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Encyclopedia > Bill Frist
William Harrison Frist
Bill Frist

In office
January 4, 1995 – January 4, 2007
Preceded by Jim Sasser
Succeeded by Bob Corker

In office
January 7, 2003 – January 3, 2007
Preceded by Tom Daschle
Succeeded by Harry Reid

Born February 22, 1952 (1952-02-22) (age 55)
Nashville, Tennessee
Political party Republican
Spouse Karyn Frist
Alma mater Princeton University
Religion Presbyterian

William Harrison "Bill" Frist, Sr. (born February 22, 1952) is an American physician, businessman, and politician. He is a former United States Senator from Tennessee. Frist was also Senate Majority Leader. Frist is a Republican and was frequently mentioned as a candidate for that party's 2008 presidential nomination, but decided in November 2006 not to run.[1] Image File history File links Bill_Frist_official_photo. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... The Senate Majority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by the party conference which holds the majority in the Senate to serve as the chief Senate spokesman for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947) is a former U.S. Senator and Senate Majority Leader from South Dakota. ... Harry Mason Reid (born December 2, 1939) is the senior United States Senator from Nevada and a member of the Democratic Party. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Nashville” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... GOP redirects here. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Doctor. ... A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...

Contents

Childhood and medical career

Frist was born in Nashville, Tennessee to Dorothy Cate and Thomas Fearn Frist.[2] He is a fourth-generation Tennessean. His great-great grandfather was one of the founders of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and his father was a doctor. “Nashville” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ...


Frist graduated from Montgomery Bell Academy in Nashville, Tennessee and then from Princeton University in 1974, where he specialized in health care policy at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. In 1972 he held a summer internship with Tennessee Congressman Joe Evins, who advised Frist that if he wanted to pursue a political career, he should first have a career outside of politics. Frist proceeded to Harvard Medical School, where he received the degree of Doctor of Medicine with honors in 1978. Name Montgomery Bell Academy Address 4001 Harding Place Nashville, Tennessee 37205 Founded 1867; trace origins to 1789 Community Urban Students 712 Boys Grades 7 to 12 Mascot Big Red Colors Cardinal and Silver Motto Fortitudo Per Scientiam. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Robertson Hall, which houses the Woodrow Wilson School. ... Joseph Landon Evins (October 24, 1910–March 31, 1984) was a Democratic U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1947 to 1977. ... Harvard Medical School (HMS) is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ...


Frist joined the lab of W. John Powell Jr., M.D. at Massachusetts General Hospital in 1977, where he continued his training in cardiovascular physiology. He left the lab in 1978 to become a resident in surgery at Massachusetts General Hospital. In 1983, he spent time at Southampton General Hospital, Southampton, England as senior registrar in cardiothoracic surgery. He returned to Massachusetts General in 1984 as chief resident and fellow in cardiothoracic surgery. From 1985 until 1986, Frist was senior fellow and chief resident in cardiac transplant service and cardiothoracic surgery at the Stanford University School of Medicine. After completing his fellowship, he became a faculty member at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, where he began a heart and lung transplantation program. He also became staff surgeon at the Nashville Veterans Administration Hospital. In 1989, he founded the Vanderbilt Transplant Center. Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Southampton General Hospital is a District General Hospital (DGH) in Southampton, operated by the Southampton University Hospitals NHS Trust. ... Stanford Medical School Stanford University School of Medicine is affiliated with Stanford University and is located at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, California, adjacent to Palo Alto and Menlo Park. ... The Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) is a collection of several hospitals and clinics associated with Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Vanderbilt Transplant Center: External Link: http://www. ...


He is currently licensed as a physician, and is certified in general surgery and heart surgery. He has performed over 150 heart transplants and lung transplants, including pediatric heart transplants and combined heart and lung transplants.


Entering politics

In 1990, Frist met with former Senate Majority Leader Howard Baker about the possibilities of public office. Baker advised him to pursue the Senate, and in 1992 suggested that Frist begin preparations to run in 1994. Frist began to build support. He served on Tennessee's Governor's Medicaid Task Force from 1992 to 1993, joined the National Steering Committee of the Republican National Committee's Health Care Coalition, and was deputy director of the Tennessee Bush-Quayle '92 campaign. As part of Frist's preparations for political office, in December 1993 he ended his membership in Nashville, Tennessee's racially segregated Belle Meade Country Club, which he had joined in the 1980s, (following a family tradition). Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... Republican holds in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue. ... Medicaid is the US health insurance program for individuals and families with low incomes and resources. ... The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the Republican Party of the United States. ... Order: 41st President Vice President: Dan Quayle Term of office: January 20, 1989 – January 20, 1993 Preceded by: Ronald Reagan Succeeded by: Bill Clinton Date of birth: June 12, 1924 Place of birth: Milton, Massachusetts First Lady: Barbara Pierce Bush Political party: Republican George Herbert Walker Bush, KBE (born... James Danforth Dan Quayle (born February 4, 1947) was the forty-fourth Vice President of the United States under George H. W. Bush (1989–1993). ... “Nashville” redirects here. ...

