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Encyclopedia > Bill Bradley
Bill Bradley
Bill Bradley

In office
January 3, 1979 – January 3, 1997
Preceded by Clifford P. Case
Succeeded by Robert Torricelli

Born July 28, 1943 (1943-07-28) (age 64)
Crystal City, Missouri
Political party Democratic
Spouse Ernestine Bradley
Religion Presbyterian

William Warren "Bill" Bradley (born July 28, 1943) is an American hall of fame basketball player, Rhodes scholar, and former U.S. Senator from New Jersey and presidential candidate, who opposed Vice President Al Gore for the Democratic Party's nomination for President in the 2000 election. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Clifford P. Case on the cover of Time Magazine (18 October 1954) Clifford Phillip Case (16 April 1904 in Franklin Park, New Jersey – 5 March 1982 in Washington, DC) was an American lawyer political figure, serving in the U.S. House of Representatives (1945–1953) and United States Senate (1955... Robert Guy Torricelli (born August 27, 1951), nicknamed the Torch, is an American politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Crystal City is a city located in Jefferson County, Missouri. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Bill Bradley may refer to: Bill Bradley, retired American politician and basketball player Bill Bradley (ABA), retired American Basketball Association player Bill Bradley (cricketer), a cricket player Bill Bradley (baseball player), a former baseball player Bill Bradley (football player), a football player William Bradley Category: ... There are different people named William Bradley: William Warren Bill Bradley, the basketball star and U.S. Senator from New Jersey. ... is the 209th day of the year (210th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... This article is about the sport. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Politics Portal      The United States Senate is one of the two chambers of the bicameral United States Congress, the... Official language(s) English de facto Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Area  Ranked 47th  - Total 8,729 sq mi (22,608 km²)  - Width 70 miles (110 km)  - Length 150 miles (240 km)  - % water 14. ... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... In the United States presidential election of 2000 Republican George W. Bush gained the US Presidency over Democrat Al Gore after the United States Supreme Court in Bush v. ...

Contents

College basketball

Bradley was born in Crystal City, Missouri to Warren Bradley, a banker, and Susie Crowe.[1] Bradley began playing basketball in fourth grade. He was a basketball star at Crystal City High School, scoring 3,068 points in his scholastic career and twice being named an All-American. With stellar academic credentials as well, he received 75 scholarship offers. Crystal City is a city located in Jefferson County, Missouri. ... Fourth grade (called Grade 4 in some regions) is a year of education in America and many other nations. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


The 6' 5" (1.96 m) Bradley chose Princeton University, even though Ivy League colleges could not offer athletic scholarships. At Princeton, under coach Butch van Breda Kolff, Bradley was a three-time All-American and the 1965 National Player of the Year. With Bradley in tow, the Tigers captured the Ivy League championship in each of his three varsity seasons. During his sophomore campaign, Bradley averaged 27.3 points and 12.2 rebounds a game while hitting 89.3 percent of his free throws. Among his greatest games was a 41-point effort in an 80-78 loss to heavily favored Michigan in the 1964 Holiday Festival (Bradley fouled out with his team leading 75-63), and a 58-point outburst against Wichita State in the 1965 NCAA tournament, which was a single game record. In total, Bradley scored 2,503 points at Princeton, averaging 30.2 points per game. In 1965, Bradley became the first basketball player chosen as winner of the James E. Sullivan Award, presented to the United States' top amateur athlete in the country. Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... “VBK” redirects here. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Wichita State University (WSU) is an American state-supported university located in the middle-size city of Wichita, Kansas, in the south central part of the state. ... The 1965 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 23 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The AAU James E. Sullivan Award is awarded annually by the Amateur Athletic Union to the outstanding amateur athlete in the United States. ...

Olympic medal record
Men's Basketball
Gold 1964 Tokyo United States
Bill Bradley playing basketball in 1964
Bill Bradley playing basketball in 1964

As a freshman, Bradley sank 57 successive free throws, a record unmatched by any other player, college or professional. As a sophomore, he led the league in rebounds, field goals, free throws, and total points, and, when he fouled out after scoring a record-breaking 40 points in an NCAA tournament game with Saint Joseph's in Philadelphia, was given an unprecedented ovation. This article is about the sport. ... The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad, were held in 1964 in Tokyo, Japan. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 522 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2180 × 2504 pixel, file size: 284 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) High resolution version http://memory. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 522 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2180 × 2504 pixel, file size: 284 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) High resolution version http://memory. ... Saint Josephs University is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic university located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in the United States. ...


