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Encyclopedia > Bill Clinton
William Jefferson Clinton
Bill Clinton

In office
January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001
Vice President(s)   Albert Gore, Jr.
Preceded by George H. W. Bush
Succeeded by George W. Bush

Born August 19, 1946 (age 60)
Hope, Arkansas, USA
Political party Democratic
Spouse Hillary Rodham Clinton
Religion Baptist
Signature

William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. Before his election as President, Clinton served nearly 12 years as the 50th and 52nd Governor of Arkansas. His wife, Hillary Rodham Clinton, is the junior United States Senator from the state of New York, where they both currently reside. The William J. Clinton Foundation was created by Clinton to address international crises such as HIV/AIDS and other humanitarian causes. Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... Baptist is a Christian denomination decended from Protestantism, with cultural origins in the American South, and holding to very general Restorationist beliefs. ... Image File history File links Bill_Clinton_signature2. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... This is a list of governors of Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... Seal of the U.S. Senate The Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. ... NY redirects here. ... Bill Clinton in Africa on behalf of the Clinton Foundation The William J. Clinton Foundation was established by former President of the United States Bill Clinton. ... Human immunodeficiency virus or HIV is a retrovirus that causes Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), a condition in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections. ... Acquired immune deficiency syndrome or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS or Aids) is a collection of symptoms and infections resulting from the specific damage to the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ...

Contents

Early life

William Jefferson Blythe III was born in Hope, Arkansas, and raised in Hot Springs, Arkansas. He was named after his father, William Jefferson Blythe, Jr., a traveling salesman who died in a car accident three months before he was born.[1] His mother, born Virginia Dell Cassidy (1923–1994), remarried in 1950 to Roger Clinton. Roger Clinton owned an automobile dealership business with his brother, Raymond. The young Billy, as he was called, was raised by his mother and stepfather, assuming his last name "Clinton" throughout elementary school but not formally changing it until he was 14. Clinton grew up in a traditional, albeit blended, family; however, according to Clinton, his stepfather was a gambler and an alcoholic who regularly abused Clinton's mother and sometimes Clinton's half-brother Roger, Jr. Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... Hot Springs is a city in Garland County, Arkansas in the United States of America. ... Image:William Jefferson Blythe Jr. ... Virginia Cassidy Blythe Clinton Kelley (June 6, 1923-January 6, 1994) born Virginia Dell Cassidy is the mother of Bill Clinton and Roger Clinton, Jr. ... Roger C. Clinton, Sr. ... Alcoholism is the consumption of, or preoccupation with, alcoholic beverages to the extent that this behavior interferes with the drinkers normal personal, family, social, or work life, and may lead to physical or mental harm. ... Roger C. Clinton, Jr. ...


Bill Clinton as a child went to St. John's Catholic School and Ramble Elementary School. While at Hot Springs High School, Clinton was an active student[2] and saxophonist. He won first chair in the state band's saxophone section and briefly considered dedicating his life to music, but as he noted in his autobiography My Life: Hot Springs High Schoool is a public secondary school located in Hot Springs, Arkansas. ... A saxophonist is a musician who plays the saxophone. ... Cover of An autobiography, from the Greek auton, self, bios, life and graphein, write, is a biography written by the subject or composed conjointly with a collaborative writer (styled as told to or with). The term dates from the late eighteenth century, but the form is much older. ... My Life My Life is a 2004 autobiography written by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, who left office on January 20, 2001. ...

(…) Sometime in my sixteenth year I decided I wanted to be in public life as an elected official. I loved music and thought I could be very good, but I knew I would never be John Coltrane or Stan Getz. I was interested in medicine and thought I could be a fine doctor, but I knew I would never be Michael DeBakey. But I knew I could be great in public service.[3]

Among influential moments of Clinton's life contributing to his decision to become a public figure was visit to the White House to meet then-President John F. Kennedy following his election as a Boys Nation Senator and Martin Luther King's speech I Have a Dream.[4] Clinton was a member of Youth Order of DeMolay but never actually became a Freemason.[5] North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ... For other persons named John Kennedy, see John Kennedy (disambiguation). ... Boys Nation is an annual civic training event run by the American Legion. ... Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. ... Martin Luther King, Jr. ... DeMolay International (originally known as the Order of DeMolay) is an international youth fraternity for young men between the ages of 12 to 21 (members who reach the age of 21 are referred to as Senior DeMolays). The organization helps prepare young men to lead successful, productive and happy lives... The Masonic Square and Compasses. ...


Clinton received a Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service (B.S.F.S.) degree from the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington D.C., where he became a brother of Alpha Phi Omega, worked for Senator J. William Fulbright, was elected to Phi Beta Kappa and won a Rhodes Scholarship to University College, Oxford. He watched Chelsea F.C. in the 60's and became a fan.[6] While at Oxford, he played rugby union as a lock, and later in life he played for the Little Rock Rugby club in Arkansas. There he also participated in the Vietnam War protest movement. After Oxford, Clinton obtained a Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree from Yale Law School in 1973. While at Yale, he began dating classmate Hillary Rodham. They married in 1975 and their only child, Chelsea, was born in 1980. Clinton is a member of Kappa Kappa Psi National Honorary Band Fraternity, Inc. A Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.Sc. ... The Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service (commonly abbreviated SFS) is a school within Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., United States. ... Georgetown University, incorporated as the The President and Directors of the College of Georgetown, is a private university in the United States, located in Georgetown, a historic neighborhood of Washington, D.C. Founded on January 23, 1789 by Archbishop John Carroll, it is both the oldest Roman Catholic and oldest... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development. ... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905–February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ... The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ... Superscript text Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... University College (in full, the College of the Great Hall of the University, commonly known as University College in the University of Oxford, usually known by its derivative, Univ), is a contender for the claim to be the oldest of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in the... Chelsea Football Club, founded in 1905, are an English Premier League football club, nicknamed The Blues or previously The Pensioners, a reference to the Chelsea Pensioners. ... A rugby union scrum. ... A rugby union team is made up of 15 players: eight forwards, numbered from 1 to 8; and seven backs, numbered from 9 to 15. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Opposition to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War began slowly and in small numbers in 1964 on various college campuses in the United States. ... Juris Doctor (Latin for Teacher of Law) or J.D. is a degree in law offered by universities in a number of countries. ... The Sterling Law Building Sculptural ornamentation on the Sterling Law Building Yale Law School, or YLS, is the law school of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... In the White House: Chelsea (lower right), together with her parents, Bill and Hillary Clinton. ... Kappa Kappa Psi is a U.S. honorary band fraternity dedicated to serving college and university bands. ...


Arkansas political career

Bill Clinton

In office
January 9, 1979 – January 19, 1981
January 11, 1983 – December 12, 1992
Lieutenant(s) Joe Purcell
(1979-1981)

Winston Bryant
(1983-1991)
Jim Guy Tucker
(1991-1992) This is a list of governors of Arkansas. ... The official duties of Arkansas lieutenant governor as described by the Arkansas Constitution are to preside over the Senate with a tie-breaking vote, to serve as governor when the governor is out of state, and to serve as governor if the governor is impeached, removed from office, dies or... Joe Edward Purcell (29 July 1923-March 1987) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas for six days in 1979. ... James Jim Guy Tucker, Jr. ...

Preceded by Joe Purcell (1st)

Frank D. White (2nd) Joe Edward Purcell (29 July 1923-March 1987) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas for six days in 1979. ... Frank Durward White (June 4, 1933 - May 21, 2003) was only the second Republican governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas since Reconstruction. ...

Succeeded by Frank D. White (1st)

Jim Guy Tucker (2nd) Frank Durward White (June 4, 1933 - May 21, 2003) was only the second Republican governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas since Reconstruction. ... James Jim Guy Tucker, Jr. ...


Born August 19, 1946
Hope, Arkansas
Political party Democratic
Spouse Hillary Rodham Clinton
Profession Politician

In 1974, his first year as a University of Arkansas law professor, Clinton ran for the House of Representatives. The incumbent, John Paul Hammerschmidt, defeated Clinton with 52% of the vote. In 1976, Clinton was elected Attorney General of Arkansas without opposition in the general election. August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Hillary Rodham Clinton (born Hillary Diane Rodham on October 26, 1947) is the Biggest loser/retard these united states have seen from New York. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The University of Arkansas known also as the U of A or UA, is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... Seal of the House of Representatives The United States House of Representatives (or simply the House) is the lower of the two chambers of the United States Congress, the other being the Senate. ... John Paul Hammerschmidt (born May 4, 1922) is an American politician from the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ...


In 1978, Bill Clinton was first elected Governor of Arkansas, the youngest to be elected governor since 1938. His first term was fraught with difficulties, including an unpopular motor vehicle tax and popular anger over the escape of Cuban prisoners (from the Mariel boatlift) detained in Fort Chaffee in 1980. This is a list of governors of Arkansas. ... Cuban refugees arriving in crowded boats during the Mariel Boatlift crisis. ... Fort Chaffee is in the northwest Arkansas region adjacent to the city of Ft. ...


In the 1980 election, Clinton was defeated in his bid for a second term by Republican challenger Frank D. White. As he once joked, he was the youngest ex-governor in the nation's history. But in 1982, Clinton won his old job back, and over the next decade he helped Arkansas transform its economy. He became a leading figure among the New Democrats, a branch of the Democratic Party that called for welfare reform and smaller government, a policy supported by both Democrats and Republicans. The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Frank Durward White (June 4, 1933 - May 21, 2003) was only the second Republican governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas since Reconstruction. ...


