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Encyclopedia > Big Joe Turner
Big Joe Turner

Background information
Birth name Joseph Vernon Turner Jr
Also known as The Boss of the Blues
Born May 18, 1911
Origin Kansas City, Missouri
Died November 24, 1985
Genre(s) Blues
Years active 1920s - 1980s
Label(s) Atlantic Records
Various
Associated
acts
Pete Johnson
Count Basie Orchestra
Website * www.hoyhoy

Big Joe Turner (born Joseph Vernon Turner Jr., May 18, 1911November 24, 1985)[1] was an American blues shouter from Kansas City, Missouri. Image File history File linksMetadata Big_Joe_Turner. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... Nickname: City of Fountains or Heart of America Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A music genre is a category (or genre) of pieces of music that share a certain style or basic musical language (van der Merwe 1989, p. ... Blues music redirects here. ... The 1920s was a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label that operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... Peter (Pete) Johnson (March 24/25, 1904 - March 23, 1967) was an American jazz pianist best known as a leading boogie-woogie player. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... May 18 is the 138th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (139th in leap years). ... 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... November 24 is the 328th day (329th on leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A blues shouter is a blues singer, often male, capable of singing with a band. ... Nickname: City of Fountains or Heart of America Location in Jackson, Clay, Platte, and Cass Counties in the state of Missouri. ...

Contents

Career

Although he came to his greatest fame in the 1950s with his pioneering rock and roll recordings, particularly "Shake, Rattle and Roll", Turner's career as a performer stretched from the 1920s, into the 1980s. The 1950s was the decade spanning from the 1st of January, 1950 to the 31st December, 1959. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... A U.S. Postage Stamp commemorating one hundred years of sound recording. ... Shake, Rattle and Roll is a prototypical twelve bar blues-form rock and roll song written by Jesse Stone (under his working name Charles Calhoun). ... The 1920s was a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ...


Known variously as The Boss of the Blues, and Big Joe Turner (due to his 6'2", 250+ lbs stature), Turner was born in Kansas City and first discovered his love of music through involvement in the church. However, Turner's father was killed in a train accident when Joe was only four years old. [2] He began singing on street corners for money, leaving school at the age of fourteen to begin working in Kansas City's club scene, first as a cook, and later as a singing bartender. He eventually became known as The Singing Barman, and worked in such venues as The Kingfish Club and The Sunset, where he and his piano playing partner, Pete Johnson became resident performers. The Sunset was managed by Piney Brown, and which featured "separate but equal" facilities for white patrons. Turner wrote "Piney Brown Blues" in his honor and sang it throughout his entire career. Music is a form of art that involves organized and audible sounds and silence. ... St. ... Students in Rome, Italy. ... Clubbing, also known as a disco A nightclub (often shortened to club) is an entertainment venue which does its primary business after dark. ... A cook is a person that prepares food for consumption. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... A grand piano, with the lid up. ... Peter (Pete) Johnson (March 24/25, 1904 - March 23, 1967) was an American jazz pianist best known as a leading boogie-woogie player. ... American white woman with red hair and blue eyes French white man Austrian white woman with blond hair In the context of basic English usage, the term White people (also white race or whites) is used to denote ... a human group having light-coloured skin, especially of European ancestry. ...


At that time Kansas City was a wide-open town run by "Boss" Tom Pendergast. Despite this, the clubs were subject to frequent raids by the police, but as Turner recounts, "The Boss man would have his bondsmen down at the police station before we got there. We'd walk in, sign our names and walk right out. Then we would cabaret until morning". 1869 tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed A boss, in political science, is a person who wields de facto power over a particular political region or constituency. ... Thomas Joseph Pendergast (July 22, 1873 – January 26, 1945) controlled Kansas City as a political boss. ... A typical suburban police station in the United States (this one is in San Bruno, California). ...


