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Encyclopedia > Big Read

The Big Read was a 2003 survey carried out by the BBC, with the goal of finding the "Nation's Best-loved Book" by way of a viewer vote via the Web, SMS and telephone. The show attracted controversy for adopting an allegedly sensationalist approach to literature, but supporters praised it for raising the public awareness of reading. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, invariably known as the BBC (and also informally known as the Beeb or Auntie) is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world, employing 26,000 staff in the UK alone and with a budget of £4 billion. ... Sensationalism is a manner of being extremely controversial, loud, attention-grabbing, or otherwise sensationalistic. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ...

Contents

Results - BBC version 1-200

  1. The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  2. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  3. His Dark Materials by Philip Pullman
  4. The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
  5. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J. K. Rowling
  6. To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee
  7. Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne
  8. Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
  9. The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C. S. Lewis
  10. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
  11. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  12. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
  13. Birdsong by Sebastian Faulks
  14. Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier
  15. The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger
  16. The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
  17. Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  18. Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
  19. Corelli's Mandolin by Louis de Bernieres
  20. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  21. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  22. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by J. K. Rowling
  23. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J. K. Rowling
  24. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling
  25. The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien
  26. Tess of the D'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy
  27. Middlemarch by George Eliot
  28. A Prayer for Owen Meany by John Irving
  29. The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck
  30. Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
  31. The Story of Tracy Beaker by Jacqueline Wilson
  32. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
  33. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  34. David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  35. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
  36. Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
  37. A Town Like Alice by Nevil Shute
  38. Persuasion by Jane Austen
  39. Dune by Frank Herbert
  40. Emma by Jane Austen
  41. Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  42. Watership Down by Richard Adams
  43. The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
  44. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  45. Brideshead Revisited by Evelyn Waugh
  46. Animal Farm by George Orwell
  47. A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
  48. Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
  49. Goodnight Mister Tom by Michelle Magorian
  50. The Shell Seekers by Rosamunde Pilcher
  51. The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
  52. Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck
  53. The Stand by Stephen King
  54. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  55. A Suitable Boy by Vikram Seth
  56. The BFG by Roald Dahl
  57. Swallows and Amazons by Arthur Ransome
  58. Black Beauty by Anna Sewell
  59. Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer
  60. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
  61. Noughts and Crosses by Malorie Blackman
  62. Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
  63. A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  64. The Thorn Birds by Colleen McCullough
  65. Mort by Terry Pratchett
  66. The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton
  67. The Magus by John Fowles
  68. Good Omens by Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett
  69. Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett
  70. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  71. Perfume by Patrick Süskind
  72. The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists by Robert Tressell
  73. Night Watch by Terry Pratchett
  74. Matilda by Roald Dahl
  75. Bridget Jones's Diary by Helen Fielding
  76. The Secret History by Donna Tartt
  77. The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins
  78. Ulysses by James Joyce
  79. Bleak House by Charles Dickens
  80. Double Act by Jacqueline Wilson
  81. The Twits by Roald Dahl
  82. I Capture the Castle by Dodie Smith
  83. Holes by Louis Sachar
  84. Gormenghast by Mervyn Peake
  85. The God of Small Things by Arundhati Roy
  86. Vicky Angel by Jacqueline Wilson
  87. Brave New World by Aldous Huxley
  88. Cold Comfort Farm by Stella Gibbons
  89. Magician by Raymond E. Feist
  90. On the Road by Jack Kerouac
  91. The Godfather by Mario Puzo
  92. The Clan of the Cave Bear by Jean M. Auel
  93. The Colour of Magic by Terry Pratchett
  94. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  95. Katherine by Anya Seton
  96. Kane and Abel by Jeffrey Archer
  97. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
  98. Girls In Love by Jacqueline Wilson
  99. The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
  100. Midnight's Children by Salman Rushdie
  101. Three Men In A Boat by Jerome K. Jerome
  102. Small Gods by Terry Pratchett
  103. The Beach by Alex Garland
  104. Dracula by Bram Stoker
  105. Point Blanc by Anthony Horowitz
  106. The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
  107. Stormbreaker by Anthony Horowitz
  108. The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks
  109. The Day of The Jackal by Frederick Forsyth
  110. The Illustrated Mum by Jacqueline Wilson
  111. Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
  112. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13¾ by Sue Townsend
  113. The Cruel Sea by Nicholas Monsarrat
  114. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
  115. The Mayor of Casterbridge by Thomas Hardy
  116. The Dare Game by Jacqueline Wilson
  117. Bad Girls by Jacqueline Wilson
  118. The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
  119. Shogun by James Clavell
  120. The Day of The Triffids by John Wyndham
  121. Lola Rose by Jacqueline Wilson
  122. Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  123. The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
  124. House of Leaves by Mark Z. Danielewski
  125. The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver
  126. Reaper Man by Terry Pratchett
  127. Angus, Thongs And Full-Frontal Snogging by Louise Rennison
  128. The Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle
  129. Possession by A. S. Byatt
  130. The Master And Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  131. The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
  132. Danny The Champion of The World by Roald Dahl
  133. East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  134. George's Marvellous Medicine by Roald Dahl
  135. Wyrd Sisters by Terry Pratchett
  136. The Color Purpleby Alice Walker
  137. Hogfather by Terry Pratchett
  138. The Thirty-Nine Steps by John Buchan
  139. Girls In Tears by Jacqueline Wilson
  140. Sleepovers by Jacqueline Wilson
  141. All Quiet On The Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque
  142. Behind The Scenes At The Museum by Kate Atkinson
  143. High Fidelity by Nick Hornby
  144. It by Stephen King
  145. James And The Giant Peach by Roald Dahl
  146. The Green Mile by Stephen King
  147. Papillon by Henri Charriere
  148. Men At Arms by Terry Pratchett
  149. Master And Commander by Patrick O'Brian
  150. Skeleton Key by Anthony Horowitz
  151. Soul Music by Terry Pratchett
  152. Thief of Time by Terry Pratchett
  153. The Fifth Elephant by Terry Pratchett
  154. Atonement by Ian McEwan
  155. Secrets by Jacqueline Wilson
  156. The Silver Sword by Ian Serraillier
  157. One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey
  158. Heart Of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
  159. Kim by Rudyard Kipling
  160. Cross Stitch by Diana Gabaldon
  161. Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  162. River God by Wilbur Smith
  163. Sunset Song by Lewis Grassic Gibbon
  164. The Shipping News by Annie Proulx
  165. The World According To Garp by John Irving
  166. Lorna Doone by R. D. Blackmore
  167. Girls Out Late by Jacqueline Wilson
  168. The Far Pavilions by M. M. Kaye
  169. The Witches by Roald Dahl
  170. Charlotte's Web by E. B. White
  171. Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
  172. They Used To Play On Grass by Terry Venables and Gordon Williams
  173. The Old Man And The Sea by Ernest Hemingway
  174. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
  175. Sophie's World by Jostein Gaarder
  176. Dustbin Baby by Jacqueline Wilson
  177. Fantastic Mr Fox by Roald Dahl
  178. Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
  179. Jonathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach
  180. The Little Prince by Antoine De Saint-Exupery
  181. The Suitcase Kid by Jacqueline Wilson
  182. Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens
  183. The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay
  184. Silas Marner by George Eliot
  185. American Psycho by Bret Easton Ellis
  186. The Diary Of A Nobody by George and Weedon Grossmith
  187. Trainspotting by Irvine Welsh
  188. Goosebumps by R. L. Stine
  189. Heidi by Johanna Spyri
  190. Sons And Lovers by D. H. LawrenceLife of Lawrence
  191. The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
  192. Man And Boy by Tony Parsons
  193. The Truth by Terry Pratchett
  194. The War Of The Worlds by H. G. Wells
  195. The Horse Whisperer by Nicholas Evans
  196. A Fine Balance by Rohinton Mistry
  197. Witches Abroad by Terry Pratchett
  198. The Once And Future King by T. H. White
  199. The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle
  200. Flowers in the Attic by Virginia Andrews

