basketball Association. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a retired American professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... The NBA staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-2 Categories: | ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Overtime is an additional period of play specified under the rules of a sport in order to bring the game to a decision and avoid declaring the contest a tie or draw. ...


In the following 1963-64 NBA season, the Celtics were again dominant, routing the Cincinnati Royals 4–1 and then winning against Chamberlain's newly-relocated San Francisco Warriors 4–1.[28] It was their seventh title in Russell’s eighth year, and their sixth consecutive, a streak unreached in any U.S. professional sports league. Russell called this Celtics team the best of all time.[7] He scored 15.0 ppg and grabbed a career-high 24.7 rpg, leading the NBA in rebounds for the first time since Wilt Chamberlain had entered the league.[16] The 1963-64 NBA Season was the 18th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The Sacramento Kings are a National Basketball Association team based in Sacramento, California. ... The Golden State Warriors are a National Basketball Association team based in Oakland, California. ... NBA minimum requirements for rebounding average are 70 games played or 800 rebounds. ...


Russell again excelled during the 1964-65 NBA season. The Celtics won a league record 62 games, and Russell averaged 14.1 points and 24.1 rebounds per game, winning his second consecutive rebounding title and his fifth MVP award.[16] In the 1965 NBA Playoffs, the Celtics played the Eastern Division Finals against the Philadelphia 76ers, who had recently traded for Wilt Chamberlain. Russell proved he was worthy of his MVP award, holding Chamberlain to a pair of field goals in the first three quarters of Game 3. In Game 5, Russell contributed 28 rebounds, 10 blocks, six steals and seven assists.[13] However, that playoff series ended in a highly dramatic Game 7. Five seconds before the end, the Sixers were trailing 109-110, and Russell turned over the ball. However, when the Sixers’ Hall-of-Fame guard Hal Greer inbounded, John Havlicek stole the ball, causing Celtics commentator Johnny Most to scream the legendary words: “Havlicek stole the ball! It's all over! Johnny Havlicek stole the ball!”[7] After the Division Finals, the Celtics enjoyed an easy NBA Finals series, winning 4–1 against the Los Angeles Lakers of Jerry West and Elgin Baylor.[29] The 1964-65 NBA Season was the 19th season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1965 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1964-1965 season. ... The Philadelphia 76ers (also known as the Sixers for short) are a professional basketball team based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... In basketball, an assist is attributed to a player who passes the ball to a teammate in a way that leads to a score by field goal, meaning that he or she was assisting in the basket. ... In basketball, a turnover occurs when a player from one team gives possession to a member of another team by losing the ball. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... In basketball, a steal occurs when a defensive player legally deflects and controls, catches, or bats to a teammate a pass or dribble of an offensive player. ... John M. Most (June 15, 1923 – January 3, 1993) was an American sports announcer, known primarily as the raspy radio voice of the Boston Celtics National Basketball Association basketball team from 1953 to 1990. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ...


In the following 1965-66 NBA season, the Celtics won their eighth consecutive title. This time, Russell’s team again beat Chamberlain’s Philadelphia 76ers 4 games to 1, proceeding to win the NBA Finals in a dramatic seven-game, 4-3 showdown against the Los Angeles Lakers.[30] During the season, Russell contributed 12.9 points and 22.8 rebounds per game. This was the first time in seven years that he failed to average 23 boards.[16] The 1965-66 NBA Season was the 20th season of the National Basketball Association. ... This was the iconic Boston Celtics 8th consecutive NBA Championship--no other team in any sport has won eight consecutive league titles. ...


1966–69

Bill and Wilt Chamberlain in 1966

Before the 1966-67 NBA season, legendary Celtics coach Red Auerbach retired and named Russell as a player-coach. Russell thus became the first African-American head coach in NBA history.[7] The Celtics’ championship streak ended that season at eight, however, as Wilt Chamberlain's Philadelphia 76ers won a record-breaking 68 regular season games and at last overpowered the Celtics.[31] As a side note, the Sixers team was also coached by Alex Hannum. Hannum, who had coached the Hawks championship team of 1958, became the only coach who could interrupt the Celtics stranglehold from 1957–1969.[7] Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... The 1966-67 NBA Season was the 21st season of the National Basketball Association. ... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was a highly successful and influential basketball coach of the BAA Washington Nationals, the NBA Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the NBA Boston Celtics. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Alexander Murray Hannum (July 19, 1923 - January 18, 2002) was a pro basketball coach. ...


In Russell's second to last season, the 1967-68 NBA season, his numbers slowly declined, but at age 34, he still tallied 12.5 points per game and an impressive 18.6 rebounds per game[16] (the latter good for the third highest average in the league).[32] In the Eastern Division Finals, the 76ers seemed on the verge of defeating the Celtics once again. After four games, the Celtics were trailing 1-3. However, they rallied to win the next two games, and in Game 7, Russell limited Chamberlain to only two shot attempts in the entire second half.[13] Despite this, the Celtics were leading only 97-95 with 34 seconds left when Russell closed out the game with several consecutive clutch plays. He sank a foul shot, blocked a shot by Sixers player Chet Walker, grabbed a rebound off a miss of Sixers player Hal Greer, and finally passed the ball to teammate Sam Jones, who made the final basket in a 100–96 win. Boston then beat the Los Angeles Lakers 4–2 in the NBA Finals, giving Russell his tenth title in twelve years.[7] For his efforts Russell was named Sports Illustrated's Sportsman of the Year. After losing for the fifth straight time against Russell and his Celtics, Hall-of-Fame Lakers guard Jerry West stated: “If I had a choice of any basketball player in the league, my No.1 choice has to be Bill Russell. Bill Russell never ceases to amaze me.”[13] The 1967-68 NBA Season was the 22nd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1967 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1966-1967 season. ... Image:Http://www. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... Sam, Samantha or Samuel Jones can refer to a number of different people. ... Series Summary Celtics win series 4-2 Categories: | ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Since its inception in 1954, Sports Illustrated magazine has annually presented the Sportsman of the Year award to the athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ...


