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Encyclopedia > Bill Bryson
Bill Bryson


Born December 8, 1951 (1951-12-08) (age 56)
Des Moines, Iowa, U.S.A.
Occupation Author
Genres Travel, English language, Science

Official website Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Des Moines” redirects here. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about work. ... A literary genre is one of the divisions of literature into genres according to particular criteria such as literary technique, tone, or content. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...

William McGuire "Bill" Bryson, OBE, (born December 8, 1951 in Des Moines, Iowa) is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. He has been a resident of North Yorkshire, England, for most of his adult life, before moving south to Norfolk in 2003. The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Des Moines” redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Norfolk (pronounced ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ...

Contents

Life

Bill Bryson was born in Des Moines, Iowa, the son of William and Mary Bryson. He has an older brother, Michael, and a sister, Mary Elizabeth. “Des Moines” redirects here. ... William McGuire Bryson (March 3, 1915-January 1986) was a sports journalist for the Des Moines Tribune for 50 years. ... Michael G. Bryson is a sports writer from Des Moines and the elder brother of travel writer Bill Bryson. ...


Bryson was educated at Drake University but dropped out in 1972, deciding to backpack around Europe for four months. He returned to Europe the following year with his high-school friend, Stephen Katz (real name Matt Angerer[1]). Some of his experiences from this trip are re-lived as flashbacks in Neither Here Nor There: Travels in Europe, which documents a similar journey Bryson made twenty years later. Drake University is a private, co-educational university located in the city of Des Moines, Iowa. ...


Bryson first visited England in 1973 during a tour of Europe, and decided to stay after landing a job working in a psychiatric hospital - the now defunct Holloway Sanatorium in Virginia Water, Surrey. It was there that he met a nurse by the name of Cynthia, a native of England who would eventually become his wife. The couple returned to the USA in 1975 so Bryson could complete his college degree, after which, in 1977, they settled in England, where they remained until 1995. Living in North Yorkshire and mainly working as a journalist, Bryson eventually became chief sub editor of the business section of The Times, and then deputy national news editor of the business section of The Independent. He left journalism in 1987, three years after the birth of his third child. Still living in Yorkshire, Bryson started writing independently and in 1990 their fourth and final child, Sam, was born. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Virginia Water Lake For the lake, see Virginia Water Lake. ... This article is about the English county. ... North Yorkshire is a non-metropolitan or shire county, located in the Yorkshire and the Humber region of England, and a ceremonial county in that region and also partly in North East England. ... For other uses, see Journalist (disambiguation). ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... For other uses, see The Independent (disambiguation). ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ...


In 1995, Bryson returned to the United States to live in Hanover, New Hampshire for some years, the stories of which feature in his book I'm A Stranger Here Myself, alternatively titled Notes from a Big Country in the United Kingdom and Canada. In 2003, however, the Brysons and their four children returned to England, and now live near Wymondham, Norfolk. Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... , Wymondham Market Cross There is also a Wymondham, Leicestershire Wymondham (pronounced ) is an historic market town and civil parish in the English county of Norfolk. ... Norfolk (pronounced ) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ...


Also in 2003, in conjunction with World Book Day, voters in the United Kingdom chose Bryson's book Notes from a Small Island as that which best sums up British identity and the state of the nation.[2] In the same year, he was appointed a Commissioner for English Heritage. World Book Day 2006 logo in the UK and Ireland World Book and Copyright Day (also known as International Day of the Book or World Book Day) is a yearly event on 23 April, organised by UNESCO to promote reading, publishing and the protection of intellectual property through copyright. ... Notes from a Small Island is a travel book by Bill Bryson. ... The standard of English Heritage English Heritage is a non-departmental public body of the United Kingdom government (Department for Culture, Media and Sport) with a broad remit of managing the historic environment of England. ...


In 2004, Bryson won the prestigious Aventis Prize for best general science book with A Short History of Nearly Everything.[3] This 500 page popular literature piece explores not only the histories and current statuses of the sciences, but also reveals their humble and often humorous beginnings. Although one "top scientist" is alleged to have jokingly described the book as "annoyingly free of mistakes",[4] Bryson himself makes no such claim, and a list of reported errors in the book is available online. In 2005, the book won the EU Descartes prize for science communication.[3] The Aventis Prizes for Science Books is an annual award for the previous years best general science writing and best science writing for children, sponsored by the Aventis Foundation. ... A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson A Short History of Nearly Everything (ISBN 0-7679-0817-1) is a general science book by Bill Bryson, which explains some areas of science in ordinary language. ... René Descartes René Descartes (IPA: , March 31, 1596 – February 11, 1650), also known as Cartesius, worked as a philosopher and mathematician. ...