His partnership with boogie-woogie pianist Pete Johnson proved fruitful. Together they headed to New York in 1936, where they appeared on a bill with Benny Goodman, but as Turner recounts, "After our show with Goodman, we auditioned at several places, but New York wasn't ready for us yet, so we headed back to K.C.". Eventually they were spotted by the talent scout, John H. Hammond in 1938, who invited them back to New York to appear in one of his "From Spirituals to Swing" concerts at Carnegie Hall, which was instrumental in introducing jazz and blues to a wider American audience. Boogie-woogie is a style of piano-based blues that became very popular in the late 1930s and early 1940s, and was extended from piano, to three pianos at once, guitar, big band, and country and western music, and even gospel. ... Pianist Claudio Arrau, Carnegie Hall, 1954. ... Nickname: Big Apple, City that never Sleeps, Gotham Location in the state of New York Coordinates: Country United States State New York Boroughs The Bronx Manhattan Queens Brooklyn Staten Island Settled 1613 Mayor Michael Bloomberg (R) Area    - City 1,214. ... Benny Goodman, born BenÅ‘ Guttman, (May 30, 1909 – June 13, 1986) was an American jazz musician, known as King of Swing, Patriarch of the Clarinet, The Professor, and Swings Senior Statesman. // Goodman was born in Chicago, the son of poor Jewish immigrants from Hungary who lived in the Maxwell... Artist and repertoire (A&R for short) is a music industry term that refers to the division of a record label that is responsible for scouting and developing talent. ... John Henry Hammond (December 15, 1910 – July 10, 1987) was a record producer, musician and music critic from the 1930s to the early 1980s. ... From Spirituals to Swing was the title of influential concerts presented by John Hammond in Carnegie Hall in 1938 and 1939. ... A classical music concert in the Rod Laver Arena, Melbourne 2005 A concert is a live performance, usually of music, before an audience. ... Carnegie Hall Carnegie Hall is a concert venue in Midtown Manhattan in New York City located at 881 7th Avenue, occupying the east stretch of 7th Avenue between West 56th Street and West 57th Street. ... Jazz is a musical art form that originated in New Orleans at around the start of the 20th century. ...


Due in part to their appearance at Carnegie Hall, Turner and Johnson scored a major hit with "Roll 'Em, Pete". It was a song which Turner recorded many times, with various combinations of musicians, over the ensuing years. In popular music, a chart-topper is an extremely popular recording, identified by its inclusion in a ranked list—a chart—of top selling or otherwise judged most popular releases. ... A song is a relatively short musical composition for the human voice (commonly accompanied by other musical instruments), which features words (lyrics). ...


In 1939, along with boogie players Albert Ammons and Meade Lux Lewis, they began a residency at Café Society, a club in New York City, where they appeared on the same bill as Billie Holiday and Frank Newton's band. Besides "Roll 'Em, Pete", Turner's best known recordings from this period are probably "Cherry Red", "I Want A Little Girl" and "Wee Baby Blues". Albert Ammons (1907-1949) was a rapist on the run ! !!!!Is he really a rapist? Prove it please!!!!!!! ?!?!Is this info had been vandalised?!?! Ammons formed his own band in 1934, and in 1938 performed in the From Spirituals to Swing concert at Carnegie Hall, which among other achievements launched... Meade Anderson Lux Lewis (1905 - 1964) was a United States pianist and composer noted for his work in the Boogie Woogie style. ... Café society was the collective description for the so-called beautiful people and bright young things who gathered in fashionable cafes and restaurants in Paris, London, Rome or New York, beginning in the late 1800s. ... Billie Holiday (April 7, 1915 – July 17, 1959), born Eleanor Harris and later called Lady Day, was an American singer known equally for her difficult life and her emotive, poignant singing voice. ... In music, a band is a company of musicians, or musical ensemble, usually popular or folk, playing parts of or improvising a musical arrangement on different musical instruments. ...


In 1941, he headed to Los Angeles where he performed in Duke Ellington's revue Jump for Joy in Hollywood. He appeared as a singing policeman in a sketch called "He's on the Beat". L.A. became his home base for a time, and in 1945 he opened his own bar, The Blue Moon Club with Pete Johnson. Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... Edward Kennedy Duke Ellington (April 29, 1899 – May 24, 1974), also known simply as Duke (see Jazz royalty), was an American jazz composer, pianist, and bandleader. ... A revue is a type of theatrical entertainment that combines music, dance and sketches that satirize contemporary figures, news, or literature. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A police officer is a person who works for a police force. ... For information about The Sketch Show TV programme, see The Sketch Show. ... Nickname: City of Angels Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: State California County Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa Area    - City 1,290. ... Tourists sit outside a bar in Chiang Mai, Thailand A Depression-era bar in Louisiana. ...