The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ... Pride and Prejudice, first published on 28 January 1813, is the most famous of Jane Austens novels. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The trilogy (non-North American versions), in order of succession from left to right. ... Philip Pullman CBE (born October 19, 1946) is an English writer. ... The cover of the first novel in the Hitchhikers series, from a late 1990s printing. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was a British author, comic radio dramatist, and amateur musician. ... Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire is the fourth book in the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... To Kill a Mockingbird is a 1960 novel by Harper Lee, which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1961. ... Harper Lee (right) with producer Alan J. Pakula in a 1962 publicity photo for the film of To Kill a Mockingbird Nelle Harper Lee (born April 28, 1926) is an American novelist, best known for her Pulitzer Prize-winning 1960 novel To Kill a Mockingbird. ... Winnie the Pooh Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, and for various childrens poems. ... Nineteen Eighty-Four (commonly abbreviated to 1984) is a dystopian novel by the English writer George Orwell, first published by Secker and Warburg in 1949. ... Eric Arthur Blair (June 25, 1903[1][2] – January 21, 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe is a fantasy novel for children by C. S. Lewis. ... Clive Staples Lewis (29 November 1898 – 22 November 1963), commonly referred to as C. S. Lewis, was a Northern Irish author and scholar. ... Jane Eyre is a classic romance novel by Charlotte Brontë which was published in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Company, London, and is one of the most famous British novels of all time. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become enduring classics of English literature. ... Catch 22 can refer to: A book by Joseph Heller, or the movie based on the book; see Catch-22. ... (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirist best remembered for writing the satiric World War II classic Catch-22. ... Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontës only novel. ... Portrait by her brother Emily Jane Brontë (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was an English novelist and poet, best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, which is now an acknowledged classic of English literature. ... Birdsong is a novel by Sebastian Faulks, published by Vintage in 1993. ... 88. ... Rebecca is a novel by prolific British author Daphne du Maurier, published in 1938 and considered to be one of the authors best-known works. ... Dame Daphne du Maurier DBE (13 May 1907–19 April 1989) was a famous British novelist best known for her short stories like The Birds and her classic novel Rebecca, published in 1938, which was the inspiration for Alfred Hitchcocks Oscar-winning film. ... The Catcher in the Rye is a novel by J. D. Salinger. ... Jerome David Salinger (b. ... Ratty and Mole, as interpreted by E. H. Shepard The Wind in the Willows is a classic of childrens literature written in 1908 by Kenneth Grahame. ... Kenneth Grahame Kenneth Grahame (March 8, 1859 – July 6, 1932) was a Scottish novelist. ... Great Expectations is a Bildungsroman (a novel tracing the life of the protagonist) by Charles Dickens and first serialized in All the Year Round from December 1860 to August 1861. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Little Women is a novel by Louisa May Alcott published on September 30, 1868, concerning the lives and loves of four sisters growing up during the American Civil War. ... Louisa May Alcott (November 29, 1832 – March 6, 1888) was an American novelist. ... Spoiler warning: Captain Corellis Mandolin is a novel by Louis de Bernières. ... Louis de Bernières (b. ... War and Peace (Russian: Война и мир, Vojna i mir; in original orthography: Война и миръ, Vojna i mir) is an epic novel by Leo Tolstoy, first published from 1865 to 1869 in Russki Vestnik, which tells the story of Russian society during the Napoleonic Era. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: , Lev Nikolaevič Tolstoj), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 [O.S. August 28] – November 20, 1910 [O.S. November 7]) was a Russian novelist, writer, essayist, philosopher, Christian anarchist, pacifist, educational reformer, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member of... Gone With the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, that was published in 1936. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books written by English author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Wikibooks Muggles Guide to Harry Potter has more about this subject: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J.K. Rowling, is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third book in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... The Hobbit is a novel written by J. R. R. Tolkien in the tradition of the fairy tale. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ... A 2000 Wordsworth Classics paperback edition Tess of the dUrbervilles is a novel by Thomas Hardy, first published in 1891. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... Middlemarch is a novel by George Eliot, first published in 1871. ... George Eliots birthplace at South Farm, Arbury George Eliot is the pen name of Mary Anne Evans[1] (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), who was an English novelist. ... A Prayer for Owen Meany is a novel by American writer John Irving, first published in 1989. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... The Grapes of Wrath is a classic novel published in 1939 and written by John Steinbeck, who was subsequently awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) is one of the best known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Lewis Carroll. ... The Story of Tracy Beaker is a novel about a child in care by Jacqueline Wilson, which was published in 1991. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad) is a novel by Gabriel García Márquez which was first published in Spanish in 1967 (Buenos Aires: Sudamericana), with an English translation by Gregory Rabassa released in 1970 (New York: Harper and Row). ... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... The cover art of Pillars of the Earth, US edition The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Ken Follett about the building of a cathedral in Kingsbridge (a fictional town located roughly in the area of the present-day town of Marlborough, Wiltshire in England). ... Ken Follett Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... It has been suggested that David Copperfield (character) be merged into this article or section. ... Dickens redirects here. ... For other uses, see Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (disambiguation) Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (1964) is a childrens book by British author Roald Dahl. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Treasure Island is an adventure novel by Scottish author Robert Louis Stevenson, narrating a tale of buccaneers and buried gold. First published as a book in 1883, it was originally serialised in the childrens magazine Young Folks between 1881-82 under the title The Sea Cook, or Treasure Island. ... Robert Louis Stevenson Robert Louis (Balfour) Stevenson (November 13, 1850 – December 3, 1894), was a Scottish novelist, poet, and travel writer, and a leading representative of Neo-romanticism in English literature. ... A Town Like Alice is a novel by the English author Nevil Shute. ... Nevil Shute (London, January 17, 1899 – Melbourne, January 12, 1960) (full name Nevil Shute Norway) was one of the most popular novelists of the mid-20th century. ... Persuasion book cover Persuasion is the last completed novel Jane Austen wrote, and was first published posthumously, in 1818. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Dune is a science fiction novel written by Frank Herbert and published in 1965. ... Frank Patrick Herbert (October 8, 1920 – February 11, 1986) was a critically acclaimed and commercially successful American science fiction author. ... Emma is a comic novel by Jane Austen, first published in 1816, about the perils of misconstrued romance. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Anne of Green Gables boxed set cover. ... Lucy Maud Montgomery Lucy Maud Montgomery, (always called Maud by family and friends) and publicly known as L. M. Montgomery, (November 30, 1874–April 24, 1942) was a Canadian author, best known for a series of novels beginning with Anne of Green Gables. ... For other uses, see Watership Down (disambiguation). ... The name Richard Adams may refer to: Richard Adams, author Richard Adams, founder of Traidcraft Richard Adams, songwriter This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... The Great Gatsby is a novel by the American author F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald (September 24, 1896 – December 21, 1940) was an Irish American Jazz Age novelist and short story writer. ... The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is a classic adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ... Brideshead Revisited, the Sacred and Profane Memories of Capt. ... Evelyn Waugh, as photographed in 1940 by Carl Van Vechten Arthur Evelyn St. ... Animal Farm is a satirical novella (which can also be understood as a modern fable or allegory) by George Orwell, ostensibly about a group of animals who oust the humans from the farm on which they live. ... Eric Arthur Blair (June 25, 1903[1][2] – January 21, 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... A Christmas Carol (full title: A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas) is Charles Dickens little Christmas Book first published on December 19,[1] 1843 and illustrated by John Leech. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Spoiler warning: Far from the Madding Crowd is a novel by 19th century English novelist Thomas Hardy, published in 1874. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... Goodnight Mister Tom is a 1981 novel by Michelle Magorian. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Shell Seekers First published in 1987 by Dell, The Shell Seekers became on of Rosamunde Pilchers most famous best-sellers. ... Rosamunde Pilcher OBE (maiden name Scott, born 22 September 1924 in Lelant, Cornwall, United Kingdom) is a British novelist. ... Cover of a 1911 publication of The Secret Garden This article refers to the novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett. ... Frances Hodgson Burnett Frances Burnetts blue plaque in central London Frances Hodgson Burnett, (November 24, 1849 - October 29, 1924) was an English–American playwright and author. ... Of Mice and Men is a novella by John Steinbeck, first published in 1937, which tells the tragic story of George and Lennie, two displaced Anglo migrant farm workers in California during the Great Depression (1929-1939). ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) is one of the best known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... The Stand is an apocalyptic horror novel by Stephen King. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ... Anna Karenina (Анна Каренина) is a novel by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy first published in periodical installments from 1875 to 1877 . ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: , Lev Nikolaevič Tolstoj), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 [O.S. August 28] – November 20, 1910 [O.S. November 7]) was a Russian novelist, writer, essayist, philosopher, Christian anarchist, pacifist, educational reformer, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member of... A Suitable Boy is a novel by Vikram Seth. ... Vikram Seth (pronounced ), born June 20, 1952 is an Indian poet, novelist, travel writer, librettist, childrens writer, biographer and memoirist. ... A paperback edition of The BFG. For other uses of the abbreviation, see BFG. The BFG (which stands for Big Friendly Giant) is a childrens book by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake, first published in 1982. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Swallows and Amazons is a series of childrens books by English author Arthur Ransome, named after the title of the first book in the series. ... Arthur Ransome (January 18, 1884 – June 3, 1967), was a British author and journalist, best known for writing the Swallows and Amazons series of childrens books, which tell of school-holiday adventures of children, mostly in the Lake District and the Norfolk Broads areas of England. ... Black Beauty is a novel written in 1877 by Anna Sewell about the life of a horse from his carefree days as a foal on an English farm enjoying the countryside with his mother, to his sale and his career pulling cabs and wagons in London. ... Anna Sewell (March 30, 1820 – April 25, 1878) was a British writer, the author of the classic novel Black Beauty. ... The term Artemis Fowl may refer to several things. ... Eoin Colfer (pronounced Owen) (born May 14, 1965) is an Irish author. ... Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступление и наказание) is a novel written by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. ... Fyodor Dostoevsky. ... Tic-tac-toe, also called noughts and crosses and many other names, is a paper and pencil game between two players, O and X, who alternate in marking the spaces in a 3×3 board. ... Malorie Blackman is a first-generation British-born writer. ... Memoirs of a Geisha is a novel by Arthur Golden, published in 1997. ... Arthur Golden (born in 1956 in Chattanooga, Tennessee) is the writer of the bestselling novel Memoirs of a Geisha. ... A Tale of Two PENISS (1859) is a historical novel by Charles Dickens; it is moreover a moral novel strongly concerned with themes of guilt, shame, redemption and patriotism. ... Dickens redirects here. ... The Thorn Birds is a 1977 best-selling novel by Colleen McCullough, an Australian author. ... Colleen McCullough (born 1 June 1937) is an internationally acclaimed Australian author. ... Mort is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett and also the name of its main character. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Magic Faraway Tree series is a popular series of childrens books written by Enid Blyton. ... The Mystery of the Vanished Prince (1951) Enid Mary Blyton (August 11, 1897–November 28, 1968) was a British childrens author. ... The Magus, cover painting by Tom Adams The Magus is the first novel by British author John Fowles, but actually the second to be published, following the success of The Collector (1963). ... John Robert Fowles John Robert Fowles (March 31, 1926 – November 5, 2005) was an English novelist and essayist. ... Good Omens: The Nice and Accurate Prophecies of Agnes Nutter, Witch (1990) is a fantasy novel written in collaboration between Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. ... Neil Richard Gaiman () (born November 10, 1960, Portchester, Hampshire) is a British author of numerous science fiction and fantasy works, including many graphic novels. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Guards! Guards! is the 8th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, first published in 1989. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding about a group of young boys who are stranded on a desert island and subsequently attempt to govern themselves, a task at which they fail disastrously. ... Sir William Gerald Golding (September 19, 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet, and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature (1983), best known for his work Lord of the Flies. ... Perfume: The Story of a Murderer is a 1985 literary historical horror novel (originally published in German as Das Parfum) by German writer Patrick Süskind. ... Patrick Süskind (born March 26, 1949) is a German writer and film script author. ... The only work of Robert Tressell, The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists is regarded as one of the most important novels concerning the class war in Britain at the turn of the 20th century. ... Robert Tressell was a pen name used by Robert Noonan (April 17, 1870–February 3, 1911) for his novel The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists. ... Night Watch is the 29th novel in Terry Pratchetts Discworld series, published in 2002. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Matilda is a novel by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Bridget Joness Diary is a 1996 novel by Helen Fielding. ... Helen Fielding (born February 19, 1958 in Morley, West Yorkshire) is a British author, best known as the author of the novel Bridget Joness Diary and its sequel Bridget Jones: The Edge Of Reason The Bridget Jones books had their origins in a column published in The Independent and... The Secret History is Donna Tartts first novel. ... Donna Tartt (born 23 December 1963) is an American novelist. ... The Woman in White is an epistolary novel written by Wilkie Collins and published in 1859. ... Wilkie Collins William Wilkie Collins (8 January 1824 – 23 September 1889) was an English novelist, playwright, and writer of short stories. ... Ulysses is a 1922 novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from 1918 to 1920, and published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ... James Joyce James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (Irish Seamus Seoighe; 2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish writer and poet, widely considered to be one of the most influential writers of the 20th century. ... Bleak House is the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, published in 20 monthly parts between March 1852 and September 1853. ... Dickens redirects here. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... The Twits is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl and illustrated by Quentin Blake. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... I Capture the Castle was the first novel written by Dodie Smith, published in 1948. ... Dorothy Gladys Dodie Smith (May 3, 1896 - November 24, 1990) was an English novelist and playwright. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Louis Sachar (IPA: ), born March 20, 1954, is an American author of childrens books. ... Gormenghast Castle in the BBC miniseries Gormenghast is a fictional castle of titanic proportions that features prominently in a series of fantasy works penned by Mervyn Peake. ... Mervyn Laurence Peake (July 9, 1911 – November 17, 1968) was a British modernist writer, artist, poet and illustrator. ... The God of Small Things (1997) is a semi-autobiographical, politically charged novel by Indian author Arundhati Roy. ... Suzanna Arundhati Roy[1] (Malayalam: അരുന്ധതി റോയ്, Bengali: অরুন্ধতী রায় Orundhoti Rae, Hindi: अरुंधती राय ArundhatÄ« Rāy) (born November 24, 1961) is an Indian novelist, activist. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Brave New World is a dystopian novel by Aldous Huxley, first published in 1932. ... Aldous Leonard Huxley (July 26, 1894 – November 22, 1963) was an English writer who emigrated to the United States, living in Los Angeles until his death in 1963. ... Cold Comfort Farm is a comic novel by Stella Gibbons, published in 1932. ... Stella Dorothea Gibbons (5 January 1902—19 December 1989) was an English novelist and poet. ... The Riftwar Saga is a series of fantasy novels by Raymond E. Feist. ... Raymond E. Feist (born 1945, Los Angeles, California) is an American author, mostly specialising in fantasy fiction. ... On the Road book cover On the Road is a novel by Jack Kerouac, published by Viking Press in 1957. ... Jack Kerouac (pronounced ) (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and part of the Beat Generation. ... The Godfather is a 1972 crime film directed and co-written by Francis Ford Coppola based on the the novel of the same name authored by the screenplays co-writer Mario Puzo. ... Mario Puzo Mario Gianluigi Puzo (October 15, 1920 – July 2, 1999) was an American author known for his fictional books about the Mafia. ... The Clan of the Cave Bear is a historical fiction novel by Jean M. Auel. ... Jean Marie Auel (born February 18, 1936 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American writer. ... The Colour of Magic is a comic fantasy novel by Terry Pratchett, the first of the Discworld series which was published in 1983. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... For similarly-named works, see The Alchemist (disambiguation) The Alchemist (Portuguese: O Alquimista) is a bestseller that was first published in Brazil in 1988 and is the most famous work of author Paulo Coelho. ... Paulo Coelho (born August 24, 1947) is a famous Brazilian lyricist and novelist. ... Anya Setons Katherine is a thoroughly researched historical novel based largely in fact. ... Anya Seton (January 23, 1906 (although the year is often misstated to be 1904 or 1916) - November 8, 1990) was an American author of historical romances. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Jeffrey Howard Archer, Baron Archer of Weston-super-Mare (born 15 April 1940) is an English author and former politician. ... Love in the Time of Cholera (El amor en los tiempos del cólera, 1985) is a novel by Gabriel García Márquez about a fifty-year love triangle between Fermina Daza, Florentino Ariza and Doctor Juvenal Urbino set in the late 19th century and the first decades of... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... Girls In Love is a book/ITV drama series created by top UK author Jacqueline Wilson that follows the romantic thrills and spills of three teenage girls- Ellie, Magda and Nadine. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... The Princess Diaries is a chick-lit series written by Meg Cabot. ... Meg Cabot (born Meggin Patricia Cabot on February 1, 1967) is an American author of romantic comedies for teens and adults. ... Midnights Children cover Midnights Children (ISBN 039451470X) is a 1980 novel by Salman Rushdie. ... Salman Rushdie (born Ahmed Salman Rushdie, Urdu: ‎, on June 19, 1947, in Bombay, India) is a British-Indian essayist and author of fiction, most of which is set on the Indian subcontinent. ... Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog), published 1889, is a humorous account by Jerome K. Jerome of a boating holiday on the Thames between Kingston and Oxford. ... Jerome K. Jerome Jerome Klapka Jerome (May 2, 1859–June 14, 1927) was an English author, best known for the humorous travelogue Three Men in a Boat. ... This article is about the novel Small Gods; for the concept of Small Gods within the Discworld, see Discworld Gods Small Gods is a novel by Terry Pratchett, the thirteenth part of the popular Discworld series. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Beach (1996) is a novel by Alex Garland about backpackers in Thailand. ... Alex Garland (left) with Danny Boyle Alex Garland (born 1970) is a British novelist, the son of the well-known and respected political cartoonist, Nick Garland. ... Dracula is an 1897 novel by Irish author Bram Stoker, and the name of its title character, the vampire Count Dracula. ... Abraham Bram Stoker (November 8, 1847–April 20, 1912) was an Irish writer, best remembered as the author of the influential horror novel Dracula. ... Point Blanc is the second book in the Alex Rider series written by British author Anthony Horowitz. ... Anthony Horowitz (born April 5, 1956) is an English author and television scriptwriter. ... The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens. ... Dickens redirects here. ... Stormbreaker is the first novel in the Alex Rider series by author Anthony Horowitz. ... Anthony Horowitz (born April 5, 1956) is an English author and television scriptwriter. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Iain Menzies Banks (officially Iain Banks, born on February 16, 1954 in Dunfermline, Fife) is a Scottish writer. ... The Day of the Jackal is a thriller novel by Frederick Forsyth, first published in 1971, about a professional assassin who is contracted by the OAS, a French terrorist group of the early 1960s, to kill Charles de Gaulle. ... Frederick Forsyth. ... The Illustrated Mum is a childrens book by the renowned British author (and now Childrens Laureate) Jacqueline Wilson, and illustrated by Nick Sharratt, a long-time collaborator of Wilsons. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Jude the Obscure is the last of Thomas Hardys novels, begun as a magazine serial and first published in book form in 1895. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13¾ is the first book in the Adrian Mole series. ... Sue Townsend (born April 2, 1946) is the author of the Adrian Mole series of books. ... The Cruel Sea refers to more than one thing: The Cruel Sea (book) is a 1951 novel by Nicholas Monsarrat. ... Nicholas John Turney Monsarrat (1910–1979) was a UK novelist best known today for his sea stories, particularly The Cruel Sea (1951). ... Les Misérables (translated variously from French as The Miserable Ones, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Victims) (1862) is a novel by French author Victor Hugo. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist, visual artist, statesman and human rights campaigner, recognized as the most influential Realist writer of the 19th century. ... The Mayor of Casterbridge is a 1886 novel by English author Thomas Hardy. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Bad Girls is Bad Girls (film), a 1994 western film. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... The Picture of Dorian Gray is the only novel to be published by Oscar Wilde, and was first published as the lead story in Lippincotts Monthly Magazine on 20 June 1890. ... It has been suggested that Wildes Manuscripts be merged into this article or section. ... Minamoto no Yoritomo, the first shogun of the Kamakura shogunate Shogun ) is a military rank and historical title in Japan. ... James Clavell in 1986 James Clavell (10 October 1924 – 7 September 1994) was a novelist, screenwriter, and World War II POW, who was famous for books such as Shogun, and such films as The Great Escape and To Sir, with Love. ... John Wyndham (July 10, 1903 – March 11, 1969) was the pen name used by the often post-apocalyptic British science fiction writer John Wyndham Parkes Lucas Beynon Harris. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Title-page to Vanity Fair, drawn by Thackeray, who furnished the illustrations for many of his earlier editions Vanity Fair: A Novel without a Hero is a novel by William Makepeace Thackeray that satirizes society in early 19th-century England. ... William Makepeace Thackeray William Makepeace Thackeray (18 July 1811 – 24 December 1863) was an English novelist of the 19th century. ... It has been suggested that Soames Forsyte be merged into this article or section. ... John Galsworthy (August 14, 1867 – January 31, 1933) was an English novelist and playwright. ... For other articles with similar names, see House of Leaves (disambiguation). ... Mark Danielewski Mark Z. Danielewski is an American author, born in 1966. ... The Poisonwood Bible is a 1998 novel by Barbara Kingsolver, which details a missionary familys life in the Congo beginning in the 1960s as experienced by the five women in the family. ... Barbara Kingsolver (born April 8, 1955) is an American fiction writer. ... Reaper Man is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Louise Rennison (born Leeds, Yorkshire, UK) is a humorous British author and comedian most known for being the author of the best-selling Confessions of Georgia Nicolson series for teens. ... The Hound of the Baskervilles is a crime novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, originally serialised in the Strand Magazine in 1901 and 1902, which is set largely on Dartmoor 1889. ... Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a Scottish author most noted for his stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes, which are generally considered a major innovation in the field of crime fiction, and the adventures of Professor Challenger. ... Look up Possession in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Dame Antonia Susan Byatt , DBE, (born August 24, 1936, Sheffield, England) has been hailed by some as one of the great postmodern novelists in Britain. ... Mikhail Bulgakov Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (Russian: Михаил Афанасьевич Булгаков; May 15 [O.S. May 3] 1891, Kiev – March 10, 1940, Moscow) was a Russian novelist and playwright of the first half of the 20th century. ... The Handmaids Tale is a dystopian novel by Canadian author Margaret Atwood, first published by McClelland and Stewart in 1985. ... Margaret Atwood Margaret Eleanor Atwood, OC (born November 18, 1939) is a Canadian writer. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... East of Eden is also an English/French travelogue site, and a rock band East of Eden is a novel by Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck, published in September 1952. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) is one of the best known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Wyrd Sisters is Terry Pratchetts sixth Discworld novel, published in 1988, and re-introduces Granny Weatherwax of Equal Rites. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Color Purple book cover The Color Purple is a 1982 novel by Alice Walker which received the 1983 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. ... Alice Malsenior Walker (born February 9, 1944) is an African-American author and feminist who received the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction in 1983 for The Color Purple. ... Hogfather is the 20th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Thirty-nine Steps is an adventure novel by the Scottish author John Buchan, first published in 1915 by William Blackwood and Sons, Edinburgh. ... John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir (August 26, 1875 - February 11, 1940), was a Scottish novelist and politician who served as Governor General of Canada. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... For the film, see All Quiet on the Western Front (film). ... Erich Remarque, about 1963. ... Kate Atkinson (b. ... High Fidelity is also the title of a book by Nick Hornby and a film directed by Stephen Frears, based upon Hornbys book. ... Nick Hornby (born 17 April 1957) is an English novelist and essayist who lives in Highbury, Islington in London. ... Look up It in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... The Green Mile has several different meanings, including: The Green Mile, a 1996 book by Stephen King. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ... Papillon is a French word for butterfly. The term may also refer to Papillon (autobiography), a memoir written by Henri Charrière about his imprisonment at a penal colony in French Guiana. ... Henri Charrière (16 November 1906 - July 29, 1973) was chiefly known as the author of Papillon, a memoir of his incarceration in a penal colony on French Guiana. ... Men at Arms is the 15th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Master and Commander (1971) is a novel by Patrick OBrian, the first in the Aubrey–Maturin series. ... Patrick OBrian (December 12, 1914 – January 2, 2000; original name Richard Patrick Russ) was a novelist and translator, best known for his Aubrey–Maturin series of novels set in the Royal Navy during the Napoleonic Wars and centered on the friendship of Captain Jack Aubrey and an Irish–Catalan... Skeleton Key, 2005 Skeleton Key is a rock band based in New York City. ... Anthony Horowitz (born April 5, 1956) is an English author and television scriptwriter. ... Soul music is a music genre that combines rhythm and blues and gospel music originating in the late 1950s in the United States. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Thief of Time is the 26th Discworld novel written by Terry Pratchett. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... The Fifth Elephant is the 24th Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... For other uses, see Atonement (disambiguation). ... Ian McEwan CBE, (born June 21, 1948), is a British novelist (sometimes nicknamed Ian Macabre because of the nature of his early work). ... This article is about the Toni Braxton album. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Ian Serraillier (1912 - November, 1994), was a British novelist and poet. ... One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest is a 1975 film directed by MiloÅ¡ Forman. ... Kenneth Elton Kesey (September 17, 1935 – November 10, 2001) was an American author, best known for his novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest, and as a (counter) cultural figure who, some consider, was a link between the beat generation of the 1950s and the hippies of the 1960s. ... Heart of Darkness is a novella by Joseph Conrad. ... Joseph Conrad. ... Look up Kim in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Joseph Rudyard Kipling (30 December 1865 – 18 January 1936) was a British author and poet, born in India, and best known today for his childrens books, including The Jungle Book (1894), The Second Jungle Book (1895), Just So Stories (1902), and Puck of Pooks Hill (1906); his novel... Diana Gabaldon (born January 11, 1952) is an American author of Mexican and English ancestry. ... Moby-Dick[1] is an 1851 novel by Herman Melville. ... Herman Melville (August 1, 1819 – September 28, 1891) was an American novelist, essayist and poet. ... Wilbur Addison Smith (b. ... Sunset Song is a 1932 novel by the Scottish writer Lewis Grassic Gibbon. ... Lewis Grassic Gibbon (13 February 1901 - 7 February 1935), born James Leslie Mitchell was a Scottish writer. ... The Shipping News is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by E. Annie Proulx which was published in 1993, and a film of the same name, released in 2001, set on the Canadian island of Newfoundland. ... E. Annie Proulx (born August 22, 1935) is an author who is best known for her second novel, The Shipping News (1993), which won the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction and the National Book Award for fiction in 1994. ... John Winslow Irving (born March 2, 1942 as John Wallace Blunt, Jr. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: Lorna Doone Lorna Doone, subtitled A Romance of Exmoor, is a novel by Richard Doddridge Blackmore, first published in 1869. ... Richard Doddridge Blackmore (June 7, 1825 - January 20, 1900), usually known as R. D. Blackmore, was one of the most famous English novelists of the his generation. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... The Far Pavilions is an epic novel of British-Indian history by M. M. Kaye, first published in 1978, which tells the story of an English officer during the Great Game. ... Mary Margaret (Mollie) Kaye (August 21, 1908 - January 29, 2004) was a British writer. ... The Witches is a book for children by Roald Dahl, first published in London in 1983 by Jonathan Cape and made into a movie in 1990. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Charlottes Web book cover Charlottes Web is a childrens book by acclaimed American author E. B. White, first published in 1952. ... Elwyn Brooks White (July 11, 1899 – October 1, 1985) was a leading American essayist, author, and literary stylist. ... Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus is a novel by Mary Shelley. ... Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (30 August 1797 – 1 February 1851) was an English novelist, the author of Frankenstein, or The Modern Prometheus. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... The Name of the Rose, a novel by Umberto Eco, is a murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327. ... Photo of Umberto Eco by Robert Birnbaum Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose and his many essays. ... Sophies World (Sofies verden in the original Norwegian) is a novel by Jostein Gaarder, published in 1995. ... Jostein Gaarder (born August 8, 1952 in Oslo) is a Norwegian intellectual and author of several novels, short stories and childrens books. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Fantastic Mr Fox is a childrens book written by Roald Dahl, and illustrated by Tony Ross. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Lolita is a novel by Vladimir Nabokov, first published in 1955 in Paris. ... Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Russian: Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков, pronounced ) (April 22, 1899 [O.S. April 10], Saint Petersburg – July 2, 1977, Montreux) was a Russian-American author. ... An illustration for the main theme of Jonathan Livingston Seagull. ... Richard David Bach (born June 23,1936 in Oak Park, Illinois) is an American writer. ... The Little Prince (French Le Petit Prince), published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupérys most famous novel, which he wrote while renting The Bevin House in Asharoken, New York on Long Island. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... Oliver Twist (1838) is Charles Dickens second novel. ... Dickens redirects here. ... The Power of One is a bildungsroman written by Bryce Courtenay, first published in 1989. ... Bryce Courtenay (born August 14, 1933) is an Australian novelist born in Johannesburg, South Africa. ... Silas Marner : The Weaver of Raveloe is a novel by George Eliot (the pen name of Mary Ann Evans) which was first published in 1861. ... George Eliots birthplace at South Farm, Arbury George Eliot is the pen name of Mary Anne Evans[1] (22 November 1819 – 22 December 1880), who was an English novelist. ... American Psycho is a 1991 novel by Bret Easton Ellis; it is a first person narrative describing episodes in the life of a wealthy young Manhattanite and self-proclaimed serial killer. ... Bret Easton Ellis (born March 7, 1964 in Los Angeles, California) is an American author. ... Trainspotting refers to: Train spotting, the hobby Trainspotting, the novel by Irvine Welsh Trainspotting, the film based upon the above-mentioned novel. ... Irvine Welsh, reading one of his new short stories at the Edinburgh International Book Festival Irvine Welsh (born Leith, Edinburgh, September 27, 1958) is a Scottish novelist. ... R. L. Stine with some of his creations. ... Robert Lawrence Stine (born October 8, 1943), known as R. L. Stine and Jovial Bob Stine, is a novelist and writer for children. ... Cover of Heidi in German Heidi is a story focusing on events in the life of the title character, a young orphan girl, in Switzerland. ... Johanna Spyri Johanna Spyri (June 12, 1827 - July 7, 1901) was an author of childrens stories, and is best known for Heidi. ... The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Czech language: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí) is a novel written by Milan Kundera in 1984. ... Milan Kundera (IPA: ) (born April 1, 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia) is a Czech-born writer who writes in both Czech and French. ... Tony Parsons is the name of two noted journalists. ... This article or section should include material from [[{{{1}}}]]. Mr. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946) was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... The Horse Whisperer (1998) is a Robert Redford movie based on the 1995 novel by Nicholas Evans about a talented horse trainer (Robert Redford) hired to help an injured teenager (played by Scarlett Johansson) and her horse recuperate. ... Nicholas Evans (born 1950 in Bromsgrove, Worcestershire, England) is a United Kingdom journalist, screenwriter TV/film producer and bestselling novelist. ... A Fine Balance is the second book by Rohinton Mistry. ... Rohinton Mistry (born July 3, 1952) is considered to be one of the foremost authors of South Asian origin writing in English. ... Witches Abroad is a Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, originally published in 1991. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 - January 17, 1964) was a writer. ... The Very Hungry Caterpillar (ISBN 0399226907) is a childrens book written by Eric Carle and originally published in 1969. ... Eric Carle Eric Carle (born June 25, 1929) is a childrens book author and illustrator, most famous for his book The Very Hungry Caterpillar, which has been translated into over 30 languages. ... Flowers in the Attic is a 1979 novel by V.C. Andrews, deeply controversial because of its themes of incest, child abuse, neglect, and other taboo subjects. ... Cleo Virginia Andrews (June 6, 1923 – December 19, 1986), better known as V. C. Andrews or Virginia C. Andrews was an American author. ...