Chancellor of Durham University
Chancellor of Durham University

Bryson has also written two popular works on the history of the English language — Mother Tongue and Made in America — and, more recently, an update of his guide to usage, Bryson's Dictionary of Troublesome Words (published in its first edition as The Penguin Dictionary of Troublesome Words in 1983). These books were popularly acclaimed and well-reviewed, though they received criticism from academics in the field, who claimed they contained factual errors, urban myths, and folk etymologies. Though Bryson has no formal linguistics qualifications, he is generally a well-regarded writer on the subject of languages. The Mother Tongue (ISBN 0380715430) is a book by Bill Bryson which wittily compiles the history and origins of the English language and its various quirks. ... Made In America (ISBN 0380713810) is a nonfiction book by Bill Bryson describing the history of the English language in America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... Folk etymology is a linguistic term for the modification of a word or phrase based on an ahistorical analogy or an erroneous etymology which is popularly believed to be true. ...


In 2005, Bryson was appointed Chancellor of Durham University,[4] succeeding the late Sir Peter Ustinov, and has even appeared in a Durham student film: the sequel to The Assassinator. He had praised Durham as "a perfect little city" in Notes from a Small Island. He has also been awarded honorary degrees by numerous universities. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Affiliations 1994 Group European University Association Association of MBAs EQUIS Universities UK N8 Group Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (IPA: ; April 16, 1921 – March 28, 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning English actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, Swiss, Russian, German and Ethiopian ancestry. ...


In 2006, Bryson ran (as part of a celebrity relay team) in the Tresco marathon, the Scillian equivalent of the London marathon. The same year, Frank Cownie, the mayor of Des Moines, awarded Bryson the key to the city and announced that October 21, 2006 would be known as, Bill Bryson - "The Thunderbolt Kid" day.[5] The view from the helicopter leaving Tresco Tresco (Cornish: ), is the second largest island of the Isles of Scilly, Cornwall, UK. It is 735 acres in size. ... For other senses of this word, see Marathon (disambiguation). ... St Martins taken from the helicopter to Penzance View from Tresco, the second largest member of the Isles of Scilly For the area of Surrey, see Scilly Isles, Surrey. ... Frank Cownie is the current mayor of Des Moines, Iowa. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


In November 2006, Bryson interviewed Prime Minister Tony Blair on the state of science and education.[6] For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency...


On December 13, 2006, Bryson was awarded an honorary OBE for his contribution to literature.[7] The following year, he was awarded the James Joyce Award of the Literary and Historical Society of University College Dublin. is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire is a British order of chivalry established on 4 June 1917 by King George V. The Order includes five classes in civil and military divisions; in decreasing order of seniority, these are Knight Grand Cross or Dame Grand Cross (GBE) Knight Commander...   The Literary and Historical Society (L&H) is University College Dublins oldest debating society and the official College Debating Union. ...


In January 2007, Bryson was the Schwartz Visiting Fellow of the Pomfret School in Connecticut.[8] Pomfret School was founded by William E. Peck in 1894 on the principles of intellectual rigor and the development of character. ... Official language(s) none (de facto English) Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport[2] Largest metro area Hartford Metro Area[3] Area  Ranked 48th in the US  - Total 5,543[4] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ...


In May 2007, he became the President of the Campaign to Protect Rural England.[9][10] His first area focus in this role was the establishment of an anti-littering campaign across England. He discussed the future of the countryside with Richard Mabey, Sue Clifford, Nicholas Crane and Richard Girling at CPRE's Volunteer Conference in November 2007. The Campaign to Protect Rural England (CPRE, formerly Council for the Preservation of Rural England ) is a voluntary anti-urbanist, pro-nature organisation. ... Richard Mabey (born 20 February 1941) is a naturalist and author. ... Nicholas Crane (born 1954, Hastings) is a British explorer, writer and broadcaster. ...


Bibliography

Travel

  • The Palace Under the Alps and Over 200 Other Unusual, Unspoiled, and Infrequently Visited Spots in 16 European Countries (1985)
  • The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America (1989)
  • Neither Here Nor There: Travels in Europe (1991)
  • Notes from a Small Island (1995) (travels in the United Kingdom, his farewell to the country he was temporarily leaving; adapted for television by Carlton Television in 1998)

Notes from a Small Island is a travel book by Bill Bryson. ... Carlton Television is the United Kingdom Channel 3 (ITV) licensee for London and the surrounding areas from 9:25am every Monday to 5. ... Notes From a Big Country is a collection of articles written by Bill Bryson for a British newspaper. ... Notes From a Big Country is a collection of articles written by Bill Bryson for a British newspaper. ... Down Under is a 2000 travelogue book about Australia written by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ... Down Under is a 2000 travelogue book about Australia written by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ... Bill Brysons African Diary is a 2002 book by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere (CARE) is one of the largest private international humanitarian organizations in the world, with programmes in over 72 countries. ...