Clinton's approach mollified conservative criticism during his terms as governor. However, personal and business transactions made by the Clintons during this period became the basis of the Whitewater investigation, which dogged his later presidential Administration. After very extensive investigation over several years, no indictments were made against the Clintons related to the years in Arkansas. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Campaign for the Democratic Nomination

There was some media speculation in 1987 that Clinton would enter the race for 1988 Democratic presidential nomination after then-New York Governor Mario Cuomo declined to run and Democratic front-runner Gary Hart bowed out due to revelations about marital infidelity. Often referred to as the "Boy Governor" at the time because of his youthful appearance, Clinton decided to remain as Arkansas Governor and postpone his presidential ambitions until 1992. Presenting himself as a moderate and a member of the New Democrat wing of the Democratic Party, he headed the moderate Democratic Leadership Council in 1990 and 1991. Presidential electoral votes by state. ... This is a list of the Governors of New York. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932), a New York State Democratic Party politician, was the 56th Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... Gary Warren Hart (born Gary Warren Hartpence, November 28, 1936) is a politician and lawyer from the state of Colorado. ... For the Canadian New Democratic Party, see New Democratic Party. ... The Democratic Leadership Council is a non-profit corporation[1] that argues that the United States Democratic Party should shift away from traditionally populist positions. ...


In 1992, Clinton was the early favorite of Democratic Party insiders and elected officials for the presidential nomination; therefore, he was able to rack up scores of superdelegates even before the first nominating contests were conducted. In spite of this, Clinton began his 1992 presidential quest on a sour note by finishing near the back of the pack in the Iowa caucus, which was largely uncontested due to the presence of favorite-son Senator Tom Harkin, who was the easy winner. Clinton’s real trouble began during New Hampshire Primary campaign, when revelations of a possible extramarital affair with Gennifer Flowers began to surface. Clinton and his wife Hillary decided to go on 60 Minutes following the Super Bowl to rebut those charges of infidelity, which had started to take their toll, as Clinton had fallen way behind former Massachusetts Senator Paul Tsongas in the New Hampshire polls. In fact, his campaign was beginning to unravel. Their TV appearance was a calculated risk, but it seemed to pay off as Clinton regained some of his lost footing. He still finished second to Tsongas in the New Hampshire Primary, but the media viewed it as a moral victory for Clinton, since he came within single digits of winning after trailing badly in the polls. Clinton shrewdly labeled himself “The Comeback Kid” on election night to help foster this perception and came out of New Hampshire on a roll. Tsongas, on the other hand, picked up little or no momentum from his victory. The Democratic Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States; the other being the Republican Party. ... Superdelegates are delegates to a party convention in the United States who are not bound by the decisions of party primaries or caucuses. ... Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... Thomas Richard Tom Harkin (born November 19, 1939) is the junior United States Senator from Iowa. ... The New Hampshire primary marks the opening of the quadrennial U.S. presidential election. ... Gennifer Flowers (born January 24, 1950) is one of three women who have claimed to have had affairs with U.S. President Bill Clinton. ... 60 Minutes is an investigative television newsmagazine on United States television, which has run on CBS News since 1968. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Paul Efthemios Tsongas Paul Efthemios Tsongas (February 14, 1941 – January 18, 1997) was a United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ...


Clinton used his new-found momentum to storm through the Southern primaries, including the big prizes of Florida and Texas, and build up a sizable delegate lead over his opponents in the race for the 1992 Democratic presidential nomination. However, there were still some doubts as to whether he could secure the nomination, as former California Governor Jerry Brown was scoring victories in other parts of the country and Clinton had yet to win a significant contest outside of his native South. With no major Southern state remaining on the primary calendar, Clinton set his sights on the delegate-rich New York Primary, which was to be his proving ground. Much to the surprise of some, Clinton scored a resounding victory in New York. It was a watershed moment for him, as he had finally broken through and shed his image as a regional candidate and as centrist Democrat whose standing with Northern liberals was questionable. Having been transformed into the consensus candidate, he took on an air of inevitability and was able to cruise to the nomination, topping it off with a victory on Brown’s home turf in the California Primary. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) None See: Languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 268,581 sq mi (695,622 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Edmund Gerald Jerry Brown, Jr. ... NY redirects here. ...


Presidential election

Bill Clinton with H. Ross Perot, Independent, and George H.W Bush, Republican, in a national debate
Bill Clinton with H. Ross Perot, Independent, and George H.W Bush, Republican, in a national debate

Clinton won the 1992 Presidential election (43.0% of the vote) against Republican George H. W. Bush (37.4% of the vote) and billionaire populist H. Ross Perot, who ran as an independent (18.9% of the vote) on a platform focusing on domestic issues; a large part of his success was Bush's steep decline in public approval. Previously described as "unbeatable" because of his approval ratings in the 80% range during the Persian Gulf conflict, Bush saw his public approval rating drop to just over 40% by election time due to a souring economy. Image File history File linksMetadata Debates. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Debates. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Populism is a political philosophy or rhetorical style that holds that the common persons interests are oppressed or hindered by the elite in society, and that the instruments of the state need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and used for the benefit and advancement of the... Ross Perot speaking to U.S. Army infantry in 2006 Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930), is a billionaire American businessman from Texas best known as an outsider candidate for the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... Combatants Kuwait United States United Kingdom Saudi Arabia Egypt Syria Qatar France Canada UN Coalition Republic of Iraq Commanders Norman Schwarzkopf Saddam Hussein Strength 660,000 360,000 Casualties 378 dead, 1,000 wounded 25,000 dead, 75,000 wounded The Gulf War (2 August 1990 – 28 February 1991) was...


Additionally, Bush reneged on his promise ("Read My Lips: No New Taxes!") not to raise taxes when he compromised with Democrats in an attempt to lower the Federal deficits. This hurt him among conservatives. Clinton capitalized on Bush's policy switch, repeatedly condemning the President for making a promise he failed to keep. Bush delivering the famous line at the 1988 convention Read my lips: No new taxes was a famous pledge made by Republican Presidential candidate George H.W. Bush at the 1988 Republican convention in his acceptance speech on August 18. ...


Finally, Bush's party base was in disarray. Conservatives had previously been united by anti-communism, but with the end of the Cold War, new issues would have to emerge. The 1992 Republican National Convention was perceived by some moderate voters to have been usurped by religious conservatives, and did not inspire them.[7] All this worked in Clinton's favor. Clinton could point to his moderate, 'New Democrat' record as governor of Arkansas. Liberal Democrats were impressed by Clinton's academic credentials, his 1960s-era protest record, and support for social causes such as women's abortion issues. Many Democrats who had supported Ronald Reagan and Bush in previous elections switched their allegiance to the more moderate Clinton. This article is about communism as a form of society and as a political movement. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... The 1992 Republican National Convention was held in the Astrodome in Houston, Texas from August 17 to August 21. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


His election ended an era of Republican rule of the White House for the previous 12 years, and 20 of the previous 24 years. That election also brought the Democrats full control of both branches of Congress. Clinton would be the first president to enjoy this privilege since Jimmy Carter in the late 1970's. North façade of the White House, seen from Pennsylvania Avenue. ...


Presidency, 1993-2001

President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... Clinton embraces British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ...

Significant events of the first term

The Clinton Cabinet
OFFICE NAME TERM
President Bill Clinton 1993-2001
Vice President Al Gore 1993-2001
State Warren M. Christopher 1993-1997
Madeleine K. Albright 1997-2001
Treasury Lloyd Bentsen 1993-1994
Robert E. Rubin 1995-1999
Lawrence H. Summers 1999-2001
Defense Les Aspin 1993-1994
William J. Perry 1994-1997
William S. Cohen 1997-2001
Justice Janet Reno 1993-2001
Interior Bruce Babbitt 1993-2001
Agriculture Mike Espy 1993-1994
Daniel R. Glickman 1994-2001
Commerce Ronald H. Brown 1993-1996
Mickey Kantor 1996-1997
William M. Daley 1997-2000
Norman Y. Mineta 2000-2001
Labor Robert B. Reich 1993-1997
Alexis M. Herman 1997-2001
Health and
Human Services
Donna E. Shalala 1993-2001
Education Richard Riley 1993-2001
Housing and
Urban Development
Henry G. Cisneros 1993-1997
Andrew Cuomo 1997-2001
Transportation Federico F. Peña 1993-1997
Rodney E. Slater 1997-2001
Energy Hazel O'Leary 1993-1997
Federico F. Peña 1997-1998
Bill Richardson 1998-2001
Veterans Affairs Jesse Brown 1993-1997
Togo D. West, Jr. 1998-2000