With Sen. Bill Frist (R-Tenn.) looking on, President George W. Bush signs into law S. 3728, the North Korea Nonproliferation Act of 2006.

During his first campaign, Frist repeatedly accused his opponent, incumbent Senator Jim Sasser, of "sending Tennessee money to Washington, DC, to Marion Barry ... While I've been transplanting lungs and hearts to heal Tennesseans, Jim Sasser has been transplanting Tennesseans' wallets to Washington, home of Marion Barry." During that campaign, he also attacked Sasser for his attempt to become Senate Majority Leader, claiming that his opponent would be spending more time taking care of Senate business than Tennessee business; an ironic claim to make given that Frist himself would become Majority Leader some years later. Frist won the election, defeating Sasser by 13 points in the 1994 Republican sweep of both Houses of Congress, thus becoming the first physician in the Senate since June 17, 1938, when Royal S. Copeland died. Image File history File linksMetadata BUSHFRISTOVAL.jpg‎ www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata BUSHFRISTOVAL.jpg‎ www. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Marion Barry Marion Shepilov Barry, Jr. ... The Republican Revolution refers to the success of Republican Party in the 1994 U.S. midterm elections, which resulted in a net gain of 54 seats in the House of Representatives, and a pickup of eight seats in the Senate. ... Royal Samuel Copeland (November 7, 1868 – June 17, 1938) was an American academic, homeopathic physician, and politician who held elected offices in both Michigan and New York. ...


In his 2000 reelection campaign, Frist easily won with 66 percent of the vote. He received the largest vote total ever by a statewide candidate in the history of Tennessee, although Al Gore won a higher percentage of the vote (70%) in his 1990 Senate re-election. Frist's 2000 campaign organization was later fined by the Federal Election Commission for failing to disclose a $1.44 million loan taken out jointly with the 1994 campaign organization.[3] Republican hold in light red, Republican pickup in dark red, Democratic hold in light blue, Democratic pickup in dark blue. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1990 was an election for the United States Senate in which the Democratic Party increased its majority with a net gain of one seat from the... The Federal Election Commission (or FEC) is an independent regulatory agency that was founded in 1975 by the United States Congress to regulate the campaign finance legislation in the United States. ...


National prominence

Frist first entered the national spotlight when two Capitol police officers were shot inside the United States Capitol by Russell Eugene Weston Jr. in 1998. Frist, the closest doctor, provided immediate medical attention (he was unable to save the two officers, but was able to save Weston). He also was the Congressional spokesman during the 2001 anthrax attacks. Russell Eugene Weston Jr. ... The United States Capitol is the capitol building that serves as the location for the United States Congress, the legislative branch of the U.S. federal government. ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The 2001 anthrax attacks in the United States, also known as Amerithrax from its FBI case name, occurred over the course of several weeks beginning on September 18, 2001. ...

Sen. Frist with Sen. Lamar Alexander and Interior Secretary Gale Norton.

As the chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee, he helped Republicans win back the Senate in the 2002 midterm election. His committee collected $66.4 million for 2001–2002, 50% more than the previous year. Shortly afterwards, Sen. Trent Lott made comments at a Strom Thurmond birthday celebration in which he said that if Thurmond's segregationist presidential bid of 1948 had succeeded, "we wouldn't have all these problems today". In the aftermath, Lott resigned his position as Senate Majority Leader and Frist was chosen unanimously by Senate Republicans as his replacement. He became the second youngest Senate Majority Leader in US history. In his 2005 book, "Herding Cats, A Lifetime in Politics", Lott accuses William Frist of being "one of the main manipulators" in the debate that ended Senator Lott's leadership in the Republican Senate. Lott wrote that Senator Frist's actions amounted to a "personal betrayal." Frist "...didn't even have the courtesy to call and tell me personally that he was going to run." "If Frist had not announced exactly when he did, as the fire was about to burn out, I would still be majority leader of the Senate today." Lott wrote. Bill Frist, from senate. ... Bill Frist, from senate. ... Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton Gale Ann Norton (born March 11, 1954) served as the 48th United States Secretary of the Interior, serving under President George W. Bush. ... The National Republican Senatorial Committee (NRSC) is the Republican Hill committee for the United States Senate, working to elect Republicans to that body. ... The 2002 midterm Congressional elections took place in 2002. ... Chester Trent Lott Sr. ... James Strom Thurmond (December 5, 1902 – June 26, 2003) was an American politician who served as governor of South Carolina and as a United States Senator representing that state. ...