Heading into the playoffs during Russell’s last season in 1968–69, the chances seemed slim for another championship. Russell himself put up decent numbers of 9.9 points per game and 19.3 rebounds per game,[16] but the aging Celtics stumbled through the regular season. They finished with a lackluster 48–34 record and entered the playoffs as only the fourth seeded team in the East.[33] In the playoffs, however, Russell and his Celtics achieved one upset after another until meeting the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Finals. Though the Celtics faced a heavily favored Lakers team with future Hall of Famers Jerry West, Elgin Baylor and newly-acquired Wilt Chamberlain, Russell's team did split the first six games and seemed to have a realistic chance of winning. In Game 7, they were ahead by nine points with five minutes remaining; in addition, Chamberlain had left the game with an injured leg. The Celtics' fortune changed when the Lakers cut the lead to one and Chamberlain asked to return to the game. Inexplicably, however, Lakers coach Bill van Breda Kolff benched Chamberlain until the end, much to the disgust of Lakers superstar Jerry West.[22][34] The Celtics won the NBA title, and Russell claimed his eleventh championship in 13 years. At age 35, Russell contributed 21 rebounds in his last NBA game.[13] In the next season, the Celtics went just 34–48 and failed to make the playoffs for the first time since 1950, illustrating just how valuable Russell was to the team.[35] The 1968-69 NBA Season was the 23rd season of the National Basketball Association. ... The 1969 NBA Playoffs was the postseason tournament of the National Basketball Associations 1968-1969 season. ... The 1969 NBA Finals was one of the most spectacular Finals series ever. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Willem Hendrik Butch Van Breda Kolff (born October 28, 1922 in Glen Ridge, New Jersey) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ...


Post-player career

Russell had his No. 6 jersey retired by the Celtics in 1972, and he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1975. Russell, who had a difficult relationship with the media, was not present at either event.[36] After retiring as a player, Russell had stints as head coach of the Seattle SuperSonics (1973 to 1977) and Sacramento Kings (1987 to 1988). His time as a coach was lackluster; although he led the struggling SuperSonics into the playoffs for the first time in franchise history, Russell’s defensive, team-oriented Celtics mindset did not mesh well with the team. Ironically, coach Lenny Wilkens would later use a similar concept to help the SuperSonics win the title in 1979. Russell’s stint with the Kings was considerably worse, his last assignment ending when the Kings went 17-41. Between coaching stints, Russell worked as a color commentator, but he was never comfortable as a broadcaster. Once asked by fellow broadcaster, Chris Schenkel, whom he would pick as his all-time NBA team, Russell quickly rattled off the names of Bob Pettit, Elgin Baylor, Jerry West, and Oscar Robertson. Asked by Schenkel who his center would be, Russell chuckled, "The guy who picked the team!"[7] Russell also wrote books, usually written as a joint project with a professional writer. These included 1979s Second Wind and 2001s Russell's Rules. After spending several years outside the public eye, Russell rose to prominence again in January 2006, when he convinced Miami Heat superstar center Shaquille O'Neal to bury the hatchet with fellow NBA superstar and former Los Angeles Lakers teammate Kobe Bryant, with whom O'Neal had a bitter public feud.[37] Later that year, on November 17, 2006, the two-time NCAA winner Russell was recognized for his impact on college basketball as a member of the founding class of the National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame. He was one of five, along with John Wooden, Oscar Robertson, Dean Smith and Dr. James Naismith, selected to represent the inaugural class.[38] The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (also called the Seattle Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... The Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team based in Sacramento, California. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... The 1979 NBA Finals were won by the Seattle Supersonics defeating the Washington Bullets 4 games to 1. ... A color commentator (colour commentator in Canada), sometimes known as a color analyst, is a member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... The Miami Heat (known as the HEAT [in all capital letters] on official team publications) is a professional basketball team based in Miami, Florida, United States. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (pronounced sha-KEEL; born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is an American professional basketball player, regarded as one of the most dominant in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Kobe Bryant (born August 23, 1978) is an American All-Star shooting guard in the National Basketball Association who plays for the Los Angeles Lakers. ... The so-called Shaq-Kobe feud refers to bitter rivalry between former National Basketball Association (NBA) teammates Shaquille ONeal and Kobe Bryant. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame is an integral portion of the College Basketball Experience proposed by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC) to be located at the Sprint Center which is scheduled to open in 2007 in Kansas City, Missouri. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931) is a retired head coach of men’s college basketball. ... James Naismith James Naismith, M.D. (November 6, 1861 – November 28, 1939) was the Canadian-American inventor of the sport of basketball and the first to introduce the use of a helmet in American football. ...


Accomplishments and legacy

Bill Russell is the cornerstone of the Boston Celtics dynasty.
— introductory line of Russell's nba.com/history summary.[7]

Russell is one of the most successful and decorated athletes in North American sports history. His awards and achievements include eleven NBA championships as a player with the Boston Celtics in 13 seasons (including two NBA championships as player/head coach), and he is credited with having raised defensive play in the NBA to a new level.[39] By winning the 1956 NCAA Championship with the University of San Francisco and the 1957 NBA title with the Celtics, Russell became the first of only four players in basketball history to win an NCAA championship and an NBA Championship back-to-back (the others being Henry Bibby, Magic Johnson, and Billy Thompson). In the interim, Russell collected an Olympic gold medal in 1956. His stint as coach of the Celtics was also of historical significance, as he became the first black head coach in major U.S. professional sports when he succeeded Red Auerbach.[40] NBA players with the most NBA championship rings. ... A player-coach, in sports, is a member of a sports team who simultaneously holds both playing and coaching duties. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... Charles Henry Bibby (born November 24, 1949 in Franklinton, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player and current Head Coach of the Los Angeles Sparks in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... William (Billy) Stansbury Thompson (born December 1, 1963 in Camden, New Jersey) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. Thompson, a 6 7 small forward from the University of Louisville, was selected 19th overall in the 1986 NBA Draft by the Atlanta Hawks. ... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was a highly successful and influential basketball coach of the BAA Washington Nationals, the NBA Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the NBA Boston Celtics. ...


In his first NBA full season (1957–58), Russell became the first player in NBA history to average more than 20 rebounds per game for an entire season, a feat he accomplished 10 times in his 13 seasons. Russell's 51 rebounds in a single game is the second highest performance ever, only trailing Chamberlain's all-time record of 55. Russell still holds the NBA record for rebounds in one half with 32 (vs. Philadelphia, on November 16, 1957). Career-wise, Russell ranks second only to Wilt Chamberlain in regular season total (21,620) and average (22.5) rebounds per game. Russell is the all-time playoff leader in total (4,104) and average (24.9) rebounds per game, he grabbed 40 rebounds in three separate playoff games (twice in the NBA Finals), and he never failed to average at least 20 rebounds per game in any of his 13 post-season campaigns. Russell also had seven regular season games with 40 or more rebounds. Russell also holds the career playoff record for most rebounds (4,104, 24.9 rpg) in 165 games, the NBA Finals record for highest rebound per game average (29.5 rpg, 1959) and by a rookie (22.9 rpg, 1957). In addition, Russell also holds the NBA Finals single-game record for most rebounds (40, March 29, 1960 vs. St. Louis and April 18, 1962 vs. Los Angeles), most rebounds in a quarter (19, April 18, 1962 vs. Los Angeles), and most consecutive games with 20 or more rebounds (15 from April 9, 1960April 16, 1963).[41] Furthermore, Russell led the NBA in rebounds per game four times, recorded 21,620 career rebounds, and averaged of 22.5 per game for his career.[7] He also had 51 in one game, 49 in two others, and twelve consecutive seasons of 1,000 or more rebounds.[7] Russell was known as one of the most clutch players in the NBA. He played in 11 deciding games (10 times in Game 7s, once in a Game 5), and ended with a flawless 11-0 record. In these eleven games, Russell averaged 18 points and 29.45 rebounds.[13] List of National Basketball Association players who have had 40 or more rebounds in a single game. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Logo of the NBA Finals. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Atlanta Hawks are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... In American sports terminology, clutch means performing well under extreme pressure. ...