Shortly after taking office, Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993, which required large employers to allow their employees to take unpaid leave because of pregnancy or serious medical condition. While this action was popular, Clinton's attempt to fulfill another campaign promise of allowing openly gay men and lesbians serving in the armed forces was the subject of criticism. His handling of the issue garnered criticism from both the left (for being too tentative in promoting gay rights) and the right (for being too insensitive to military life). After much debate, the Congress - which has sole power under the U.S. Constitution to regulate the armed forces - implemented the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy, stating that homosexual men and women may serve in the military as long as their sexuality is kept secret. By 1999, Clinton said he didn't "think any serious person could say" that the way the policy was being implemented was not "out of whack".[8] Some gay rights advocates criticized Clinton for not going far enough and accused him of making his campaign promise simply to get votes and contributions.[9][10] These advocates felt Clinton should have integrated the military by executive order, noting that President Harry Truman ended segregation of the armed forces in that manner. Clinton's defenders argued that an executive order might have prompted the then-Democrat-controlled Senate to write the exclusion of gays into law, potentially making it even harder to integrate the military in the future. The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries â€¢ Politics Portal      The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... Warren Minor Christopher (born October 27, 1925) is an American diplomat and lawyer. ... Madeleine Korbel Albright (born May 15, 1937 in Prague, Czechoslovakia), American diplomat, served as the 64th United States Secretary of State. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the head of the United States Department of the Treasury, concerned with finance and monetary matters, and, until 2003, some issues of national security and defense. ... Lloyd Millard Bentsen Jr. ... Robert Edward Rubin (born August 29, 1938) is an American financier and businessman who served as the 70th United States Secretary of the Treasury during President Clintons administration. ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ... The United States Secretary of Defense is the head of the United States Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and The role of the Secretary of Defense is to be the principal defense policy advisor to the President and is responsible for the formulation of general defense... Leslie Les Aspin, Jr. ... Alternative meaning: William Perry (football) William James Perry (born October 11, 1927) was the U.S. Secretary of Defense under President Bill Clinton from February 3, 1994 to January 23, 1997. ... William Sebastian Cohen (born August 28, 1940) is an American Republican politician from Maine. ... The United States Attorney General is the head of the United States Department of Justice concerned with legal affairs and is the chief law enforcement officer of the United States government. ... Janet Reno (born July 21, 1938) was the 78th Attorney General of the United States (1993–2001), and was the first woman to hold that post. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Bruce Edward Babbitt (born June 27, 1938), a Democrat, served as United States Secretary of the Interior and as Governor of Arizona. ... Alphonso Michael Espy, usually called Mike Espy, (born November 30, 1953) was a U.S. political figure. ... Dan Glickman Daniel Robert Glickman (born November 24, 1944) is a United States politician. ... The office of the U.S. Secretary of Commerce in the mid-20th century. ... Ronald Harmon Brown (August 1, 1941 - April 3, 1996), was the first black United States Secretary of Commerce, serving during the first term of President Bill Clinton. ... Michael Mickey Kantor (born August 7, 1939 in Nashville, Tennessee) is an American politician and lawyer. ... William Daley was United States Secretary of Commerce under President Bill Clinton. ... Norman Yoshio Mineta Norman Yoshio Mineta (born November 12, 1931) is an American politician and member of the Democratic party. ... Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the 22nd United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 - 1997. ... DOL portrait Alexis Margaret Herman (born July 16, 1947) served as the 23rd U.S. Secretary of Labor under President Bill Clinton. ... The United States Secretary of Health and Human Services is the head of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Donna Edna Shalala (born February 14, 1941) served as the United States Secretary of Health and Human Services under President Bill Clinton. ... Richard Wilson Riley (born January 2, 1933), American politician, was the United States Secretary of Education under President Bill Clinton as well as the Governor of South Carolina, is a member of the Democratic Party. ... The United States Secretary of Housing and Urban Development is the head of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development, concerned with The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... Henry Gabriel Cisneros (born June 11, 1947) is a prominent American politician and community leader. ... Andrew Mark Cuomo (born December 6, 1957, in New York City) is the New York State Attorney General, having been elected to that office on November 7, 2006. ... Federico Fabian Peña Federico Fabian Peña (born March 15, 1947) was United States Secretary of Transportation from 1993 to 1997, during the presidency of Bill Clinton. ... Rodney Earl Slater (born in Marianna, Arkansas February 23, 1955) was the United States Secretary of Transportation under U. S. President Bill Clinton. ... Hazel OLeary Hazel Rollins OLeary (born May 17, 1937) was the seventh United States Secretary of Energy from 1993 to 1997. ... Federico Fabian Peña Federico Fabian Peña (born March 15, 1947) was United States Secretary of Transportation from 1993 to 1997, during the presidency of Bill Clinton. ... William Blaine Bill Richardson (born November 15, 1947) is an American politician and a member of the Democratic Party. ... The United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs is the head of the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, the department concerned with veterans benefits and related matters. ... Jesse Brown was the United States Secretary of Veterans Affairs, appointed in 1993 by Bill Clinton. ... Categories: U.S. Secretaries of Veterans Affairs | 1942 births ... The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-3, enacted February 5, 1993) is a United States labor law allowing an employee to take unpaid leave due to illness or to care for a sick family member. ... Homosexuality refers to sexual and romantic attraction between two individuals of the same sex. ... The gay rights movement is a collection of loosely aligned civil rights groups, human rights groups, support groups and political activists seeking acceptance, tolerance and equality for non-heterosexual, (homosexual, bisexual), and transgender people - despite the fact that it is typically referred to as the gay rights movement, members also... Dont Ask, Dont tell is the common term for the U.S. military policy which implements Pub. ... For the victim of Mt. ...


Critics, however, said that the issue was one that should be experimented on in society as a whole, not in the military. The military's goal was not to be a "social Petri dish," but to defend the nation.[11]


Clinton promoted another controversial issue during this period: one regarding free trade. In 1993, Clinton supported the North American Free Trade Agreement for ratification by the U.S. Senate. Despite being negotiated by his Republican predecessor, Clinton (along with most of his Democratic Leadership Committee allies) strongly supported free trade measures. Opposition came from anti-trade Republicans, protectionist Democrats and supporters of Ross Perot. Ultimately, the treaty was ratified. Map of NAFTA The North American Free Trade Area is the trade bloc created by North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and its two supplements, the North American Agreement on Environmental Cooperation (NAAEC) and the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC) whose members are Canada, Mexico and the United...


Clinton signed the Brady Bill, which imposed a five-day waiting period on handgun purchases. He also expanded the Earned Income Tax Credit, which benefits working class families with dependent children. The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993. ... The United States federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes that low-income working people pay (such as payroll taxes) and also frequently operates as a wage subsidy for low-income workers. ... The term working class is used to denote a social class. ...


One of the most prominent items on Clinton's legislative agenda, however, was a health care reform plan, the result of a taskforce headed by Hillary Clinton, aimed at achieving universal coverage via a national healthcare plan. Though initially well-received in political circles, it was ultimately doomed by well-organized opposition from conservatives, the American Medical Association, and the health insurance industry. Despite his party holding a majority in the House and Senate, the effort to create a national healthcare system ultimately died under heavy public pressure. It was the first major legislative defeat of Clinton's administration. In 1993, United States President Bill Clintons administration proposed a significant health care reform package. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... The American Medical Association (AMA) is the largest association of medical doctors in the United States. ...


Two months later, after two years of Democratic Party control under Clinton's leadership, the mid-term elections in 1994 proved disastrous for the Democrats. This was the first time the Democratic Party had lost control of both houses of Congress in 40 years The U.S. House election, 1994 was an election for the United States House of Representatives in 1994 which occurred in the middle of President Bill Clintons first term. ...


In August of 1993, Clinton signed the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993, which passed Congress without a single Republican vote. It raised taxes on the wealthiest 1.2% of taxpayers, while cutting taxes on 15 million low-income families and making tax cuts available to 90 percent of small businesses.[12] Additionally, it mandated that the budget be balanced over a number of years, and the implementation of spending restraints. The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 (or OBRA-93) was passed by the 103rd United States Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. ...


Significant events of the second term

President Clinton's Cabinet, circa 1993
President Clinton's Cabinet, circa 1993

In the 1996 presidential election, Clinton was re-elected, receiving 49.2% of the popular vote over Republican Bob Dole (40.7% of the popular vote) and Reform candidate Ross Perot (8.4% of the popular vote), becoming the first Democrat to win reelection to the presidency since Franklin Roosevelt. The Republicans lost a few seats in the House and gained a few in the Senate, but overall retained control of the Congress. Clinton received 379, or over 70% of the Electoral College votes, with Dole receiving 159 electoral votes. File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Robert Joseph Bob Dole (born July 22, 1923) is best known as a former Republican presidential nominee in the 1996 presidential election, in which he was defeated by then-incumbent President Bill Clinton. ... The Reform Party of the United States of America (abbreviated Reform Party USA or RPUSA) is a political party in the United States, founded by Ross Perot in 1995 under the belief that Americans were disillusioned with the state of politics--as being corrupt and unable to deal with vital... Ross Perot speaking to U.S. Army infantry in 2006 Henry Ross Perot (born June 27, 1930), is a billionaire American businessman from Texas best known as an outsider candidate for the office of President of the United States in 1992 and 1996. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ...


In 1998, a controversy was raised by Republicans over Clinton's relationship with a young White House intern, Monica Lewinsky, resulting in the Lewinsky scandal. In a lame duck session after the 1998 elections, the Republican-controlled House voted to impeach Clinton for matters relating to the scandal. The Senate then voted to acquit Clinton the following year, and he remained in office to complete his term. Monica Lewinskys visa picture taken in May of 1997 by Office of the Secretary of Defense photographer Helene Stikkel Monica Samille Lewinsky (born July 23, 1973 in San Francisco) is an American woman who had an affair with U.S. President Bill Clinton, while she was working at the... The Monica Lewinsky scandal (informally Monicagate, various ) was a political sex scandal emerging from a short-term sexual relationship between United States President Bill Clinton and a then 22-year-old White House intern, Monica Lewinsky. ... A lame duck is a bird which has trouble walking, usually due to astraxaphysis, a crippling leg condition affecting waterfowl. ...


In the closing year of his Administration, Clinton attempted to address the Arab-Israeli conflict. After initial successes such as the Oslo accords of the early 90's, the situation had quietly deteriorated, breaking down completely with the start of the Second Intifada. Clinton brought Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak and Palestinian Authority Chairman Yasser Arafat together at Camp David. However, Barak and Arafat could not find common ground, and the negotiations were ultimately unsuccessful. Combatants Arab nations Israel Arab-Israeli conflict series History of the Arab-Israeli conflict Views of the Arab-Israeli conflict International law and the Arab-Israeli conflict Arab-Israeli conflict facts, figures, and statistics Participants Israeli-Palestinian conflict · Israel-Lebanon conflict · Arab League · Soviet Union / Russia · Israel and the United... The al-Aqsa Intifada is the wave of violence and political conflict that began in September 2000 between Palestinian Arabs and Israelis; it is also called the Second Intifada (see also First Intifada). ... Ehud Barak (Hebrew: אֵהוּד בָּרָק) (born Ehud Brog on February 12, 1942, in Mishmar HaSharon kibbutz [1], then British Mandate of Palestine) is an Israeli politician and was the 10th Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001. ... Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (Arabic: محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني; August 1929 - November 11, 2004), popularly known as Yasser Arafat ( Yāsir `Arafāt) and by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار Abū `Ammār), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004) and President[2] of the Palestinian National Authority... Main Lodge at Camp David during Nixon administration, February 9, 1971. ...


Clinton remained popular with the public throughout his two terms as President, ending his presidential career with a 65% approval rating, the highest end-of-term approval rating of any President since Eisenhower.[13] In addition to his political skills, Clinton also oversaw a boom of the US economy. Under Clinton, the United States had a projected federal budget surplus for the first time since 1969.[14] Dwight David Ike Eisenhower (October 14, 1890–March 28, 1969), American soldier and politician, was the 34th President of the United States (1953–1961) and supreme commander of the Allied forces in Europe during World War II, with the rank of General of the Army. ...