Authors by number of novels in the top 100

Dickens redirects here. ... Terence David John Pratchett OBE (born April 28, 1948, in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England[1]) is an English fantasy author, best known for his Discworld series. ... Roald Dahl (IPA: ) (September 13, 1916 – November 23, 1990) was a Welsh novelist and short story author of Norwegian descent, famous as a writer for both children and adults. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... The Lottie Project Jacqueline Wilson, OBE (born Jacqueline Aitken in Bath on December 17, 1945) is a British author of childrens books. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Stephen Edwin King (born September 21, 1947) is an American author best known for his enormously popular horror novels. ... Thomas Hardy Thomas Hardy, OM (2 June 1840 – 11 January 1928) was an English novelist, short story writer, and poet of the naturalist movement, who delineated characters struggling against their passions and circumstances. ... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... Eric Arthur Blair (June 25, 1903[1][2] – January 21, 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) is one of the best known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: , Lev Nikolaevič Tolstoj), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 [O.S. August 28] – November 20, 1910 [O.S. November 7]) was a Russian novelist, writer, essayist, philosopher, Christian anarchist, pacifist, educational reformer, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member of...

German version

The initiative was launched in Germany as well in 2004, under the name Das große Lesen (literal translation), where a list of 200 items was pre-selected by a committee of professionals to choose from. The results were voted by 250,000 people. 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Results

  1. The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  2. Bible
  3. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  4. Perfume by Patrick Süskind
  5. The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
  6. Buddenbrooks by Thomas Mann
  7. The Physician by Noah Gordon
  8. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  9. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by J. K. Rowling
  10. Pope Joan by Donna Cross
  11. Inkheart by Cornelia Funke
  12. Cross Stitch/Outlander by Diana Gabaldon
  13. The House of the Spirits by Isabel Allende
  14. The Reader by Bernhard Schlink
  15. Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  16. The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafón
  17. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  18. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
  19. Angels and Demons by Dan Brown
  20. Effie Briest by Theodor Fontane
  21. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J. K. Rowling
  22. Der Zauberberg by Thomas Mann
  23. Gone With the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  24. Siddharta by Hermann Hesse
  25. The Discovery of Heaven by Harry Mulisch
  26. The Neverending Story by Michael Ende
Source: [1], [2]

The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ... The word Bible refers to the canonical collections of sacred writings of Judaism and Christianity. ... The cover art of Pillars of the Earth, US edition The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Ken Follett about the building of a cathedral in Kingsbridge (a fictional town located roughly in the area of the present-day town of Marlborough, Wiltshire in England). ... Ken Follett Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... Perfume: The Story of a Murderer is a 1985 literary historical horror novel (originally published in German as Das Parfum) by German writer Patrick Süskind. ... Patrick Süskind (born March 26, 1949) is a German writer and film script author. ... The Little Prince (French Le Petit Prince), published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupérys most famous novel, which he wrote while renting The Bevin House in Asharoken, New York on Long Island. ... Sculpture of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and the little prince in Lyon Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (June 29, 1900 – July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... Buddenbrooks book cover Buddenbrooks was Thomas Manns first novel, published in 1901 when he was twenty six years old. ... Paul Thomas Mann (June 6, 1875 – August 12, 1955) was a German novelist, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and Nobel Prize laureate, lauded principally for a series of highly symbolic and often ironic epic novels and mid-length stories, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and intellectual. ... Noah Gordon (born November 11, 1926 in Worcester, Massachusetts) is an American novelist. ... For similarly-named works, see The Alchemist (disambiguation) The Alchemist (Portuguese: O Alquimista) is a bestseller that was first published in Brazil in 1988 and is the most famous work of author Paulo Coelho. ... Paulo Coelho (born August 24, 1947) is a famous Brazilian lyricist and novelist. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books written by English author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... The Papess, a Marseilles tarot card of the 18th century, depicts a female Pope. ... Inkheart (original title: Tintenherz) is a young adult-child fantasy novel by Cornelia Funke about a girl named Meggie whose life changes dramatically when she realizes that her father, a bookbinder named Mo, has an unusual ability: when he reads aloud, he can bring characters from books into our world. ... Cornelia Caroline Funke is a German author. ... Outlander (1991) is a historical fiction novel, written by Diana Gabaldon. ... Diana Gabaldon (born January 11, 1952) is an American author of Mexican and English ancestry. ... The House of the Spirits (Spanish: La Casa de los Espíritus) is the debut novel of Isabel Allende. ... Isabel Allende Llona (born August 2, 1942) is a Chilean writer, who is considered one of the most popular novelists in the world today. ... For other uses, see The Reader (disambiguation). ... Bernhard Schlink (born 6 July 1944 in Großdornberg) is a German writer with a legal background. ... Faust (Latin Faustus) is the protagonist of a popular German tale of a pact with the Devil, assumed to be based on the figure of the German magician and alchemist Dr. Johann Georg Faust (approximately 1480–1540). ... Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. ... The Shadow of the Wind (La sombra del viento) is a 2001 novel by Spanish writer Carlos Ruiz Zafon, and a huge worldwide bestseller. ... Carlos Ruiz Zafón is a Spanish novelist. ... Pride and Prejudice, first published on 28 January 1813, is the most famous of Jane Austens novels. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Name of the Rose, a novel by Umberto Eco, is a murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327. ... Photo of Umberto Eco by Robert Birnbaum Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose and his many essays. ... Wikibooks has a book on the topic of Angels and Demons Angels and Demons (Angels & Demons) is a bestselling mystery novel by Dan Brown. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for writing the controversial 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... Theodor Fontane (December 30, 1819 – September 20, 1898) was a 19th-century German novelist and poet. ... This article is about the book. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... The Magic Mountain book cover The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg) is a 1924 novel by Thomas Mann. ... Paul Thomas Mann (June 6, 1875 – August 12, 1955) was a German novelist, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and Nobel Prize laureate, lauded principally for a series of highly symbolic and often ironic epic novels and mid-length stories, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and intellectual. ... Gone With the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, that was published in 1936. ... Getting their moniker from Buddhas original name, Siddharta is a six-piece slovenian melodic metal band founded in 1995, probably Slovenias most popular musical act since Laibach. ... Hermann Hesse in 1927 Hermann Hesse (pronounced ) (2 July 1877 – 9 August 1962) was a German-born poet, novelist, and painter who became a Swiss citizen. ... The Discovery of Heaven is a 1992 novel by the famous Dutch author Harry Mulisch. ... Harry Mulisch Harry Mulisch (born July 29, 1927) is a Dutch author. ... The Neverending Story (original German: Die Unendliche Geschichte) is a fantasy novel by Michael Ende, first published in Germany in 1979. ... Michael Andreas Helmuth Ende (November 12, 1929 - August 29, 1995) was a German writer of fantasy novels and childrens books. ...

Hungarian version

The Big Read was imported into Hungary under the name A Nagy Könyv (lit. "The Big Book", [3]) and took place in 2005.


Voting for the Top 100 began in late February: one was allowed to vote for any novel published in Hungarian. It ended on April 23, when the 50 "foreign" and 50 Hungarian most popular novels were selected. 1400 libraries, 500 book shops and 1300 schools participated in the competition with various programmes. This round proved to be far more popular in Hungary (with a population of 10 million) than in the UK (with a population of 60 million), with 400,000 votes arriving (as opposed to 140,000 votes in the UK competition in the corresponding period). April 23 is the 113th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (114th in leap years). ...