Language

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Mother Tongue (ISBN 0380715430) is a book by Bill Bryson which wittily compiles the history and origins of the English language and its various quirks. ... Made In America (ISBN 0380713810) is a nonfiction book by Bill Bryson describing the history of the English language in America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Science

A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson A Short History of Nearly Everything (ISBN 0-7679-0817-1) is a general science book by Bill Bryson, which explains some areas of science in ordinary language. ...

Memoir

The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid is a semi-autobiographical memoir by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ...

Biography

  • Shakespeare: The World as Stage (2007)

References

  1. ^ http://www.itv.com/page.asp?partid=6466
  2. ^ BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Arts | Bryson tops 'England' poll
  3. ^ a b Pauli, Michelle (2005-12-07), "Bryson wins Descartes prize for his guide to science", The Guardian, <http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/profile/story/0,11109,1642405,00.html>
  4. ^ a b "Bill Bryson: The accidental chancellor", The Guardian, 2005-11-15, <http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/profile/story/0,11109,1642405,00.html>
  5. ^ http://www.randomhouse.com/features/billbryson/news/CityofDesMoinesProclamation.pdf
  6. ^ PM in conversation with Bill Bryson
  7. ^ BBC NEWS | Entertainment | Bill Bryson made an honorary OBE
  8. ^ http://www.norwichbulletin.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070121/NEWS01/70121003
  9. ^ BBC NEWS | UK | Bryson to head litterbug campaign
  10. ^ CPRE - Bill Bryson set to be CPRE's new President

Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Academic offices
Preceded by
Sir Peter Ustinov
Chancellor of the University of Durham
2005–
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Persondata
NAME Bryson, William McGuire
ALTERNATIVE NAMES Bryson, Bill
SHORT DESCRIPTION American author
DATE OF BIRTH December 8, 1951 (1951-12-08) (age 56)
PLACE OF BIRTH Des Moines, Iowa, United States
DATE OF DEATH
PLACE OF DEATH
Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Wikiquote is one of a family of wiki-based projects run by the Wikimedia Foundation, running on MediaWiki software. ... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Metacritic is a website that collates reviews of music albums, games, movies, TV shows, DVDs and books. ... Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov, CBE (IPA: ; April 16, 1921 – March 28, 2004), born Peter Alexander Baron von Ustinov, was an Academy Award-winning English actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur of French, Italian, Swiss, Russian, German and Ethiopian ancestry. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Affiliations 1994 Group European University Association Association of MBAs EQUIS Universities UK N8 Group Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... Notes from a Small Island is a travel book by Bill Bryson. ... Notes From a Big Country is a collection of articles written by Bill Bryson for a British newspaper. ... Down Under is a 2000 travelogue book about Australia written by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ... Bill Brysons African Diary is a 2002 book by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ... The Mother Tongue (ISBN 0380715430) is a book by Bill Bryson which wittily compiles the history and origins of the English language and its various quirks. ... Made In America (ISBN 0380713810) is a nonfiction book by Bill Bryson describing the history of the English language in America. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Short History of Nearly Everything by Bill Bryson A Short History of Nearly Everything (ISBN 0-7679-0817-1) is a general science book by Bill Bryson, which explains some areas of science in ordinary language. ... The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid is a semi-autobiographical memoir by best-selling travel writer Bill Bryson. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... “Des Moines” redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bill Bryson - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (809 words)
William 'Bill' McGuire Bryson (born December 8, 1951) is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects.
Bryson has also written two works on the history of the English language - Mother Tongue and Made in America - and, more recently, an update of his guide to usage, Bryson's Dictionary of Troublesome Words (published in its first edition as The Penguin Dictionary of Troublesome Words in 1983).
In 2005, Bryson was appointed Chancellor of Durham University, Durham being a place he had praised as "a perfect little city" in Notes from a Small Island.
A Short History of Nearly Everything - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (586 words)
Bryson tells the story of science through the stories of the people who made the discoveries, such as Edwin Hubble, Isaac Newton, and Albert Einstein.
Bill Bryson wrote this book because he was dissatisfied with his scientific knowledge — that was, not much at all.
Bryson ends the book by noting how many extinctions humans are responsible for, and how lucky mankind is to be living on planet Earth today.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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