Legislation and programs

Major legislation signed

Major legislation vetoed 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... February 5 is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993 (Public Law 103-3, enacted February 5, 1993) was one of the first major new laws enacted by United States President Bill Clinton in his first term, fulfilling a campaign promise. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... August 10 is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1993 (or OBRA-93) was passed by the 103rd United States Congress and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. ... An income tax is a tax levied on the financial income of persons, corporations or other legal entities. ... Corporate tax refers to a direct tax levied by various jurisdictions on the profits made by companies or associations. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... the AmeriCorps logo In the United States, AmeriCorps is a network of more than 2,100 non-profit organizations, public agencies, and faith-based organizations. ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... November 30 is the 334th day (335th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 31 days remaining. ... The Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act, also known as the Brady Bill, was passed by the United States Congress, signed into law by President Bill Clinton on November 30, 1993, and went into effect on February 28, 1994. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... September 13 is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years). ... The Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act (1994) is a piece of legislation, passed by the US Congress, which expanded Federal law in several ways. ... Capital punishment, or the death penalty, is the execution of a convicted criminal by the state as punishment for crimes known as capital crimes or capital offences. ... In law, an offense is a violation of the penal law. ... The Federal Assault Weapons Ban (AWB) was a provision of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, a federal law of the United States that included a prohibition on the sale of semi-automatic assault weapons manufactured after the date of the bans enactment. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The Communications Decency Act (CDA) was arguably the first attempt by the United States Congress to regulate pornographic material on the Internet, in response to public concerns in 1996. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... February 8 is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... On January 3, 1996, the 104th Congress of the United States amended or repealed sections of the the Communications Act of 1934 with the new Telecommunications Act of 1996. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... February 26 is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... March 14 is the 73rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (74th in leap years) with 292 days remaining in the year. ... Counter-terrorism refers to the practices, tactics, and strategies that governments, militaries, and other groups adopt in order to fight terrorism. ... Terrorist redirects here. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (100th in leap years). ... The Line Item Veto Act of 1996 enacted a line-item veto for the Federal Government of the United States, but its effect was brief due to judicial review. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (115th in leap years). ... The Antiterrorism and Effective Death Penalty Act of 1996 is a series of laws in the US signed into law[1] on April 24, 1996 to deter terrorism, provide justice for victims, provide for an effective death penalty, and for other purposes. It was introduced following the Oklahoma City bombing. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... August 20 is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... September 21 is the 264th day of the year (265th in leap years). ... The Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, is the commonly-used name of a federal law of the United States that is officially known as Pub. ... Same-sex marriage is a term for a marriage in which two people of the same sex live together as a family. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 5 is the 217th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (218th in leap years), with 148 days remaining. ... The Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 reduced several federal taxes in the United States. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) is a United States copyright law which criminalizes production and dissemination of technology that can circumvent measures taken to protect copyright, not merely infringement of copyright itself, and heightens the penalties for copyright infringement on the Internet. ... 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining. ... The Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-338) [1] (codified in a note to 22 USCS § 2151) is an United States Congressional statement of policy calling for regime change in Iraq. ...

Proposals not passed by Congress The process of creating the budget for the United States Government is known as the budget process. ... The phrase partial-birth abortion is a controversial one used primarily by abortion opponents in the United States. ... Welfare reform is the name for a political movement in countries with a state-administered social welfare system to institute changes in that system, generally in a more conservative direction. ... The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (PSLRA) implemented several significant substantive changes affecting certain cases brought under the federal securities laws, including changes related to pleading, discovery, liability, and awards fees and expenses. ... A congress is a gathering of people, especially a gathering for a political purpose. ...

Initiatives

In 1993, United States President Bill Clintons administration proposed a significant health care reform package. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Campaign finance. ... Ehud Barak (Hebrew: אֵהוּד בָּרָק) (born Ehud Brog on February 12, 1942, in Mishmar HaSharon kibbutz [1], then British Mandate of Palestine) is an Israeli politician and was the 10th Prime Minister of Israel from 1999 to 2001. ... Mohammed Abdel-Raouf Arafat al-Qudwa al-Husseini (Arabic: محمد عبد الرؤوف القدوة الحسيني; August 1929 - November 11, 2004), popularly known as Yasser Arafat ( Yāsir `Arafāt) and by the kunya Abu `Ammar (أبو عمّار Abū `Ammār), was Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) (1969–2004) and President[2] of the Palestinian National Authority... It has been suggested that Palestinian government of March 2006 be merged into this article or section. ... The Israeli-Palestinian conflict, a part of the greater Arab-Israeli conflict, is an ongoing dispute between the State of Israel and Palestinian people. ... Dont Ask, Dont tell is the common term for the U.S. military policy which implements Pub. ... For other articles with similar names, see Gay (disambiguation). ... Sinn Féin (pronounced in English, in Irish) is a name used by a series of Irish political movements of the 20th century, each of which claimed sole descent from the original party established by Arthur Griffith in 1905. ... One America Initiative See also External links Categories: | | | | ... Extraordinary rendition is an American extra-judicial procedure which involves the sending of untried criminal suspects, suspected terrorists or alleged supporters of groups which the US Government considers to be terrorist organizations, to countries other than the United States for imprisonment and interrogation. ...

Supreme Court appointments

Clinton appointed the following justices to the Supreme Court: The Supreme Court of the United States (SCOTUS) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the judicial branch of the United States federal government. ...

Ruth Joan Bader Ginsburg (born March 15, 1933) is an Associate Justice on the U.S. Supreme Court. ... Stephen Gerald Breyer (born August 15, 1938) is an American attorney, political figure, and jurist. ...

Controversies

The Lewinsky scandal

Main article: Lewinsky scandal

In 1998, as a result of allegations that he had lied during grand jury testimony regarding his sexual relationship with Monica Lewinsky, a young female White House intern, Clinton was the second U.S. president to be impeached by the House of Representatives (the other being Andrew Johnson). The House held no serious impeachment hearings before the 1998 mid-term elections. In spite of the allegations against the President, his party picked up a few seats in the Congress. The Republican leadership then called a lame duck session in December 1998 to hold impeachment proceedings. The Monica Lewinsky scandal (informally Monicagate, various ) was a political sex scandal emerging from a short-term sexual relationship between United States President Bill Clinton and a then 22-year-old White House intern, Monica Lewinsky. ... Monica Lewinskys visa picture taken in May of 1997 by Office of the Secretary of Defense photographer Helene Stikkel Monica Samille Lewinsky (born July 23, 1973 in San Francisco) is an American woman who had an affair with U.S. President Bill Clinton, while she was working at the... Impeachment is the process by which a legislative body formally levels charges against a high official of government. ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ... A lame duck is a bird which has trouble walking, usually due to astraxaphysis, a crippling leg condition affecting waterfowl. ...


Although the House Judiciary Committee hearings were perfunctory and ended in a straight party line vote, the debate on the Floor of the House was lively. The two charges that were passed in the House (largely on the basis of Republican support but with a handful of Democratic votes as well) were for perjury and obstruction of justice. The perjury charge arose from Clinton's testimony about his relationship to Monica Lewinsky during a sexual harassment lawsuit brought by former Arkansas-state employee Paula Jones. The obstruction charge was based on his actions during the subsequent investigation of that testimony. The Senate later voted to acquit Clinton on both charges. U.S. House Committee on the Judiciary, or (more commonly) the House Judiciary Committee, is a standing committee of the United States House of Representatives. ... Perjury is the act of lying or making verifiably false statements on a material matter under oath or affirmation in a court of law or in any of various sworn statements in writing. ... Modern Obstruction of Justice, in a common law state, refers to the crime of offering interference of any sort to the work of police, investigators, regulatory agencies, prosecutors, or other (usually government) officials. ... Monica Lewinskys visa picture taken in May of 1997 by Office of the Secretary of Defense photographer Helene Stikkel Monica Samille Lewinsky (born July 23, 1973 in San Francisco) is an American woman who had an affair with U.S. President Bill Clinton, while she was working at the... Paula Corbin Jones (born Paula Rosalee Corbin on September 17, 1966, in Lonoke, Arkansas) was a former Arkansas state employee who sued President Bill Clinton for sexual harassment and eschewal. ...


Impeachment trial in the Senate

The Senate refused to convene to hold an impeachment trial before the end of the old term, so the trial was held over until the next Congress. Clinton was represented by Washington powerhouse law firm Williams & Connolly. The impeachment trial of President Bill Clinton in 1998, Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist presiding. ... Williams & Connolly LLP is a prominent litigation firm based in Washington, D.C. The firm was founded by legendary trial lawyer Edward Bennett Williams. ...


On February 12, the Senate concluded a 21-day trial with the vote on both counts falling short of the Constitutional requirement of a two-thirds majority to convict and remove an office holder. The final vote was generally along party lines, with all of the votes to convict being cast by Republicans. On the perjury charge 55 senators voted to acquit, including 10 Republicans, and 45 voted to convict; on the obstruction charge the Senate voted 50-50.[15] Clinton, like the only other president to be impeached, Andrew Johnson, served the remainder of his term. February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Andrew Johnson (December 29, 1808 – July 31, 1875) was the seventeenth President of the United States (1865–1869), succeeding to the presidency upon the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. ...


In a separate case, Clinton was disbarred from his Arkansas law license for five years and ordered to pay $25,000 in fines to that state's bar officials.[16] The agreement came on the condition that Whitewater prosecutors would not pursue criminal charges against him after he lied under oath about his relationship with White House intern Monica Lewinsky.[17]


Administrative controversy

The White House travel office controversy began on May 19, 1993, when several longtime employees of the White House Travel Office were fired. A whistleblower's letter, written during the previous administration, triggered an FBI investigation, which revealed evidence of financial malfeasance. Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr investigated the firings and could find no evidence of wrongdoing on the Clintons' part.[18] The White House personnel file controversy of June, 1996 arose around improper access to FBI security-clearance documents. ... The White House travel office controversy began on May 19, 1993, when several longtime employees of the White House Travel Office were fired. ... May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (140th in leap years). ... 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ...