On June 11, the Top 12 novels were chosen in the framework of a television show presented by cultural celebrities. In the next months, 12 short films were made from these novels and screened in television, which competed with each other in pairs. On December 15, 2005, the population selected their ultimate favourite by SMS and phone in a similar show. The winning novel, which received the title "the most liked novel of Hungary 2005", was the same book as the result of the previous round, "Eclipse of the Crescent Moon". The other two books that participated in the final were The Paul Street Boys (2nd) and "Abigail" (3rd; see their details below). The programme A Nagy Könyv is intended to be continued. June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (163rd in leap years), with 203 days remaining. ... December 15 is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... SMS arrival notification on a Siemens phone Received and displayed SMS message on a Motorola RAZR handset. ...

Note: When English translations are available for Hungarian novels, usually the title of their most recent English translation is given. Literal translations, where no English translation is available, are marked with quotation marks.

The top 12 before screening the films (June 11, 2005)

  1. Eclipse of the Crescent Moon by Géza Gárdonyi (literal translation: "Stars of Eger")
  2. The Paul Street Boys by Ferenc Molnár
  3. The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  4. Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne
  5. The Little Prince by A. de Saint-Exupéry
  6. "Abigail" by Magda Szabó
  7. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by J. K. Rowling
  8. "Thorn Castle" by István Fekete
  9. Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
  10. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  11. The man with the golden touch by Mór Jókai (other translations: Timar's Two Worlds; Modern Midas; literal title: "The Golden Man")
  12. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez

Géza Gárdonyi (August 3, 1863 – October 30, 1922) was a Hungarian author. ... (Eger is also German name for the city Cheb in the Czech Republic. ... The Paul Street Boys is a youth novel by the Hungarian writer Ferenc Molnár (in Hungarian: Molnár Ferenc), first published in 1906. ... Ferenc Molnár (b. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ... Winnie the Pooh Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, and for various childrens poems. ... The Little Prince (French Le Petit Prince), published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupérys most famous novel, which he wrote while renting The Bevin House in Asharoken, New York on Long Island. ... Sculpture of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and the Little Prince in Lyon Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (pronounced ) (June 29, 1900 – presumably July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books written by English author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... István Fekete (January 25, 1900 – June 23, 1970) was a Hungarian writer, author of several youth novels and animal stories. ... Nineteen Eighty-Four (commonly abbreviated to 1984) is a dystopian novel by the English writer George Orwell, first published by Secker and Warburg in 1949. ... Eric Arthur Blair (June 25, 1903[1][2] – January 21, 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... The Master and Margarita (Russian: ) is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven about the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. ... Mikhail Bulgakov Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (Russian: Михаил Афанасьевич Булгаков; May 15 [O.S. May 3] 1891, Kiev – March 10, 1940, Moscow) was a Russian novelist and playwright of the first half of the 20th century. ... Mór Jókai Mór Jókai (19 February 1825 – 5 May 1904) was a Hungarian dramatist and novelist. ... In Greek mythology Midas (Μιδας, often referred to as King Midas) is popularly remembered for his ability to turn anything he touched into gold: the Midas touch. Midas was king[1] of Pessinus, a city in Phrygia in Asia Minor, who as a child was adopted by the king, Gordias, and... One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad) is a novel by Gabriel García Márquez which was first published in Spanish in 1967 (Buenos Aires: Sudamericana), with an English translation by Gregory Rabassa released in 1970 (New York: Harper and Row). ... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ...

The final list after screening the films (December 15, 2005)

  1. Eclipse of the Crescent Moon by Géza Gárdonyi (literal translation: "Stars of Eger")
  2. The Paul Street Boys by Ferenc Molnár
  3. "Abigail" by Magda Szabó
  4. Nineteen Eighty-Four by George Orwell
  5. The man with the golden touch by Mór Jókai (other translations: Timar's Two Worlds; Modern Midas; literal title: "The Golden Man")
  6. Winnie-the-Pooh by A. A. Milne
  7. The Little Prince by A. de Saint-Exupéry
  8. The Lord of the Rings by J. R. R. Tolkien
  9. Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by J. K. Rowling
  10. The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
  11. "Thorn Castle" by István Fekete
  12. One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez
  13. Abel Alone by Áron Tamási
  14. The Baron's sons by Mór Jókai
  15. "The Railroad House about to Start" by Sándor Rideg
  16. Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban by J. K. Rowling
  17. Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by J. K. Rowling
  18. Be Faithful Unto Death by Zsigmond Móricz
  19. Vuk: The Little Fox by István Fekete
  20. The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway
  21. Lottie and Lisa by Erich Kästner
  22. Gone with the Wind by Margaret Mitchell
  23. Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
  24. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
  25. "The Funtinel Witch" by Albert Wass
  26. Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix by J. K. Rowling
  27. Fateless by Imre Kertész
  28. The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
  29. The Treasure-Hunting Smock by Ferenc Móra
  30. Quo Vadis by Henryk Sienkiewicz
  31. "Give me back my mountains" by Albert Wass
  32. Embers by Sándor Márai
  33. "Pansy Violet" by Zsigmond Móricz
  34. Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
  35. St. Peter's Umbrella by Kálmán Mikszáth
  36. Jane Eyre by Charlotte Brontë
  37. "Dirty Fred the Captain" by Jenő Rejtő
  38. Slave of the Huns by Géza Gárdonyi
  39. Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë
  40. "The Lover of the Sun" by Sándor Dallos
  41. The Red and the Black by Stendhal
  42. The Catcher in the Rye by Jerome David Salinger
  43. Anna Édes by Dezső Kosztolányi
  44. Catch-22 by Joseph Heller
  45. Thistle by István Fekete
  46. Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  47. The 14-carat Roadster by Jenő Rejtő
  48. "The Golden Brush" by Sándor Dallos
  49. Lassie Come Home by Eric Knight
  50. Winnetou by Karl May
  51. "Winter Grove" by István Fekete
  52. War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
  53. For Whom The Bell Tolls by Ernest Hemingway
  54. Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
  55. The Gold Coffin by Ferenc Móra
  56. "The Black Town" by Kálmán Mikszáth
  57. The Princess Diaries by Meg Cabot
  58. The Toth Family by István Örkény
  59. Flowers for Algernon by Daniel Keyes
  60. "Stop Mommy Teresa!" by Zsuzsa Rácz
  61. The Name of the Rose by Umberto Eco
  62. Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
  63. Death is my trade by Robert Merle
  64. The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown
  65. East of Eden by John Steinbeck
  66. The Good Soldier Švejk by Jaroslav Hašek
  67. The Young Lions by Irwin Shaw
  68. "The Sword and the Scythe" by Albert Wass
  69. The Pillars of the Earth by Ken Follett
  70. Arch of Triumph by Erich Maria Remarque
  71. School at the Frontier by Géza Ottlik
  72. A Hungarian Nabob by Mór Jókai
  73. This above all by Eric Knight
  74. Revulsion by László Németh
  75. A Farewell to Arms by Ernest Hemingway
  76. Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
  77. A Journey round my Skull by Frigyes Karinthy
  78. Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams
  79. Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel García Márquez
  80. The Book of Fathers by Miklós Vámos
  81. The Pendragon Legend by Antal Szerb
  82. "Just look at my time" by Klára Fehér
  83. "Greg and the Dream-catchers" by Gyula Böszörményi
  84. Malevil by Robert Merle
  85. The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho
  86. "Für Elise" by Magda Szabó
  87. Journey by Moonlight by Antal Szerb
  88. Jadviga's Pillow by Pál Závada
  89. "The Novel of Ida" by Géza Gárdonyi
  90. The Magic Mountain by Thomas Mann
  91. An Old-fashioned Story by Magda Szabó
  92. The Unbearable Lightness of Being by Milan Kundera
  93. The Door by Magda Szabó
  94. "The Confessions of a Haut-Bourgeois" by Sándor Márai
  95. The Red Lion by Mária Szepes
  96. Joseph and His Brothers by Thomas Mann
  97. "Do not be afraid" by Anna Jókai
  98. My Happy Days in Hell by György Faludy
  99. "PetePite" by Gábor Nógrádi
  100. Celestial Harmonies by Péter Esterházy
  • Sources: [4], [5], [6] (Sources differ on the order of books ranked 32nd and 33rd.)