In the 2003 legislative session, Frist enjoyed many successes. He was able to push many initiatives through to fruition, including the Bush administration's third major tax cut and legislation that was against partial-birth abortion. However, the tactics that he used to achieve those victories alienated many Democrats. In 2004, by comparison, he saw no major legislative successes, with the explanations ranging from delay tactics by Democrats to lack of unity within the Republican Party. A tax cut is a reduction in the rate of tax charged by a government, for example on personal or corporate income. ... Partial-birth abortion (PBA) is a non-medical term used to refer to some late-term abortion procedures. ...


In a prominent and nationally broadcast speech to the Republican National Convention in August, 2004, Frist highlighted his background as a doctor and focused on several issues related to health care. He spoke in favor of the recently passed Medicare prescription drug benefit and the passage of legislation providing for Health Savings Accounts. He described President Bush's policy regarding stem cell research, limiting embryonic stems cells to certain existing lines, as "ethical." In an impassioned argument for medical malpractice tort reform, Frist called personal injury trial lawyers "predators": "We must stop them from twisting American medicine into a litigation lottery where they hit the jackpot and every patient ends up paying." Frist has been an advocate for imposing caps on the amount of money courts can award plaintiffs for noneconomic damages in medical malpractice cases.[4] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... President Johnson signing the Medicare amendment. ... The Health savings account (HSA) is the new name for the Medical savings account (MSA) plans in the United States. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... Tort reform is the phrase used by its advocates who claim it is a change in the legal system to reduce litigations alleged adverse effects on the economy. ... This snapping turtle is trying to make a meal of a Canada goose, but the goose is too wary. ... A plaintiff, also known as a claimant or complainer, is the party who initiates a lawsuit (also known as an action) before a court. ... In law, damages refers to the money paid or awarded to a claimant (as it is known in the UK) or plaintiff (in the US) following their successful claim in a civil action. ... Medical malpractice is an act or omission by a health care provider which deviates from accepted standards of practice in the medical community and which causes injury to the patient. ...


During the 2004 election season, Frist employed the unprecedented political tactic of going to the home state (South Dakota) of the opposition party (Democrat)'s minority leader, Democrat Tom Daschle, and actively campaigned against him, quite successfully since Daschle's Republican opponent, John Thune, defeated Daschle. In Daschle's farewell address, Frist arrived late. After the 2004 elections, Frist played a role in the controversy over Arlen Specter's post-election remarks. Frist demanded a public statement from Specter in which Specter would repudiate his earlier remarks and pledge support for Bush's judiciary nominees. Frist rejected an early version of the statement as too weak, and gave his approval to the statement that Specter eventually delivered. Official language(s) English Capital Pierre Largest city Sioux Falls Area  Ranked 17th  - Total 77,116[1] sq mi (199,905 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 380 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Thomas Andrew Daschle (born December 9, 1947) is a former U.S. Senator and Senate Majority Leader from South Dakota. ... John Randolph Thune (born January 7, 1961) is the junior U.S. Senator from the state of South Dakota. ... Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ...


Frist received some criticism within the Republican caucus in the Senate over his handling of the Majority Leader position, and his near invisibility as a spokesman for the Republican caucus, which has damaged his reputation. His supporters within the caucus point to his success in moving tax legislation important to the executive branch as a sign that he is simply filling his place on the team, namely to bring important bills to a vote, and then ensure that gains made on the floor are preserved in the conference committee process.


Many of Frist's opponents have attacked him for what they see as pandering to future Republican primary voters. They claim that he has taken extreme positions on social issues such as the Terri Schiavo matter in order to please them. On the other hand, Frist changed his position on stem cell research. For other uses, see Primary. ... Theresa Marie Terri Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005), from St. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ...