The White House personnel file controversy of June 1996 arose around improper access to FBI security-clearance documents. Craig Livingstone, head of White House security, improperly requested, and received from the FBI, personnel files without asking permission of the subject individuals. In March 2000, Independent Counsel Robert Ray determined that there was no credible evidence of any criminal activity. Ray's report further stated "there was no substantial and credible evidence that any senior White House official was involved" in seeking the files. The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) is a Federal police force which is the principal investigative arm of the United States Department of Justice (DOJ). ...


Campaign finance and the pardons

The 1996 United States campaign finance controversy was an alleged effort by the People's Republic of China (PRC) to influence the domestic policies of the United States, prior to and during the Clinton administration and also involved the fundraising practices of the administration itself.[19] The 1996 United States campaign finance controversy was an alleged effort by the Peoples Republic of China (PRC) to influence domestic American politics prior to and during the Clinton administration and also involved the fund-raising practices of the administration itself. ... President Bill Clinton was widely criticized for some pardons and other acts of executive clemency; collectively, this controversy has sometimes been called Pardongate in the press. ...


It is common practice for Presidents to grant a number of pardons shortly before leaving office. On his last day in office (January 20, 2001), Clinton issued 140 pardons. Most of the controversy surrounded Marc Rich and allegations that Hillary Clinton's brother, Hugh Rodham, accepted payments in return for influencing the president's decision-making regarding the pardons. None of the allegations have been proven.[20] January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Marc Rich (born Marc David Reich on December 18, 1934) is a billionaire international commodities trader who fled the United States in 1983 to live in Switzerland in order to avoid prosecution on charges of tax evasion and illegally making oil deals with Iran during the hostage crisis. ... Hugh Rodham was Hillary Clinton’s father and a lifelong Republican. ...


Willey and Broaddrick allegations

Two claims of sexual misconduct on the part of Bill Clinton were alleged by Kathleen Willey and Juanita Broaddrick, during the Clinton Administration. Neither claim was proven, and both resulted in no charges brought against Clinton. Kathleen Willey was a White House aide who on March 15, 1998 claimed on the TV news program 60 Minutes that she and President Bill Clinton were in his private study off the Oval Office when Clinton sexually assaulted her. ... Several presidents of the United States have been accused during or after their presidencies of earlier committing rape. ...


Public approval

Clinton's approval ratings throughout his presidential career
Clinton's approval ratings throughout his presidential career

While Clinton's job approval rating varied over the course of his first term, ranging from a low of 36 percent in mid-1993 to a high of 64 percent in late-1993 and early-1994,[21] his job approval rating consistently ranged from the high 50s to the high 60s in his second term.[22] Clinton's approval rating reached its highest point at 73 percent approval in the aftermath of the impeachment proceedings in 1998 and 1999.[23] A CNN/USA TODAY/Gallup poll[24] conducted as he was leaving office, revealed deeply contradictory attitudes regarding Clinton. Although his approval rating at 68 percent was higher than that of any other departing president since polling began more than seventy years earlier, only 45 percent said they would miss him. While 55 percent thought he "would have something worthwhile to contribute and should remain active in public life", and 47 percent rated him as either outstanding or above average as a president, 68 percent thought he would be remembered for his "involvement in personal scandal" rather than his accomplishments as president, and 58 percent answered "No" to the question "Do you generally think Bill Clinton is honest and trustworthy?" 47 percent of the respondents identified themselves as being Clinton supporters. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (834x527, 76 KB) Summary Clinton approval ratings. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (834x527, 76 KB) Summary Clinton approval ratings. ...


In May 2006, a CNN poll comparing Clinton's job performance with that of his successor, George W. Bush, found a majority of respondents said Clinton outperformed Bush in six different areas questioned.[25]


Public image

Clinton reading with a child.
Clinton reading with a child.

As the first Baby Boomer president, Clinton was the first president in a half century not shaped by World War II. With his sound-bite-ready dialogue and pioneering use of pop culture in his campaigning, such as playing his saxophone on The Arsenio Hall Show, Clinton was sometimes described as the "MTV president".[26] Until his inauguration as president, he had earned substantially less money than his wife, and had the smallest net worth of any president in modern history, according to My Life, Clinton's autobiography which was released in June 2004. Clinton, a charismatic speaker, tended to draw huge crowds during public speeches throughout his terms in office. Clinton was also very popular among African-Americans and made improving race relations a major theme of his presidency.[27] Photo provided by government archive: http://www. ... Photo provided by government archive: http://www. ... A Baby boomer is someone who was born during the period of increased birth rates when economic prosperity rose in many countries following World War II. In the United States, the term is iconic and more properly capitalized as Baby Boomers and commonly applied to people with birth years after... The Arsenio Hall Show was a talk show, which aired on late night in syndication from 1989 to 1994. ... MTV (Music Television) is an American cable television network headquartered in New York City. ... My Life My Life is a 2004 autobiography written by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, who left office on January 20, 2001. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, with a length of 30 days. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American or Black American) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


Nobel Prize-winning author Toni Morrison in 1998 called Clinton "the first Black president," saying "Clinton displays almost every trope of blackness: single-parent household, born poor, working-class, saxophone-playing, McDonald's-and-junk-food-loving boy from Arkansas," and, despite his career accomplishments, comparing Clinton's scrutinized sex life to the stereotyping and double standards that blacks typically endure.[28] Nobel Prize medal. ... For the Louisiana politician, see deLesseps Morrison, Jr. ... The degree to which an individual is sympathetic to or a part of the culture of African-Americans. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... A double standard is an ethical rule applied more stringently to one party than to others. ...

Former presidents Bill Clinton, George Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and their wives at the funeral of President Richard Nixon on 1994-04-27.
Former presidents Bill Clinton, George Bush, Ronald Reagan, Jimmy Carter, Gerald Ford, and their wives at the funeral of President Richard Nixon on 1994-04-27.

Download high resolution version (934x578, 121 KB)Five presidents and first ladies attended the funeral of Richard Nixon on April 27, 1994, in Nixons hometown of Yorba Linda, California. ... Download high resolution version (934x578, 121 KB)Five presidents and first ladies attended the funeral of Richard Nixon on April 27, 1994, in Nixons hometown of Yorba Linda, California. ... George Herbert Walker Bush GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Nixon redirects here. ... 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by United Nations. ... April 27 is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 248 days remaining. ...

Post-presidential career

Public speaking

Clinton has engaged in a career as a public speaker on a variety of issues. In his speaking engagements around the world,[29][30] he continues to comment on aspects of contemporary politics. One notable theme is his advocacy of multilateral solutions to problems facing the world. Clinton's close relationship with the African American community has been highlighted in his post-Presidential career with the opening of his personal office in the Harlem section of New York City. He assisted his wife, Hillary Clinton, in her campaign for office as Senator from New York. It has been suggested that After dinner speaker be merged into this article or section. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... For other uses, see Harlem (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Big Apple, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Brooklyn Manhattan Queens Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Hillary Clinton Hillary Diane Rodham Clinton (born October 26, 1947), was First Lady of the United States from 1993 to 2001, as the wife of President Bill Clinton. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... NY redirects here. ...

Hillary Clinton re-enacts being sworn in as a U.S. Senator by Vice President Gore as Bill and Chelsea Clinton observe.
Hillary Clinton re-enacts being sworn in as a U.S. Senator by Vice President Gore as Bill and Chelsea Clinton observe.

Clinton campaigned for a number of Democratic candidates for the Senate in the 2002 elections, but only one was voted into office. While Clinton's was still well-liked, his personal popularity didn't have the desired affect for the candidates he was supporting in the political arena. Reenactment of Vice President Al Gore swearing in First Lady Hillary Clinton as a United States Senator in the Old Senate Chamber at the Capitol on January 3, 2001. ... Reenactment of Vice President Al Gore swearing in First Lady Hillary Clinton as a United States Senator in the Old Senate Chamber at the Capitol on January 3, 2001. ... In the White House: Chelsea (lower right), together with her parents, Bill and Hillary Clinton. ...


On July 26, 2004, Clinton spoke for the fifth consecutive time to the Democratic National Convention, using the opportunity to praise candidate John Kerry. In it, he criticized President George W. Bush's depiction of Kerry, saying that "strength and wisdom are not opposing values." Unfortunately for Kerry, despite Clinton's strong speech, the post convention bounce to his poll numbers was less than was hoped for.[31] July 26 is the 207th day (208th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 158 days remaining. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 Democratic National Convention logo The 2004 Democratic National Convention culminated in the arrival of John Kerry on July 29 to address the delegates. ... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts. ...


He dedicated his presidential library, which is the largest in the nation, the William J. Clinton Presidential Center, in Little Rock, Arkansas on November 18, 2004. Under rainy skies, Clinton received words of praise from former presidents Jimmy Carter and George H. W. Bush, as well as from the current president, George W. Bush. He was also treated to a musical rendition from Bono and The Edge from U2, who expressed their gratitude at Clinton's efforts to resolve the Northern Ireland conflict during his presidency. The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum is on the campus of the University of Texas at Austin. ... Clinton Presidential Center William J. Clinton Presidential Library, Little Rock, AK The William J. Clinton Presidential Center and Park includes the Clinton presidential library and the offices of the Clinton Foundation and the Clinton School of Public Service, established by Bill Clinton, the 42nd President of the United States. ... Nickname: Rocktown, The Rock, Capital City Coordinates: Country United States State Arkansas County Pulaski Founded 1821 Incorporated 1831 Mayor Jim Dailey Mayor-Elect: Mark Stodola [1] Area    - City 302. ... November 18 is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... David Howell Evans (born August 8, 1961, Barking, Essex [now in Greater London], England), byname the Edge, is the guitarist of the Irish rock band U2. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ...