Turner made lots of records, not only with Johnson but with the pianists Art Tatum and Sammy Price and with various small jazz ensembles.[1] He recorded on several record labels, particularly National Records, and also appeared with the Count Basie Orchestra. In his career, Turner successively led the transition from big bands to jump blues to rhythm and blues, and finally to rock and roll. Turner was a master of traditional blues verses and at the legendary Kansas City jam sessions he could swap choruses with instrumental soloists for hours. Art Tatum, The Great Jazz Pianist. ... Sammy Price (born Sam Blythe Price, October 6, 1908 - died April 14, 1992) was an American jazz pianist. ... A musical ensemble is a group of two or more musicians who gather to perform music. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... National Records was started in New York by Albert Green in 1945 and lasted till sometime in 1950. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A big band is a type of musical ensemble associated with playing jazz music and which became popular during the Swing Era from 1935 until the late 1940s. ... Jump blues is a type of up-tempo blues music influenced by big band sound. ... Rhythm and blues (aka R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... Rock and roll (also spelled Rock n Roll, especially in its first decade), also called rock, is a form of popular music, usually featuring vocals (often with vocal harmony), electric guitars and a strong back beat; other instruments, such as the saxophone, are common in some styles. ... In the folk tradition, there are many traditional blues verses that have been sung over and over by many artists. ... A jam session is a musical act where musicians gather and play (or jam) without extensive preparation or predefined arrangements. ... A refrain (from the Old French refraindre to repeat, likely from Vulgar Latin refringere) is the line or lines that are repeated in music or in verse; the chorus of a song. ... A musician is a person who plays or composes music. ... In music, solo means to play or sing alone. ...


In 1951, while performing with the Count Basie Orchestra at Harlem's Apollo Theater as a replacement for Jimmy Rushing, he was spotted by Ahmet and Nesuhi Ertegün, who signed him to their new recording company, Atlantic Records. Turner recorded a number of hits for them, including the blues standards, "Chains of Love" and "Sweet Sixteen" before hitting it big in 1954 with "Shake, Rattle and Roll", which not only enhanced his career, turning him into a teenage favorite, but also transformed popular music. Harlem is a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Manhattan, long known as a major black cultural and business center. ... Apollo Theater marquee, c. ... James Andrew (Jimmy) Rushing (August 26, 1901/02/03 - June 8, 1972) was an American blues singer from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. ... Ahmet Ertegün (1923 - 2006) Ahmet Ertegün (July 31, 1923 – December 14, 2006) and Nasuhi Ertegün (November 26, 1917–April 15, 1989), were the Turkish-American executives of Atlantic Records. ... Atlantic Records (Atlantic Recording Corporation) is an American record label that operates as a wholly owned subsidiary of Warner Music Group. ... A blues standard, much like a jazz standard or pop standard, refers to a song that is widely known, performed, and recorded among blues musicians. ... Shake, Rattle and Roll is a prototypical twelve bar blues-form rock and roll song written by Jesse Stone (under his working name Charles Calhoun). ... Popular music is music belonging to any of a number of musical styles that are accessible to the general public and are disseminated by one or more of the mass media. ...


Although the cover version of the song by Bill Haley & His Comets, with the risqué lyrics incompletely cleaned up, was a bigger hit, many listeners sought out Turner's version and were introduced thereby to the whole world of rhythm and blues. Elvis Presley showed he needed no such introduction. His version of "Shake, Rattle and Roll" combined Turner's lyrics with Haley's arrangement, but was not successful as a single release. In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... The original members of Bill Haley and His Comets, c. ... Lyrics are the words in songs. ... Rhythm and blues (aka R&B or RnB) is a popular music genre combining jazz, gospel, and blues influences — first performed by African American artists. ... Elvis Aron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), often known simply as Elvis and also called The King of Rock n Roll or simply The King, was an American singer, musician and actor. ... In music, an arrangement loosely describes rewriting a piece of pre-existing music for a specific set of instruments or voices, often in harmony or with additional original material. ... A collection of various CD singles In music, a single is a short recording of one or more separate tracks. ...


Amidst the rock songs he found time to cut the classic Boss of the Blues album.[1]


After a number of hits in this vein, Turner left popular music behind and returned to his roots as a singer with small jazz combos, recording numerous albums in that style in the 1960s and 1970s. In 1966, Bill Haley helped revive Turner's career by lending him the Comets for a series a popular recordings in Mexico (apparently no one thought of getting the two to record a duet of "Shake, Rattle and Roll", as no such recording has yet surfaced). In 1977 he recorded a version of Guitar Slim's song, "The Things That I Used to Do". An album is a collection of related audio tracks distributed to the public. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, inclusive. ... Bill Haley, with his band, the Comets, was one of the first rock and roll acts to tour the United Kingdom. ... The duet, by Hendrik ter Brugghen A duet is a musical composition or piece for two performers, most often used for a vocal or piano duet. ... In popular music, a cover version, or simply cover, is a new rendition (performance or recording) of a previously recorded song. ... Eddie Guitar Slim Jones (December 10, 1926 – February 7, 1959) is a New Orleans blues guitar player from the 1940s and 1950s best known for the million-selling song The Things That I Used to Do (a song that shaped rock and roll), and his flamboyant stage presence. ... The Things That I Used to Do is a blues song written by Guitar Slim (aka Eddie Jones) and his 1953 recording of it in New Orleans, was arranged and produced by a young Ray Charles. ...