There has also been controversy regarding the "nuclear option," under which the Republicans would change a rule in the Senate to prevent the filibuster of judicial nominations. Although Frist claimed that "[n]ever before has a minority blocked a judicial nominee that has majority support for an up-or-down vote on the Senate floor," critics pointed to the nearly two century history of the filibuster, including the successful four-day 1968 minority Republican filibuster of Lyndon Johnson's chief justice nominee, Abe Fortas.[5][6] Also, in 1998 Frist participated in the Republican filibuster to stall the nomination of openly gay James C. Hormel to be ambassador to Luxembourg; Hormel eventually received a recess appointment from President Bill Clinton, bypassing a Senate vote. Frist also helped block the 1996 nomination of Richard Paez to the 3rd Federal Court of Appeals, a four-year filibuster that was defeated in 2000 when 14 Republicans dropped their support for it and allowed Paez to be confirmed by a simple majority. The nuclear option, also called the Constitutional option, is a parliamentary ruling by the presiding officer of the United States Senate to end debate and hold an immediate vote on a matter under consideration. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Abe Fortas (June 19, 1910–April 5, 1982) was a U.S. Supreme Court associate justice. ... As a form of obstructionism in a legislature or other decision making body, a filibuster is an attempt to extend debate upon a proposal in order to delay or completely prevent a vote on its passage. ... James Catherwood Hormel, born January 1, 1931 in Austin, Minnesota, is a philanthropist and heir to the fortune of George Hormel, founder of Hormel Foods (producers of SPAM and other meat products). ... A recess appointment occurs when the President of the United States fills a vacant Federal position during a recess of the United States Senate. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Richard Paez was confirmed by the Senate to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit in March 2000. ...


More criticism of perceived weakness came in the midst of an extended confirmation fight over Bush's pick for US ambassador to the United Nations, John R. Bolton. Twice Frist failed to garner the 60 votes to break cloture, getting fewer votes the second time and even losing the support of one conservative Republican (George Voinovich of Ohio). On June 21, 2005, Frist said the situation had been "exhausted" and there would be no more votes. Only an hour later, after speaking to the White House, Frist said: "The president made it very clear he wants an up-or-down vote." This sudden switch in strategy led to charges of flip-flopping in response to pressure from the Bush administration. Nevertheless, no up-and-down vote was held, and Bush made a recess appointment of Bolton. UN and U.N. redirect here. ... John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948), is an jewish American diplomat in several Republican administrations, who served as the Permanent US Representative to the UN from August 2005 until December 2006, on a recess appointment. ... George Victor Voinovich (born July 15, 1936) is the senior United States Senator from the state of Ohio, and a member of the Republican Party. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In September 2006, working with Arizona Senator Jon Kyl, Frist was a major Senate supporter of H.R. 4411 — The Unlawful Internet Gambling and Enforcement Act[7] . This page is about the current Arizona Senator; for his father, a U.S. Representative from Iowa, see John Kyl; for a U.S. Representative from Mississippi with a similar name, see John Kyle. ...


Political future

Frist at the inauguration of his successor Bob Corker Along with Frist is Tennessee's other Senator Lamar Alexander(far right), and Corker's friend, and former U.S Senator Howard Baker(second to right).
Frist at the inauguration of his successor Bob Corker Along with Frist is Tennessee's other Senator Lamar Alexander(far right), and Corker's friend, and former U.S Senator Howard Baker(second to right).

Frist pledged to leave the Senate after two terms in 2006, and did not run in the 2006 Republican primary for his Senate seat. He campaigned heavily for Republican nominee Bob Corker, who won by a small margin over Congressman Harold Ford, Jr. in the general election. Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... Harold Eugene Ford, Jr. ... U.S. Representative Harold Ford Jr. ...


Frist had been widely seen as a potential presidential candidate for the Republican party in 2008, much in the same tradition as Bob Dole, a previous holder of the Senate Majority Leader position. On November 28, 2006, however, he announced that he had decided not to run, and would return to the field of medicine.[8] § Robert Joseph Dole (born July 22, 1923) was a United States Senator from Kansas from 1969-1996, serving part of that time as United States Senate Majority Leader. ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Frist's name has been mentioned as a possible candidate for Governor of Tennessee in 2010 when incumbent Governor Phil Bredesen will be barred from running again due to term limits. Though no official word has come from Frist on the subject, Tennessee Republican Party Chairman Bob Davis has said that "he'd have a lot of support" if he chose to run.[9] Notes 1East was Secretary of State for Tennessee from 1862-1865, appointed by Andrew Johnson, the military governor of the state under Union occupation during the American Civil War. ... Philip Norman Phil Bredesen (born November 21, 1943) is the 48th Governor of Tennessee, having served since 2003. ... GOP redirects here. ...