On December 9, 2005, speaking at the United Nations Climate Change Conference in Montreal, Clinton publicly criticized the Bush Administration for its handling of emissions control. Further, Clinton twice visited the University of California, Los Angeles in 2006 to promote initiatives concerning the environment. First, on August 1, 2006, he met with Tony Blair, Ken Livingstone, Antonio Villaraigosa, and Gavin Newsom to advertise the Large Cities Climate Leadership Group. On October 13, 2006, he spoke in favor of California Proposition 87, which was voted down. December 9 is the 343rd day (344th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United Nations Climate Change Conference, COP 11 or COP/MOP 1, is a global event taking place in Montreal, Quebec, Canada from November 28 to December 9, 2005. ... Motto: Concordia Salus Coordinates: Country Canada Province Québec Founded 1642 Established 1832 Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area    - City 366. ... The University of California, Los Angeles, generally known as UCLA, is a public university whose main campus is located in the affluent Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, United States. ... August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (214th in leap years), with 152 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the UK Labour Party, and Member of the UK Parliament... Ken Livingstone Kenneth Robert Livingstone (born June 17, 1945), is an English politician who has been the Mayor of London since the creation of the post in 2000. ... Antonio Ramon Villaraigosa (born Antonio Ramon Villar, Jr. ... San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom Gavin Christopher Newsom (born October 10, 1967) is the 42nd Mayor of San Francisco, California. ... The Large Cities Climate Leadership Group is a group of cities committed to the reduction of urban carbon emissions and adapting to climate change. ... October 13 is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... California Proposition 87 is a proposition on the ballot for California voters for the November 7, 2006 general election, officially titled If passed, the proposition would a establish a $4 billion program with goal to reduce petroleum consumption by 25%, with research and production incentives for alternative energy, alternative energy...


Health

Bill Clinton on The Daily Show, promoting My Life
Bill Clinton on The Daily Show, promoting My Life

On September 2, 2004, Clinton had an episode of angina and was evaluated at Northern Westchester Hospital. It was determined that he had not suffered a coronary infarction, and he was sent home, returning the following day for angiography, which disclosed multiple vessel coronary artery disease. He was transferred to Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City, where he underwent a successful quadruple coronary artery bypass surgery on September 6, 2004. The medical team stated that, had he not had surgery, he would likely have suffered a massive heart attack within a few months.[32] On March 10, 2005, he underwent a follow-up surgery to remove scar tissue and fluid from his left chest cavity, a result of his open-heart surgery. Jon Stewart interviewing Bill Clinton on The Daily Show This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... Jon Stewart interviewing Bill Clinton on The Daily Show This is a screenshot of a copyrighted movie or television program. ... The Daily Show (currently The Daily Show with Jon Stewart) is a Peabody and Emmy-winning half-hour American satirical news television program produced by and run on the Comedy Central cable television network. ... My Life My Life is a 2004 autobiography written by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, who left office on January 20, 2001. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... angina tonsillaris see tonsillitis. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Angiography or arteriography is a medical imaging technique in which an X-ray picture is taken to visualize the inner opening of blood filled structures, including arteries, veins and the heart chambers. ... Coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease (CAD) and atherosclerotic heart disease, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries that supply the myocardium (the muscle of the heart). ... New York-Presbyterian Hospital is a prominent university hospital in New York City, composed of two medical centers, Columbia University Medical Center and New York Weill Cornell Medical Center, each affiliated with an Ivy League University. ... Early in a coronary artery bypass surgery during vein harvesting from the legs (left of image) and the establishment of bypass (placement of the aortic cannula) (bottom of image). ... September 6 is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years). ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Acute myocardial infarction (AMI or MI), commonly known as a heart attack, is a clinical event that occurs when the blood supply to a part of the heart is interrupted. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (70th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Clinton, along with Pres. George W. Bush, Laura Bush, and Pres. George H. W. Bush pay their respects to Pope John Paul II before the pope's funeral.
Clinton, along with Pres. George W. Bush, Laura Bush, and Pres. George H. W. Bush pay their respects to Pope John Paul II before the pope's funeral.

The Vatican City State released this photo into the public domain, one of few that have been done so, of the President of the United States and two former Presidents of the United States paying homage to Pope John Paul II lying in state at St. ... The Vatican City State released this photo into the public domain, one of few that have been done so, of the President of the United States and two former Presidents of the United States paying homage to Pope John Paul II lying in state at St. ...

Humanitarian work

Main article: William J. Clinton Foundation

While in Sydney to attend a Global Business Forum, Clinton signed a memorandum of understanding on behalf of his presidential foundation with the Australian government to promote HIV/AIDS programs in the Asia-Pacific region. Bill Clinton in Africa on behalf of the Clinton Foundation The William J. Clinton Foundation was established by former President of the United States Bill Clinton. ... The Sydney Opera House on Sydney Harbour Sydney (pronounced ) is the most populous city in Australia with a metropolitan area population of over 4. ...


On May 3, 2005, Clinton announced through the William J. Clinton Foundation an agreement by major soft drink manufacturers to stop selling sugared sodas and juice drinks in public primary and secondary schools. May 3 is the 123rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (124th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bill Clinton in Africa on behalf of the Clinton Foundation The William J. Clinton Foundation was established by former President of the United States Bill Clinton. ...


Friendship with George H. W. Bush

There had been reported signs of a friendship growing between Clinton and George H. W. Bush. After the official unveiling of his White House portrait in June 2004, the Asian Tsunami disaster, Hurricane Katrina, and the 2004 election, Clinton and Bush met, although the nature of the meetings did not appear to include a reconciliation of political opinions. Presidential election results map. ...

Clinton with former President George H. W. Bush in January 2005.
Clinton with former President George H. W. Bush in January 2005.

On January 3, 2005, President George W. Bush named Clinton and George H. W. Bush to lead a nationwide campaign to help the victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake. On February 1, 2005, he was selected by UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan to head the United Nations earthquake and tsunami relief and reconstruction effort. Five days later, Clinton appeared with Bush on the Super Bowl XXXIX pre-game show on Fox in support of their bipartisan effort to raise money for relief of the disaster through the USA Freedom Corps, an action which Bush described as "transcending politics". Thirteen days later, they traveled to the affected areas to see the relief efforts. Image File history File links Bush_and_Clinton. ... Image File history File links Bush_and_Clinton. ... January 3 is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tsunami strikes Ao Nang, Thailand. ... February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a diplomat of Ghanaian ancestry who served as the seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 2006. ... The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate cooperation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... The humanitarian response to the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake was prompted by one of the worst natural disasters of modern times. ... Date February 6, 2005 Stadium ALLTEL Stadium City Jacksonville, Florida MVP Deion Branch, Wide receiver Favorite Patriots by 7 National anthem Combined choirs of the U.S. Military Academy, the U.S. Naval Academy, the U.S. Air Force Academy, and the U.S. Coast Guard Academy, and U.S... The Fox Broadcasting Company is a television network in the United States. ... George W. Bush speaks in front of a USA Freedom Corps display. ...


On August 31, 2005, following the devastation of the Gulf Coast by Hurricane Katrina, Clinton again teamed with George H. W. Bush to coordinate private relief donations, in a campaign similar to their earlier one in response to the Indian Ocean tsunami. August 31 is the 243rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (244th in leap years), with 122 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Gulf of Mexico is a major body of water bordered and nearly landlocked by North America. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ... Animation of the tsunami caused by the earthquake (see also the full-length version) From NOAA/PMEL. The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, was an undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) on December...


Honors and accolades

In February 2004, Clinton (along with Mikhail Gorbachev and Sophia Loren) won a Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children for narrating the Russian National Orchestra's album Wolf Tracks and Peter and the Wolf. Clinton won a second Grammy in February 2005, Best Spoken Word Album for My Life. Mikhail Sergeyevich Gorbachyov ( , IPA: , commonly written as Mikhail Gorbachev; born March 2, 1931) was the last leader of the Soviet Union, serving from 1985 until its collapse in 1991. ... Sophia Loren (born September 20, 1934) is a motion picture and stage, Academy Award-winning actress, widely considered to be the most popular Italian performer. ... Grammy Award The Grammy Awards (originally called the Gramophone Awards, commonly abbreviated as the Grammys or GRAMMYs ), presented by the Recording Academy known as NARAS, (an association of Americans professionally involved in the recorded music industry) for outstanding achievements in the recording industry, is one of four major music awards... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album for Children has been awarded since 1994. ... The Russian National Orchestra is an orchestra based in Moscow, Russia. ... This is a unique collaborative project that demonstrates the power of music to bring people together. ... The Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album has been awarded since 1959. ... My Life My Life is a 2004 autobiography written by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, who left office on January 20, 2001. ...


On November 22, 2004, New York Republican Governor George Pataki named Clinton and the other living former presidents (Gerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and George H. W. Bush) as honorary members of the board rebuilding the World Trade Center. November 22 is the 326th day (327th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Elmer Pataki (born June 24, 1945) is the current Governor of New York State, USA serving since January 1995, and as of late 2006 is the longest-serving of all current U.S. governors. ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... George Herbert Walker Bush GCB (born June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States of America serving from 1989 to 1993. ... This article is about the former twin towers in New York City. ...


The 2005 J. William Fulbright Prize for International Understanding was awarded to Clinton by the Fulbright Association. Clinton received the award in a ceremony in Washington on April 12, 2006. The Fulbright Association is a U.S.-based membership organization of Fulbright Program alumni and supporters committed to fostering international awareness and understanding through: Advocating increased worldwide support for Fulbright exchanges; Enriching the Fulbright experience; and Facilitating lifelong interaction among alumni and current participants. ...


In 2005, the University of Arkansas System opened the Clinton School of Public Service on the grounds of the Clinton Presidential Center. Plaque on University of Arkansas campus The University of Arkansas (also known as the U. of A. or simply Arkansas) is a public, coeducational, land-grant university system. ... The Clinton School of Public Service is a branch of the University of Arkansas. ...