In the 1960s and 1970s he was reclaimed by jazz and blues, appearing at many festivals and recording for the impresario Norman Granz's Pablo label, once with his friendly rival, Jimmy Witherspoon. He also worked with the German boogie-woogie pianist Axel Zwingenberger.[1] A music festival is a festival that presents a number of musical performances usually tied together through a theme or genre. ... An impresario is a manager or producer in one of the entertainment industries, usually Music or Theatre. ... Norman Granz (Los Angeles, USA, August 6, 1918 - Geneva, Switzerland, November 22, 2001), was an American jazz music impresario and producer. ... Pablo Records was a record label founded by Norman Granz in 1973. ... Jimmy Witherspoon (August 8, 1920-September 18, 1997) was an American blues singer. ... Axel Zwingenberger(born May 7, 1955 in Hamburg) is a German blues and boogie-woogie pianist. ...


It is a mark of his dominance as a singer that he won the Esquire magazine award for male vocalist in 1945, the Melody Maker award for best 'new' vocalist in 1956, and the British Jazz Journal award as top male singer in 1965. His career thus stretched from the bar rooms of Kansas City in the 1920s (at the age of twelve when he performed with a pencilled moustache and his father's hat), on to the European jazz music festivals of the 1980s. Cover of an issue of Esquire magazine. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... 1945 (MCMVL) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1945 calendar). ... Melody Maker, published in the United Kingdom, was (until its closure) the worlds oldest weekly music newspaper. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... A Pencil. ... Edgar Allan Poe had a simple moustache. ... Father with child Daddy and Fatherhood redirect here. ... World map showing Europe A satellite composite image of Europe Europe is one of the seven traditional continents of the Earth. ... The 1980s refers to the years of 1980 to 1989. ...


Death

He died in Inglewood, California in November 1985, at the age of seventy four of a heart attack, having suffered the earlier effects of arthritis, a stroke and diabetes. Big Joe Turner was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987. Location of Inglewood in California and Los Angeles County. ... A myocardial infarction occurs when an atherosclerotic plaque slowly builds up in the inner lining of a coronary artery and then suddenly ruptures, totally occluding the artery and preventing blood flow downstream. ... Arthritis (from Greek arthro-, joint + -itis, inflammation; plural: arthritides) is a group of conditions where there is damage caused to the joints of the body. ... A stroke, also known as cerebrovascular accident (CVA),[1] is an acute neurological injury in which the blood supply to a part of the brain is interrupted. ... For the disease characterized by excretion of large amounts of severely diluted urine, see diabetes insipidus. ... Posthumous means after death. ... The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame at sunset. ... 1987 (MCMLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Tribute

The late, New York Times music critic Robert Palmer, said: "...his voice, pushing like a Count Basie solo, rich and grainy as a section of saxophones, which dominated the room with the sheer sumptuousness of its sound.[3] This page deals with the cessation of life. ... The New York Times is a newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Music critic. ... For information on the popular 20th century British vocalist by the same name, see Robert Palmer (British singer). ...


Quotation

   
“
Roll 'em boy,

Gonna jump for joy,
Yeah man, happy as a baby boy,
My baby just brought me a brand new choo-choo toy. Image File history File links Cquote1. ...

   
”
"Roll 'Em, Pete" -- by Joe Turner and Pete Johnson

Image File history File links Cquote2. ...