Géza Gárdonyi (August 3, 1863 – October 30, 1922) was a Hungarian author. ... (Eger is also German name for the city Cheb in the Czech Republic. ... The Paul Street Boys is a youth novel by the Hungarian writer Ferenc Molnár (in Hungarian: Molnár Ferenc), first published in 1906. ... Ferenc Molnár (b. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... Nineteen Eighty-Four (commonly abbreviated to 1984) is a dystopian novel by the English writer George Orwell, first published by Secker and Warburg in 1949. ... Eric Arthur Blair (June 25, 1903[1][2] – January 21, 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... Mór Jókai Mór Jókai (19 February 1825 – 5 May 1904) was a Hungarian dramatist and novelist. ... In Greek mythology Midas (Μιδας, often referred to as King Midas) is popularly remembered for his ability to turn anything he touched into gold: the Midas touch. Midas was king[1] of Pessinus, a city in Phrygia in Asia Minor, who as a child was adopted by the king, Gordias, and... Winnie the Pooh Winnie-the-Pooh is a fictional bear created by A. A. Milne. ... Alan Alexander Milne (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was a British author, best known for his books about the teddy bear, Winnie-the-Pooh, and for various childrens poems. ... The Little Prince (French Le Petit Prince), published in 1943, is French aviator Antoine de Saint-Exupérys most famous novel, which he wrote while renting The Bevin House in Asharoken, New York on Long Island. ... Sculpture of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry and the Little Prince in Lyon Antoine de Saint-Exupéry (pronounced ) (June 29, 1900 – presumably July 31, 1944) was a French writer and aviator. ... The Lord of the Rings is an epic high fantasy novel written by English academic J. R. R. Tolkien. ... John Ronald Reuel Tolkien CBE (3 January 1892 – 2 September 1973) was an English writer and university professor who is best known as the author of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, as well as many other works. ... Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone is the first volume in a planned series of seven books written by English author J. K. Rowling, and featuring Harry Potter, a young wizard. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... The Master and Margarita (Russian: ) is a novel by Mikhail Bulgakov, woven about the premise of a visit by the Devil to the fervently atheistic Soviet Union. ... Mikhail Bulgakov Mikhail Afanasievich Bulgakov (Russian: Михаил Афанасьевич Булгаков; May 15 [O.S. May 3] 1891, Kiev – March 10, 1940, Moscow) was a Russian novelist and playwright of the first half of the 20th century. ... István Fekete (January 25, 1900 – June 23, 1970) was a Hungarian writer, author of several youth novels and animal stories. ... One Hundred Years of Solitude (Spanish: Cien años de soledad) is a novel by Gabriel García Márquez which was first published in Spanish in 1967 (Buenos Aires: Sudamericana), with an English translation by Gregory Rabassa released in 1970 (New York: Harper and Row). ... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... Mór Jókai Mór Jókai (19 February 1825 – 5 May 1904) was a Hungarian dramatist and novelist. ... Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third book in the Harry Potter series of books by J. K. Rowling. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Wikibooks Muggles Guide to Harry Potter has more about this subject: Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by J.K. Rowling, is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Philosophers Stone. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Zsigmond Móricz (1879–1942) was a Hungarian novelist and social realist. ... István Fekete (January 25, 1900 – June 23, 1970) was a Hungarian writer, author of several youth novels and animal stories. ... The Old Man and the Sea is a novella by Ernest Hemingway written in Cuba in 1951 and published in 1952. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Lottie and Lisa (original German title Das doppelte Lottchen The duplicated Lottie) is a 1949 novel by Erich Kästner, which originally started out during WWII as an aborted movie scenario, about twin girls separated at birth who meet at a summer camp. ... Erich Kästner (February 23, 1899 - July 29, 1974) is one of the most famous German authors of the 20th century. ... Gone With the Wind, an American novel by Margaret Mitchell, was published in 1936 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937. ... For the Canadian politician see Margaret Mitchell (politician) Margaret Munnerlyn Mitchell (November 8, 1900 – August 16, 1949) was the American author who won the Pulitzer Prize in 1937 for her immensely successful novel, Gone with the Wind, that was published in 1936. ... Les Misérables (translated variously from French as The Miserable Ones, The Wretched, The Poor Ones, The Victims) (1862) is a novel by French author Victor Hugo. ... Victor-Marie Hugo (26 February 1802 – 22 May 1885) was a French poet, novelist, playwright, essayist, visual artist, statesman and human rights campaigner, recognized as the most influential Realist writer of the 19th century. ... The Count of Monte Cristo (French: Le Comte de Monte-Cristo) is a classic adventure novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ... Count Albert Wass de Szentegyed and Czege (1908-1998) (pronunced like wash) was a Hungarian noble and writer in the XX. century, from Transylvania. ... This article is about the book. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Fateless or Fatelessness (Hungarian: Sorstalanság, lit. ... Imre Kertész (born November 9, 1929) is a Jewish-Hungarian author, Holocaust concentration camp survivor, and winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2002 for writing that upholds the fragile experience of the individual against the barbaric arbitrariness of history. Kertész best-known work, Fatelessness (Sorstalanság... DArtagnan and the Musketeers The Three Musketeers (Les Trois Mousquetaires) is a novel by Alexandre Dumas, père. ... Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ... Ferenc Móra (Kiskunfélegyháza, 19 July 1879 – Szeged, 8 February 1934) was a Hungarian (Magyar) novelist, journalist, and museologist. ... Quo Vadis is a novel by a Polish writer Henryk Sienkiewicz, describing the introduction of Christianity into early A.D. Rome (while under Neros rule). ... Henryk Oszyk-Sienkiewicz Henryk Adam Aleksander Pius Oszyk-Sienkiewicz (pronounce: ) (May 5, 1846 - November 15, 1916) was a Polish novelist, one of the outstanding writers of the second half of the 19th century. ... Count Albert Wass de Szentegyed and Czege (1908-1998) (pronunced like wash) was a Hungarian noble and writer in the XX. century, from Transylvania. ... Sándor Márai (detail of his statue in KoÅ¡ice, Slovakia) Sándor Márai (originally Sándor Károly Henrik Grosschmied de Mára) (April 11, 1900 – February 22, 1989) was a Hungarian writer and journalist. ... Zsigmond Móricz (1879–1942) was a Hungarian novelist and social realist. ... Crime and Punishment (Russian: Преступление и наказание) is a novel written by Russian author Fyodor Dostoyevsky. ... Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky (Russian: Фёдор Миха́йлович Достое́вский, Fëdor Mihajlovič Dostoevskij, sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky  ) (November 11, 1821 [O.S. October 30] – February 9, 1881 [O.S. January 28]) is considered one of the greatest Russian writers. ... Kálmán Mikszáth (January 16, 1847 – May 28, 1910) was a Hungarian novelist and politician. ... Jane Eyre is a classic romance novel by Charlotte Brontë which was published in 1847 by Smith, Elder & Company, London, and is one of the most famous British novels of all time. ... Charlotte Brontë (IPA: ) (April 21, 1816 – March 31, 1855) was an English novelist, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters whose novels have become enduring classics of English literature. ... Géza Gárdonyi (August 3, 1863 – October 30, 1922) was a Hungarian author. ... Wuthering Heights is Emily Brontës only novel. ... Portrait by her brother Emily Jane Brontë (July 30, 1818 – December 19, 1848) was an English novelist and poet, best remembered for her only novel Wuthering Heights, which is now an acknowledged classic of English literature. ... Le Rouge et le Noir (The Red and the Black) is a novel by Stendhal, published in 1830. ... Stendhal. ... The Catcher in the Rye is a novel by J. D. Salinger. ... Jerome David Salinger (born January 1, 1919) is an American author best known for The Catcher in the Rye, a classic coming-of-age story that has enjoyed enduring popularity since its publication in 1951. ... DezsÅ‘ Kosztolányi is a famous Hungarian poet. ... Catch 22 can refer to: A book by Joseph Heller, or the movie based on the book; see Catch-22. ... (May 1, 1923 – December 12, 1999) was an American satirist best remembered for writing the satiric World War II classic Catch-22. ... István Fekete (January 25, 1900 – June 23, 1970) was a Hungarian writer, author of several youth novels and animal stories. ... Lord of the Flies is an allegorical novel by Nobel Prize-winning author William Golding about a group of young boys who are stranded on a desert island and subsequently attempt to govern themselves, a task at which they fail disastrously. ... Sir William Gerald Golding (September 19, 1911 – 19 June 1993) was a British novelist, poet, and winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature (1983), best known for his work Lord of the Flies. ... Lassie Come Home is a 1943 film which tells the story of a poor boys dog who, when sold to a rich nobleman, makes a difficult journey to return home to her original owner. ... Eric Knight (April 10, 1897 - January 15, 1943) was an author who is mainly notable for creating the fictional collie Lassie. ... Winnetou is the American-Indian hero of several novels written by Karl May (one of the best selling German writers of all time), in German including the sequel Winnetou I to Winnetou III. According to Karl Mays story, first-person-narrator Old Shatterhand encounters Winnetou and after initial dramatic... Karl May. ... István Fekete (January 25, 1900 – June 23, 1970) was a Hungarian writer, author of several youth novels and animal stories. ... War and Peace (Russian: Война и мир, Vojna i mir; in original orthography: Война и миръ, Vojna i mir) is an epic novel by Leo Tolstoy, first published from 1865 to 1869 in Russki Vestnik, which tells the story of Russian society during the Napoleonic Era. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: , Lev Nikolaevič Tolstoj), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 [O.S. August 28] – November 20, 1910 [O.S. November 7]) was a Russian novelist, writer, essayist, philosopher, Christian anarchist, pacifist, educational reformer, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member of... For Whom the Bell Tolls is a 1940 novel by Ernest Hemingway. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Pride and Prejudice, first published on 28 January 1813, is the most famous of Jane Austens novels. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Ferenc Móra (Kiskunfélegyháza, 19 July 1879 – Szeged, 8 February 1934) was a Hungarian (Magyar) novelist, journalist, and museologist. ... Kálmán Mikszáth (January 16, 1847 – May 28, 1910) was a Hungarian novelist and politician. ... The Princess Diaries is a chick-lit series written by Meg Cabot. ... Meg Cabot (born Meggin Patricia Cabot on February 1, 1967) is an American author of romantic comedies for teens and adults. ... Flowers for Algernon is a science fiction story written by Daniel Keyes. ... Daniel Keyes (born August 9, 1927 in Brooklyn, New York City, New York) is an American author, primarily of science fiction. ... The Name of the Rose, a novel by Umberto Eco, is a murder mystery set in an Italian monastery in the year 1327. ... Photo of Umberto Eco by Robert Birnbaum Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose and his many essays. ... Robinson Crusoe and Man Friday by Carl Offterdinger Robinson Crusoe is a novel by Daniel Defoe, first published in 1719 and sometimes regarded as the first novel in English. ... Daniel Defoe Daniel Defoe (1660 [?] â€“ April 1731) was an English writer, journalist and spy, who gained enduring fame for his novel Robinson Crusoe. ... Robert Merle (August 28, 1908 - March 28, 2004) was a French novelist. ... This article is about the novel. ... Dan Brown (born June 22, 1964) is an American author of thriller fiction, best known for writing the controversial 2003 bestselling novel, The Da Vinci Code. ... East of Eden is also an English/French travelogue site, and a rock band East of Eden is a novel by Nobel Prize winner John Steinbeck, published in September 1952. ... John Ernst Steinbeck (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) is one of the best known and most widely read American writers of the 20th century. ... The Good Soldier Å vejk is an unfinished satirical novel by Jaroslav HaÅ¡ek. ... Jaroslav HaÅ¡ek Jaroslav HaÅ¡ek ( ) (IPA: ) (April 30, 1883 – January 3, 1923) was a Czech humorist and satirist who became well-known mainly for his world-famous novel The Good Soldier Å vejk, an unfinished collection of farcical incidents about a soldier in World War I, which has been translated... The Young Lions was novel by Irwin Shaw and a 1958 film based upon the book starring Marlon Brando, Montgomery Clift, and Dean Martin. ... Irwin Shaw (né Irwin Gilbert Shamforoff, February 27, 1913 - May 16, 1984) was an American Jewish playwright, screen writer and author. ... Count Albert Wass de Szentegyed and Czege (1908-1998) (pronunced like wash) was a Hungarian noble and writer in the XX. century, from Transylvania. ... The cover art of Pillars of the Earth, US edition The Pillars of the Earth is a historical novel by Ken Follett about the building of a cathedral in Kingsbridge (a fictional town located roughly in the area of the present-day town of Marlborough, Wiltshire in England). ... Ken Follett Ken Follett (born June 5, 1949) is a British author of thrillers and historical novels. ... In the Arch of Triumph (1946), Erich Maria Remarque, the author of All Quiet on the Western Front, writes about stateless refugees life in Paris before World War II. The novel was originally published in German. ... Erich Remarque, about 1963. ... Géza Ottlik (born May 9, 1912 in Budapest, died October 9, 1990 in Budapest) was Hungarian writer, translator, mathematician, and bridge theorist. ... Mór Jókai Mór Jókai (19 February 1825 – 5 May 1904) was a Hungarian dramatist and novelist. ... Eric Knight (April 10, 1897 - January 15, 1943) was an author who is mainly notable for creating the fictional collie Lassie. ... A Farewell to Arms is a semi-autobiographical novel written by Ernest Hemingway in 1929. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Anna Karenina (Анна Каренина) is a novel by the Russian writer Leo Tolstoy first published in periodical installments from 1875 to 1877 . ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: , Lev Nikolaevič Tolstoj), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 [O.S. August 28] – November 20, 1910 [O.S. November 7]) was a Russian novelist, writer, essayist, philosopher, Christian anarchist, pacifist, educational reformer, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member of... Frigyes Karinthy (1887 in Budapest - 1938 in Siófok) was a Hungarian author, playwright, poet, journalist and translator. ... The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy originated as a 1978 radio comedy series written by Douglas Adams. ... Douglas Noël Adams (11 March 1952 – 11 May 2001) was a British author, comic radio dramatist, and amateur musician. ... Love in the Time of Cholera (El amor en los tiempos del cólera, 1985) is a novel by Gabriel García Márquez about a fifty-year love triangle between Fermina Daza, Florentino Ariza and Doctor Juvenal Urbino set in the late 19th century and the first decades of... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... the best novel of Szerb ... Antal Szerb (Budapest, 1901 - Balf, 1945) was a noted Hungarian scholar and writer. ... Malevil is a 1972 science fiction novel by French writer Robert Merle. ... Robert Merle (August 28, 1908 - March 28, 2004) was a French novelist. ... For similarly-named works, see The Alchemist (disambiguation) The Alchemist (Portuguese: O Alquimista) is a bestseller that was first published in Brazil in 1988 and is the most famous work of author Paulo Coelho. ... Paulo Coelho (born August 24, 1947) is a famous Brazilian lyricist and novelist. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... Journey by Moonlight (in Hungarian, Utas és holdvilág which literally means Traveler and Moonlight) is among the best-known novels in Hungarian literature. ... Antal Szerb (Budapest, 1901 - Balf, 1945) was a noted Hungarian scholar and writer. ... Géza Gárdonyi (August 3, 1863 – October 30, 1922) was a Hungarian author. ... The Magic Mountain book cover The Magic Mountain (Der Zauberberg) is a novel by Thomas Mann, first published in November 1924. ... Paul Thomas Mann (June 6, 1875 – August 12, 1955) was a German novelist, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and Nobel Prize laureate, lauded principally for a series of highly symbolic and often ironic epic novels and mid-length stories, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and intellectual. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... The Unbearable Lightness of Being (Czech language: Nesnesitelná lehkost bytí) is a novel written by Milan Kundera in 1984. ... Milan Kundera (IPA: ) (born April 1, 1929 in Brno, Czechoslovakia) is a Czech-born writer who writes in both Czech and French. ... The Door is a novel by Hungarian writer Magda Szabó, originally published in Hungary in 1987, and translated into English in 1995 (by Stefan Draughon) for American publication, and again in 2005 (by Len Rix) by British publication. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... Sándor Márai (detail of his statue in KoÅ¡ice, Slovakia) Sándor Márai (originally Sándor Károly Henrik Grosschmied de Mára) (April 11, 1900 – February 22, 1989) was a Hungarian writer and journalist. ... Joseph and His Brothers is a four part novel by Thomas Mann, published in over the course of 16 years. ... Paul Thomas Mann (June 6, 1875 – August 12, 1955) was a German novelist, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and Nobel Prize laureate, lauded principally for a series of highly symbolic and often ironic epic novels and mid-length stories, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and intellectual. ... György Faludy or George Faludy (September 22, 1910, Budapest - September 1, 2006, Budapest) was a Hungarian-Jewish poet, writer and translator. ... Count Péter Esterházy de Galántha (occasionally written Eszterházy) is one of the most widely known contemporary Hungarian writers. ...