In his junior year, he scored 51 points against Harvard, more than the entire opposing team had scored before he was taken out, and his 33.1 points-per-game average that season set an Ivy League record. Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ...


In his senior year, when he was captain, he led Princeton to the highest national ranking it had ever had in basketball. The Tigers placed third behind UCLA and Michigan in the NCAA tournament, as a result of an 118-82 victory over Wichita State in the consolation game of the semi-finals. In the Wichita game, Bradley scored 58 points, an NCAA tournament record that still stands today. The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ...

John McPhee's A Sense of Where You Are (1965) is a book-length profile of Bradley at age 21.
John McPhee's A Sense of Where You Are (1965) is a book-length profile of Bradley at age 21.

Bradley graduated with honors and was awarded a Rhodes Scholarship at Worcester College, Oxford University. Bradley also served as captain of the gold medal-winning U.S. Olympic basketball team in 1964. This image is a book cover. ... This image is a book cover. ... John McPhee John Angus McPhee (born March 8, 1931) is a writer widely considered one of the pioneers of creative nonfiction. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... Worcester College has been an institution of learning since the late thirteenth century, even though the current college was founded only in the eighteenth century. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Captain is a rank or title with various meanings. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... This article or section is incomplete and may require expansion and/or cleanup. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ...


Professional basketball

After completing his studies at Oxford, and playing professional basketball briefly in Italy for Olimpia Milano (1965/66 season), where he won a European Champions Cup (the most important trophy for European teams), Bradley returned to the U.S. to join the New York Knicks of the National Basketball Association. On the court, Bradley struggled his rookie year before coming into his own in his second season. During that season, he was moved from the guard position to his more natural forward position. In 1969–70, he helped the Knicks win their first NBA championship, followed by a second in 1972–73. The second championship season was Bradley’s best and he made his only All-Star Game appearance that year. Retiring from basketball in 1977, he was elected to the Basketball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility. In 1984 the Knicks retired his number 24 jersey. The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The Euroleague (EL) is a high-calibre professional basketball league with teams from thirteen different European countries. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ...


In the NBA, Bradley was not the major scoring threat he had been in college. Over ten years playing small forward for the Knicks, "Dollar Bill," as he was nicknamed, scored a total of 9,217 points for an average of 12.4 points per game, with his seasonal best being 16.1 points per game. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


During his time in the NBA, Bradley used his fame on the court to explore social as well as political issues, meeting with journalists, government officials, academics, businesspeople and social activists. He also worked as an assistant to the director of the Office of Economic Opportunity in Washington, D.C. making contacts in Democratic circles. In 1976, Bill also became an author, with Life on the Run, which chronicled his experiences in the NBA and the people he met along the way.


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Presidential candidate

Bradley ran in the 2000 primaries, opposing incumbent Vice President Al Gore for his party's nomination. Bradley campaigned as the liberal alternative to Gore, taking positions to the left of Gore on a number of issues, including universal health care, gun control, and campaign finance reform. This article discusses the primary elections to nominate candidates for the 2000 U.S. presidential election. ... Seal of the office of the Vice-President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the President. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... American liberalism—that is, liberalism in the United States of America—is a broad political and philosophical mindset, favoring individual liberty, and opposing restrictions on liberty, whether they come from established religion, from government regulation, from the existing class structure, or from multi-national corporations. ... Universal health care is a state in which all residents of a geographic or political region have access to most types of health care. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gun politics. ... Political campaign Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Campaign finance reform is the common term for the political effort in the United States to change the involvement of money in politics, primarily in political campaigns. ...


On the issue of taxes, Bradley trumpeted his sponsorship of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, which had significantly cut tax rates, while simultaneously abolishing dozens of loopholes. He voiced his belief that the best possible tax code would be one with low rates and no loopholes, but he refused to rule out the idea of raising taxes to pay for his health care program. “Taxes” redirects here. ... President Ronald Reagan signs the Tax Reform Act of 1986 on the South Lawn. ... A tax (also known as a dutyor Zakat in islamic economics) is a charge or other levy imposed on an individual or a legal entity by a state or a functional equivalent of a state (e. ... The term loophole could refer to a number of things: See Embrasure; a slit in a castle wall Loophole (1954 movie) Loophole (1981 movie) for other meaning see Loophole at Wikionary Cash Loopholes ...