Most Famous Recordings

  • "Roll 'Em, Pete" - 1938; available in many versions over the years. Used for the million-dollar first scene of Spike Lee's 'Malcolm X'. [[4]]
  • "Chains Of Love" - 1951 (This was the first million seller by this rhythm-and-blues artist. The song was written by 'Nugetre' (words) - Ahmet Ertegun, Van Wallis (music), and the disc reached the million by 1954).[2]
  • "Honey Hush" - 1953
  • "Shake, Rattle and Roll" - 1954
  • "Flip Flop And Fly" - 1955 (Has sold a million through the years. The song was written by Charles Calhoun and Turner, although credited to the latter's wife, Lou Willie Turner).[2]
  • "Cherry Red" - 1956
  • "Corrine, Corrina" - 1956 (The fourth million seller...with adaption by J Mayo Williams, Mitchell Parish and Bo Chatmon in 1932. This disc was #41, and spent 10 weeks in the Billboard chart).[2]
  • "Wee Baby Blues" - 1956; a song Turner had been singing since his Kingfish Club days
  • "Midnight Special" - 1957

Tracks marked as were million selling discs. 1938 (MCMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar). ... Shelton Jackson Lee (born March 20, 1957 in Atlanta, Georgia), better known as Spike Lee, is an American film director, producer, writer, and actor noted for his films dealing with social and political issues. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ... The Ertegun brothers, Ahmet Ertegun (1923) and Nesuhi Ertegun (1917–1989) are co-founders of Atlantic Records. ... Honey Hush Joe Turner Atlantic Honey Hush , written by Big Joe Turner (although he assigned the rights to his wife, Lou Willie Brown, was recorded in May, 1953 in New Orleans and released that August by Atlantic Records. ... 1953 (MCMLIII) was a common year starting on Thursday. ... Shake, Rattle and Roll is a prototypical twelve bar blues-form rock and roll song written by Jesse Stone (under his working name Charles Calhoun). ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jesse Stone (born Charles Calhoun 16 November 1901, died 1 April 1999) was a American rhythm and blues musician whose influence spanned a wide range of genres. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Corrina, Corrina is a traditional folk song recorded by Bob Dylan on his 1963 Album The Freewheelin Bob Dylan. ... Mitchell Parish (July 10, 1900 – March 31, 1993) was a Jewish-American lyricist. ... Armenter Bo Carter Chatmon Armenter Bo Carter Chatmon was born March 21, 1893 in Bolton, Mississippi & died in Memphis, Tennessee on September 21, 1964. ... Billboard is a weekly American magazine devoted to the music industry. ... A record chart, also known as a music chart, is a method of ranking music according to popularity during a given period of time. ... 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Beatles Magical Mystery Tour (1967) as a 33 â…“ LP vinyl record A gramophone record (also phonograph record, or simply record) is an analogue sound recording medium consisting of a flat disc with an inscribed modulated spiral groove starting near the periphery and ending near the center of the disc. ...


Notes

  1. ^ a b c Russell, Tony (1997). The Blues - From Robert Johnson to Robert Cray. Dubai: Carlton Books Limited, p. 178-179. ISBN 1-85868-255-X.
  2. ^ a b c Murrells, Joseph (1978). The Book of Golden Discs, Second, London: Barrie and Jenkins Ltd, p. 57. ISBN 0-214-20512-6.

References

  • The Encyclopedia of Jazz and Blues - ISBN 1-86155-385-4
  • Jumpin' the Blues - Joe Turner with Pete Johnson's Orchestra - Arhoolie Records - Liner notes
  • Rocks in my Bed - Big Joe Turner - International Music Co. - Liner notes
  • The Chronological Joe Turner - 1949-1950 - Big Joe Turner - Classics Records - Liner notes
  • Rock and Roll - Big Joe Turner - Atlantic Records - Liner notes
  • Shout, Rattle and Roll - Big Joe Turner - Proper Records (Four CD boxed set - 2005) - Liner notes

Arhoolie Records is a small record label run by Chris Strachwitz. ... Liner notes are the booklets which come inserted into the compact disc jewel case or any sound recording container. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A boxed set (often erroneously referred to as a box set) is one or more musical recordings, films, or television programs that are contained in a box. ...

External links

  • Big Joe Turner from the Cascade Blues Association
  • Big Joe Turner fansite
  • www.hoyhoy biography

  Results from FactBites:
 
Big Joe Turner - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (685 words)
Turner continued to record blues with small combos on several record labels, particularly National Records and also appeared with the Count Basie Orchestra.
In his career, Turner led the transition from big bands to jump blues, to rock and roll.
Big Joe Turner was posthumously inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1987.
Club Kaycee -- Kansas City Jazz History -- Turner, Joseph Vernon "Big Joe" (270 words)
Together with pianist Pete Johnson, Joe Turner merged blues and boogie woogie on the musical landscape of Kansas City during the 1930s.
During the 1930s, Big Joe continued his dual role as a singing bartender at the Sunset Club, where Pete Johnson's band was featured.
In 1936, with the help of John Hammond, Big Joe and Pete Johnson moved to New York, where their reception was less than enthusiastic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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