On the hardwood, he was considered the consummate defensive center, noted for his unmatched defensive intensity, his stellar basketball IQ and his sheer will to win.[13] Russell excelled at playing man-to-man defense, blocking shots, and grabbing defensive and offensive rebounds.[7] He also could score with putbacks and made mid-air outlet passes to point guard Bob Cousy for easy fast break points.[7] He was also known as an excellent passer and pick-setter, featuring a decent left-handed hook shot and finishing strong on alley oops.[13] IQ redirects here. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Alley Oop USPS stamp Alley Oop was a character created in 1932 by American cartoonist V. T. Hamlin. ...


However, on offense, Russell's output was limited. His NBA career personal averages show him to be an average scorer (15.1 points career average), a poor free throw shooter (56.1%), and average overall shooter from the field (44%, not exceptional for a center). In his 13 years, he averaged a relatively low 13.4 field goals attempted (normally, top scorers average 20 and more), illustrating he was never the focal point of the Celtics offense, instead open to focus on his tremendous defense.[16] It has been suggested that Three point play be merged into this article or section. ...


In his career, Russell won five regular season MVP awards (1959, 1961–63, 1965) — second all-time behind Kareem Abdul Jabbar's six awards. He was selected three times to the All-NBA First Teams (1959, 1963, 1965) and eight Second Teams (1958, 1960–62, 1964, 1966–68), and was a twelve-time NBA All-Star (1958–1969). Russell was elected to one NBA All-Defensive First Team. This took place during his last season (1969), and was the first season the NBA All-Defensive Teams were selected. In 1970, the Sporting News named Russell the "Athlete of the Decade". Russell is universally seen as one of the best NBA players ever,[7] and was declared "Greatest Player in the History of the NBA" by the Professional Basketball Writers Association of America in 1980.[7] For his achievements, Russell was named "Sportsman of the Year" by Sports Illustrated in 1968. He also made all three NBA Anniversary Teams: the NBA 25th Anniversary All-Time Team (1970), the NBA 35th Anniversary All-Time Team (1980) and the NBA 50th Anniversary All-Time Team (1996). In 2003, SLAM Magazine named Russell the #4 player of all time behind Michael Jordan, Wilt Chamberlain and Oscar Robertson.[42] Finally, his number 6 jersey was retired by the Celtics in 1972.[43] Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 in New York City, New York) was a successful high school, collegiate, and professional basketball player. ... The Associated Press All-NBA Team, also known simply as the All-NBA Team, is an annual honor bestowed on the best players in the league following every NBA season. ... The NBA All-Defensive Team is the NBAs annual honor given to the best defensive players in the NBA during the regular season. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ...


Personal life

Russell is the son of Katie and Charlie Russell, whose family also included the noted playwright Charlie L. Russell, Russell's older brother. Russell himself was married to his college sweetheart Rose Swisher from 1956 – 1973, with whom he had three children, namely daughter Karen Russell, the television pundit and lawyer, and sons William Jr. and Jacob. When Rose and Russell divorced, he married former "Miss USA" of 1968, Dorothy Anstett, in 1977 whom he also eventually divorced.[44] In addition, Russell was close friends with his perennial opponent Wilt Chamberlain. It should be noted however that Russell never considered Chamberlain his rival and disliked the term, instead pointing out that they rarely talked about basketball. When Chamberlain died in 1999, Chamberlain’s nephew stated that Russell was the second person he was ordered to break the news to.[14] Asked about his idols, Russell has stated that his childhood hero was his father, and regarding basketball, his idol was Minneapolis Lakers superstar George “Mr. Basketball” Mikan, whom he met when he was in high school.[14] . Russell was also active in the Black Power movement. He was often called "Felton X" and he even purchased land in Liberia. Russell was one of several prominent African-American athletes active in the "Black Power" movement in the 1960's who supported Muhammad Ali's decision to refuse to be drafted.[45] Charlie Louis Russell, Jr. ... For the author, see Karen Russell (author). ... Divorce or dissolution of marriage is the ending of a marriage before the death of either spouse. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ...


Russell's life was marked with an uphill battle against racism. As a child, the young Russell witnessed how his parents were victims of racist abuse, and eventually moved into housing projects to escape the daily torrent of bigotry.[1] When he later became a standout amateur basketball player at USF, Russell bitterly recalled how he and his few fellow African-American colleagues were jeered at by white students.[4] Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota...


Even after he became a superstar on the Boston Celtics, Russell was the victim of racial abuse. Once, he refused to play a game in Lexington, KY when he and his black teammates were refused service at a local restaurant in 1962.[36] Matters in Boston were made worse by a hostile press failing to acknowledge Russell's torment, instead citing Russell's perceived "bad attitude" as the problem.[46] "I didn't play for Boston," he once said, "I played for the Celtics."[46] While the Celtics founded the most successful sports dynasty of all time, bringing in 11 NBA championships in 13 years, the Boston Garden was snubbed by the local sports fans. During Russell's career, the crowd averaged a mere 8,406 fans, thousands short of a sellout. By contrast, the Celtics teams of the 1980s led by white legend Larry Bird sold out the 14,890-seat Garden for 662 straight games.[46] The worst case of bigotry was recalled by Russell's white Celtics teammate Tom Heinsohn. He recalled the instance when Russell tried to move from his home in the Boston suburb of Reading to a new home across town in 1968. His would-be neighbors filed a petition trying to block the move, and when that failed, other neighbors banded together to try to purchase the home that Russell wanted to buy.[46] Vandals broke into Russell's home and defecated on his bed. This event led him to call the city of Boston a "flea market of racism".[47] Heinsohn also added that two white sportswriters from Boston told him they would not vote Russell the league's Most Valuable Player because he was black.[46] Furthermore, once in Marion, Indiana, he had been given the key to the city only to be refused service that evening in his hotel's dining room. Russell went to the mayor's home, woke him up, and returned the key.[46] The Boston Garden was a famous arena built in 1928 in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Tom Heinsohn Thomas William Heinsohn (born August 26, 1934) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics National Basketball Association (NBA) team. ... Reading is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial quota... Marion (IPA: ) is a city in Grant County, Indiana, United States. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ...