On March 5, 2006, he received an honorary doctorate of humane letters from Pace University, and is the first recipient of the Pace University President's Centennial Award. Following reception of the honorary degree, he spoke to the students, faculty, alumni and staff of Pace, officially kicking off the centennial anniversary of the university. Also in 2006 Clinton was awarded the J. William Fulbright Prize for International Understanding. March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (65th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Pace University See also: Pace University High School Pace University is a private, co-educational and comprehensive multi-campus university with campuses in New York City and Westchester County in the U.S. State of New York. ... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905–February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ...


On May 13, 2006, Clinton was the commencement speaker along with George H. W. Bush at Tulane University in New Orleans. They both received honorary Doctorates of Laws from Tulane University. Clinton spoke to the students, faculty and alumni of Tulane and of the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina that Tulane students had known firsthand. May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (134th in leap years). ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Lowest pressure 902 mbar (hPa; 26. ...


In Europe, Bill Clinton remains immensely popular, especially in a large part of the Balkans and in Ireland. In Priština, Kosovo, a five-story picture of the former president was permanently engraved into the side of the tallest building in the province as a token of gratitude for Clinton's support during the crisis in Kosovo.[33] PriÅ¡tina, also spelled Pristina (Albanian: Prishtinë / Prishtina; Serbian: PriÅ¡tina / Приштина,  ) is the capital and the largest city of Kosovo, a Serbian province under UN administration. ... For other uses of the name Kosovo, see Kosovo (disambiguation). ...


On December 3, 2006, Clinton was made an honorary chief and Grand Companion of the Order of Logohu by Prime Minister of Papua New Guinea Michael Somare. Clinton was awarded the honor for his "outstanding leadership for the good of mankind during two terms as US president" and his commitment to the global fight against HIV/AIDS and other health challenges in developing countries.[34] December 3 is the 337th (in leap years the 338th) day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Papua New Guinea honours system is the main system of honouring citizens of Papua New Guinea for their services to that country. ... List of Prime Ministers of Papua New Guinea Sir Michael Somare (1975-1980) Sir Julius Chan (1980-1982) Sir Michael Somare (1982-1985) Paias Wingti (1985-1988) Sir Rabbie Namaliu (1988-1992) Paias Wingti (1992-1994) Sir Julius Chan (1994-1997) Bill Skate (1997-1999) Sir Mekere Morauta (1999-2002... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ...


Further reading

Primary sources

  • Bill Clinton, My Life. (2004). ISBN 0-375-41457-6.
  • Sidney Blumenthal The Clinton Wars. (2003). ISBN 0-374-12502-3
  • Kenneth Starr The Starr Report: The Findings of Independent Counsel Kenneth W. Starr on President Clinton and the Lewinsky Affair (1998) ISBN 1-891620-24-X
  • George Stephanopoulos All Too Human: A Political Education (1998) ISBN 0-316-92919-0

Sidney Blumenthal was born in Chicago in 1948 and educated at Brandeis University(BA in Sociology in 1969). ... Kenneth Winston Starr Kenneth Winston Starr (born July 21, 1946) is an American lawyer and former judge who was appointed to the Office of the Independent Counsel to investigate the death of the deputy White House counsel Vince Foster and the Whitewater land transactions by President Bill Clinton. ... While working as an intern at the White House, Monica Lewinsky had a short-term sexual relationship with President Bill Clinton. ... George Stephanopoulos George Robert Stephanopoulos (born February 10, 1961) is an American broadcaster and political adviser. ...

Popular books

  • Peter Baker The Breach: Inside the Impeachment and Trial of William Jefferson Clinton (2000) ISBN 0-684-86813-X
  • James Bovard Feeling Your Pain: The Explosion and Abuse of Government Power in the Clinton-Gore Years (2000) ISBN 0-312-23082-6
  • Joe Conason and Gene Lyons The Hunting of the President: The Ten-Year Campaign to Destroy Bill and Hillary Clinton (2003) ISBN 0-312-27319-3
  • Elizabeth Drew On the Edge: The Clinton Presidency (1994) ISBN 0-671-87147-1
  • Nigel Hamilton Bill Clinton: An American Journey (2003) ISBN 0-375-50610-1
  • John F. Harris The Survivor: Bill Clinton in the White House (2005) ISBN 0-375-50847-3
  • Christopher Hitchens No One Left to Lie to: The Triangulations of William Jefferson Clinton (1999) ISBN 1-85984-736-6
  • Michael Isikoff Uncovering Clinton: A Reporter's Story (1999) ISBN 0-609-60393-0
  • Joe Klein The Natural: The Misunderstood Presidency of Bill Clinton (2003) ISBN 0-7679-1412-0
  • David Maraniss First in His Class: A Biography of Bill Clinton (1996) ISBN 0-684-81890-6
  • David Maraniss The Clinton Enigma: A Four and a Half Minute Speech Reveals This President's Entire Life (1998) ISBN 0-684-86296-4
  • Dick Morris with Eileen McGann Because He Could (2004) ISBN 0-06-078415-6
  • Roger Morris Partners in Power: The Clintons and Their America (1996) ISBN 0-89526-302-5
  • Richard A. Posner An Affair of State: The Investigation, Impeachment, and Trial of President Clinton (1999) ISBN 0-674-00080-3
  • Mark J. Rozell The Clinton Scandal and the Future of American Government (2000) ISBN 0-87840-777-4
  • Michael Waldman POTUS Speaks: Finding the Words That Defined the Clinton Presidency (2000) ISBN 0-7432-0020-9
  • Ivory Tower Publishing Company Achievements of the Clinton Administration: the Complete Legislative and Executive (1995) ISBN 0-88032-748-0

James Bovard is a bestselling libertarian author and lecturer, whose political commentary targets examples of governmental waste, failures, and abuses of power. ... Joe Conason is a United States-based journalist and author and is a noted commentator for liberal positions. ... Gene Lyons is a well-known political columnist and co-author of The Hunting of the President, a documentary book, with a supporing film, that describes the massive campaign waged against President Clinton leading eventually to the presidents impeachment and subsequent exoneration. ... Elizabeth Drew (born November 16, 1935, Cincinnati, Ohio) is an American political journalist and author. ... John F. Harris is a writer for the Washington Post and the author of a book on Bill Clinton called The Survivor (ISBN 0375508473). ... Christopher Eric Hitchens (born in Portsmouth, England April 13, 1949) is an author, journalist and literary critic. ... Michael Isikoff is an investigative journalist for the US-based magazine Newsweek. ... Joe Klein (b. ... David Maraniss (1949- ) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author. ... David Maraniss (1949- ) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author. ... Dick Morris appears on TVs FOX News channel. ... Roger Morris is a British writer and advertising copywriter. ... Richard A. Posner Richard Allen Posner (born January 11, 1939 in New York City) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ...

Academic studies

  • Cohen; Jeffrey E. "The Polls: Change and Stability in Public Assessments of Personal Traits, Bill Clinton, 1993-99" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 31, 2001
  • Cronin, Thomas E. and Michael A. Genovese; "President Clinton and Character Questions" Presidential Studies Quarterly Vol. 28, 1998
  • Davis; John. "The Evolution of American Grand Strategy and the War on Terrorism: Clinton and Bush Perspectives" White House Studies, Vol. 3, 2003
  • Edwards; George C. "Bill Clinton and His Crisis of Governance" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 28, 1998
  • Fisher; Patrick. "Clinton's Greatest Legislative Achievement? the Success of the 1993 Budget Reconciliation Bill" White House Studies, Vol. 1, 2001
  • Glad; Betty. "Evaluating Presidential Character" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 28, 1998
  • Harris, John F. The Survivor: Bill Clinton in the White House. (2005) ISBN 0-375-50847-3, biography
  • William G. Hyland. Clinton's World: Remaking American Foreign Policy (1999) ISBN 0-275-96396-9
  • Jewett, Aubrey W. and Marc D. Turetzky; " Stability and Change in President Clinton's Foreign Policy Beliefs, 1993-96" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 28, 1998
  • Johnson, Fard. "Politics, Propaganda and Public Opinion: The Influence of Race and Class on the 1993 - 1994 Health Care Reform Debate". (2004). ISBN 1-4116-6345-4
  • Laham, Nicholas, A Lost Cause: Bill Clinton's Campaign for National Health Insurance (1996)
  • Lanoue, David J. and Craig F. Emmert; "Voting in the Glare of the Spotlight: Representatives' Votes on the Impeachment of President Clinton" Polity, Vol. 32, 1999
  • Livingston, C. Don, Kenneth A. Wink; "The Passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement in the U.S. House of Representatives: Presidential Leadership or Presidential Luck?" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 27, 1997
  • Maurer; Paul J. "Media Feeding Frenzies: Press Behavior during Two Clinton Scandals" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 29, 1999
  • Nie; Martin A. "'It's the Environment, Stupid!': Clinton and the Environment" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 27, 1997
  • O'Connor; Brendon. "Policies, Principles, and Polls: Bill Clinton's Third Way Welfare Politics 1992-1996" The Australian Journal of Politics and History, Vol. 48, 2002
  • Poveda; Tony G. "Clinton, Crime, and the Justice Department" Social Justice, Vol. 21, 1994
  • Renshon; Stanley A. The Clinton Presidency: Campaigning, Governing, and the Psychology of Leadership Westview Press, 1995
  • Renshon; Stanley A. "The Polls: The Public's Response to the Clinton Scandals, Part 1: Inconsistent Theories, Contradictory Evidence" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 32, 2002
  • Rushefsky, Mark E. and Kant Patel. Politics, Power & Policy Making: The Case of Health Care Reform in the 1990s (1998) ISBN 1-56324-956-1
  • Schantz, Harvey L. Politics in an Era of Divided Government: Elections and Governance in the Second Clinton Administration (2001) ISBN 0-8153-3583-0
  • Wattenberg; Martin P. "The Democrats' Decline in the House during the Clinton Presidency: An Analysis of Partisan Swings" Presidential Studies Quarterly, Vol. 29, 1999
  • Wattier; Mark J. "The Clinton Factor: The Effects of Clinton's Personal Image in 2000 Presidential Primaries and in the General Election" White House Studies, Vol. 4, 2004