He has also been mentioned as a possible candidate for Chancellor of Vanderbilt University.[10]


Personal life

Frist has been married to his wife, Karyn, whom he met at a Boston emergency hospital, since 1982. They have three sons: Harrison, Jonathan, and Bryan. Harrison is a 2006 graduate of Princeton University, Jonathan is a student at Vanderbilt University, and Bryan is a first-year student at Princeton University. The Frist family are members of the National Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C.. However, Frist had once said in a TV interview that he became Christian in order to be on the Republican ticket. Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a large number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


Frist has been a pilot since the age of 16. He holds commercial, instrument and multi-engine ratings. He has also run seven marathons and two half-marathons. For other uses, see Aviator (disambiguation). ... Modern day marathon runners The word marathon refers to a long-distance road running event of 42. ...


In June, 1989, Frist published his first book, Transplant: A Heart Surgeon's Account of the Life-And-Death Dramas of the New Medicine, in which he wrote, "A doctor is a man whose job justifies everything . . . Life [is] a gift, not an inalienable right."


With J. H. Helderman, he edited "Grand Rounds in Transplantation" in 1995. In October, 1999, Frist co-authored Tennessee Senators, 1911–2001: Portraits of Leadership in a Century of Change with J. Lee Annis, Jr. In March, 2002, Frist published his third book, When Every Moment Counts: What You Need to Know About Bioterrorism from the Senate's Only Doctor. While generally well received, the book later spurred accusations of hypocrisy regarding his remarks about Richard Clarke. When Clarke published his book Against All Enemies in 2004, Frist stated "I am troubled that someone would sell a book, trading on their service as a government insider with access to our nation's most valuable intelligence, in order to profit from the suffering that this nation endured on September 11, 2001." In December 2003, Frist and coauthor Shirley Wilso released Good People Beget Good People: A Genealogy of the Frist Family, Frist has also written numerous medical articles. Richard A. Clarke (born 1951) provided national security advice to four U.S. presidents: Ronald Reagan, George H.W. Bush, Bill Clinton and George W. Bush, consulting on issues of intelligence and terrorism, from 1973 to 2003. ... The World Trade Center on fire The September 11, 2001 attacks were a series of coordinated terrorist attacks against the United States on September 11, 2001. ...


In 1998 he visited African hospitals and schools with the Christian aid group Samaritan's Purse. Frist has continued to make medical mission trips to Africa every year since 1998. In Africa, he has operated on people and saved lives. He has also been vocal in speaking out against the genocide occurring in Darfur, but as done little in terms of action. A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... Samaritans Purse is a nondenominational evangelical Christian organization engaged in crisis relief and community development. ...


Financial status

Frist has a fortune in the millions of dollars, most of it the result of his ownership of stock in Hospital Corporation of America, the for-profit hospital chain founded by his brother and father. Frist's 2005 financial disclosure form lists blind trusts valued between $15 million and $45 million.[11] Additionally, the Frist family has been accused of millions of dollars earned from insider trading of HCA stock. The Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) NYSE: HCA is the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world. ...


Members of the Frist family have been major donors to Princeton University, pledging a reported $25 million in 1997 for the construction of the Frist Campus Center.[12] Frist has said that, a few years after his 1974 graduation from Princeton, "I made a commitment to myself that if I was ever in a position to help pull together the resources to establish a center [on the Princeton campus] where there could be an informal exchange of ideas, and to establish an environment that is conducive to the casual exchange of information, I would do so."[13] Daniel Golden, a Wall Street Journal journalist and author of the book The Price of Admission: How America's Ruling Class Buys Its Way into Elite Colleges — and Who Gets Left Outside the Gates, has suggested that two of Frist's sons (Harrison and Bryan) were admitted to Princeton as recognition of this donation rather than their own academic and extracurricular merit.[14] Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Daniel Golden is an American journalist. ...