Bill Bradley on the cover of Time magazine on October 4, 1999.
Bill Bradley on the cover of Time magazine on October 4, 1999.

On public education, Bradley reversed his previous support of school vouchers, declaring them to be a failure. He proposed to make over $2 billion in block grants available to each state every year to be used for education. He further promised to bring 60,000 new teachers into the education system annually by offering college scholarships to anyone who agreed to become a teacher after graduating. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Time (whose trademark is capitalized TIME) is a weekly American newsmagazine, similar to Newsweek and U.S. News & World Report. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... // Public education is education mandated for the children of the general public by the government, whether national, regional, or local, provided by an institution of civil government, and paid for, in whole or in part, by taxes. ... An education voucher, commonly called a school voucher, is a certificate by which parents are given the ability to pay for the education of their children at a school of their choice, rather than the public school to which they were assigned. ... In a federal system of taxation systems and spent it without any restrictions from above. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


Bradley also made child poverty a significant issue in his campaign. Having voted against the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Act, better known as the "Welfare Reform Act," which, he said, would result in even higher poverty levels, he promised to repeal it as president. He also promised to address the minimum wage, expand the Earned Income Tax Credit, allow single parents on welfare to keep their child support payments, make the Dependent Care Tax Credit refundable, build support homes for pregnant teenagers, enroll 400,000 more children in Head Start, and increase the availability of food stamps. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA, Pub. ... The minimum wage is the minimum rate a worker can legally be paid (usually per hour) as opposed to wages that are determined by the forces of supply and demand in a free market. ... The United States federal Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) is a refundable tax credit that reduces or eliminates the taxes that low-income working people pay (such as payroll taxes) and also frequently operates as a wage subsidy for low-income workers. ... It has been suggested that Baby mama be merged into this article or section. ... In many countries, child support or child maintenance is the ongoing obligation for a periodic payment made by a non-custodial parent to a custodial parent, caregiver or guardian, for the care and support of children of a relationship or marriage that has been terminated. ... A child tax credit is a tax credit based on the number of dependent children in a family. ... Teenage pregnancy is defined as an underaged girl becoming pregnant with a baby. ... Head Start is a program of the United States Department of Health and Human Services that focuses on assisting children from low-income families. ... The Food Stamp Program is a federal assistance program that provides food to low income people living in the United States. ...


Although Gore was considered the favorite of the party, Bradley did receive a few high-profile endorsements. He was supported by Senators Paul Wellstone, Bob Kerrey, and Daniel Moynihan; former Senators John A. Durkin and Adlai Stevenson III; Governor John Kitzhaber; former Governors Lowell P. Weicker, Jr. (a former Republican), Mario Cuomo, Ray Mabus, Brendan Byrne, Robert W. Scott, Neil Goldschmidt, Phil Noel, Tony Earl, and Pat Lucey; Congressmen Luis Gutierrez and Jim McDermott; former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich; former New York City Mayor Ed Koch; former Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker; and Harvard Professor Cornel West and even from Michael Jordan and best friend Phil Jackson . Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Joseph Robert Bob Kerrey (born August 27, 1943) was the Democratic Governor of Nebraska from 1983 to 1987, and a U.S. Senator from Nebraska (1989–2001). ... Daniel Patrick Pat Moynihan (March 16, 1927 - March 26, 2003) was a four-term U.S. Senator, ambassador, administration official, and academic. ... credited to the United States Senate Historical Office For the professor at the University of Akron, see John Durkin. ... Adlai Stevenson III Adlai Ewing Stevenson III (born October 10, 1930, in Chicago) is an American politician of the Democratic party. ... John Kitzhaber (born March 5, 1947) is a physician and United States Democratic Party politician from Oregon. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mario Matthew Cuomo (born June 15, 1932) served as the Governor of New York from 1983 to 1995. ... Although Ray Mabus was the youngest governor in America at the time of his inauguration on January 12, 1988, he had accumulated an impressive record of public service and academic achievements. ... Brendan Thomas Byrne (born April 1, 1924) was the Democratic governor of the U.S. state of New Jersey from 1974 to 1982. ... Robert Walter (Bob) Scott (born 13 June 1929, Haw River, North Carolina) was the Democratic governor of the state of North Carolina from 1969 to 1973. ... Neil Edward Goldschmidt (born June 16, 1940) is a former politician and businessman living in the State of Oregon and a member of the United States Democratic Party. ... Anthony Scully Earl, (bornApril 12, 1936) in Lansing, Michigan, American politician and a member of the Democratic party, served as the 41st Governor of Wisconsin from 1983 until 1987. ... Luis Gutiérrez Luís Vicente Gutiérrez (born December 10, 1953), American politician, has been a Democratic member of the United States House of Representatives since 1993, representing the 4th District of Illinois (map). ... James Adelbert Bagdhad Jim McDermott (born December 28, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois) is the current U.S. Representative for Washingtons 7th congressional district. ... The United States Secretary of Labor is the head of the United States Department of Labor. ... Robert Bernard Reich (born June 24, 1946) was the twenty-second United States Secretary of Labor, serving under President Bill Clinton from 1993 to 1997. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Edward Irving Koch (born December 12, 1924; pronounced to rhyme with Scotch) was a United States Congressman from 1969 to 1977 and the Mayor of New York City from 1978 to 1989. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ... Economist Paul Adolph Volcker (September 5, 1927 - ) born in Cape May, New Jersey, is best-known as the Chairman of the Federal Reserve under United States Presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan (from August 1979 to August 1987). ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a prominent African-American scholar and public intellectual. ... For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is the current coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, an American professional basketball team. ...