These hostile reactions made Russell sullen and wary. Similar to fellow NBA center legend Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, who was known to be very aloof,[48] Russell was known for his deep mistrust against the media, and was also notorious for his refusal to sign autographs. He stated: "You owe the public the same it owes you—nothing". In addition, Russell neither was present in person when his Number 6 jersey was retired in 1972, nor when he was inducted into the Hall of Fame in 1975, shunning the limelight both times.[36] Russell has stated that his experiences hardened him against abuse of all kinds and he never permitted himself to be a victim, denying the bigots their triumph. He said: "I was a man first and basketball player second. I did not want people to define me by what I did for my profession."[5][6] However despite this bitterness which Russell felt toward Boston, in recent years he has visited the city on a regular basis, something he never did in the years after his retirement.[49] Russell still has sore feelings towards the city, but there has been something of a reconciliation in recent years.[49] When Russell originally retired he demanded that the retiring of his jersey be done with no fans present,[50] however on May 6, 1999 the Celtics re-retired Russell's jersey in a ceremony attended by Russell's on-court nemesis Chamberlain, along with Celtics' legend Larry Bird and Hall of Famer Kareem Abdul-Jabbar.[50] The crowd gave Russell a prolonged standing ovation, which brought tears to his eyes.[50] Finally, Russell and his daughter Karen—both sarcoidosis patients—have joined with the Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research to help raise national awareness of this disease.[51] Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... is the 126th day of the year (127th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ...


On May 20, 2007, Russell was awarded an honorary doctorate by Suffolk University, where he served as its commencement speaker, and Russell received an honorary degree from Harvard University on June 7, 2007. is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... An Honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum) is a degree awarded to someone by an institution that he or she may have never attended, it may be a bachelors, masters or doctorate degree - however, the latter is most common. ... Suffolk University is a private university in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, situated on Beacon Hill. ... Harvard redirects here. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Books

  • Russell, Bill; Branch, Taylor (1979). Second Wind. Ballantine Books. ISBN-13: 978-0394503851. 
  • Russell, Bill; Faulkner, David (2001). Russell Rules. New American Library. ISBN 0-525-94598-9. 

Further reading

  • Heisler, Mark (2003). Giants: The 25 Greatest Centers of All Time. Chicago: Triumph Books. ISBN 1-57243-577-1. 
  • Pluto, Terry (1992). Tall Tales: The Glory Years of the NBA in the Words of the Men Who Played, Coached, and Built Pro Basketball. New York: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 0-671-74279-5. 

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Thompson, Tim (2001-02-19). Bill Russell overcame long odds, dominated basketball. thecurrentonline.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  2. ^ a b c Bjarkman, Peter C (2002). Boston Celtics Encyclopedia. Sports Publishing LLC, pg. 99. ISBN 1582615640. 
  3. ^ a b c Schneider, Bernie (2006). 1953–56 NCAA Championship Seasons: The Bill Russell Years. University of San Francisco. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  4. ^ a b Matthews, Chris (2000-04-28). Bill Russell and American racism. Jewish World Review. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  5. ^ a b A conversation with Bill Russell. sportsillustrated.cnn.com (1999-05-10). Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  6. ^ a b A conversation with Bill Russell. usatoday.com (2001-06-06). Retrieved on 2007-02-09. Note: This source appears to have a typo it was corrected in this article: It reads "I did now want..." in the source, it was changed to the obviously intended form, "I did not want..."
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Bill Russell. nba.com/history. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  8. ^ Hickok, Ralph. Bill Russell Biography. HickokSports.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  9. ^ Rules of Basketball. www.howard-winn.k12.ia.us. Retrieved on 2007-02-08.
  10. ^ "Along Came Bill", Time, 1956-01-02. Retrieved on 2007-02-23. 
  11. ^ NCAA Basketball Tourney History: Two by Four. CBS Sportsline.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-23.
  12. ^ Green, Ben (2005). Spinning The Globe. Amistad. ISBN 0-06-055549-1. 
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Ryan, Bob. Timeless Excellence. nba.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  14. ^ a b c Russell, Bill. Chat Transcript: Celtics Legend Bill Russell. nba.com/celtics. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  15. ^ Games of the XVIth Olympiad–1956. usabasketball.com. Retrieved on 2008-04-01.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Bill Russell Statistics. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  17. ^ Smith, Sam (2006-30-10). 2003 draft eventually may be best in history. msnbc.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  18. ^ Boston Celtics. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  19. ^ 1957 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  20. ^ 1958 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  21. ^ 1959 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  22. ^ a b c Wilt Chamberlain Bio. nba.com/history. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  23. ^ 1960 NBA Finals. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  24. ^ Boston Celtics. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  25. ^ 1961 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  26. ^ 1962 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-06.
  27. ^ 1963 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  28. ^ 1964 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  29. ^ 1965 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  30. ^ 1966 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  31. ^ 1967 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  32. ^ 1968 NBA Season Summary. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2007-03-09.
  33. ^ 1969 NBA Playoffs. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  34. ^ Sachare, Alex. Added Incentive. nba.com. Retrieved on 2007-12-06.
  35. ^ Boston Celtics. basketball-reference.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-04.
  36. ^ a b c Flatter, Ron. Russell was a proud, fierce warrior. espn.go.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  37. ^ Shaq heeds Russell’s call for peace; Lakers hold on for win. espn.go.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-03.
  38. ^ Collegiate Basketball Hall of Fame to induct founding class. nabc.cstv.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-02.
  39. ^ Bill Russell. hoophall.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  40. ^ Bill Russell. infoplease.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  41. ^ NBA Finals records. usatoday.com. Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  42. ^ Wolfley, Bob. "NBA's top 75 has Milwaukee flavor", Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2003-03-11. Retrieved on 2008-03-30. 
  43. ^ Retired Numbers. nba.com/celtic. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  44. ^ Bill Russell. nndb.com. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  45. ^ Athletes support Muhammad Ali!.
  46. ^ a b c d e f Zirin, Dave (2004-06-23). Barry Bonds vs. Boston. counterpunch.org. Retrieved on 2007-02-09.
  47. ^ Zirin, Dave (2005-09-28). Redeeming the Olympic Martyrs of 1968. zmag.org. Retrieved on 2006-04-30.
  48. ^ Talking With Kareem. lakersblog.latimes.com. Retrieved on 2006-12-05.
  49. ^ a b Macquarrie, Brian. "Bitterness subsides", The Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, 2000-11-19. Retrieved on 2007-02-09. 
  50. ^ a b c Sandomir, Richard. "Russell Redux: A Private Man Bursts Back Into the Public Eye", The New York Times, 2000-06-16. Retrieved on 2007-02-09. 
  51. ^ Sarcoidosis Public Service Announcement: New Awareness Announcement. Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.