Frist and his wife are the sole trustees in charge of a family foundation bearing the senator's name, which had more than $2 million in assets in 2004. Frist and his siblings are vice presidents of another charitable foundation bearing their parents' names. Frist failed to list his positions with the two foundations on his Senate disclosure form. In July 2006, when the matter was raised by the Associated Press, his staff said the form would be amended. Frist has previously disclosed his board position with World of Hope, a charity that gives money to causes associated with AIDS. The charity has come under scrutiny for paying consulting fees to members of Frist's political inner circle.[15] The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


The status of Frist’s blind trust, and subsequent statements about it and activities within it led to an SEC Investigations of the trustees June 13th 2005 sale. The U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York issued subpoenas to investigate the sale, and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission began an insider trading investigation of the sale. After an 18 month investigation, Frist was cleared of any wrongdoing saying that "I've always conducted myself according to the highest ethical standards in both my personal and public life, and my family and I are pleased that this matter has been resolved," [16] A Blind trust is a trust in which the executors or those who have been given power of attorney have full discretion over the assets, and the trust beneficiaries have no knowledge of the holdings of the trust. ... United States Attorneys represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court. ... The United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) is the Federal district court whose jurisdiction is comprised of the following counties: New York, Bronx, Westchester, Putnam, Rockland, Orange, Dutchess, and Sullivan. ... A subpoena is a command to appear at a certain time and place to give testimony upon a certain matter. ... The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, commonly referred to as the SEC, is the United States governing body which has primary responsibility for overseeing the regulation of the securities industry. ...


Controversies

Schiavo case

Main article: Terri Schiavo

Senate Majority Leader Frist believed that Terri Schiavo, a brain-damaged woman whose husband wanted to remove her gastric feeding tube, should not have been diagnosed as in a persistent vegetative state (PVS). In a lengthy speech delivered on the Senate Floor, Frist challenged the diagnosis of Schiavo’s physicians: "I question it based on a review of the video footage which I spent an hour or so looking at last night in my office." The Washington Post reported that Frist was criticized by a medical ethicist at Northwestern University for making a diagnosis without personally examining the patient and for questioning the diagnosis when he was not a neurologist.[17] After her death, the autopsy showed signs of long-term and irreversible damage to a brain consistent with PVS. Frist defended his actions after the autopsy. Because of his speech and his status as a licensed physician, various complaints against Frist were filed with medical oversight organizations, but those organizations lacked jurisdiction to take any action. Theresa Marie Terri Schiavo (December 3, 1963 – March 31, 2005), from St. ... A persistent vegetative state (PVS) is a condition of patients with severe brain damage in whom coma has progressed to a state of wakefulness without detectable awareness. ... ... Northwestern University (NU) is a selective private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago, Illinois. ...


Medical school experiments

While in medical school, Senator Frist was involved in a lab project which entailed dissecting feline remains. In a 1989 autobiography, Frist described how he "spent days and nights on end in the lab, taking the hearts out of cats, dissecting each heart." After some time, Frist said "[the lab] lost their supply of cats," The project, which needed to be completed as part of the medical school curriculum, could not be finished without another supply of cats. Frist obtained cats from animal shelters, falsely suggesting that he wanted to adopt them as pets, an act that he described as "heinous and dishonest." He attributed his behavior to the pressures of school. While he was a medical school student in the 1970s, Bill Frist (formerly a Republican U.S. Senator from Tennessee) performed medical experiments on shelter cats while researching the use of drugs on the mitral valve. ...


Ideology and issues

Frist's primary legislative focus has been on issues of concern to the health care industry. The senator also opposes abortion. In the Senate, he led the fight against intact dilation and extraction. He voted for the Partial-Birth Abortion Act of 2003, voted against an amendment to include a woman's health exception (as he considered the procedure to be hazardous to a woman's health), and is opposed to all federal funding of abortion.[18] Frist supports a total ban on human cloning, even for purposes of stem cell research. He supports programs to fight AIDS and African poverty. He travels to Africa frequently to provide medical care. Intact dilation and extraction (IDX or intact D&X), also known as intact dilation and evacuation (intact D&E), dilation and extraction (D&X), intrauterine cranial decompression and in the United States as partial birth abortion, is a surgical abortion wherein an intact and usually viable fetus is removed from... George W. Bush signing the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003, surrounded by members of Congress The Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act (Public Law 108-105, HR 760, S 3, 18 U.S. Code 1531)[1] (or PBA Ban) is a United States law prohibiting a form of late... Although genes are recognized as influencing [behavior] and [cognition], genetically identical does not mean altogether identical; identical twins, despite being natural human clones with near identical DNA, are separate people, with separate experiences and not altogether overlapping personalities. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ...