Authors by number of novels in the top 100

István Fekete (January 25, 1900 – June 23, 1970) was a Hungarian writer, author of several youth novels and animal stories. ... Joanne “Jo” Rowling, OBE (born July 31, 1965[1]) is an English fiction writer who writes under the pen name J. K. Rowling. ... Magda Szabó (b. ... Géza Gárdonyi (August 3, 1863 – October 30, 1922) was a Hungarian author. ... Ernest Miller Hemingway (July 21, 1899 – July 2, 1961) was an American novelist, short-story writer, and journalist. ... Mór Jókai Mór Jókai (19 February 1825 – 5 May 1904) was a Hungarian dramatist and novelist. ... Count Albert Wass de Szentegyed and Czege (1908-1998) (pronunced like wash) was a Hungarian noble and writer in the XX. century, from Transylvania. ... Alexandre Dumas redirects here. ... Eric Knight (April 10, 1897 - January 15, 1943) was an author who is mainly notable for creating the fictional collie Lassie. ... Paul Thomas Mann (June 6, 1875 – August 12, 1955) was a German novelist, social critic, philanthropist, essayist, and Nobel Prize laureate, lauded principally for a series of highly symbolic and often ironic epic novels and mid-length stories, noted for their insight into the psychology of the artist and intellectual. ... Sándor Márai (detail of his statue in Košice, Slovakia) Sándor Márai (originally Sándor Károly Henrik Grosschmied de Mára) (April 11, 1900 – February 22, 1989) was a Hungarian writer and journalist. ... Gabriel José García Márquez, also known as Gabo (born March 6, 1927), is a Colombian novelist, journalist, publisher, political activist, and recipient of the 1982 Nobel Prize in Literature. ... Robert Merle (August 28, 1908 - March 28, 2004) was a French novelist. ... Kálmán Mikszáth (January 16, 1847 – May 28, 1910) was a Hungarian novelist and politician. ... Ferenc Móra (Kiskunfélegyháza, 19 July 1879 – Szeged, 8 February 1934) was a Hungarian (Magyar) novelist, journalist, and museologist. ... Zsigmond Móricz (1879–1942) was a Hungarian novelist and social realist. ... Antal Szerb (Budapest, 1901 - Balf, 1945) was a noted Hungarian scholar and writer. ... Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy (Russian: , Lev Nikolaevič Tolstoj), commonly referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy (September 9, 1828 [O.S. August 28] – November 20, 1910 [O.S. November 7]) was a Russian novelist, writer, essayist, philosopher, Christian anarchist, pacifist, educational reformer, vegetarian, moral thinker and an influential member of...

See also

This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Big Read (201 words)
The Big Read is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts designed to restore reading to the center of American culture.
The NEA presents The Big Read in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and in cooperation with Arts Midwest.
The Big Read brings together partners across the country to encourage reading for pleasure and enlightenment.
Big Read - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (827 words)
The Big Read was a 2003 survey carried out by the BBC, with the goal of finding the "Nation's Best-loved Book" by way of a viewer vote via the Web, SMS and telephone.
The show attracted controversy for adopting an allegedly sensationalist approach to literature and for being vulnerable to vote-padding - for example, the top 200 entries include 10 novels by comic fantasy author Terry Pratchett - but supporters praised it for raising the public awareness of reading.
The Big Read was imported into Hungary under the name A Nagy Könyv (lit.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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