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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 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External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Bill Russell
  • Bill Russell career stats
  • NBA.com: Bill Russell
  • Bill Russell: Hall of Fame
  • FIBA Hall of Fame on Russell
  • USFDons.com: Bill Russell years
  • NBA.com about Russell
  • Online excerpt of Russell's book "11 Lessons"
  • Bill Russell biography and video interview
  • Bill Russell: Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research
Preceded by
Tom Gola
NCAA Basketball Tournament
Most Outstanding Player
(men's)

1955
Succeeded by
Hal Lear
Preceded by
Bob Cousy
NBA Most Valuable Player
1957-58
Succeeded by
Bob Pettit
Preceded by
Wilt Chamberlain
NBA Most Valuable Player
1960-61, 1961-62, 1962-63
Succeeded by
Oscar Robertson
Preceded by
Bob Pettit
NBA All-Star Game Most Valuable Player
1963
Succeeded by
Oscar Robertson
Preceded by
Oscar Robertson
NBA Most Valuable Player
1964-65
Succeeded by
Wilt Chamberlain
Preceded by
Red Auerbach
Boston Celtics Head Coach
1966–1969
Succeeded by
Tom Heinsohn
Preceded by
Bucky Buckwalter
Seattle SuperSonics Head Coach
1973–1977
Succeeded by
Bob Hopkins
Preceded by
Jerry Reynolds
Sacramento Kings Head Coach
1987–1988
Succeeded by
Jerry Reynolds
Persondata
NAME Russell, Bill
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Russell, William Felton (birth name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION Hall of Fame American basketball player.
DATE OF BIRTH February 12, 1934
PLACE OF BIRTH Monroe, Louisiana
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
The NBA 25th Anniversary Team was selected in 1971 to celebrated 25 years existence of BAA/NBA. This team was meant to be an All-NBA Team for that period. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Adolph Schayes (known as Dolph Schayes) (born May 19, 1928 in New York, New York) was a professional basketball player and coach in the NBA. He played his college basketball at New York University 1944-48. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... Joseph Franklin Jumping Joe Fulks (October 26, 1921 - March 21, 1976) was a United States basketball player, sometimes called the first of the high-scoring forwards. He was one of the first players enshrined in the Basketball Hall of Fame. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Robert Edris Davies (b. ... Samuel Sam Jones (born June 24, 1933 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player. ... // The NBA 35th Anniversary Team was selected on 1981 to celebrated 35th Anniversary of NBA. Unlike its predecassor, The NBA 25th Anniversary Team, that take concept of All-NBA Team, this Team was more like an NBA All-Star Team that contains 11 best players on NBAs 35 years... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Height: 6-6 Weight: 210 lbs Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a retired American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a retired American professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... NBA redirects here. ... The 50 Greatest Players in National Basketball Association History (also referred to as the NBAs 50th Anniversary All-Time Team) were chosen in 1996 on the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... This article is about the NBA Player. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... This article is about the basketball player. ... Richard (Rick) Francis Dennis Barry III (born March 28, 1944, in Elizabeth, New Jersey) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... David Bing (born November 24, 1943 in Washington, D.C.) is a former All-Star player in the National Basketball Association, primarily for the Detroit Pistons from 1966 to 1975. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... William John Billy Cunningham (born June 3, 1943 in Brooklyn, New York) is a former pro basketball player, who was nicknamed the Kangaroo Kid, and coach. ... David Albert DeBusschere (October 16, 1940 - May 14, 2003) was a professional basketball player born in Detroit, Michigan. ... Clyde Austin Drexler (born June 22, 1962 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is a former National Basketball Association shooting guard. ... Height: 6-6 Weight: 210 lbs Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a retired American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Patrick Aloysius Ewing (born August 5, 1962) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Walter Clyde Frazier (born March 29, 1945, in Atlanta, Georgia) is a retired American basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... George Gervin (born April 27, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former professional basketball player, a shooting guard for the American Basketball Associations (ABA) Virginia Squires and San Antonio Spurs and the National Basketball Associations (NBA) San Antonio Spurs and Chicago Bulls. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... John J. Havlicek (born April 8, 1940 in Martins Ferry, Ohio) is a retired American professional basketball player who competed for 16 seasons with the Boston Celtics, winning eight NBA titles, half of them coming in his first four seasons. ... Elvin Ernest Hayes (born November 17, 1945 in Rayville, Louisiana) is considered as one of the all-time great collegiate and professional basketball players. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... Samuel Sam Jones (born June 24, 1933 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Karl Anthony Malone (born July 24, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Peter Press Maravich (June 22, 1947 – January 5, 1988) was an American basketball player known for his dazzling ballhandling, incredible shooting abilities, and creative passing. ... Kevin Edward McHale (born December 19, 1957) is an American former professional basketball player who starred for thirteen seasons in the NBA for the Boston Celtics. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Vernon Earl Monroe (born on November 21, 1944, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American former professional basketball player known for his flamboyant dribbling, passing and play-making. ... Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (born Akeem Abdul Olajuwon on January 21, 1963) is a retired Nigerian-American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (pronounced sha-KEEL; born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is an American professional basketball player, regarded as one of the most dominant in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Robert Lee Parish (born August 30, 1953) in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a retired American basketball center. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Scottie Maurice Pippen (born September 25, 1965 in Hamburg, Arkansas) is a former American professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is most remembered for leading the Chicago Bulls together with Michael Jordan to six championships and being one of the best all-around players... Willis Reed Jr. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965)) is a retired American NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... Adolph Schayes (known as Dolph Schayes) (born May 19, 1928 in New York, New York) was a professional basketball player and coach in the NBA. He played his college basketball at New York University 1944-48. ... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... This article is about the professional basketball player. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is currently the head coach of the NBAs New York Knicks. ... Nathaniel Nate Thurmond (born July 25, 1941, in Akron, Ohio) is rated by many one of the best defensive centers ever to play pro basketball, feared and praised by legends including Bob Pettit, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, and Wilt Chamberlain. ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a retired American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... James Ager Worthy (born February 27, 1961 in Gastonia, North Carolina) is a retired American college and professional basketball player. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Westley Sissel Wes Unseld (born March 14, 1946 in Louisville, Kentucky) is an American former basketball player and coach in the NBA. Unseld is a prominent member of Alpha Phi Alpha, the first intercollegiate Greek-letter fraternity established for African-Americans. ... Willis Reed Jr. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky[1]) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Robert Allen Bob McAdoo (born September 25, 1951 in Greensboro, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player who spent his fourteen-season career between the center and power forward positions in the National Basketball Association. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a retired American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Height: 6-6 Weight: 210 lbs Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a retired American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Moses Eugene Malone (born March 23, 1955 in Petersburg, Virginia) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player who also played in the American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as on the NBAs Atlanta Hawks, Houston Rockets, Milwaukee Bucks, Philadelphia 76ers, San Antonio Spurs and Washington Bullets. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... This article is about the basketball player. ... Hakeem Abdul Olajuwon (born Akeem Abdul Olajuwon on January 21, 1963) is a retired Nigerian-American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965)) is a retired American NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... Karl Anthony Malone (born July 24, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Karl Anthony Malone (born July 24, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (pronounced sha-KEEL; born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is an American professional basketball player, regarded as one of the most dominant in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... Timothy Tim Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976 in Christiansted, St. ... Timothy Tim Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976 in Christiansted, St. ... Kevin Maurice Garnett (born May 19, 1976 in Mauldin, South Carolina) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Stephen John Nash, OC, OBC (born February 7, 1974),[1][2][3] is a Canadian professional basketball player who plays point guard for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Stephen John Nash, OC, OBC (born February 7, 1974),[1][2][3] is a Canadian professional basketball player who plays point guard for the Phoenix Suns of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Dirk Werner Nowitzki (pronounced ) (born June 19, 1978) is a German professional basketball player who plays for the Dallas Mavericks of the National Basketball Association. ... Ed Macualey (born March 22, 1928 in Saint Louis, Missouri), is a former professional basketball player. ... Paul Joseph Arizin (April 9, 1928 – December 12, 2006), nicknamed Pitchin Paul, was an American basketball player who spent his entire National Basketball Association career with the Philadelphia Warriors from 1950 to 1962. ... George Lawrence Mikan, Jr. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... William Walton Bill Sharman (born May 25, 1926 in Abilene, Texas) is a former professional basketball player and coach. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Robert Joseph Cousy (born August 9, 1928 in New York City, is an American former professional basketball player, who played point guard with the NBAs Boston Celtics from 1951 to 1963 and (briefly) with the Cincinnati Royals in the 1969-1970 season, being recognized as one of the greatest... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Elgin Gay Baylor (born September 16, 1934 in Washington, D.C.) is an American former basketball forward. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Wilton Norman Wilt Chamberlain (August 21, 1936–October 12, 1999), nicknamed Wilt the Stilt and The Big Dipper, was an American professional National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player for the Philadelphia / San Francisco Warriors, the Philadelphia 76ers and the Los Angeles Lakers; and also played for the Harlem Globetrotters. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Bob Pettit (with the ball) as a player of the St. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Adrian Howard Smith (born October 5, 1936 in Farmington, Kentucky) is an American former NBA player. ... Richard (Rick) Francis Dennis Barry III (born March 28, 1944, in Elizabeth, New Jersey) is an American former professional basketball player. ... Harold Everett Greer (born June 26, 1936 in Huntington, West Virginia) is a former pro basketball player. ... Oscar Palmer Robertson (born November 24, 1938 in Charlotte, Tennessee), nicknamed The Big O, is a former American NBA player with the Cincinnati Royals and the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Willis Reed Jr. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... Jerry Alan West (born May 28, 1938, in Chelyan, West Virginia) is a retired American basketball player who played his entire professional career for the NBAs Los Angeles Lakers. ... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... Robert Jerry Lanier (born September 10, 1948 in Buffalo, New York) was a professional basketball player for the Detroit Pistons and Milwaukee Bucks of the NBA. He played collegiately at St. ... Walter Clyde Frazier (born March 29, 1945, in Atlanta, Georgia) is a retired American basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... David Bing (born November 24, 1943 in Washington, D.C.) is a former All-Star player in the National Basketball Association, primarily for the Detroit Pistons from 1966 to 1975. ... Height: 6-6 Weight: 210 lbs Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a retired American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Randolph Randy Smith (born December 12, 1948 in Bellport, New York) is a former professional basketball player who set the NBA record for consecutive games played. ... David ONeil Thompson (born July 13, 1954 in Shelby, North Carolina) is a former American professional basketball star with the Denver Nuggets of both the National Basketball Association (NBA) and American Basketball Association (ABA), as well as the Seattle SuperSonics. ... George Gervin (born April 27, 1952 in Detroit, Michigan) is a former professional basketball player, a shooting guard for the American Basketball Associations (ABA) Virginia Squires and San Antonio Spurs and the National Basketball Associations (NBA) San Antonio Spurs and Chicago Bulls. ... This article is about the NBA Player. ... Larry Joe Bird (born December 7, 1956) is a retired American NBA basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest players of all time, and one of the best clutch performers in the history of sports. ... Height: 6-6 Weight: 210 lbs Julius Winfield Erving II (born February 22, 1950 in Roosevelt, New York), commonly known by the nickname Dr. J, is a retired American basketball player who helped launch a modern style of play that emphasizes leaping and play above the rim. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is currently the head coach of the NBAs New York Knicks. ... Image:Ralph Sampson. ... Isiah Lord Thomas III () (born April 30, 1961, in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is currently the head coach of the NBAs New York Knicks. ... Some people with the name Tom Chambers include the following: Tom Chambers, the former professional NBA basketball player from Utah Tom R. Chambers, a portraiture and visual artist Tom Chambers, a Virginia-based photographer Tom Chambers, a San Diego journalist Tom Chambers, an English actor Tom Chambers, a Washington State... Karl Anthony Malone (born July 24, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... This article is about the basketball player. ... Earvin Johnson redirects here. ... This article is about the professional basketball player. ... Karl Anthony Malone (born July 24, 1963) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Scottie Maurice Pippen (born September 25, 1965 in Hamburg, Arkansas) is a former American professional basketball player who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA), and is most remembered for leading the Chicago Bulls together with Michael Jordan to six championships and being one of the best all-around players... Mitchell James (Mitch) Richmond (born June 30, 1965 in Fort Lauderdale, Florida) is a retired American basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Glen Anthony Rice (born May 28, 1967 in Flint, Michigan) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (pronounced sha-KEEL; born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is an American professional basketball player, regarded as one of the most dominant in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Timothy Tim Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976 in Christiansted, St. ... Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... Kobe Bryant (born August 23, 1978) is an American All-Star shooting guard in the National Basketball Association who plays for the Los Angeles Lakers. ... Kevin Maurice Garnett (born May 19, 1976 in Mauldin, South Carolina) is an American professional basketball player for the NBAs Boston Celtics. ... Shaquille Rashaun ONeal (pronounced sha-KEEL; born March 6, 1972), frequently referred to simply as Shaq, is an American professional basketball player, regarded as one of the most dominant in the history of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Allen Ezail Iverson (born June 7, 1975, in Hampton, Virginia[1]), nicknamed A.I. and The Answer, is an American professional basketball player for the Denver Nuggets of the National Basketball Association. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Kobe Bryant (born August 23, 1978) is an American All-Star shooting guard in the National Basketball Association who plays for the Los Angeles Lakers. ... LeBron Raymone James (born December 30, 1984) is an American professional basketball player who currently plays for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Since its inception in 1954, Sports Illustrated magazine has annually presented the Sportsman of the Year award to the athlete or team whose performance that year most embodies the spirit of sportsmanship and achievement. ... Bannister was chosen as the first Sports Illustrated Sportsman of the Year for his accomplishments in 1954. ... John Joseph Johnny Podres (born September 30, 1932 in Witherbee, New York) is a former Major League Baseball left-handed starting pitcher who played with the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers (1953-55, 1957-67); Detroit Tigers (1966-67), and San Diego Padres (1969). ... Bobby Joe Morrow (born October 15, American athlete, winner of three Olympic gold medals in 1956. ... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Rafer Lewis Johnson (born August 18, 1935) is a former American decathlete. ... Ingemar Johansson (born 22 September 1932 -) is a Swedish former boxer and heavyweight champion of the world. ... This article is about the golfer. ... Jerry Ray Lucas (born March 30, 1940) was a legendary basketball star from the 1950s to the 1970s, and is now a world-renowned memory education expert. ... Terry Wayne Baker (born May 5, 1941 in Pine River, MN) is a former quarterback for the Oregon State University football team. ... Alvin Ray Pete Rozelle (March 1, 1926–December 6, 1996) was the commissioner of the National Football League (NFL) from January 1960 to November 1989, when he retired from office. ... Ken Venturi (born 1931 in San Francisco, California) was a prominent PGA Tour professional during the late 1950s and early 1960s. ... Sanford Koufax (IPA pronunciation: /kofæks/) (born Sanford Braun, on December 30, 1935, in Brooklyn, New York) is an American left-handed former pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, from 1955 to 1966. ... James Ronald (Jim) Ryun (born April 29, 1947) is an American former track athlete and politician, who was a Republican member of the United States House of Representatives from 1997 to 2007, representing the 2nd District in Kansas. ... Carl Yastrzemskis number 8 was retired by the Boston Red Sox in 1989 Carl Michael Yaz Yastrzemski (pronounced ), i. ... For other persons named Thomas Seaver, see Thomas Seaver (disambiguation). ... Robert Gordon Bobby Orr, OC (born March 20, 1948 in Parry Sound, Ontario) is a retired Canadian ice hockey defenseman, and is considered to be one of the greatest hockey players of all time. ... Lee Buck Trevino (born December 1, 1939) is an American professional golfer. ... Billie Jean Moffitt King (born November 22, 1943 in Long Beach, California) is a retired tennis player from the United States. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Sir John Young Stewart, OBE[2] (born 11 June 1939 in Milton, West Dunbartonshire), better known as Jackie, and nicknamed The Flying Scot, is a Scottish[3] former racing driver. ... For other persons named Muhammad Ali, see Muhammad Ali (disambiguation). ... Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ... Christine Marie Evert (born December 21, 1954) is a former World No. ... Steve Cauthen (born May 1, 1960 in Covington, Kentucky) is an American jockey. ... Jack William Nicklaus (born January 21, 1940), also known as The Golden Bear,[1] is widely regarded as the greatest professional golfer of all time, in large part because of his records in major championships. ... Terry Paxton Bradshaw (born September 2, 1948), is a former American football quarterback with the Pittsburgh Steelers in the National Football League (NFL). ... Wilver Dornell Willie Stargell (March 6, 1940 – April 9, 2001), nicknamed Pops in the later years of his career, was a professional baseball player who played his entire Major League career (1962-1982) with the Pittsburgh Pirates as an outfielder and first baseman. ... U.S. captain Mike Eruzione(left) celebrates with Bill Baker (center) moments after scoring the decisive goal against the Soviet Union. ... Ray Charles Leonard (born May 17, 1956 in Wilmington, North Carolina) is a retired professional boxer. ... Wayne Douglas Gretzky, OC (born 26 January 1961 in Brantford, Ontario) is a retired Canadian-American professional ice hockey player who is currently part-owner and head coach of the Phoenix Coyotes. ... Mary Slaney (born Mary Teresa Decker August 4, 1958) is an American former track and field athlete, who holds seven American records in her sport. ... Edwin Corley Moses (born in Dayton, Ohio August 31, 1955) is an American track and field athlete who won gold medals in the 400-meter hurdles at the 1976 and 1984 Summer Olympics. ... Mary Lou Retton (born January 24, 1968 in Fairmont, West Virginia) is an American gymnast. ... Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (born April 16, 1947 as Ferdinand Lewis Alcindor, Jr) is an American athlete and retired professional basketball player, widely considered one of the greatest NBA players of all time. ... Joseph Vincent Paterno (born December 21, 1926, in Brooklyn, New York), nicknamed JoePa, is the head coach of Pennsylvania State Universitys college football team, a position he has held since 1966. ... Bob Bourne (born 21 June 1954 in Saskatchewan, Saskatchewan, Canada) is a retired professional ice hockey centre who played in the NHL between 1974 and 1988. ... Kipchoge (Kip) Keino (born January 17, 1940), chairman of the Kenyan Olympic Committee (KOC), is a retired Kenyan athlete and two-time Olympic gold medalist. ... Dale Bryan Murphy (b. ... Patty Sheehan (b October 27, 1956 Middlebury, Vermont) is an American professional golfer. ... Rory Darnell Sparrow (born June 12, 1958 in Suffolk, Virginia) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. He played collegiately at Villanova University. ... Reginald Williams (born September 19, 1954 in Flint, Michigan) is a former professional American football player. ... Orël Leonard Hershiser IV (born September 16, 1958) is a former professional right-handed pitcher and is currently an analyst for Baseball Tonight on ESPN. In 1988, he won the Cy Young Award, the NLCS MVP and the World Series MVP with the L.A. Dodgers. ... Gregory James Greg LeMond (born June 26, 1961 in Lakewood, California) is a former professional road bicycle racer from the United States and a three time winner of the Tour de France. ... Joseph Clifford Joe Montana, Jr. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Donald Francis Shula (born January 4, 1930 in Grand River, Ohio) is a former professional football coach for the National Football League. ... Bonnie Kathleen Blair (born March 18, 1964 in Cornwall, New York) is a retired American speedskater. ... Johann Olav Koss (born 29 October 1968 in Drammen, Norway) is a former speed skater, considered to be one of the best in history. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 1 in (1. ... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931) is a retired head coach of men’s college basketball. ... Mark David McGwire (born October 1, 1963 in Pomona, California) is a former professional baseball player who played the majority of his major league career with the Oakland Athletics before finishing his career with the St. ... Samuel Sosa Peralta (born November 12, 1968 in San Pedro de Macorís, Dominican Republic) is a designated hitter for the Texas Rangers of the American League. ... First International Italy 1–0 USA (Jesolo, Italy; 18 August 1985) Largest win USA 12–0 Mexico (Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 18 April 1991) USA 12–0 Martinique (Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 20 April 1991) Worst defeat USA 0–4 Brazil (Hangzhou, China; 27 September 2007) World Cup Appearances 5... Personal Information Birth December 30, 1975 ) Cypress, California Height 6 ft 1 in (1. ... Curtis Montague (Curt) Schilling (born November 14, 1966 in Anchorage, Alaska) is an American Major League Baseball right-handed starting pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. ... For other people named Randy Johnson, see Randy Johnson (disambiguation) Randall David Johnson (born September 10, 1963), nicknamed the Big Unit, is a southpaw American starting pitcher who currently plays for Major League Baseballs Arizona Diamondbacks. ... Lance Armstrong (born Lance Edward Gunderson on September 18, 1971) is a retired American professional road racing cyclist. ... David Maurice Robinson (born August 6, 1965)) is a retired American NBA basketball player, who is often considered one of the greatest centers to ever play the game. ... Timothy Tim Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976 in Christiansted, St. ... Location Fenway Park (Since 1912) Boston, Massachusetts (Since 1901) 2004 Information Owner(s) John Henry Tom Werner Larry Lucchino Manager(s) Terry Francona Local television NESN Local radio WEEI The Boston Red Sox 2004 season is the 103rd Major League Baseball season for the Boston Red Sox franchise. ... Thomas Edward Brady, Jr. ... Dwyane Tyrone Wade, Jr. ... Brett Hillbilly Favre (pronounced Farv, born on October 10, 1969 in Gulfport, Mississippi [1]) is an American football player, currently starting quarterback for the Green Bay Packers of the National Football League (NFL). ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Boston Celtics are a professional basketball team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The 2007-08 Boston Celtics season will be the 62nd season of NBA basketball in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Matthews Arena, located in Boston, Massachusetts, is the worlds oldest indoor hockey arena. ... The Boston Garden was a famous arena built in 1928 in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Hartford Civic Center is a sports and convention complex located in Hartford, Connecticut, USA owned by the City of Hartford and operated by Madison Square Garden Connecticut under contract with the Connecticut Development Authority. ... TD Banknorth Garden is a sports arena in the West End neighborhood of Boston, Massachusetts. ... John Honey Russell (born May 31, 1902 in Brooklyn, New York, died November 15, 1973) was an American basketball player and coach. ... Alvin F. Doggie Julian (b. ... Arnold Jacob Red Auerbach (September 20, 1917 – October 28, 2006) was a highly successful and influential basketball coach of the BAA Washington Nationals, the NBA Tri-Cities Blackhawks and the NBA Boston Celtics. ... Tom Heinsohn Thomas William Heinsohn (born August 26, 1934) is a member of the Basketball Hall of Fame as a player on the Boston Celtics National Basketball Association (NBA) team. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Dave Cowens David William Cowens (born October 25, 1948 in Newport, Kentucky) is a former professional basketball player and NBA Head Coach. ... Bill Fitch (born 1935) is an NBA coach who has been successful in making teams playoff contenders throughout his coaching career. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is an American former professional basketball player and coach. ... Jimmy Rodgers is a former basketball coach. ... Christopher Joseph Ford (born January 11, 1949 in Atlantic City, New Jersey) is a former professional basketball player and head coach. ... Michael Leon (M.L.) Carr (born January 9, 1959 in Wallace, North Carolina) is a former basketball player in the National Basketball Association and American Basketball Association, and former head coach and General Manager of the Boston Celtics. ... Pitino coaching the Louisville Cardinals Rick Pitino (born September 18, 1952) is the head basketball coach at the University of Louisville. ... Jim OBrien (born February 11, 1952 in Philadelphia, PA) is best known as a professional basketball coach. ... 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Series Summary Celtics win series 4-2 Categories: | ... The 1969 NBA Finals was one of the most spectacular Finals series ever. ... The Eastern Belfast Ladz defeat The Western Belfast Ladz, 4 games to 3. ... The 1976 NBA Finals was the championship round for the 1975-1976 NBA season. ... The 1981 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1980-1981 NBA season. ... The 1984 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1983-1984 NBA season. ... The 1986 NBA Finals was the championship round of the 1985-1986 NBA season The Boston Celtics won the series over the Houston Rockets four games to two. ... The Seattle SuperSonics (also called the Seattle Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... Alfred A. Al Bianchi nickname Funzy (born March 26, 1932, in Long Island City, New York) is an American former professional basketball player and coach. ... Lenny Wilkens with the Portland Trail Blazers Leonard Randolph Wilkens (born October 28, 1937, in Brooklyn, New York, USA) is a former National Basketball Association player, as well as the NBAs career leader in coaching wins and losses. ... Tom Nissalke is a former professional basketball coach in the NBA and ABA. He has coached several teams in both leagues, and has an overall coaching record of 371-508. ... Morris Bucky Buckwalter is a former NBA coach and executive, as well as a former coach in the ABA. He served briefly as head coach of the Seattle SuperSonics in 1972 (on an interim basis), and then later would serve as a the head coach of the Utah Stars of... Robert M. (Bob) Hopkins (born November 3, 1934 in Jonesboro, Louisiana) is a former National Basketball Association player and coach. ... 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Nathaniel Nate McMillan (born August 3, 1964 in Raleigh, North Carolina) is a former professional basketball player and current head coach of the Portland Trail Blazers. ... Robert William Weiss (born May 7, 1942, in Easton, Pennsylvania) was most recently the head coach of the Seattle SuperSonics of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Robert G. Hill (born November 24, 1948) is an American basketball coach. ... Peter J. (P. J.) Carlesimo (born May 30, 1949 in Scranton, Pennsylvania) is the current head coach of the Seattle SuperSonics and a former college basketball coach and son of Peter A. Carlesimo who was the longtime coach and athletic director at the University of Scranton and Fordham University. ... The Sacramento Kings are a professional basketball team based in Sacramento, California. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Les Harrison. ... 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Bill Russell Summary (4353 words)
Russell was also the captain of the 1956 United States men's Olympic basketball team, which cruised to the gold medal at the Melbourne Summer Games with an average margin of victory of 53.5 points.
Russell's 51 rebounds in a single game is the second best performance ever (only trailing Wilt Chamberlain's record of 55), and he still holds the NBA record for rebounds in one half with 32.
Russell is the all-time playoff leader in total (4,104) and average (24.9) rebounds, he grabbed 40 rebounds in three separate playoff games, and he never failed to average at least 20 rebounds per game in any of his 13 post-season campaigns.
Bill Russell - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1946 words)
Russell's 51 rebounds in a single game is the second best performance ever (only trailing Wilt Chamberlain's record of 55), and he still holds the NBA record for rebounds in one half with 32.
Russell is the all-time playoff leader in total (4,104) and average (24.9) rebounds per game, he grabbed 40 rebounds in three separate playoff games, and he never failed to average at least 20 rebounds per game in any of his 13 post-season campaigns.
Russell was life-long friends with another legend, Wilt Chamberlain, who many consider to be the greatest ever offensive player; their on-court battles were perhaps the greatest individual rivalry in the history of the league.
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