Since 2001, Frist had stood beside Bush in his insistence that only currently existing lines be used for stem cell research. But in July 2005, after severely criticizing the MLO, Frist reversed course and endorsed a House-passed plan to expand federal funding of the research, saying "it's not just a matter of faith, it's a matter of science." Up to that point the legislation had been considered bottled up in the Senate. The decision quickly drew criticism from some Christian fundamentalists such as Dr. James Dobson, but garnered praise from some Democrats and many Republicans, including former First Lady Nancy Reagan. Fundamentalist Christianity is a fundamentalist movement, especially within American Protestantism. ... James Dobson, Ph. ... Nancy Davis Reagan (born Anne Frances Robbins on July 6, 1921) is the widow of the former United States President Ronald Reagan and was First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989. ...


He opposes same-sex marriage and gay adoption, and supports the death penalty. [1] One of four newly wedded same-sex couples in a public wedding at Taiwan Pride 2006. ... Legal status of gay adoption in Europe (map needs to be changed; UK, Norway, Iceland see text). ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ...


On education, Frist supports the No Child Left Behind Act, which passed in 2001 with bipartisan support. In August 2005 he announced his support for teaching intelligent design in public school science classes. President Bush signing the bipartisan No Child Left Behind Act at Hamilton H.S. in Hamilton, Ohio. ... For other uses, see Intelligent design (disambiguation). ...


In November 2005, Frist told reporters that he was less concerned about possible torture at CIA secret prisons than he was about potentially compromising the security of millions of Americans. Extraordinary rendition and irregular rendition are terms used to describe the extrajudicial transfer of a person from one state to another with the intent of legally torturing them outside of the jurisdiction of a state which prohibits it. ...


Flying home after visiting the Guantanamo Bay detention center he said September 10, 2006 he expects bipartisan support for putting top captured al-Qaida figures on trial before military commissions and for guidelines on how they should be treated. Frist visited the detention center in eastern Cuba, which holds some 460 detainees, including 14 top alleged al-Qaida figures recently transferred from CIA custody. Frist said his visit with fellow Republicans Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky and Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania, the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman, was especially poignant coming one day short of the fifth anniversary of the attacks that killed nearly 3,000 people. Frist told that to be there with the recognition that 14 individuals were there who in all likelihood contributed to the September 11, 2001 attacks led him to think how critical it is that we do define the appropriate criteria to make sure we get information to prevent such a tragedy from ever occurring again. The senators didn't see the 14 new detainees and instead visited Guantanamo to learn of interrogation techniques he said. In his mind, the detainees are being treated in a safe and humane way. Detainees upon arrival at Camp X-Ray, January 2002 Guantánamo Bay detainment camp serves as a joint military prison and interrogation center under the leadership of Joint Task Force Guantanamo (JTF-GTMO), has occupied a portion of the United States Navys base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba since 2002. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Al-Qaeda (Arabic: القاعدة, the foundation or the base) is the label given to an alleged worldwide militant Islamist alliance said to be founded by Afghanistan in 1988 as an expansion of the mujahideen resistance movement against the Soviet occupation of Afghanistan into a... The CIA Seal The Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) is an American intelligence agency, responsible for obtaining and analyzing information about foreign governments, corporations, and individuals, and reporting such information to the various branches of the U.S. Government. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Arlen J. Specter (born February 12, 1930) is a United States Senator from Pennsylvania. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... The U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary (informally Senate Judiciary Committee) is a standing committee of the United States Senate, the upper house of the United States Congress. ... A sequential look at United Flight 175 crashing into the south tower of the World Trade Center The September 11, 2001 attacks (often referred to as 9/11—pronounced nine eleven or nine one one) consisted of a series of coordinated terrorist[1] suicide attacks upon the United States, predominantly...


Electoral history

Tennessee United States Senate Election, 2000
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Bill Frist (Incumbent) 1,255,444 65.10 +8.75
Democratic Jeff Clark 621,152 32.21
Tennessee United States Senate Election, 1994
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Bill Frist 834,226 56.35
Democratic Jim Sasser (Incumbent) 623,164 42.10 -22.99

This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... This article is about the modern United States Republican Party. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major United States political parties. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