Bradley's campaign ultimately floundered, in part because it was overshadowed by Senator John McCain's far more attention-gaining, but ultimately unsuccessful, campaign for the Republican nomination, and in part because it was not able to match Gore's organization once the multiple-primary Super Tuesdays began. For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ... In the United States, Super Tuesday commonly refers to a Tuesday in early March of a presidential election year. ...


Recent years

Bradley has mostly stayed out of the limelight since his failed 2000 presidential primary campaign, working mainly as a corporate consultant and investment banker. He is chief outside advisor to McKinsey & Company's nonprofit practice. In 2005, he joined the advisory board of British corporate investigation firm Hakluyt & Company. Oxford University awarded Bradley an honorary Doctor of Civil Law (DCL) in 2003, with the comment that he was "An outstandingly distinguished athlete, a weighty pillar of the Senate, and still a powerful advocate of the weak." A consultant (from the Latin consultare meaning to discuss from which we also derive words such as consul and counsel) is a professional who provides expert advice in a particular area of expertise such as accountancy, the environment, technology, the law, human resources, marketing, medicine, finance, public affairs, communication, engineering... An investment banker works for an investment bank. ... McKinsey & Company is a privately owned management consulting firm that focuses on solving issues of concern to senior management in large corporations and organizations. ... Hakluyt & Company is a British corporate investigation firm. ...


Despite some speculation about a second presidential run, he did not run in 2004 and has shown no interest in returning to political office. In 2002, he reportedly turned down a last-minute offer from New Jersey Democrats to replace Robert Torricelli on the ballot for his old Senate seat (Frank Lautenberg accepted it instead). In January of 2004, Bradley endorsed Howard Dean for President in the 2004 Democratic primaries, joining his old rival Al Gore in making that move — the endorsement, however, did not have any apparent effect on Dean's unexpectedly unsuccessful campaign. Bradley's book, The New American Story, was released on March 27, 2007. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Robert Guy Torricelli (born August 27, 1951), nicknamed the Torch, is an American politician from the U.S. state of New Jersey. ... Frank Raleigh Lautenberg (born January 23, 1924) is a businessman and Democratic Party politician. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Albert Arnold Gore, Jr. ... The New American Story is a book written by former United States Senator and 2000 presidential hopeful, Bill Bradley, and first published on March 27, 2007. ...


Trivia

  • He appears as a character and vice President of the United States in Jeffrey Archer book Shall We Tell the President?[citation needed]
  • Bradley is an Eagle Scout and recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award from the Boy Scouts of America.[2][3]
  • Bradley's basketball ability was enhanced by his unusually wide peripheral vision. While most people's horizontal field covers 180 degrees, his covered 192 degrees. Vertically most people can see 47 degrees upward; Bradley could see 72 degrees.[4]
  • Bradley is left-handed.
  • Bradley appeared in the second episode of Saturday Night Live, giving a trophy to guest host Paul Simon for winning a one-on-one contest with an Atlanta Hawks player in an earlier (pre-taped) segment of the program.
  • Bradley spoke at Groton School's Prize Day in 2006.[5]
  • During his high school years, Bradley maintained a maniacal practice schedule. He would work on the court for "three and a half hours every day after school, nine to five on Saturday, one-thirty to five on Sunday, and, in the summer, about three hours a day. He put ten pounds of lead slivers in his sneakers, set up chairs as opponents and dribbled in a slalom fashion around them, and wore eyeglass frames that had a piece of cardboard taped to them so that he could not see the floor, for a good dribbler never looks at the ball."[6]
  • Bradley is a close friend of NBA Coach Phil Jackson, they met when they were traveling roommates playing for the New York Knickerbockers together. In 2000, Jackson was a vocal supporter of Bradley's run for the presidency, often displaying his campaign button in public. In the 2007 Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremony, Bradley accompanied Jackson who was one of the inductees of that year.