References

  1. ^ a b Biography of William J. Clinton, The White House
  2. ^ President Bill Clinton's Hometown Homepage. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  3. ^ Clinton, Bill (June 22, 2004). My Life. Knopf, 52. 
  4. ^ It All Began in a Place Called Hope. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  5. ^ Famous Non-Masons. Retrieved on 2006-12-20.
  6. ^ Your Chelsea - Celebs. Retrieved on 2006-12-20.
  7. ^ Le Beau, Bryan. The Political Mobilization of the New Christian Right. Creighton University. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  8. ^ President seeks better implementation of 'don't ask, don't tell' - CNN, 1999-12-11
  9. ^ Stranger Among Friends. - book reviews - John Cloud, Washington Monthly, November 1996
  10. ^ Washington Blade Editorial: Bush Has Mandate to Let Gays Serve - Kevin Naff, Center for the Study of Sexual Minorities in the Military, 2003-01-10
  11. ^ Patterson, Robert, Lt. Colonel, USAF (Ret) (2003). Dereliction of Duty: The Eyewitness Account of How Bill Clinton Endangered America's Long-Term National Security. Washington, DC: Regnery Publishing Company, 101. ISBN 0-89526-140-5. 
  12. ^ Presidential Press Conference - 08/03/1993
  13. ^ Historical Presidential Approval Ratings, abcnews.go.com, accessed February 27, 2006
  14. ^ http://www.cbo.gov/budget/historical.pdf
  15. ^ "Clinton acquitted; president apologizes again", CNN, February 12, 1999. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  16. ^ "Clinton to contest Supreme Court suspension", CNN, October 2, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  17. ^ "Bill Clinton Disbarment to End", AP/11alive.com, January 18, 2006. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  18. ^ Howard Kurtz, The Washington Post, 11/23/98
  19. ^ Woodward, Bob and Duffy, Brian, "Chinese Embassy Role In Contributions Probed", Washington Post, Feb. 13, 1997
  20. ^ "Clinton pardons: Cast of characters", BBC, 22 February, 2001. Retrieved on 2006-12-21.
  21. ^ Job Performance Ratings for President Clinton, accessed 2006-02-25
  22. ^ Bill Clinton: Job Ratings - PollingReport.com
  23. ^ Poll: Clinton's approval rating up in wake of impeachment - CNN, 1998-12-20
  24. ^ Poll: Majority of Americans glad Clinton is leaving office - Keating Holland, CNN, 2001-01-10
  25. ^ Poll: Clinton outperformed Bush - CNN.com
  26. ^ Bresler, Robert J.. "The Muddled Meaning of the 2000 Election", USA Today (Society for the Advancement of Education), January, 2001. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  27. ^ A Conversation With President Bill Clinton on Race in America Today - interview with Clinton, Center for American Progress, July 16, 2004.
  28. ^ Morrison, Toni (October 1998). Clinton as the first black president. The New Yorker. Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  29. ^ Press release: President Bill Clinton to be keynote speaker at World Congress on IT 2002, World Information Technology and Services Alliance, Adelaide, South Australia
  30. ^ Katherine Hamilton. "Bill Clinton to speak at Class Day", The Daily Princetonian, 2006-04-18
  31. ^ Page, Susan. "Poll: No boost for Kerry after convention", USA TODAY, August 1, 2004. Retrieved on 2007-02-01.
  32. ^ Vedantam, Shankar. "Clinton's Heart Bypass Surgery Called a Success", The Washington Post, September 7, 2004, pp. A01. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  33. ^ Rangel Blasts Clinton as ‘a Redneck’. NewsMax Media (2005-02-08). Retrieved on 2006-12-01.
  34. ^ It's 'Chief Clinton' to you. news.com.au (2005-12-03). Retrieved on 2006-12-03.

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Further information: Category:Bill Clinton

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Political offices
Preceded by
Jim Guy Tucker
Attorney General of Arkansas
1977 – 1979
Succeeded by
Steve Clark
Preceded by
Joe Purcell
Governor of Arkansas
1979 – 1981
Succeeded by
Frank D. White
Preceded by
Frank D. White
Governor of Arkansas
1983 – 1992
Succeeded by
Jim Guy Tucker
Preceded by
Michael Dukakis
Democratic Party presidential nominee
1992 (won), 1996 (won)
Succeeded by
Al Gore
Preceded by
George H. W. Bush
President of the United States
January 20, 1993January 20, 2001
Succeeded by
George W. Bush
Preceded by
Jacques Chirac
Chair of the G8
1997
Succeeded by
Tony Blair
Order of precedence in the United States of America
Preceded by
George H. W. Bush
United States order of precedence
as of 2007
Succeeded by
U.S. ambassadors (while at their posts; otherwise Condoleezza Rice)
Persondata
NAME Clinton, Bill
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Clinton, William Jefferson (full name)
SHORT DESCRIPTION 42nd President of the United States (1993–2001)
DATE OF BIRTH 19 August 1946
PLACE OF BIRTH Hope, Arkansas
DATE OF DEATH living
PLACE OF DEATH

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Statue of James Paul Clarke, marble by Pompeo Coppini. ... Daniel Webster Jones (15 December 1839 -- 25 December 1918) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... Jefferson Jeff Davis (6 May 1862 – 3 January 1913) was a Democratic United States Senator from Arkansas and also served as governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... John Sebastian Little (14 March 1851 - 29 October 1916) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives and governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... John Isaac Ike Moore (7 February 1856–18 March 1937) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... Xenophon Overton Pindall (21 August 1873 - 2 January 1935) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... Jesse M. Martin was a Democratic Governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... George Washington Donaghey (1 July 1856 - 15 December 1937) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas from 1909 to 1913. ... Joseph Taylor Robinson Joseph Taylor Robinson (August 26, 1872 - July 14, 1937) was a Democratic United States Senator, Senate Majority Leader, member of the United States House of Representatives, Governor of Arkansas, and U.S. Vice Presidential candidate. ... William Kavanaugh Oldham (20 May 1865--6 May 1938) was the acting Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas for six days in 1913. ... Junius Marion Futrell (14 August 1870–20 June 1955) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas from 1933 to 1937, and for a short stint in 1913. ... George Washington Hays (23 September 1863--15 September 1927) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... Charles Hillman Brough (9 July 1876–26 December 1935) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas from 1917 to 1921. ... Thomas Chipman McRae (21 December 1851 - 2 June 1929) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives, and was governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas from 1921 to 1925. ... Thomas Jefferson Terral (21 December 1882–9 March 1946) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas from 1925 to 1927. ... John Ellis Martineau (2 December 1873–6 March 1937) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas, USA, from 1927 to 1928. ... Harvey Parnell (28 February 1880–16 January 1936) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas from 1928 to 1933. ... Junius Marion Futrell (14 August 1870–20 June 1955) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas from 1933 to 1937, and for a short stint in 1913. ... Carl Edward Bailey (8 October 1894–23 October 1948) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas from 1937 to 1941. ... Homer Martin Adkins (15 October 1890–26 February 1964) was a Democratic Governor of Arkansas. ... Benjamin Travis Laney (25 November 1896–21 January 1977) was a Democratic Governor of Arkansas. ... Sid McMath, from the cover of his autobiography Promises Kept (University of Arkansas Press, 2003) Sidney Sanders McMath (June 14, 1912 – October 4, 2003) was a decorated U.S. Marine, renowned attorney and progressive Democratic reform Governor of Arkansas (1949–1953) who, in defiance of his states political establishment... Francis Adams Cherry (5 September 1908–15 July 1965) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas from 1953 to 1955. ... Orval Eugene Faubus (7 January 1910–14 December 1994) was a six-term Democratic Governor of Arkansas, infamous for his 1957 stand against integration of Little Rock, Arkansas schools in defiance of U.S. Supreme Court rulings. ... Winthrop Rockefeller (1 May 1912 – 22 February 1973), a member of the prominent United States Rockefeller family, was a politician and philanthropist who served as the first Republican governor of Arkansas since Reconstruction. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Dale Leon Bumpers (born 12 August 1925) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from the State of Arkansas, from 1975 until his retirement in January, 1999; and was governor of Arkansas from 1971 to 1975. ... Bob Cowley Riley (September 18, 1924–February 16, 1994) was the Democratic Governor of Arkansas for ten days in 1975. ... David Hampton Pryor David Hampton Pryor (born August 29, 1934) was a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives and United States Senator from the State of Arkansas. ... Joe Edward Purcell (29 July 1923-March 1987) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas for six days in 1979. ... Frank Durward White (June 4, 1933 - May 21, 2003) was only the second Republican governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas since Reconstruction. ... James Jim Guy Tucker, Jr. ... Michael Dale (Mike) Huckabee (born August 24, 1955, in Hope, Arkansas) has been the governor of the U.S. state of Arkansas since 1996. ... Mike Beebe launches his campaign for Governor in his hometown Searcy, Arkansas Mike Beebe (born December 28, 1946) is the current and 51st Attorney General of the state of Arkansas. ... The presidential seal was used by President Hayes in 1880 and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,732 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Biography of William J. Clinton (607 words)
After the failure in his second year of a huge program of health care reform, Clinton shifted emphasis, declaring "the era of big government is over." He sought legislation to upgrade education, to protect jobs of parents who must care for sick children, to restrict handgun sales, and to strengthen environmental rules.
Clinton was graduated from Georgetown University and in 1968 won a Rhodes Scholarship to Oxford University.
Clinton was elected Arkansas Attorney General in 1976, and won the governorship in 1978.
Bill Clinton - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (10617 words)
William Jefferson "Bill" Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001.
Clinton also battled Congress nearly every session on the federal budget, in an attempt to secure spending on education, government entitlements, the environment, and AmeriCorps–the national service program that was passed by the Democratic Congress in the early days of the Clinton administration.
Clinton had vetoed similar measures in the past, but he agreed to the restrictions when faced with the prospect that the United States would lose its vote in the UN General Assembly for nonpayment of dues.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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