References

  1. ^ "Frist Decides Against ’08 Presidential Bid", Wall Street Journal, November 29, 2006
  2. ^ http://www.wargs.com/political/frist.html
  3. ^ FEC Finds that Frist 2000 Violated Law
  4. ^ Remarks by Sen. Frist to the Republican National Convention
  5. ^ Filibuster Precedent? Democrats Point to '68 and Fortas
  6. ^ The Not-So-Secret History of Filibusters
  7. ^ Votes on H.R. 4411
  8. ^ "Frist Decides Against ’08 Presidential Bid", Wall Street Journal, November 29, 2006
  9. ^ http://www.thehill.com/thehill/export/TheHill/News/Frontpage/011707/frist.html "Frist Looking at Governor Run in 2010" by Sam Youngman, The Hill, January 18, 2007
  10. ^ http://www.tennessean.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070726/COLUMNIST0101/707260368/1092/NEWS01
  11. ^ Sen. Frist sells HCA stock; then price falls
  12. ^ Frist family and Scully fund university projects
  13. ^ Captain America: The Senator explains politics, the virtues of public service, and life in general beyond the Cottage Club
  14. ^ Thornburgh, Nathan. "How VIPs get in", Time Magazine, 13 August 2006. 
  15. ^ Frist Fails to Disclose Foundation Role
  16. ^ Frist Not Charged as Investigators Close Probe of His Hospital Stock Sales Washington Post, April 27, 2007
  17. ^ Letter: Frist Schiavo diagnosis being reviewed in Tennessee June 24, 2005
  18. ^ Frist Floor Statement on Partial-Birth Abortion

is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Bill Frist

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ...

Official

The Biographical Directory of the United States Congress is a biographical dictionary of all members of both houses of the United States Congress, past and present. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ...

Watchdogs, records

  • OpenSecrets.org — 'Bill Frist (R-TN) Top Industries' (top industries supporting Bill Frist), Center for Responsive Politics
  • OpenSecrets.org — 'Bill Frist (R-TN) Top Contributors' Top Contributors' (top contributors supporting Bill Frist), Center for Responsive Politics

The Center for Responsive Politics is a non-partisan, non-profit research group based in Washington, D.C. that tracks money in politics, and the effect of money on elections and public policy. ...

News

  • Stolberg, Sheryl Gay. "Frist hears cheers, jeers after stem cell reversal", The New York Times, 2005-07-30. 
  • HumanEvents.com — 'Frist a Major Share-Holder in Reputed For-Profit Abortion Provider', Terence P. Jeffrey (Dec 23, 2002), Human Events
  • LAWeekly.com — 'The Bad Doctor: Bill Frist’s long record of corporate vices', Doug Ireland, LA Weekly (January 10, 2003)
  • NYTimes.com — 'Leadership in Recapturing the Senate Pushed Frist Into Spotlight', David Firestone,The New York Times (December 21, 2002)
  • Senator sold stock before price dropped (AP story on Frist's sale of HCA stock)
  • [2] 'Frist concerned more about leaks than secret prisons'
  • Frist aides rebuke press over HCA stock-sale questions — December 14, 2005
Preceded by
Jim Sasser
United States Senator (Class 1) from Tennessee
1995-2007
Served alongside: Fred Thompson, Lamar Alexander
Succeeded by
Bob Corker
Preceded by
Mitch McConnell
Kentucky
Chairman of National Republican Senatorial Committee
2001–2003
Succeeded by
George Allen
Virginia
Preceded by
Trent Lott
Mississippi
Senate Republican Leader
2002-2007
Succeeded by
Mitch McConnell
Kentucky
Senate Minority Leader
2002–2003
Succeeded by
Tom Daschle
South Dakota
Preceded by
Tom Daschle
South Dakota
Senate Majority Leader
2003–2007
Succeeded by
Harry Reid
Nevada

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bill Frist - Congresspedia (4043 words)
Frist is widely seen as a potential presidential candidate for the Republican party in 2008, much in the same tradition as Bob Dole, a previous holder of the Senate Majority Leader position.
In 1998 Frist did participate in the Republican filibuster to stall the nomination of openly gay James C. Hormel to be ambassador to Luxembourg; Hormel eventually received a recess appointment from President Bill Clinton, bypassing a Senate vote.
Frist has a fortune in the millions of dollars, most of it the result of his ownership of stock in Hospital Corporation of America, the for-profit hospital chain founded by his brother and father.
Bill Frist: Information from Answers.com (4044 words)
Frist is widely seen as a potential presidential candidate for the Republican party in 2008, much in the same tradition as Bob Dole, a previous holder of the Senate Majority Leader position.
In 1998 Frist did participate in the Republican filibuster to stall the nomination of openly gay James C. Hormel to be ambassador to Luxembourg; Hormel eventually received a recess appointment from President Bill Clinton, bypassing a Senate vote.
Frist told that to be there with the recognition that 14 individuals were there who in all likelihood contributed to the September 11, 2001 attacks led him to think how critical it is that we do define the appropriate criteria to make sure we get information to prevent such a tragedy from ever occurring again.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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