Not to be confused with Geoffrey Archer. ... Shall We Tell The President? is a 1977 book by English author Jeffrey Archer. ... An Eagle Scout is a Scout with the highest rank attainable in the Boy Scouting program of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... The Distinguished Eagle Scout Award, is a special award, awarded only to Eagle Scouts, for distinguished service in his profession or to the community for a period of at least 25 years after earning his Eagle Scout rank. ... For the Boy Scouting program within the BSA, see Boy Scouting (Boy Scouts of America). ... People who are left-handed are more dextrous with their left hand than with their right hand: they will probably also use their left hand for tasks such as personal care, cooking, and so on. ... This article is about the American television series. ... Paul Frederic Simon (born October 13, 1941) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, half of the folk-singing duo Simon and Garfunkel who continues a successful solo career. ... The Atlanta Hawks are an American professional basketball team based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Philip Douglas Phil Jackson (born September 17, 1945 in Deer Lodge, Montana) is the current coach of the Los Angeles Lakers, an American professional basketball team. ... The New York Knicks (or New York Knickerbockers) are a National Basketball Association team based in New York, New York. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://www.wargs.com/political/bradley.html
  2. ^ Townley, Alvin [2006-12-26]. Legacy of Honor: The Values and Influence of America's Eagle Scouts. New York: St. Martin's Press, p. 9. ISBN 0-312-36653-1. Retrieved on 2006-12-29. 
  3. ^ Ray, Mark (2007). What It Means to Be an Eagle Scout. Scouting Magazine. Boy Scouts of America. Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  4. ^ Wicked Problems: Peripheral Vision. Squarspace.com (2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  5. ^ Groton School Celebrates 120th Prize Day. Groton School (2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-05.
  6. ^ Birnbaum, Jeffrey H. (1987). Showdown at Gucci Gulch. 

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Peter Miller Dawkins (born March 8, 1938 in Royal Oak, Michigan) is a former U.S. Army Brigadier General, Heisman Trophy winner, Rhodes Scholar, and businessman. ...

Further reading

  • Bradley, Bill The New American Story (Random House, 2007) ISBN 978-1-40006-507-3
  • Bradley, Bill The Journey from Here (Artisan, 2000) ISBN 1-57965-165-8
  • Bradley, Bill Values of the Game (Artisan, 1998) ISBN 1-57965-116-X
  • Bradley, Bill Time Present, Time Past: A Memoir (Diane Pub Co, 1996) ISBN 0-7881-5778-7
  • Bradley, Bill Life on the Run (Bantam Books, 1977) ISBN 0-553-11055-1
  • McPhee, John A Sense of Where You Are: Bill Bradley at Princeton (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 1965) ISBN 0-374-51485-2

John McPhee John Angus McPhee (born March 8, 1931) is a writer widely considered one of the pioneers of creative nonfiction. ...

External links

Preceded by
Walt Hazzard
NCAA Basketball Tournament
Most Outstanding Player
(men's)

1965
Succeeded by
Jerry Chambers
Preceded by
Clifford P. Case
United States Senator (Class 2) from New Jersey
19791997
Served alongside: Harrison A. Williams, Jr., Nicholas F. Brady, Frank Lautenberg
Succeeded by
Robert Torricelli

  Results from FactBites:
 
Bill Bradley - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1776 words)
Bradley was re-elected in 1984 with 64% of the vote, and he still retained popularity in New Jersey from his Knicks days and from practices such as his annual Labor Day talk-to-citizens stroll along Jersey Shore beaches.
Bradley's campaign ultimately foundered, in part because it was overshadowed by Senator John McCain's far more attention-gaining, but ultimately unsuccessful, campaign for the Republican nomination, and in part because it was not able to match Gore's organization once the multiple-primary Super Tuesdays began.
Bradley is an Eagle Scout and recipient of the Distinguished Eagle Scout Award from the Boy Scouts of America.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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